The Calcaire House Meets Strict Energy Codes — and Does it in Style

The residential compound is made up of five interconnected buildings and features both gabled standing seam metal roofs and low-slope TPO roofs. Photos: S-5!

The Calcaire House is a 15,000-square-foot modern Colorado single-family residential compound consisting of five interconnected buildings. Floor-to-ceiling glass connects the interior space to the exterior landscape, offering spectacular views of the Boulder Flatirons. A combination of exposed timber, stone and steel structural design elements, and exposed custom roof trusses complement the gabled standing seam metal roof.

Boulder Roofing Company and The Solar Revolution were charged with installing a metal roof and solar array with more than 60 kilowatts of solar dispersed over multiple rooftops. Boulder Roofing installed both standing seam metal and TPO roof systems on the project. Crews installed approximately 12,000 square feet of 14-inch, 24-gauge panels from Drexel Metals in traditional black over Titanium PSU30 high-temp peel and stick underlayment.

They also installed 3,000 square feet of 60-mil Versico TPO over low-slope areas. The TPO was adhered to quarter-inch DensDeck Prime over tapered EPS insulation. Boulder Roofing fabricated and installed custom flashings and coping, and also installed an S-5! snow-guard system incorporating the S-5! ColorGard bars, S-5-S Mini clamps, SnoClip IIs, and VersaClips.

The Energy Challenge

The city of Boulder has strict energy codes in place and requires all new construction to meet a certain level of efficiency. The requirements are based on the square footage of the home and are more stringent on larger homes — the larger the home, the more efficient it needs to be. The goal is to have a net-zero home, not taking energy from the grid, and the only way for a larger home to achieve this is with solar. A modest home or small addition might only require about 2 kilowatts. A large home might require 20-30 kilowatts.

The most optimal rooftops for solar were also the most visually prominent, and the homeowner was concerned about aesthetics. These concerns were alleviated after seeing a small-scale mock-up of the S-5! PVKIT 2.0 solution combined with an all-black solar module.

In addition, the area is considered a high-wind area and would require a study to account for windspeeds, as the solar installers could only rely on the roof itself and its attachment to the wood sheeting when attaching solar panels using S-5!’s zero-penetration system.

Another difficulty was finding a viable path to route the energy created by the solar panels back to the point of connection with the home’s distribution. The Solar Revolution worked with the builder and the architect, and analyzed photos and design plans to find ways to conceal the conduits. They ultimately found a viable path that was aesthetically pleasing, code compliant and cost-effective.

The Solution

The Solar Revolution installers utilized S-5!’s PVKIT 2.0 to build the solar array. The installation team started at ground level prepping S-5! PVKIT MidGrabs and EdgeGrabs. Another team member prepared the solar modules by installing the power optimizers and managing the various wires. By completing this work on the ground, the roof crew could focus on setting modules, and it minimized their time in harnesses on a steep metal roof. The solar installers prefer to install modules starting with the bottom row and working up. Extra care is taken when aligning the first row. This precision allows for subsequent rows to drop into place on the S-5! PVKIT MidGrabs.

The Solar Revolution installed a solar array that provides more than 60 kilowatts of power.

“The Solar Revolution has been utilizing the S-5! PVKIT 2.0 solution since it first hit the market,” says Doug Claxton, CEO of The Solar Revolution. “Hands down, it is the best solar mounting solution for metal roofing of any description. At first, we were a little worried about wire management and installing in landscape, but those worries were overcome with our first installation. It’s a piece of cake.”

Long-Term Outlook

With the S-5! PVKIT 2.0, the Calcaire House was able to meet the city code requirements for solar and establish itself as an energy-efficient, net-zero home. Because the PVKIT comes in black, it matched the roof nicely, pulling together all of the design elements in an aesthetically pleasing, cost-effective manner — saving the customer time and money on installation and materials.

TEAM

Architect: Surround Architecture, Boulder, Colorado, www.surroundarchitecture.com

General Contractor: Harrington Stanko Construction, Niwot, Colorado, www.harringtonstanko.com

Engineer: Anthem Structural Engineers, Boulder, Colorado, www.anthemstructural.com

Roofing Contractor: Boulder Roofing Company, Boulder, Colorado, www.boulderroof.com

Solar Installer: The Solar Revolution, Boulder, Colorado, www.thesolarrevolution.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: 175SS 14-inch, 24 gauge panels, Drexel Metals, www.drexmet.com

Underlayment: Titanium PSU30, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

TPO Roof: 60-mil Grey TPO, Versico, www.versico.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Solar Attachment: S-5! PVKIT 2.0 in black with S-5-S Mini Clamps, www.S-5.com

Snow Guards: S-5! ColorGard, S-5-S Mini Clamps, SnowClipIIs and VersaClips

Boulder Lumber Warehouse Needed a Roof Built to Last in Tough Conditions

Boulder Lumber’s 19,512-square-foot warehouse needed a roof that could withstand high winds and extreme weather. Photos: Versico

Since 1927, Boulder Lumber has served the building contractors of Boulder, Colorado, providing lumber, millwork, doors, windows, decking, and other building materials. In 2019, Boulder Lumber’s built-up tar and gravel roof needed to be replaced, largely because of damage caused by wind events. The wood nailer at the perimeter had become dislodged and the built-up system had begun to peel back from the concrete deck.

The city of Boulder is located in the Boulder Valley where the Rocky Mountains meet the Great Plains. Wind uplift is a major concern for buildings in this area, as high winds come off the canyons from the Rocky Mountains. The wind intensifies as it travels over buildings, which creates high pressure at roof perimeters. Winter conditions in Boulder range from mild to bitterly cold, with an average of 88 inches of snow per season.

The unpredictable weather in northern Colorado shortens their roofing season compared to other areas in the country. Winters can be very cold, and the Boulder area receives an average of 88 inches of snowfall per season.

Key Priorities

When selecting a new roof for the 19,512-square-foot warehouse, Boulder Lumber was looking for something with excellent wind uplift resistance to avoid the problems they’d experienced in the past. They also wanted a system that could be installed quickly in a variety of temperatures, since the weather in Boulder can be very unpredictable and the labor market is tight. Lastly, they wanted to work with a skilled, dependable roofer who would get the job right the first time around.

Boulder Lumber enlisted Black Roofing to install a tough, durable roofing system that would be able to withstand the high wind uplift pressures at the perimeter of the roof. Black Roofing suggested Versico’s RapidLock Roofing System due to the ability of this roofing system to perform well in this environment.

The RapidLock Roofing System uses Velcro Brand Securable Solutions’ hook and loop attachment method to provide a fully adhered system without adhesives. The backing on the VersiFleece membrane attaches to a specialized facer on the insulation boards.

RapidLock roofs are designed to be quick and easy to install and there are no installation temperature restrictions, making this system an ideal fit for the Boulder Lumber project. According to the manufacturer, RapidLock installations provide up to 80 percent labor savings compared to traditional bonding adhesive and up to 25 percent labor savings compared to a traditional VersiFleece system.

The Installation

The 20-year-old existing built-up roof system had to be torn off to the structural concrete deck, including scraping residual asphalt.

Because of the damage to the concrete deck, the existing wood nailer was deteriorating. Black Roofing decided to use Metal-Era’s Eliminailer to provide a strong connection on the perimeter and protect the roof against high winds.

Black Roofing used CAV-GRIP 3V to prime the deck. The product promotes adhesion and can be used in temperatures as low as 15 degrees Fahrenheit when used as a primer.

Flexible DASH Adhesive was used to adhere a layer of 1-inch SecurShield Polyiso insulation to the concrete deck. Alan Nedelea with Black Roofing says, “We used Flexible DASH to eliminate any of the fasteners that would have been needed to penetrate into the concrete deck, and also to provide a good adhesion for the wind uplift required for this system.”

A layer of 6-inch SecurShield HD RL was then adhered to the base layer. The product has a specialized facer that allows for membrane attachment without using adhesives.

VersiFleece RL EPDM was attached to the SecurShield HD RL. Black Roofing simply positioned the RapidLock EPDM sheets, removed the release liners, then broomed and rolled the membrane into place. Once the job was complete, a 15-year, 55-mph wind speed warranty was issued.

Nedelea cited the roof system’s wind uplift resistance and the lack of temperature restrictions for installation as the key reasons it was chosen for this project. He also pointed to RapidLock’s labor-saving benefits, which allow the roofing system to be installed in far less time than a traditional roofing system.

“This is the first RapidLock roofing system that Black Roofing has installed,” Nedelea says. “We really enjoyed doing this project.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Black Roofing Inc., Boulder, Colorado, www.blackroofing.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 115-mil VersiFleece RL EPDM RapidLock, Versico, www.versico.com

Insulation: SecurShield HD RL Polyiso RapidLock Insulation and SecurShield Polyiso, Versico

Metal Nailer: Eliminailer, Metal-Era, www.metalera.com

Versico Roofing Systems Names New Director of Sales

Versico Roofing Systems announced the hiring of Lorraine Russ as its new Director of Sales. Russ will be responsible for the continued growth of the Versico and WeatherBond brands throughout the United States.

“We’re excited to have Lorraine join and lead the Versico team into the new decade,” said Steve Schwar, Vice President of Single-Ply Sales for Carlisle Construction Materials. “Her experience in the building materials industry, including sales, marketing and leadership make her ideally suited for this role at Versico.”

Russ was most recently employed with LP Building Products, where she served in a variety of roles, most recently as Director of Sales and Marketing for the Western United States, Canada and the EU. Russ holds an MBA from the Massey School of Business at Nashville’s Belmont University and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland.

For more information, visit www.versico.com

Re-Roofing a Planetarium Under the Stars

Photos: Versico

The James S. McDonnell Planetarium is a St. Louis icon. Located in Forest Park, a 1,300-acre public park, the planetarium is the main attraction at the Saint Louis Science Center, one of the few free nonprofit science museums in the country. It serves more than one million people each year. Opened in 1963, the planetarium features one of the world’s best opto-mechanical start projectors, which projects a 360-degree view of the constellations in the night sky onto its domed ceiling.

The giant, white structure is hard to miss, but its roof is hidden from view for those on the ground. The low-slope roof system and penthouse are nearly invisible behind a large, bowl-shaped parapet. The existing roof was saturated with moisture and was starting to develop leaks, and the planetarium’s dome-shaped screen and multimillion-dollar projection system could not get wet.

The Problems

Bade Roofing was just finishing up a re-roofing project at a Science Center warehouse when the company was called in to take a look at the planetarium roof. According to Dave Bade, president of Bade Roofing, and Drew Bade, the project manager, the company determined a total roof replacement was required. They also identified some key challenges.

A crane was used to lift material to the roof and remove debris.

The 4,000-square-foot roof is unusual; it’s perfectly round, yet slightly bowl-shaped, with round penthouse in the center. The unique shape would make it difficult to design a tapered insulation system, flashings, and terminations for the 30-year project. Another difficulty was posed by the concrete step-offs located under the existing roof. There were no dimensions on the original plans, so creating the tapered insulation layout would be especially tricky.

The schedule was also complicated, as the planetarium would remain open throughout the construction process, hosting daily educational presentations for schoolchildren, as well as special events and exhibits. Work couldn’t take place during business hours.

“We had to work at night, craning stuff up there with big lights,” says Dave Bade. “The good thing was the guys couldn’t fall because they couldn’t go anywhere; the roof had an eight-foot wall around it. The safety plan was easy, but the tapered design was tough.”

The Proposal

Bade Roofing decided to go with a SureMB 120TG Base Ply as a temporary roof to ensure the equipment inside the building would be protected throughout the tear-off and installation process. “It was a secondary line of defense that allowed us to remove the entire roof all at once and not have to rely on tie-ins from the old roof to the new one when the crew started and stopped each night,” Drew Bade says.

The existing roof of the James S. McDonnell Planetarium was removed and replaced with a fully adhered 90-mil EPDM system from Versico.

The temporary roof allowed the company to accurately measure the existing roof for the tapered insulation design. “This is another reason we decided to use the SureMB 120TG; it allowed us to really see what was going on with the tapered and make adjustments prior to ordering,” notes Drew Bade.

The roof specified for the final phase of the project was a 90-mil VersiGard EPDM fully adhered system manufactured by Versico. “The Science Center and the architect both have a history of using EPDM on their projects because they’ve had a lot of success with it,” says Drew Bade. “And with the uncommon design and shape of this roof, EPDM was perfect to mold into all the unique angles and it did a good job conforming to the many curves of the building. We used a 90-mil EPDM to get the 30-year warranty the Science Center wanted and for the overall longevity of the roof.”

The Process

Once the crane and light towers were in place, crews began the loading and tear-off process. Crews accessed the roof through a window of the penthouse, but material had to be lifted in place with the crane. The typical workday began at about 5 p.m., and crews worked until 2 or 3 o’clock the next morning.

“We started by priming the concrete deck with CAV-GRIP 3V,” says Drew. “Then we installed the SureMB 120 TG Base Ply.”

The insulation was adhered in Flexible DASH low-rise adhesive. Crews installed a base layer of 2-inch SecurShield polyiso, which has a special facer, followed by a layer of tapered SecurShield polyiso. The drainage areas needed exacting care. “The drains were down in a concrete sump,” says Dave Bade. “We put the drawing right on the roof and cut out each of those sections. It was like cutting a pie into 50 pieces.”

Crews then installed Securock cover board, followed by the 90-mil VersiGard EPDM. “The EPDM did a great job conforming to the building’s angles and curves,” says Drew Bade. “We adhered the EPDM with Versico’s standard Bonding Adhesive because it’s got a long track record and it works.”

Once the tapered insulation was in place, the membrane installation was pretty straightforward, although the circular roof area posed some challenges with the details. “The counter flashings and terminations were kind of tough because everything had to be pre-bent to that radius,” Dave Bade notes. “It wasn’t a tight radius, but everything had to be pre-formed to that exact radius so you could keep constant compression on that membrane.”

The Professionals

The new system qualified for a 30-year warranty. “One of the main benefits of a Versico system, from a contractor perspective, is the support from Versico’s tech reps,” says Drew Bade. “It’s second to none; they make sure the job’s done right and they’re there every step of the way.”

The work was meticulous, and Bade Roofing’s experienced crews took great care to get it right. “The artistic part of it is the roof itself. It’s a shame that no one will ever see it,” says Dave Bade. “We did the work at night, so no one even saw our trucks.”

It’s a satisfying accomplishment to re-roof an iconic structure, even if no one sees you do it. “We really wanted to do this job,” says Dave Bade. “It meant a lot to us because we try to do things that are out of the ordinary. After being in business for more than 60 years, you like project like this because you get to show off your talents. And the men like stuff like this; the ones who got to work on this project, it really meant a lot to them. They are true professionals.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Bade Roofing Co., Inc., St. Louis, Missouri, www.baderoofing.com

Architect: T.R.,i Architects, St. Louis, Missouri, http://www.triarchitects.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 90-mil VersiGard EPDM, Versico, www.versico.com

Insulation: SecurShield Polyiso, Versico

Base Ply: SureMB 120TG, Versico

Primer: CAV-GRIP 3V Low-VOC Adhesive/Primer, Versico

Cover Board: 1/2-inch Securock, USG, www.usg.com

Restoring Multiple Roof Systems on Historic Structure Is a Labor of Love

The Evans family restored the mill’s main roof as well as the flat roof over a retail space. Crews also re-roofed the large covered porch on the side of the mill and the one-story log cabin residence added to the back of the mill. Photo: Evans Candy

The first thing longtime roofer Dave Fisher will do is correct your pronunciation of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania — it’s traditionally pronounced “Lang-kiss-ter” for anyone wondering. And tradition is important where Fisher’s from.

Founded in 1729, Lancaster County is one of the oldest communities in America. The area is the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch country and has a strong farming and milling history. At the height of the milling industry, the area had more than 300 various types of mills operating.

The list of historical buildings in Lancaster County is long, so working on old structures is nothing new to Fisher, who runs I & D Contracting Ltd. in Lancaster. But re-roofing a 130-year-old mill to protect the interior while preserving its key historic characteristics presents unique challenges. Throw in local attachment to the building and a personal relationship with the owner and the stakes for doing the project right get even higher.

The mill had many names and many owners over its history before the Evans family purchased it in 1983. Photo: Evans Candy

This was the challenge presented to Fisher’s crew in re-roofing the Evans Candy Store in Lancaster County, done in stages over the last several years, with the most recent project being completed in 2018. The candy store is located inside a flour mill that serves as a recognizable piece of Lancaster’s history. The structure was originally built in the 1700s, but dust from grinding flour was a perpetual fire risk, and the mill burned twice over its history. The existing structure has been in place since 1889.

The mill has had many names and many owners over its history, but the Evans family purchased the mill in 1983 and has worked to bring it back to its former glory. Coming from a line of Lancaster milling families themselves, the Evans have used the historic structure to create a destination retail location that keeps people coming back for more — more chocolate, that is — oftentimes long after they have moved out of the area.

The flour mill is an iconic structure in Lancaster County. The existing structure dates back to 1889. Photo: Lancaster Historical Society, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

“I refer to us as a very large mom-and-pop store. We still get most of our business from word of mouth and know many of our customers by name or what they order, but we’ve grown and branched out into grocery stores and specialty shops,” says Steve Evans, second-generation owner of the Evans Candy Store located in the old mill. “Still, about half of the people who order through our website are people who moved out of the area, but still want their Evans chocolate.”

Fisher is no stranger to the area, the old mill or the Evans family either. “I was born and raised in Lancaster County, so I’ve been familiar with this building since I was a kid,” Fisher says. “I’ve been doing work for the Evans family for 20 years now — sisters, brothers, parents. I’ve been glad to get to work on it and be a part of its story.”

Franken-Roof

Affectionately referred to as “Franken-roof” by both Fisher and Evans, the roof on the 10,000-square-foot Evans Candy Store consists of four separate roofs — a three-story, steep-slope roof; a two-story, flat roof over a retail space; a large covered porch attached to the side of the mill; and a long, one-story log cabin residence attached to the back of the mill. Each of these roofs has a different type and color of roofing installed for various reasons, and each presented its own challenges.

At one point, an owner of the mill covered the siding with red asphalt shingles, visible in this photo at the upper right. Photo: Evans Candy

The “Franken-roof” extended to nearly every part of the mill’s exterior as a previous owner nailed red-colored asphalt shingles over all of the building’s original 1889 wood siding in an effort to protect the historic structure.

“I’ve lived in this area my whole life and I’ve never seen anything quite like it,” Evans says of the shingle-covered exterior. “When my family started restoring the mill — I was like 10 or 11 years old — I can’t tell you how many dumb asphalt shingles I picked up. That was my job. My brothers knocked them off the house and I picked them up and put them in the trash.”

Since then, the entire bottom floor of the building has been retrofitted to house to the candy store, while the upper floors have been converted into 3,000 square feet of residential space that a number of Evans family members have called home over the years.

The Steep-Slope Roof

It’s difficult to know for certain, but Fisher thinks the original roof over the main portion of the mill was slate. By the time the Evans bought the mill in 1983, the roof had been replaced with asphalt shingles. Evans hired Fisher and the I & D Contracting crew to re-roof this largest portion of the building — a 2,400-square-foot steep-slope roof — 10 years ago. To protect the historic building, Fisher wanted to start from scratch and make sure the job was done right. When he tore off the old roof, he found no real roof decking, just old barn wood in random sizes fitted together.

To preserve as much of the historical nature of the building, Fisher kept the original board decking, shoring it up where needed, and applied TAMKO Moisture Guard Ice and Rain Underlayment. To help create a more uniform surface for the shingles, Fisher chose a thick felt paper — TAMKO No. 30 Underlayment — to cover the barn wood roof deck and started laying the Heritage Premium asphalt shingles.

The shingle application required some extra care and an attentive ear due to the old barn wood deck. “There were gaps between the old barn wood pieces, so we had to listen to the sound each nail made as it went in — you could hear the difference when the nail hit one of the gaps and didn’t get any wood,” Fisher says. “In those cases, we had to move the nail and try again, because we wanted to know that it was really solid.”

Evans chose the very light-colored Olde English Pewter shingle in an attempt to reduce the heat coming in to the third story. Energy efficiency is always a concern in buildings of this age. When the Evans family purchased the building, it had no drywall or insulation, just open studded walls. Over the years, the family added spray foam insulation, insulation batting and roof vents to help address heat flow in and out of the massive historic building.

Fisher notes his crew took extra care around the 130-year-old brick chimney, which had been re-pointed in the past but needed some additional work. Fisher fabricated aluminum flashing and counter flashing out of coil stock on an aluminum brake to further protect the historic structure from potential damage.

The Flat Roof

Before Evans befriended Fisher and the two started their working relationship, Evans hired another roofer friend, Josh Miller of Miller’s Roofing in Wellsville, Pennsylvania, to update the flat roof portion of the old mill. The existing asphalt roll roofing installed in the early 1980s had reached the end of its life and Evans and Miller worked together to add foam sheeting over top of the existing rolled roofing and finished it by installing a Versico EPDM roofing system in the late 1990s.

The original roof deck over the flat roof portion of the mill was tongue and groove, and the men worked carefully to preserve the integrity of the original decking as they modernized the covering.

The Covered Porch

Fast-forward to 2018, and Evans contacted Fisher to replace and repair the roof over a large covered porch connected to the side of the building. The 450-square-foot cedar shake roof was added in an effort to blend with the rest of the historical structure, but after several decades, the moss-covered shakes succumbed to water damage and began to fail.

Fisher and his crew removed the cedar shakes and found part of the reason for the roof’s failure — zero flashing connecting the shake to the side of the building, just some old caulk. As part of the re-roofing project, Fisher added new flashing where the porch roof connected to the side of the mill.

“We had to get creative — flashing underneath the existing siding to try and prevent the same problems from recurring,” Fisher says.

Evans loved the old cedar shake roof and felt torn when choosing a replacement shingle. He ended up going with Heritage Premium asphalt shingles for their durability and selected the Rustic Slate color to differentiate the covered porch from the rest of the structure.

“It was a toss-up — would I match the new shingles to the other parts of the building?” Evans recalls. “But then I realized, I kind of liked the covered porch being a separate entity unto itself. It had always had a different shade of roofing, signifying a separate area of the building, and I liked that. I chose the Rustic Slate color because it still gave that rustic, historic feel that I loved about the cedar shake.”

The Log Cabin Residence

The other roof Fisher’s crew updated on the old mill in 2018 was on the long, log-cabin residence attached to the side of the three-story structure. Despite looking like an original part of the mill’s construction, the log cabin was added to the building in 1992, as a retirement home for Evans’ aging parents.

The log cabin addition was constructed in 1992. The roof was recently replaced with TAMKO Heritage Premium asphalt shingles in Rustic Cedar to help it blend in with the rest of the historic structure. Photo: Evans Candy

By the time Fisher got a good look at the log cabin roof in 2018, he realized the existing asphalt shingles were at the end of their service life, and one particular section of the roof had been patched multiple times and had additional layers of shingles stacked on the roof in an attempt to repel water.

Fisher took the 1,600-square-foot roof down to the decking, installed ice and water shield, new felt paper and installed TAMKO Heritage Premium asphalt shingles. Evans chose the Rustic Cedar color for the new roof as it was similar to the previous shingle color that added to the rustic, historic look that Evans hoped the log cabin would have in an effort to have it meld with the rest of the 130-year-old mill structure.

“I liked that Rustic Cedar look, pairing it with the log front,” Evans notes. “I think back to olden times with the cedar shake and wanted to emulate that. And I think we accomplished it. It is fun — it makes us smile when people ask us, ‘How old is that log home?’ and we get to tell them it’s only 26 years old.”

Fisher has grown to appreciate what he calls the “hodge-podge” of roof styles and colors on the old mill, and says the most important thing is that the building’s owner got exactly what he wanted and is a happy customer.

“Sometimes if people want to see installed examples of different colors of TAMKO shingles, I just send them to the mill because they can see a variety there,” Fisher says, laughing. “I jokingly asked Steve the other day if he had a shed that we could roof for him … just to see how many different colors we could do.”

About the author: Melissa Dunson is an award-winning journalist with more than a decade of experience writing about a wide variety of business sectors, including the construction industry, and as a technical and creative writer for TAMKO Building Products.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: I & D Contracting Ltd., Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Roofing Contractor: Miller’s Roofing, Wellsville, Pennsylvania

MATERIALS

Underlayment: No. 30 Asphalt Saturated Organic Felt, TAMKO, www.tamko.com

Waterproofing: Moisture Guard Ice and Rain Underlayment, TAMKO

Asphalt Shingles: TAMKO Heritage Premium Laminated Asphalt Shingles in Olde English Pewter, Rustic Slate and Rustic Cedar

Low-Slope Roof: Versico EPDM Roofing System, www.versico.com

Polyiso Insulation Contains No Halogenated Flame Retardants

VersicoVersico Roofing Systems introduces its VersiCore MP-H NH and SecurShield NH polyiso insulations. According to the manufacturer, these products provide the same performance characteristics as standard polyiso products but contain no halogenated flame retardants. VersiCore MP-H NH and SecurShield NH are Living Building Challenge “Red List Free” with Declare label and product database listing. They are also California Department of Public Health (CDPH) VOC emissions compliant and can contribute toward LEED v4 credit requirements, according to the company.

“VersiCore MP-H NH and SecurShield NH meet all the same performance characteristics of our standard polyiso products, including stringent UL and FM fire testing requirements, without the use of halogenated flame retardants,” said Chad Buhrman, Versico’s Insulation Product Manager. “These new products are Living Building Challenge ‘Red List Free’ and now provide a choice for building owners and specifiers seeking insulation products with no added halogenated flame retardants.”

VersiCore MP-H NH and SecurShield NH are manufactured in Montgomery, N.Y., on a made-to-order basis. As demand requires, additional manufacturing locations will be brought online and more products will be made available.

For more information, www.versico.com.