The Innovative Wood Products Collaborative Launches Website

The Innovative Wood Products Collaborative announces the launch of its website. The new site is the product of a collaboration between Washington and Oregon sustainable forestry managers, wood products manufacturers, conservationists, academics and architects to highlight the latest information about using innovative wood products from sustainably managed forests.

Wood—the only building material that is grown by the power of the sun—is a renewable resource that has a low carbon and energy footprint. Using wood from sustainably managed forests will significantly reduce carbon emissions from the building sector.

According to a Yale University study, substituting wood for more energy-intensive building materials would reduce global carbon dioxide emissions by 14 to 31 percent because wood consumes much less energy than concrete or steel construction.

“Wood construction is incredibly fast and effective, with the added benefit of producing a building that stores carbon rather than emitting it,” says Canadian architect Michael Green. “The only way to achieve a net-zero building is to build with wood.”

As timber grows, it soaks up carbon dioxide through photosynthesis, and that carbon is stored in wood products. This creates a carbon sink that helps mitigate climate change. About half of the dry weight of wood is stored carbon. In contrast, 16 percent of global fossil-fuel consumption goes into manufacturing steel, concrete and bricks.

“This collaboration between Oregon and Washington sustainable forest growers and manufacturers is capturing the recent wave of recognition among architects, builders and conservation groups that wood products have real carbon benefits, and can be used in tall buildings,” says Mark Doumit, executive director of the Washington Forest Protection Association.

“Wood products are carbon-negative because they sequester and store carbon,” says Joseph Mayo, a designer at Mahlum Architects in Seattle. “There is no other natural building material like wood. Increasing the use of wood also supports local jobs and industry.”

“The forest landowners and lumber manufacturers in the Pacific Northwest are the largest supplier of wood building materials in the nation,” says Paul Barnum, executive director of the Oregon Forest Resources Institute. “Using those wood products in new and better ways will benefit the environment and the economies of Oregon and Washington.”

Wood’s strength-to-weight ratio is comparable to concrete and steel. Engineered wood products such as cross-laminated timber (CLT), glue-laminated timber (glulam) and laminated veneer lumber (LVL) make it possible to build taller wood structures. These mass timber construction materials are highly fire-resistant and cost-effective. Prefabricated CLT panels can also be installed quickly, speeding up construction time.

“As global demand for wood continues to increase with population, we need to be sourcing our timber from sustainably managed forests,” says Thomas Maness, dean of the Oregon State University College of Forestry. “The most environmentally sustainable place to grow wood is right here in the Pacific Northwest.”

ECHOTape Repair Tape Now Sold by The Home Depot via HomeDepot.com

Pressure-sensitive tape supplier, ECHOtape’s full repair line will be sold online by a home improvement retailer, The Home Depot via HomeDepot.com. Launched in 2014 at the beginning of the third quarter, the repair line provides contractors with an alternative to duct tapes, and is designed to deliver solutions for repairs, sealing and waterproofing.

“We are very excited to be working with such a trusted name in home improvement like The Home Depot,” says Risa Edelstein, director of marketing for ECHOtape. “We dedicate our business to providing the ultimate tape solutions for a variety of applications and now contractors, remodelers, retrofitters and builders across the nation can purchase our performance-based repair tapes.”

ECHOtape’s comprehensive repair line is geared towards building contractors. In total, seven tapes are available now on HomeDepot.com. The products include three types of repair tapes with different color options:

  • All Purpose Repair Tape: This tape leaves little residue in comparison to a duct tape and is thick and flexible. Ideal for stretching and wrapping, this tape can be used for temporary repairs as well as for rips, tears, gashes and holes. This tape is available in clear and white.
  • All Weather Repair Tape: This tape is made with a butyl-based adhesive, which makes it sticky enough for applications to concrete, stone, wood, glass, metal, plastic, cement, plywood, and damp fabrics, and is ideal for sealing holes and cracks. It is puncture- and tear-resistant, waterproof, and will not crack in temperatures as low as -30 F or fail in temperatures as high as 200 F if applied correctly. The tape is available in white, silver and black.
  • All Leak Repair Tape: Also made with butyl-based adhesive, it is considered an extreme adhesive tape with double the stickiness of the All Weather Repair Tape. It shares many of the same qualities, including being waterproof, but is also resistant to corrosion. Because of its high level of adhesive, it can be used for repairing leaks in roof joints, skylights, RVs, pools and ponds. This tape is available in black and white.

“We are committed to making our products widely available to contractors in the U.S.,” says Edelstein. “This is an important step in increasing convenience for purchasers, and we look forward to continuing to expand our reach and product availability.”

Screw Fastens Wood to Concrete

The WOOD-TO-CONCRETE Tapping Screw from Triangle Fastener Corp.

The WOOD-TO-CONCRETE Tapping Screw from Triangle Fastener Corp.

The WOOD-TO-CONCRETE Tapping Screw from Triangle Fastener Corp. was developed for attaching 2X wood to concrete, masonry or block. Engineered with a proprietary “Hex-Countersunk” drive, it provides the driving stability of a hex drive with the flush mounting feature of a countersunk-head wood screw. The product has been coated for corrosion protection even in treated wood. Case hardened dual thread taps concrete and provides pullout resistance while the nail point guides the screw into concrete and assists in removing debris in the hole.

Roof Decks: Don’t Underestimate the Backbone of the Roof System

NOTE: This article is intended to provide general information while conveying the importance of the roof deck as an integral part of a roof system. Additional information about specific effects and concerns in regard to roofing can be found in The NRCA Roofing and Waterproofing Manual and various roof-cover manufacturers’ design guides.

Wood plank decks can provide a dramatic exposed roof deck.

Wood plank decks can provide a dramatic exposed roof deck.

The roof deck is the backbone and an integral component of all roofing systems. Its main function is to provide structural support for the roof system and, therefore, is a building element that needs to be designed by a licensed design professional because proper support of the roofing above is critical to the roof system’s success.

Roof decks also add thermal performance and fire resistance and ratings, provide slope for drainage and enhance wind-uplift performance. They must accommodate building movement and often determine the attachment method of the vapor retarder, insulation and membrane.

Roof Deck Types

There are many types of roof decks being installed today:

  • Steel
  • Precast concrete panel
  • Structural concrete
  • Cementitious wood fiber
  • Wood planking
  • Plywood/OSB
  • Poured gypsum

Some decks are covered with topping fills that become the base for the roof system and may also be an integral structural component:

  • Concrete
  • Lightweight insulation concrete topping
  • Lightweight aggregate concrete topping

Other deck toppings are available, such as poured gypsum and lightweight concrete with integral insulation, but these are considered substrate covers and not roof decks.

The most prevalent roof deck in the U.S. for commercial buildings is steel. On the West Coast, plywood/OSB is very popular. In addition to the roof decks already mentioned, in the course of roof-replacement work the designer may come in contact with the following:

While the “plate” test is not a preferred method, it can quickly and inexpensively give an indication of retained moisture in lightweight aggregate concrete roof deck covers.

While the “plate” test is not a preferred method, it can quickly and inexpensively
give an indication of retained moisture in lightweight aggregate
concrete roof deck covers.

  • Book tile
  • Lightweight precast concrete planks
  • Precast gypsum planks
  • Transite

Collaboration with the Structural Engineer

Because a roof deck is the foundation for the roof system, the designer needs to coordinate the roof system design requirements for the roof deck with the structural engineer to ensure the performance of the roof system. For example, the roof deck may need to extend to the roof edge. In this example, the roof deck may not need to extend to the roof edge for structural concerns but is needed to support the roof system; the roof designer must address this. If the roof deck is structurally sloped, the designer and engineer must determine whether the low point is a potential drain location. Are there steel beams in the way of the drain location? The roof deck must be attached to the structure to prevent uplift. And the designer and engineer must determine what the deflection of the roof-deck span may be between structural supports. For example, steel deck is sometimes installed with spans of 7 feet between joists and flexes (deflects) under foot traffic. This typically is not a good condition onto which a ridged roof system, such as a bituminous one, should be installed. It cannot be expected to accommodate such deflection. PHOTOS: Hutchinson Design Group Ltd. [Read more…]