Commercial Roofing Contractor Flexes Its Muscles on 1.3 Million-Square-Foot Project

The new Under Armour distribution warehouse roof encompasses 1,286,000 square feet. It was topped with a TPO roof system manufactured by Johns Manville. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

Industrial projects exceeding one million square feet of roofing might give some contractors pause, but at Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc., it’s just another day at the office.

The third-generation family run roofing contractor has been in business since 1953. Orndorff & Spaid services the Baltimore-Washington metro area, as well as parts of Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. It focuses primarily on large-scale commercial projects, including warehouses, distribution centers, retail businesses, schools and data centers.

Orndorff & Spaid routinely tackles roofing projects up to 1.5 million square feet. The company strives to keep as much work as possible under its own control, and the necessary supplies and equipment are always on hand at its 13-acre headquarters in Beltsville, Maryland.

“We’re a little bit unique as a roofing company in that we self-perform almost everything,” says Richard Harville, vice president of estimating. “We have our own cranes, all our own lifts. We do our own trucking. We have an in-house mechanic’s shop that repairs all of the equipment. All fuel servicing is done from our yard here. We also warehouse a fair share of material here because the logistics of running a job.”

Photo: Johns Manville

A recent new construction project at the former location of a Bethlehem Steel factory in Tradepoint St. John’s was right up their alley. “This was a new construction project, fairly conventional in most regards except for one, and that had to do with the site,” notes Harville. “Most of the site had been infilled over the years, and there was a lot of slag and other materials on this site, so it is not bedrock, for sure.” Due to the potential for movement, seismic expansion joints were specified. The gaps in the deck were as wide as 9 inches.

The owner of the complex was kept under wraps during construction phase, but the completed Under Armour distribution warehouse is now an area landmark. The roof encompasses 1,286,000 square feet, and the project had to be completed under a very tight schedule.

The general contractor on the project, FCL, reached out to Orndorff & Spaid during the design phase, and they recommended a TPO roof system manufactured by Johns Manville.

Harville shared his insights on the project with Roofing, along with members of the project team including Dane Grudzien, estimator; Carl Spraker, project manager, single ply; and Mike McKinney, project manager, sheet metal.

The Clock Is Ticking

Work began in April 2017 with a deadline to finish by the end of July. “The schedule was what made this project difficult,” notes Harville. “They had an end user set to come in and they were in an extreme hurry to get this thing done.”

Workers outside the safety perimeter were tied off 100 percent of the time using AES Raptor TriRex Safety Carts. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

Harville and Spraker were confident the experienced team would be up to the task. “Once we got our bearings, we rock and rolled this job,” Spraker says. “We had up to 40 employees on the site and worked six days a week.”

The roof system installed over the structure’s metal deck included two layers of 2.5-inch polyiso and a 60-mil TPO membrane. “This job was mechanically attached at 6 inches on center, with perimeter and corner enhancements as required by FM,” notes Grudzien.

The roof installation began with a 10-man crew, and crews were added as the work ramped up. “We ended up with four 10-man crews, with the foreman on the first crew in charge the team,” Spraker recalls. “We just did as much as we could every day and kept track of everything. We averaged 700 squares a day. One day we did 1,000 squares.”

Crews worked on half of the building at a time, with falling back as needed to install flashings or strip in the gravel stop. “We started on one side of the building and went from end to end, following the steel contractor,” says Spraker. “When we finished one side, we came all the way back to the end where they started and followed them down the opposite side.”

The roof system incorporates 276 VELUX skylights that provide daylighting in key areas of the facility. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

The roof also incorporated 276 VELUX skylights to illuminate key areas of the facility. Logistics Lighting delivered them all in one shipment, as Orndorff & Spaid requested. The 4-foot-by-8-foot skylights were stored on site and loaded to the roof with a crane for installation after a plasma cutter was used to cut holes in the deck. Prefabricated curbs were installed and flashed. “I had a separate crew designated just to install skylights,” Spraker notes

Safety precautions included perimeter warning lines, and workers outside that area were tied off 100 percent of the time, as they were when the skylights were installed. AES Raptor TriRex Safety Carts were used as anchor points.

Safety is always crucial, notes Harville, and the company makes it a priority on every project. “Our safety parameters go above and beyond standard state or federal mandating,” he notes.

Metal Work

The scope of work included large external gutters, downspouts and edge metal. According to McKinney, the sheet metal application was pretty straightforward. “There was just a lot of it — long, straight runs down two sides,” he says. “The coping was installed on the parapets on the shorter ends.”

Gutters were installed after the roof system was in place. “The roof wasn’t 100 percent complete, but once areas of the roof were installed and the walls were painted white, we could begin to install the gutters,” says McKinney. “After work was completed on one side, crews moved to the other side.”

The large gutter featured internal and external hangers, alternating 36 inches on center. All the metal was fabricated in house, and the exterior hangers were powder coated to match the steel.

Once the external hangers were installed, the gutter sections were lowered into place and secured by crew members in a man lift. “Once you had your hangers up, you could just lower the gutter over the side and into the external hangers,” McKinney explains. “We put the internal hangers into place after that. After the drip edge is installed, the single-ply crews come back and flash the drip edge into the roof system.”

Downspouts were custom-designed to match the building’s paint scheme. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

Installation of the downspouts had to wait until the walls were painted. One wrinkle was the change in color of the downspouts. About two-thirds of the way up the wall, the paint scheme went from black to white, and the building owner wanted the downspouts to change colors to match. “We reverse-engineered it,” notes McKinney. “We measured from the paint line up and put in a 30-foot section of downspouts there, because we put our bands at the joints and we didn’t want to have the bands too close together in the middle of the wall.”

Talented Team

The project was completed on budget — and a month early. FCL hosted a barbecue to celebrate. “FCL had a big cookout for the contractors with a steak dinner for everyone,” notes Harville. “They really went over and above on that.”

The Orndorff & Spaid team credits the effort of all companies involved for the success of the project. “The steel contractor was phenomenal, and FCL did an excellent job of coordinating everything,” Spraker says.

The large gutter featured internal and external hangers. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

The manufacturer also did an excellent job, notes Harville, who commended the work of Melissa Duvall, the JM sales rep on the project, and Barney Conway, the field rep, who visited the site at least once a week. “JM did a good job keeping us well stocked with material and getting us deliveries when we needed them,” Harville notes.

The team members at Orndorff & Spaid believe their confidence comes from experience and knowing that most of the variables are under control. “A lot of that has to do with the equipment we can bring to bear when we need to,” Harville states. “We control the logistics all the way through. Most companies are going to rent a crane or hire trucking — we do all of that. We have our own lifts, we have our own cranes, we do all of our flatbed trucking. We bring a unique process to the table. Beyond that, and our project managers are well versed at doing this. It’s not our first rodeo.”

TEAM

Architect: MacGregor Associates Architects, Atlanta, www.macgregorassoc.com
General Contractor: FCL Builders, Chicago, www.fclbuilders.com
Roofing Contractor: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc., Beltsville, Maryland, www.osroofing.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 60-mil TPO, Johns Manville, www.jm.com
Insulation: Two layers of 2.5-inch ENRGY 3 Polyisocyanurate, Johns Manville
Skylights: Dynamic Dome Skylights Model 4896, VELUX, www.veluxusa.com

Johns Manville Partners With Logistics Lighting

Johns Manville announced the company has formed a partnership with Logistics Lighting to create the Johns Manville skylight program. The skylight program was established to allow JM to integrate skylights into clients’ projects and incorporate a seamless process for including a complete system with the roofing package. This program includes various skylight products with different brands in order to provide the most cost-effective option, with up to a 20-year warranty. The products offered through the program include skylights, smoke vents, tubular skylights, safety screens, burglar bars and roof curbs. There are also several services offered through the JM skylight program, including design and layout of skylights, energy savings calculations, specification review, submittal packages, and project specific meetings with designers and contractors.

This program has allowed JM to broaden the company’s offering and create more opportunities for customers to diversify based on their needs. The goal of the partnership was to combine Logistics Lighting’s extensive knowledge of skylights with the expertise that JM brings to roofing, creating real value for the consumers. According to JM, this partnership provides consumers with quality products, a competitive price, and a guarantee that is backed by a trusted company.

The JM skylight program includes a skylight warranty, issued by JM, as an addendum to the 20-year roof guarantee. The 20-year guarantee is only available on Velux and Kingspan products. The other two brands that are offered are Sunoptics and Wasco, and those have up to five and 10-year warranties, depending on the product.

President of Logistics Lighting Eric Huffman stated, “We are proud to be a part of the Johns Manville skylight program. We are honored to serve Johns Manville clients and sales team, and to provide the finest skylight and smoke vent options for their projects, combined with the best warranty available. The skylight program allows JM to help their clients to cost-effectively meet their daylighting and sustainability goals, and serve as a single source for the entire roof guarantee.”

For more information about the skylight program, contact Huffman at EHuffman@LogisticsLighting.com or call (307) 633-9696.

Dome Commercial Skylights Boast Balanced Light, Structural Performance

Dynamic Dome commercial skylights feature a proprietary wicking system, which evacuates condensation to the skylight exterior.

Dynamic Dome commercial skylights feature a proprietary wicking system, which evacuates condensation to the skylight exterior.

VELUX Dynamic Dome commercial skylights are engineered to reflect less light and harvest more light, especially in the early morning and late afternoon. The focus of the design is on maximizing low-sun-angle performance. This can result in reduced energy costs; electric lights can be turned off earlier in the day and will not have to be turned back on until later in the day. Other features include a proprietary wicking system, which evacuates condensation to the skylight exterior, and an encapsulating design that provides a water barrier with a 100 percent thermally broken skylight frame.

Exterior Shades Are Designed for Skylights

VELUX and RENSON have introduced Topfix VMS, a motor-operated sunscreen with special mounting feet engineered for fixed and movable VELUX Modular Skylights.

VELUX and RENSON have introduced Topfix VMS, a motor-operated sunscreen with special mounting feet engineered for fixed and movable VELUX Modular Skylights.

VELUX and RENSON have introduced Topfix VMS, a motor-operated sunscreen with special mounting feet engineered for fixed and movable VELUX Modular Skylights. It employs ZipShade technology, providing fabric tension and wind resistance up to 75 mph. The proprietary design integrates screen fabrics to which zippers are affixed and move within a side channel and guide system for smooth extension/retraction, consistent fabric tension and resistance to the elements. Topfix VMS is available in a variety of colors and blackout-shade options. It can be integrated into a building-management system.

Clean, Quiet and Safe Glass

VELUX America has introduced “Clean, Quiet & Safe Glass” for its skylights.

VELUX America has introduced “Clean, Quiet & Safe Glass” for its skylights.

VELUX America has introduced “Clean, Quiet & Safe Glass” to the roofing industry. This laminated glass will keep ENERGY STAR-certified VELUX Solar Powered Fresh Air skylights cleaner, reduce outside noise, and take the guesswork out of interpreting local building codes for the type of glass required for out-of-reach applications.

Clean: A thin coating of titanium dioxide and silicone dioxide on the exterior surface of the laminated glass will smooth the glass and, with the help of the sun, destroy organic matter deposited on skylights over time. Then, the next time it rains, this organic matter is washed away keeping the skylight glass cleaner longer.

Quiet: Laminated glass reduces outside noise by up to 25 percent when compared to a standard double pane glass and up to 50 percent more when compared to a plastic skylight.

Safe: U.S. building codes require laminated glass be used in out-of-reach applications where any point of the glass is 12 feet above the floor of the room. VELUX Clean, Quiet & Safe glass meets or exceeds this important building code requirement nationwide and also carries a 10-year warranty against hail damage on the glass itself.

In addition to its water-shedding properties, the new glass option carries a 10-year hail warranty and is superior to regular tempered glass in U-Value, UV protection and fade protection. Beginning in 2014, it will be available on most VELUX skylights and will be the standard glass option for the VELUX Solar Powered Fresh Air skylights. The new glass option is also available in Impact, Miami-Dade, White laminated and Snowload models.

The Solar Powered Fresh Air Skylight, now standard with Clean, Quiet & Safe glass, is also a No Leak Skylight and carries the VELUX 10-year installation warranty plus 20-years on glass, 10-years on product, and 5-years on blinds and controls. The units use standard VELUX engineered flashing and energy efficient LoE3 glass. VELUX solar powered skylights, along with solar powered blinds, as well as the installation costs, are eligible for a 30 percent federal tax credit.

Roof Windows Are Operated By Hand

VELUX's GDL CABRIO roof window

VELUX’s GDL CABRIO roof window

Roof windows and skylights share common elements, including glass, wood frames, sashes and aluminum. But skylights are designed for out-of-reach applications and can be automated while roof windows are within reach and are operated by hand.

Roof windows utilize a ventilation flap that allows fresh air circulation even while the unit is closed. Roof window sashes also rotate inward for easy cleaning from the inside.

VELUX produces two types of roof windows: the deck mount GPL Top hinged model which opens to a 45-degree angle to satisfy current requirements for emergency escape and rescue, while admitting natural light and passive ventilation, and the deck mount GDL CABRIO roof window which utilizes a dual-sash operation that allows the top to open upward to 45 degrees for ventilation and the bottom to open outward to create a roof balcony. The design makes the CABRIO a “fresh air” alternative to a dormer and it can also provide emergency escape and rescue capabilities.

Both models can be fitted with blinds and screens and provide decorative flair in addition to their functional features.