SES Foam Wall Insulation Products Use Honeywell’s Low Global-Warming Material

Honeywell has announced that SES Foam has transitioned to Honeywell’s low global-warming-potential (GWP) material for wall insulation, with roofing systems to follow.

SES has introduced a 2.0 closed-cell spray polyurethane foam (ccSPF) formulated with Honeywell’s Solstice Liquid Blowing Agent (LBA) for use in wall insulation applications. SES joins a list of companies that have switched from hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) foam blowing agents such as HFC-365mfc and HFC-245fa to Solstice LBA in ccSPF systems, well ahead of environmental regulations calling for a phaseout of HFCs due to their high GWPs. More than 190 countries recently agreed to an amendment to the Montreal Protocol that would phase down the use of HFCs beginning in 2019.

Solstice LBA, which is based on next-generation hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) technology, complies with changing regulatory requirements aimed at reducing climate impact, while also providing improved foam performance compared to HFCs. Blowing agents are an important ingredient in closed-cell foam, allowing it to expand and enabling its insulating performance.

“SES is proud of its commitment to sustainable solutions and innovation,” said Charles Valentine, chief operating officer, SES Foam. “Having built our open-cell foam business around sucrose-based technology, we believe that adopting Honeywell’s Solstice LBA in our closed-cell foam aligns with our customers and environmental focus. Our expertise is unique in that many of our staff are former spray foam contractors, so they have insight into customers’ needs, and can provide the support and products they require to succeed.”

“Honeywell is committed to helping industry leaders like SES create solutions such as using Solstice LBA in its closed-cell foam,” said Laura Reinhard, global business manager for spray foam, Honeywell. “Not only does Solstice LBA provide SES with an environmental solution, it has helped their 2.0 product formulation deliver foam performance.”  

Solstice LBA has a low global-warming-potential of 1, which is 99.9 percent lower than HFCs and equal to carbon dioxide. It is nonflammable (ASTM E-681) and is not a volatile organic compound per the EPA. Solstice LBA is listed under the EPA’s Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. In Europe, it is not listed in the Annex I of F-Gas regulation and thus not considered an F-Gas. It is also registered under the European Union’s REACH program.
 
Solstice LBA is used in a variety of rigid foam insulation applications, including spray foam insulation, residential and commercial refrigeration equipment, and insulated metal panels, as well as flexible foam applications, such as molded and slabstock foam, and integral skin. Visit the website for more information on Solstice LBA.

Atlas Roofing Supports Wildlife Biologists Expedition With Build of Tiny House

Atlas Roofing is supporting a group of Canadian-based wildlife biologists this summer on their expedition to study the whale and dolphin species of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Led by Katy Gavrilchuk and David Gaspard, in association with a non-profit organization, the Mingan Island Cetacean Study, the expedition will focus on the long-term monitoring of large baleen whales on an important summer feeding ground. With the assistance of donations from Atlas Roofing and several other companies, Katy and David were able to build an environmentally sound tiny house that will serve as their mobile research base. It will assist in their expedition, while keeping their carbon footprint to a minimum.

“This expedition is truly one of a kind and Atlas is very excited to be a part of this innovative project,” said Tom Robertson, wall insulation business manager for Atlas. “What Katy and David are doing with their mobile research base is both smart and unique. We can’t wait to see what they are able to achieve in both their studies and in the name of environmental awareness with the help of the tiny home.”

Background on the Expedition
Studying mammals, such as dolphins and whales, requires the ability to move at any time in order to properly observe and track these amazing creatures. In the biologists’ previous expeditions, that level of flexibility was not economically or plausibly feasible. In addition, the biologists had a desire to raise awareness of the consequences of global consumption and reduce their own personal impact on the environment while still accomplishing their research.

In order to address these issues, they came up with the idea of constructing a tiny home on wheels, giving them the ability to overcome the logistical obstacles of studying mammals on the move, while also raising environmental awareness.

Building the Tiny House
For Katy and David’s tiny house, they developed a set of criteria for the products used in the construction and one of the most important was that the supplier companies be eco-conscious.

The wildlife biologists found that Atlas products are highly energy efficient, water and fire resistant and are manufactured with sustainable processes.

While the environmental aspect of the tiny homes insulation was important, Atlas had to meet other criteria as well including:
·High thermal resistance: A smaller space can lose heat quickly and the tiny home needed to be used in varying weather and temperature conditions.
·Lightweight: Since the tiny house would be attached to a trailer, the biologists had to respect the maximum load capacity and save weight where they could.

After the wildlife biologists determined Atlas met their needs both environmentally and logistically, EnergyShield PRO foam boards were installed in the building envelope. EnergyShield PRO wall insulation features a high R-value, Class A durable aluminum facer that also serves as a water resistive barrier, all helpful qualities for the tiny house. In addition, the insulation boards hold a Class A fire rating and can be used for exterior CI (continuous insulation) for installation over concrete, wood, wood stud and more. Because of size constraints, it was important to get the greatest insulation value possible from the few inches of space that could be allocated to insulation. With an R-value of 6.5 per inch, the highest available in the market, EnergyShield PRO was able to provide a total R-value of 22 in a 3.5 inch product. Overall, it took the wildlife biologists four days to install the Atlas insulation.

What’s Next?
The expedition is 670 miles long, and the field season will last until September 2016. The journey to the whales begins in Montreal, where the biologists will be stopping along the way in Quebec City, Tadoussac, Baie Comeau and Sept-Iles. The journey to the Gulf of St. Lawrence will serve two purposes: raise public awareness about living sustainably and ecologically, as well as monitoring for whales along the north coast of the Gulf. To follow Katy and David’s journey along the way, visit http://venturebiologists-tinyhome.weebly.com/ or BigWhaleTinyHouse.com.

PIMA Announces Environmental Product Declarations for Polyiso Roof and Wall Insulations

Consistent with its delivery of energy-efficient and sustainable building insulation solutions, the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA) announced the receipt of third party-verified ISO-compliant Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for polyisocyanurate (polyiso) roof and wall insulations as manufactured by PIMA members across North America. An EPD is an internationally recognized and standardized tool that reports the environmental impacts of products.

These EPDs document that the energy-savings potential of polyiso roof and wall insulation during a typical 60-year building life span is equal to up to 47 times the initial energy required to produce, transport, install, maintain, and eventually remove and dispose of the insulation. In addition to a high return on embodied energy, the EPDs document that polyiso roof and wall insulation offer high unit R-value per inch, zero ozone depletion potential, recycled content, opportunity for reuse and outstanding fire performance.

Beyond providing consistent and comparable environmental impact data, the PIMA polyiso EPDs also present information about additional environmental and energy characteristics, including the high net return on energy provided by polyiso roof and wall insulation.

Specifically, the polyiso EPDs describe the environmental impacts of the combined weighted average production for PIMA member manufacturing locations located across the United States and Canada, based on an established set of product category rules applicable to all types of building thermal insulation. The environmental impacts reported in the PIMA polyiso EPDs are derived from independently verified cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA) process, including all critical elements related to the resourcing, production, transport, installation, maintenance, and eventual removal and replacement of polyiso roof and wall insulation.

Using the LCA process, the PIMA polyiso roof and wall insulation products are evaluated on a number of impact categories including global warming potential, ozone depletion potential, eutrophication potential, acidification potential, and smog creation potential, as well as other environmental indicators including primary energy demand, resource depletion, waste to disposal, waste to energy, and water use.

PIMA polyiso roof and wall insulation EPDs also meet the requirements of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED v4 Green Building Rating System under Credit MRC-2 Building Product Disclosure and Optimization: Environmental Product Declarations as industry-wide or generic declarations that may be valued as one-half of an eligible product for the purposes of credit calculation.

“These third party-verified EPDs for polyiso roof and wall insulation products produced by PIMA manufacturers reflect our industry’s commitment to sustainability and transparency in reporting environmental performance,” says Jared Blum, president of PIMA. “These EPDs will be a valuable tool to provide environmental information to all building and design professionals, and they should be especially helpful in meeting emerging criteria for green building design.”