Inside, Outside

I was first introduced to Malinowski’s hierarchy of needs in college during an introduction to sociology class. I must admit, I wasn’t paying very close attention. I was an English literature major, and sociology was just a required elective. My hierarchy of interests was topped by the cute girls I might meet at the local tavern during quarter beer night.

I do remember that Malinowski put the need for shelter right up there with food and companionship as one of human society’s most important components. That concept made intuitive sense to me, but as I sat in the classroom, it never occurred to me how important the buildings themselves — and their roofs — were to educational facilities. Roofs not only protect students and teachers, but they also help preserve priceless works of art and literature — including those in digital formats — inside academic buildings.

The project profiles in this issue document the crucial roles roofs play in educational settings. They detail how roof design and installation, roof maintenance, and roof replacement are all critical functions that must be expertly handled. They also reveal how a school’s buildings can embody and define the institution architecturally.

At Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, crews from Charles F. Evans Company, Inc. replaced the roof systems on the first building constructed on the campus — Morrill Hall, built in 1868. The challenges on the project included bringing the building up to code while capturing its original look with modern products.

On the campus of Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas, crews from Empire Roofing faced similar challenges as they replaced the roof on historic Austin Hall, a building that has been occupied since 1851.

Educational buildings that are less than 150 years old also need to have their roofs replaced. At the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, Massachusetts, crews from Tech Roofing re-roofed the entire complex, which houses irreplaceable works of Yiddish literature in a building designed to resemble a shtetl, or traditional Jewish town common in Eastern Europe before World War II.

This issue also profiles building envelopes that help embody the design goals of new construction projects, including the Innovation Lab at the Lamplighter School in Dallas and the energy-positive Myrtle Beach Middle School in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

While we all probably remember begging our teachers to hold classes outside on a beautiful fall day, it’s reassuring to know that structures like these will live on to serve future generations, thanks in part to the work of dedicated roofing professionals.

About Chris King

Chris King is the editor in chief of Roofing magazine. He has covered the construction industry for 18 years, previously serving as editor of Roofing Contractor, managing editor of the Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration News, and associate editor of Plumbing & Mechanical. He can be reached by email at chris@roofingmagazine.com.

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