Membrane System Reflects Sunlight to Reduce Impact of IR Rays

Kemperol Reflect 2K FR, a cold, liquid-applied reinforced cool roofing system that can improve building energy efficiency, was introduced by Kemper System America Inc.

Kemperol Reflect 2K FR, a cold, liquid-applied reinforced cool roofing system that can improve building energy efficiency, was introduced by Kemper System America Inc.

Kemperol Reflect 2K FR, a cold, liquid-applied reinforced cool roofing system that can improve building energy efficiency, was introduced by Kemper System America Inc.

The bright white surface helps reflect sunlight and reduce the impact of infrared (IR) rays that can tax building cooling systems.

The easy-to-apply, fully-reinforced membrane is applied the same way as Kemper System’s Kemperol 2K-PUR solvent- and odor-free system, but the liquid waterproofing pours out white and dries to a bright white finish. Because no topcoat is necessary, labor costs and installation time are reduced.

The cool roof resin membrane system consists of 70 percent renewable resources, is fire rated for Class-A assemblies, and is odor-free and low-VOC.

Kemperol Reflect 2K FR extends Kemper System’s efforts to support sustainable design. It works for exposed roofs where reflectivity can make a major impact on building energy demands, and it offers many of the same advantages as the Kemperol 2K-PUR system, popular for ‘Green Roofs’ and ‘Blue Roofs’.

The product was tested in Europe and proven valuable on ‘cool roofs’ (also known as ‘white roofs’) especially in warmer climates and areas with above average sunshine.

Both Kemperol systems are also both eligible for LEED credits under the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification program.

Kemperol membrane systems fully adhere to substrates, and are self-flashing and self-terminating for easy installation and edge-to-edge protection. They can seal roof perimeters, multiple penetrations and virtually any architectural detail, with extended-warranty protection. They are fully reinforced with 165 polyester fleece which absorbs the resin and can achieve proper membrane thickness in a single layer.

ERA Challenges LBNL Study about White Roofs

The Bethesda, Md.-based EPDM Roofing Association (ERA) is challenging a study released by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif., which cites white roofs as the most “cost-effective” roofing option over a 50-year time span. The study, published in the March 2014 issue of Energy and Buildings, also calls for the phase-out of black roofs.

“Our members make both black and white roofing membranes. We strongly oppose any recommendation that irresponsibly promotes the use of one of our products over another based on faulty science. We question the validity of this study since it is based on a sample size of only 22 roofs, and we are challenging the conclusions that the authors draw from the data,” says Ellen Thorp, ERA’s associate executive director. “Due to the complexity of roof and building science, prescriptive requirements that limit design choices are not in the best interests of architects, design professionals or building owners.”

To help provide clarity regarding roofing-system choice and refute some errors in the study, ERA convened a panel of experts to review the LBNL science and its conclusions. A complete analysis can be found on the ERA website.

Overall, the LBNL study was marked by “a systematic failure to understand that roofs are systems, not a single component,” says Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, principal of Hutchinson Design Group Ltd., Barrington, Ill., an internationally recognized expert on roof system design and a Roofing editorial advisor. “Additionally, the study completely ignored
ballasted EPDM systems that, in other studies, have proven to be the roof system that provides the greatest service life and energy savings. To suggest that a comparatively ‘new’ roofing material will have a longer service life than EPDM, a material proven to last over 30 years, is naïve.”

“Our members—Firestone Building Products, Carlisle SynTec Systems and Johns Manville—have a vested interest in providing accurate information to our customers,” Thorp adds. “Their knowledge is based on marketing, installing and maintaining thousands of roofing systems. We hope that architects, specifiers and roofing consultants will continue to rely on their field-based knowledge about the comparative costs and effectiveness of roofing systems, rather than on flawed science based on flimsy and biased data.”

Benjamin Mandel, a research assistant in the Heat Island Group at LBNL and an author of the LBNL study, recently responded to ERA’s remarks on Today’s Facility Manager’s website.
Read Mandel’s reaction at bit.ly/1hcD0HR.