Reflective Granulated Cap Sheet Is for BUR Systems

The reflective granulated cap sheet may be used as a cap or flashing sheet in built-up roof systems.

The reflective granulated cap sheet may be used as a cap or flashing sheet in built-up roof systems.

Johns Manville has introduced a highly reflective granulated cap sheet called GlasKap CR G, which may be used as a cap or flashing sheet in built-up roof systems. The CR G membranes are surfaced with white reflective minerals and can be installed using standard granulated cap sheet installation methods. GlasKap CR G joins the larger offering of JM cool roof membrane solutions. These products are approved by FM Global and UL. They are also listed with CRRC and meet current Title 24 requirements. GlasKap CR G provides an additional option for customers who want a reflective cap sheet as part of a reliable BUR system.

Duro-Last Single-Ply Roofing Membranes Earn Platinum Certification

Duro-Last announces that it has achieved platinum certification under the NSF American National Standard for Sustainable Roofing Membranes, NSF/ANSI 347. Certified by UL, this standard represents that Duro-Last manufactures a product that is third-party verified as sustainable, durable, and high performing. The certification applies to 40, 50 and 60 mil, white, tan, gray and dark gray as well as 50 mil terra cotta Duro-Last membranes.
 
“Duro-Last was excited to have most of our membrane product lines certified by this third-party standard,” says Jason Tunney, executive vice president and general counsel of Duro-Last. “But we wanted to take it to the next level and achieve the highest rating possible.”
 
NSF/ANSI 347 was written by NSF International and, according to their website, is based on life-cycle assessment principles. NSF/ANSI 347 employs a point system to evaluate roofing membranes against established prerequisite requirements, performance criteria and quantifiable metrics in five key areas:

  • Product design
  • Product manufacturing
  • Membrane durability
  • Corporate governance
  • Innovation

 
Obtaining this certification will help the Duro-Last membrane meet the market demand for products that comply with green building standards like the Green Building Initiative’s Green Globes. Product specifiers and purchasers are under pressure to find products that meet their sustainability criteria, and having the NSF 347 certification can give them the peace of mind of specifying a third-party verified product.
 
This certification is one more step in Duro-Last’s commitment to sustainability and transparency, coming after the announcement of the publication of Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for Duro-Tuff, Duro-Fleece and Duro-Last EV membranes. To read more about Duro-Last’s sustainability efforts, visit here.
 
“There’s talk in the roofing industry about being ‘green’ and sustainable,” says Katie Chapman, Duro-Last corporate sustainability specialist. “At Duro-Last we want to help people make informed decisions when purchasing roofing products.”
 
For more information regarding Duro-Last’s sustainability initiatives contact Katie Chapman at (800)248-0280 or kchapman@duro-last.com.

UL-listed Smoke Vent Skylights Minimize Warehouse’s Power Consumption

Trojan Battery, a manufacturer of deep-cycle batteries, occupies a 160,000-square-foot industrial facility in Santa Fe Springs, Calif., along with several other large industrial buildings in California. Each facility consumes a significant amount of electrical power each month. By adding 100 polycarbonate dome UL-listed smoke vent skylights, Trojan Battery will be able to save upwards of 40 percent on its power consumption for its warehouse in Santa Fe Springs.

By adding 100 polycarbonate dome UL-listed smoke vent skylights, Trojan Battery will be able to save upwards of 40 percent on its power consumption for its warehouse in Santa Fe Springs, Calif.

By adding 100 polycarbonate dome UL-listed smoke vent skylights, Trojan Battery will be able to save upwards of 40 percent on its power consumption for its warehouse in Santa Fe Springs, Calif.

According to a representative of Santa Ana, Calif.-based IRC (Independent Roofing Consultants), a roofing consulting firm: “Typically, a 2 percent density of skylight units are utilized for effective energy reduction. Densities of 2.5 to 3 percent are being provided for newer buildings and being installed in conjunction with roof replacements to reduce energy costs associated with building lighting.”

The roof originally consisted of outdated skylights significantly reducing the benefits of natural lighting. New polycarbonate dome skylights and smoke vents from SKYCO Skylights allow owners to maximize the use of free daylighting. Additional benefits include 10 years against yellowing and breakage.

Aside from the energy benefits, Trojan Battery was able to reduce its safety liability. UL-listed smoke vents with polycarbonate domes not only provide ample daylighting, but they are life-saving devices. The smoke vent is designed with two thermal triggered hatches that automatically open up in the event of a fire.

Fire marshals and insurance companies recognize the benefits of a UL-listed smoke vent skylight because they allow the smoke, heat and hot gasses inside a burning warehouse to escape providing trapped workers a visible route for safe exit. They also reduce smoke damage to warehouse inventories. In many cases, insurance companies will provide a much needed break on rates when UL-listed smoke vents are added to the rooftop.

The smoke vent is designed with two thermal triggered hatches that automatically open up in the event of a fire.

The smoke vent is designed with two thermal triggered hatches that automatically open up in the event of a fire.

The reroof was performed by Highland Commercial Roofing, Baldwin Park, Calif. The commercial roofer specializes in and provided Trojan Battery headquarters with a RainShield seamless single-ply roofing system. The RainShield system, reinforced with a tough polyester mat, uses waterproofing-grade asphalts and highly reflective elastomeric acrylic surfacing to create a seamless, waterproof, highly reflective membrane providing a permanent, high-performance roofing system guaranteed not to leak for at least 20 years. The cool roof system chosen reflects more than 80 percent of the sun’s radiant heat, which can reduce a building’s cooling cost by as much as 50 percent.

With average temperatures and power costs rising, building owners and occupant are looking for new innovative ways to save money. Highland Commercial Roofing recommends a complete analysis of the skylights when owners consider reroofing their building. Replacing old, ineffective skylights at the time of reroof is the most cost effective method for the investment.

A Roofer’s Guide to Lightning Protection

Your roof is not only a weather barrier, it is a work platform for other trades, including lightning-protection installers. Understanding a few basics about lightning protection will simplify job-site coordination and lead to more successful projects.

Lightning protection installers are highly trained craftsmen. Like roofers, they work exposed to the weather and often at dangerous heights.

Lightning protection installers are highly trained craftsmen. Like roofers, they work exposed to the weather and often at dangerous heights.

Lightning protection systems (LPS) are increasingly being used to enhance building resilience to natural disasters. More architects are specifying them because climate change is increasing the frequency of lightning strikes, and the growing use of electronic devices in buildings make them vulnerable to lightning surges.

Lightning protection installers are among the first trades on a job site and one of the last to leave; grounding may have to be installed simultaneously with foundations and final connections cannot be made until all building systems are in place.

The Maryville, Mo.-based Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) has certification programs for journeymen and master installers. An advanced Master Installer/Designer certificate is also available; it is crucial because project architects typically delegate design authority to the lightning protection contractor. The installer/designer must then meet stringent standards issued by the Quincy, Mass.-based National Fire Protection Association; Northbrook, Ill.-based UL LLC; and LPI.

COMPONENTS

Most of an LPS is below roof level. The most obvious above-roof components are air terminals, formerly called lightning rods. They must be located at the highest points on a roof. Depending on the building’s size and configuration, additional air terminals are required around the roof perimeter at intervals not exceeding 20 feet, within the field of the roof, on rooftop equipment and as dictated by the standards. Air terminals can be as slender as 3/8-inch diameter and as short as 10-inches tall; larger ones can be used for decorative purposes or to meet special requirements. While most air terminals now have blunt tips, pointed ones are still encountered and can be a hazard to the unwary.

Air terminals are interconnected by conductors—typically multi-strand cables that can safely carry up to 3 million volts of lightning to ground. Conductors must also be used to bond rooftop equipment and metal components to ground. In most buildings, through-roof penetrations are required so the down conductors can be run inside the structure; the penetrations can be sealed with typical flashing details. If conductors are exposed to view, they should be located in the least conspicuous locations and follow the building’s architectural lines.

Every wire entering the building must have a surge-protective device on it, and these are sometimes mounted above the roof. A variety of mounting devices, connectors, fasten- ers and adhesives are also required. All LPS components should be listed by UL specifically for lightning protection.

LPS components are typically cop- per or aluminum. To prevent galvanic action with roofing and flashings, copper components should be used with copper roofing and aluminum components with steel or aluminum roofing.

Cables interconnect the air terminals (on top of the parapet) to roof penetration (foreground) and other metal items, such as the rooftop exhaust fans and their anchorage points. Interconnections are vital to the function of the lightning protection system.

Cables interconnect the air terminals (on top of the parapet) to roof penetration (foreground) and other metal items, such as the rooftop exhaust fans and their anchorage points. Interconnections are vital to the function of the lightning protection system.

CONSTRUCTION

Before getting on the job, the roofer, LPS installer, and general contractor should agree on project schedule and roof access, as well as review proposed locations of lightning protection components. Penetrations, especially, should be located and marked prior to roofing so they can be found afterward.

The roofing manufacturer should be consulted for its recommendations. Adhesives, for example, must be compatible with the roofing, and some manufacturers require an extra layer of membrane under attachment points.

For added assurance, the building owner should have UL or LPI Inspection Service inspect the job and certify the LPS was properly installed.

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CertainTeed Metal Roofing Exceeds Industry Standards

Roof specifiers and installers can now achieve project goals in fire resistance and solar reflectance more easily with CertainTeed Presidio Metal Roofing as a result of testing to the latest editions of industry performance test standards. Introduced last year, the line of steel roofing products blends the look of classic roofing materials with the exceptional wind/hail resistance and solar reflectance of metal roofing.

Specifiers now can achieve Class A fire rating with Presidio applied over a layer of a specific fire-resistant roofing membrane product paired with a single layer of select CertainTeed underlayments – a barrier board is no longer needed. Further, the Presidio metal roofing products now earn a Class B fire rating when applied over a single layer of a variety of CertainTeed roofing underlayments.

In regards to solar reflectance, seven colors from the Presidio roofing product line have recently been listed for solar reflectance and thermal emittance by the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC). Presidio Tile colors English Toffee, Nutmeg, Speckled Bronze and Terra Cotta, and Presidio Shake colors Ash, Sand Dune and Weathered Wood are listed by CRRC with initial solar reflectance values ranging from 0.26 to 0.34.

“Sustainability and providing customers with products that help ensure the safety of homeowners have long been top priorities at CertainTeed,” says Dale Walton, residential products manager for CertainTeed Roofing. “And, the recent ratings from Intertek and the CRRC serve as proof of this commitment. With Presidio, specifiers and contractors will have the peace of mind to install the highest quality energy-efficient, fire- and weather-resistant roof, all while more easily meeting project certification goals.”

Each easy to install Presidio panel has overlaps that conceal the joints and create a seamless appearance. Presidio Tile embodies the same Mediterranean magnetism of traditional clay, but weighs hundreds of pounds less, and at a fraction of the cost. Presidio Shake is pre-weathered, aged and distressed to recreate the look of wood. Lastly, Presidio Slate showcases the natural beauty of stone in a lightweight, fully recyclable, energy-efficient material.

Duro-Last Achieves Gold Certification for All Membrane Product Lines

Duro-Last has achieved gold certification for all membrane product lines under the NSF American National Standard for Sustainable Roofing Membranes – NSF/ANSI 347. Certified by UL, this standard represents that Duro-Last manufactures a product that is third-party verified as sustainable, durable and high performing. The certification applies to Duro-Tuff, Duro-Fleece and Duro-Last EV membranes, in addition to Duro-Last membrane, which was certified in 2015.

With the certification of these four product lines, Duro-Last has the most roofing membrane product lines certified in the industry—furthering the company’s commitment to sustainability and transparency.

“Duro-Last believes in the importance of sustainability,” says Jason Tunney, Duro-Last’s executive vice president and general counsel. “These third-party certifications confirm what we already know about our products.”

Duro-Last has worked with UL for many years on product testing, including the UL 790 Spread of Flame Test, UL 1256 Direct to Deck (insulation) and the UL 2218 Hail Impact Test. As the sustainability business division of UL, a premier global independent safety science company that has championed progress for 120 years, UL Environment works to advance global sustainability, environmental health, and safety by supporting the growth and development of environmentally preferable products, services, and organizations.

NSF/ANSI 347 was developed by the NSF National Center for Sustainability Standards (NCSS) through a consensus-based public process with a multi-stakeholder group of participants and, according to their website, is based on life-cycle assessment principles. NSF/ANSI 347 employs an easy-to-use point system to evaluate roofing membrane products against established prerequisite requirements, performance criteria and quantifiable metrics in five key areas:

  • Product design
  • Product manufacturing
  • Membrane durability
  • Corporate governance
  • Innovation

Obtaining this certification will help Duro-Last’s membranes meet the market demand for products that comply with green building standards and codes like the Green Building Initiative’s Green Globes and the International Green Construction Code (IgCC). Product specifiers and purchasers are under pressure to find products that meet their sustainability criteria, and having the NSF/ANSI 347 certification can give them the peace of mind of specifying a third-party verified product.

Duro-Last has also published environmental product declarations (EPDs) for Duro-Tuff, Duro-Fleece and Duro-Last EV membranes. This is in addition to the previously published EPD for Duro-Last membrane—the first product-specific PVC EPD in the North American roofing industry.

Certified by NSF International, the Duro-Last EPD reports environmental impact data, which assists building contractors, architects and designers in making more informed purchasing decisions. EPDs are increasingly used across many industries to enable product manufacturers to bring transparent environmental data to customers.

“Duro-Last is proud to publish product-specific EPDs for PVC roofing,” Tunney says. “We have always known that the Duro-Last Roofing System is a durable, flexible, serviceable and recyclable product, and now these EPDs can give building owners and specifiers peace of mind.”

How to Choose a Roofing Contractor

The greatest challenge for anyone responsible for any physical asset is how to keep it operating properly. The key is finding qualified maintenance providers to solve problems that are beyond our own abilities. With the advent of the Internet, our options are limitless. If we need a doctor, we Google the type of doctor we need and get a list of options. The same can be said for all other types of goods and services. But with more options, are we really getting more quality from these numerous choices?

Unfortunately, people and companies can make any claim on the Internet and, as long as they don’t slander anybody else, it’s perfectly legal. I get emails every day claiming to have a cure for cancer, obesity, hemorrhoids, etc., and all I have to do is log on to the website, enter my credit card number and the “cure” will be sent to my house within 72 hours.

Everyone knows this is a hoax, right? Yet more and more of these websites keep popping up every day. Clearly someone is falling for these frauds or there wouldn’t be any! But I digress. The topic of this article is “how to choose a roofing contractor”, not “how not to get ripped off using the Internet.”

Preliminary Questions

Consequently, if I have a roof leak, the first thing I will do is conduct a web search for roofing contractors in my area. I will probably look for ones located closest to my facility. I will call the company and say something like: “I have a roof leak. Do you fix those?” The contractor will probably say, “Yes, I can fix leaks.” I will then say: “Great! When can you be here?” And the rest is, as they say, history. Hopefully, the contractor I selected is licensed, bonded, insured and competent. As you can see, I didn’t ask any of those questions, so I really don’t know. But he must be good; he was listed on the Internet!

If he’s not licensed, there is probably a pretty good reason why he isn’t—he’s not a real contractor, just kind of a handyman. If he’s not bonded and there is a problem with the work he performs and he refuses to fix his mistakes, I will have no recourse to take legal action because he doesn’t have a bonding company backing his work. If he isn’t insured and he falls off my roof, he can sue me personally for causing him bodily injury.

Before any contractor comes out to your facility, make sure the company is licensed, bonded and insured. Always ask for the license number, bonding company name and number, and personal liability insurance policy number. Once you get this information, verify these numbers and providers. I once had a contractor give me his license number only to find out the number was made up! If the information checks out, set up an appointment for the contractor to evaluate your problem. Don’t set the appointment and then check out the company’s qualifications. If a roofer comes out, climbs on your roof and falls off without liability insurance, you are on the hook paying for “Mr. FastRoofs Inc.’s” medical bills or worse: he sues you for not having fall protection on your roof—not that you should know what that is—and rest assured you will pay his medical and legal bills!

Once you have determined a certain level of legitimacy, you should also check what other types of certifications the contractor has attained. I would determine whether he or she belongs to the Better Business Bureau. This is no guarantee that these companies won’t have problems, but it does show a willingness to be responsible once the work has been completed. Also, determine whether the company belongs to trade associations. A roofing contractor should be “a member in good standing” and belong to the Rosemont, Ill.-based National Roofing Contractors Association or one of its affiliates.

Don’t assume just because a company says it belongs to a trade association it does. I once dealt with a painting contractor that listed on its website belonging to the Painting and Decorating Contractors of America, Maryland Heights, Mo. I called the trade association and learned the contractor did not belong at all! In other words, if a contractor makes a claim, make a call and check it out—no matter what!

The Proposal

Once you have properly vetted your prospective contractor, call him and describe your problem in the most basic terms. Most people want to solve the problem themselves and then just have the contractor effect the change.

Customers often will call and say: “I have a lot of problems on my roof. Can you come out and give me a quote for a new roof?” I am sure many of you are reading this and are completely incredulous this happens but, be honest, it’s human nature to not want to seem ignorant. As a matter of fact, I find those with the most experience are quickest to opine on their problems when they really don’t have a clue as to what’s wrong with their roof.

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Roof Deck Is Noncombustible

USG Corp. has launched USG Structural Solutions; the USG Structural Panel Concrete Roof Deck is among the first products in the portfolio.

USG Corp. has launched USG Structural Solutions; the USG Structural Panel Concrete Roof Deck is among the first products in the portfolio.

USG Corp. has launched USG Structural Solutions; the USG Structural Panel Concrete Roof Deck is among the first products in the portfolio. USG Structural Solutions was designed with the structural engineer and contractor in mind. The products in the portfolio feature a noncombustible formulation (certified by Underwriters Laboratories Inc.), dry application process and ease of handling on the job site. The roof deck creates one- and two-hour fire-rated assemblies. It is strong, durable and dimensionally stable and fits in a standard elevator.

Shingles Resemble Wood Shakes

GAF has introduced its Glenwood Shingles, which offer thickness, staggered exposure and triple-layer construction, resulting in an authentic wood-shake look.

GAF has introduced its Glenwood Shingles, which offer thickness, staggered exposure and triple-layer construction, resulting in an authentic wood-shake look.

GAF has introduced its Glenwood Shingles, which offer thickness, staggered exposure and triple-layer construction, resulting in an authentic wood-shake look. Glenwood Shingles carry the highest fire rating—Class A from Underwriters Laboratories Inc. They also offer Stain Guard protection to help ensure the beauty of customers’ roofs against blue-green algae, as well as Dura Grip Adhesive to seal each shingle tightly and reduce the risk of shingle blow-off. The shingles feature a lifetime limited transferable warranty with Smart Choice Protection (non-prorated material and installation labor coverage) for the first 10 years.

Englert Holds Customer Appreciation Days and Offers Special Promotions and Pricing

Field Service Centers at four Englert Inc. locations will be holding Customer Appreciation Days during April, offering special promotions and pricing on metal roofing accessories, gutter products, trim coil and the Englert brand gutter screens, MicroGuard and SureGuard.

The annual open houses kick off Tuesday, April 7, at the Englert Field Service Center in Manassas, Va. from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Englert’s Pittsburgh Field Service Center in Coraopolis, Pa. will hold its Customer Appreciation Day on Thursday, April 9 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Englert’s Field Service Center in Long Island, N.Y. will hold its day on Tuesday, April 14 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the New Jersey center in Perth Amboy, N.J. will stage its annual open house on Thursday, April 16 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Along with free refreshment and giveaways, each location will also have special pricing on sealant, 5- and 6-inch gutter hangers, and Series 1300 stainless steel floating clips, and Series 2000 UL rated clips along with complimentary roofing and gutter machine tuneups for customers by appointment only. Customers must call (800) 364-5378 to reserve time for a tuneup.

  • Virginia — Tuesday, April 7
  • Pittsburgh — Thursday, April 9
  • Long Island — Tuesday, April 14
  • New Jersey — Thursday, April 16
  • Florida — Wednesday, May 6
  • Massachusetts — Tuesday, May 12
  • Connecticut — Thursday, May 14
  • Knoxville, Tenn. — Wednesday, May 20