RCI Announces Speakers for October Building Envelope Technology Symposium

Raleigh, N.C.-based RCI Inc. has assembled a panel of expert speakers to discuss methods for designing sound building exteriors. More than 300 building designers and construction professionals are expected to be in attendance at the association’s annual Building Envelope Technology Symposium, which will be held Oct. 17-18 at the Westin Galleria Houston, Texas.

The program features 12 educational sessions presented by leading building envelope designers. Speakers offer their experience-based insight for specification of sound, durable exterior enve- lopes. Most programs focus on repair and/or sustainable design methods for strengthening and improving existing structures.

Attendees can earn up to 12 continuing-education credits from RCI and the American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C. An evening reception after the close of the first day’s meeting will allow those in attendance to network and mingle with fellow professionals.

This year’s topics and speakers include:

The Performance of Weather-Resistant Barriers in Stucco Assemblies
Karim P. Allana, RRC, RWC, P.E. | Allana Buick & Bers Inc., Palo Alto, Calif.

Aluminum Windowsill Anchors and Supplemental Waterproof Flashing Design Practices
Rocco Romero, AIA | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc., Seattle

The Ideal Third-party Warranty: A Risk-managed Approach
Lorne Ricketts, P.Eng. | RDH Building Science Inc., Vancouver

Playing Against a Stacked Deck: Restoration of a Stone Fin Façade
Matthew C. Farmer, P.E. | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Fairfax, Va.

Everyone Loves a Pool, But What’s Lurking Beneath the Surface?
Rob Holmer, P.E., GE | Terracon Consulting Engineers, Sacramento, Calif.
Michael Phifer | Terracon Consulting Engineers, Sacramento

Design Principles for Tower and Steeple Restoration
Robert L. Fulmer | Fulmer Associates Building Exterior Consultants LLC, North Conway, N.H.

When the Numbers Don’t Work: Engineering Judgement Tips for Historical Buildings
Rachel L. Will, P.E. | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Chicago
Edward A. Gerns, RA, LEED AP | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Chicago

Air Barrier Integration: Don’t Entangle Yourself with These Common Pitfalls
Timothy A. Mills, P.E., LEED AP, CIT | TAM Consultants Inc., Williamsburg, Va.

Upgrading the Performance of Heritage Windows to Suit Modern Design Conditions
Scott Tomlinson, P.Eng. | Morrison Hershfield, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Design Considerations for Renewing Podium Waterproofing
Bereket Alazar, RRO, LEED AP BD+C | Morrison Hershfield, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Stéphane P. Hoffman, P.E. | Morrison Hershfield, Seattle

Fully Soldered Metal Roofing: More Complicated Than You Think
Nicholas T. Floyd, P.E., LEED AP | Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., Waltham, Mass.

A Case History of ETFE on Today’s Projects
Lee Durston | Morrison Hershfield, St. Paul, Minn.
Shawn Robinson | Morrison Hershfield, Atlanta

For more information, visit RCI’s website, or call (800) 828-1902.

A Watertight Warranty Convinces HOA to Select Standing-seam Metal Roofing

When you know you can do a good job and you know you’re working with good products, you don’t mind being held accountable. On Top Roofing of Park City, Utah, recently completed a demanding roofing project and supplied the homeowners association with a watertight warranty.

With a strict spec from the consultant and a watertight warranty to back up the work, a standing-seam metal roofing system installed by On Top Roofing was selected for Cache Condos

With a strict spec from the consultant and a watertight warranty to back up the work, a standing-seam metal roofing system installed by On Top Roofing was selected for Cache Condos.

Homeowners associations, or HOAs, have been known to provide challenges to roofers, especially metal roofing installers. The only thing more daunting than an uneducated HOA board is an HOA board that was forced to learn about roofing. The HOA board at the Cache Condos in Park City knows roofing.

The original roof on the condos was a cedar shake that lasted more than 20 years, but a little more than five years ago, it was starting to fail. The board elected to go with a corrugated metal roof with a rusty look.

“In the five years they had that corrugated roof, they had more trouble with leaks than they did in 20 years with the shake roof,” says Jeremy Russell of On Top Roofing. “It was a bad install by a company no longer in business. So they hired a consultant—a consultant who insisted that all details be installed to specification. That’s what we do.”

First, the consultant and the board had to be re-sold on metal roofing for the Cache Condos. The rusty 7/8-inch corrugated metal roof installed just five years ago was installed with exposed fasteners, was rusting in flashing areas and leaking in the laps when snow built up on the roof. With a strict spec from the consultant and a watertight warranty from Drexel Metals to back up the work, a standing-seam metal roofing system installed by On Top Roofing was selected.

“One of the requirements was we had to inject the seams with butyl,” Russell says. “So we purchased a Hot Melt [Technologies] system. It was a huge investment, but we were happy to do it. It was something we’ve wanted to do and this project got us to take that step.

“We received plenty of support from Drexel, putting everything together to meet the requirements of the consultant,” he adds. “We worked out all the details to spec and added some of our own that were above spec.”

One requirement was to use no exposed fasteners. That meant employing stainless-steel material in many of the details: skylights, chimneys, roof to wall flashings. “We etched it, primed it and painted it with automotive paint to match,” Russell notes. “It took more time, but it will not leak.”

One requirement was to avoid exposed fasteners, which meant employing stainless-steel material in many of the details: skylights, chimneys, roof to wall flashings.

One requirement was to avoid exposed fasteners, which meant employing stainless-steel material in many of the details: skylights, chimneys, roof to wall flashings.

More than 33,500 square feet of 22-gauge Galvalume 1 3/4-inch snap-lock standing-seam panels—all formed onsite—were installed by Russell’s crew. The roofing panels, rollformed on one of On Top Roofing’s two New Tech Machinery rollformers, were PVDF-painted in Medium Bronze. The project took about eight months to complete and On Top Roofing wrapped up in November 2014.

“We issued the warranty in December 2014,” says Frank Oswald, warranty inspector for Drexel Metals. “I’d say Jeremy went above and beyond what a typical installer would have done on this project. I was at this site on three different occasions because this project was really under a microscope. Ultimately, we’re quite satisfied with the work and the install.”

Union Corrugating Launches a MetalProTECTION System Warranty

Union Corrugating has launched a MetalProTECTION System Warranty available to the marketplace. This warranty is now available to homeowners when purchasing a new metal roofing system installed by a Union factory-trained MetalPro contractor.

When installation requirements are met, this warranty guarantees homeowners 10 years of labor protection covering 100 percent of labor and materials in case of manufacturing defects.

“Our MetalPro contractor program is a quality metal roofing installation training program,” says Keith Medick, Union CEO. “Using our contractors, coupled with Union’s recommended roofing components, homeowners will get a quality metal roof and warranty protection. We don’t know of a better warranty out there that delivers the peace of mind they deserve,” says Medick.

Mule-Hide Redesigns Website

Mule-Hide Products has launched its newly redesigned website, mulehide.com, which makes it easier for contractors, architects, building owners, facility managers, modular manufacturers/dealers, and distributors to find the product and system information they need. It also offers a variety of user-friendly tools designed to help warranty-eligible contractors manage their Mule-Hide-warranted jobs.