New Roof Systems Make Shopping Center a Showplace Once Again

Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

LK Construction tackles many composite shingle roofing projects each year. On an average, they’ve been known to knock out 20 or more commercial and residential composite roofs annually. And, while each project is special, nothing compares to their 2018 mega-project: the re-roofing of South Lake Village Shopping Center in Reston, Virginia.

With almost two dozen retailers and businesses, the shopping center has 109,527 square feet of space. And every building in the connected community center had a failing cedar roof.

Built in 1984, South Lake Village had a natural cedar roof complementing a low-slope membrane roof system. Fast forward to 2018. Functionally, the roof was failing badly. Stores complained of water leaks. Shingles were cracked and had moss growth, degrading the look of the entire shopping center. That’s when the management company decided to invest in a new roof system featuring Bellaforté Shake from DaVinci Roofscapes.

“We knew this project was a winner the moment we started the installation,” says Scott Kim, vice president at LK Construction in Annandale, Virginia. “Both store residents and shoppers were astonished by the transformation. Everyone expressed their excitement at the look of the new synthetic shakes. We immediately got calls from people wanting the Bellaforté Shake on their homes. Within several months, 10 houses in the area had composite shake roofing. And now there are many other homeowners inquiring about the DaVinci product on a regular basis.”

Safety First

The process of re-roofing South Lake Village came with a unique set of challenges for the team at LK Construction. While shoppers were going in and out of Safeway, Starbucks, CVS Pharmacy and other stores, the team had to take great care.

The roof replacement project at South Lake Village Shopping included a new TPO roof system on the low-slope section and synthetic shake on the steep-slope sections.

“This is the largest DaVinci project we’ve ever done,” says Kim. “There were a lot of moving pieces. From ordering, receiving and storing the composite shakes to staging onsite. In addition, when it came to assuring pedestrian safety during the roofing process, the challenges were enormous. We focused a great deal on safety measures throughout the entire two-week project.”

LK Construction brought in traffic controllers and road guards to help control the active environment. “Our goal was to safely install the composite roofing without disturbing the businesses,” says Kim. “Safety was our top priority. And, we were able to achieve that goal.”

The shops at South Lake Village now feature Bellaforté Shake composite shingles from DaVinci Roofscapes.

As shoppers moved smoothly in and out of stores, the LK Construction team replaced the flat roofing with a new thermoplastic membrane. Approximately 52,000 square feet of Sure-Weld TPO from Carlisle SynTec was installed on this project.

Crews then installed the Bellaforté Shake tiles. Made to withstand fire, impact and severe weather, the synthetic shakes are ideal for the shopping center location.

“There’s no other synthetic product in the market that can mimic natural hand-split cedar as perfectly as Bellaforté Shake,” says Kim. “These tiles are designed to simulate a multi-width look. They’re extremely realistic and cost-effective.”

Mission Accomplished

With their beautiful new roofs overhead, the shops at South Lake Village now stand out again as a showplace in the Reston community. From banks to restaurants to retailers, each structure can count on their DaVinci roofs to provide long-term beauty and durability.

“The high visibility of this project opened the door for us even more in this marketplace,” says Kim. “We’re now busy replacing old cedar roofs throughout the area with synthetic shake.”

“People are embracing the look of Bellaforté,” he continues. “They love the many advantages of the product. At this point, we’re forecasting a great number of homeowners throughout Reston will switch to DaVinci products in the near future.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: LK Construction, Annandale, Virginia, www.lkconstructionusa.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Bellaforté Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Low-Slope Roof: Sure-Weld TPO, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

Planning Ahead Sets Up Warehouse Re-Roofing Project for Success

Citizens Service Center is the primary document storage facility for El Paso County, Colorado. When the roof had to be replaced, protecting the interior of the facility was critical. Photos: Exterior Solutions Group

The most crucial decisions on a project are often made before work even begins. According to Ken Flickinger Jr., president of Exterior Solutions Group, that was the case with the recent Citizens Service Center re-roofing project in Colorado Springs. Owned and managed by El Paso County, the building is the primary document storage facility for the county. The building’s historic documents — some dating back to the 1800s — were under threat of damage due to an active roof leak. The existing roof also had extensive hail damage, so the roof replacement project was put out for bid.

With offices in Colorado, Iowa and Oklahoma, Exterior Solutions Group does all types of roofing work, but its focus is primarily on commercial roofing, both re-roofing and new construction. Flickinger, who heads up the location in Parker, Colorado, was definitely intrigued by the project.

The scope of work involved removing old HVAC equipment on the roof, which would be done by a separate party in coordination with the roofing contractor. The HVAC equipment was obsolete; it had been replaced and relocated a few years earlier. “It was an interesting project because there was equipment everywhere on this roof,” he says. “It looked like an automotive manufacturing plant. For us, we like those types of projects. We like ones that are a bit out of the ordinary and require a little bit higher level of project management. So, that’s what drew us to bidding the job.”

Tim Hicks, the salesperson at Exterior Solutions who sold the job, explains that the original spec called for white EPDM, with TPO as an accepted alternate. “Oddly enough, they didn’t require you to do the base bid to bid the alternate,” he notes. “We chose to just bid the TPO. We ended up being the low bidder on that, and that’s how we got the project.”

After obsolete HVAC equipment was removed, crews from Exterior Solutions Group installed a TPO system from Johns Manville.

The logistics of the removal and roof replacement would be complicated, and it became obvious that access to the roof would also be an issue, as it was a high-security building. “This is a multi-story building, and the amount of security we would have to go through to enter the building and get up to the roof hatch would’ve created all kinds of problems,” Hicks explains. “So, we suggested putting a stair tower up and giving us complete access from the outside. We’d never have to enter the building. They had never even considered that option, but as we walked them through it and said, ‘This is how we’d like to set the job up,’ they replied, ‘We love it.’”

The next step involved coordinating equipment removal with the HVAC contractor. Again, a suggestion from Exterior Solutions helped increase efficiency and cut costs. The HVAC contractor’s original plan called for roofing crews to take out the roof system around the HVAC units, allowing HVAC crews to cut out sections of the steel decking below the equipment. The deck sections would have to be replaced before temporary roofs could be installed to keep the building watertight. The team at Exterior Solutions pointed out that there was no need to remove the decking. Instead, the equipment supports could be cut off as close to the deck as possible, and the ends of the supports could be buried in the insulation of the new roof system.

Equipment Removal

In the end, that’s the plan they executed. A fire watch was set up inside the building as equipment was removed. Crews from Exterior Solutions removed the existing roof to give the HVAC crews access. “We basically created a hole in the roof for them so they could see what they were doing,” Hicks explains. “We would slice the existing TPO back and take out the insulation. They would put down welding blankets in the area and then use cutting torches to cut the I-beam and L-beam steel supports off. Our roofers were on site to make sure supports were cut down to the proper length. As soon as the supports were cut off, we basically filled the hole.”

The deck was left intact, making it much faster and easier to patch the existing roof. It was critical to ensure the roof was weathertight every night to protect the documents inside the building. “We put the insulation back, we replaced the membrane, and we used an Eternabond product or welded a small cover strip around it, depending on the size of the hole,” notes Hicks.

The HVAC equipment was taken off the roof with a crane. Once the equipment was removed from one side of the roof, crews began installing the new system.

Roof Installation

With the equipment gone, the rest was clear sailing. “In all honesty, the roof was easy,” Flickinger says.

The existing roof system was torn off down to the deck and a TPO system from Johns Manville was installed. New polyiso insulation was topped with a fully tapered system to ensure proper drainage. After DensDeck cover board was installed, the 60-mil TPO membrane was adhered into place.

“We worked from one side to the other,” Hicks says. “The high point of the roof with the tapered system was in the center, and water is pushed to both sides where there are internal drains and overflow scuppers. We started at the low point and roofed up the hill to the center on one side, and then turned around and did the exact same thing on the other side.”

Details were minimal — just a few penetrations and a curb around the roof hatch. The edge metal installed was the Anchor-Tite system manufactured by Metal-Era. “We offered an upgrade on the metal edge,” notes Hicks. “Instead of a shop-fabricated metal edge, we recommended Anchor-Tite all the way around. After all, the area is subject to high winds. We felt that was a better way to go.”

The TPO system installed was ideal for the project, according to Flickinger. “I’ve been a thermoplastic guy my entire career,” he says. “I’m a big believer in heat-welded seams. We thought the heat-welded seams and adhered walls offered a better approach. We think it’s a very good-looking roof, and with the addition of a cover board — which the original roof didn’t have — it would definitely improve its hail performance.”

Hicks credits the manufacturer for assistance on the project. “Manville was very supportive,” he says. “They were local, and their technical support is excellent. We thought that for a project like this, to have a partner who was right there with you was important.”

The project was completed in less than a month, and Flickinger believes the key to executing the job efficiently was the decision to set up the stair tower. “That was the suggestion of our project manager,” says Flickinger. “Our company likes using stair towers, especially when we’re talking about long ladder runs. For us, it’s partly about safety for our own people, but because the building was secured, and as they talked to us about the steps we would have to take on a daily basis to just get access to the roof, we realized it was just going to kill us on production. We were going to waste so may man-hours on a weekly basis just getting to and from the roof. That was one of the driving factors that got the owner to agree to the stair tower, and we got a change order for it.”

The cost of the change order was minimal compared to the time and money it saved. “We have some really bright people,” says Flickinger. “They are all really good at looking at something and seeing if there is a better way. One of our strengths is we are really good at creative solutions, whether it’s something as simple as avoiding the grief of going through a secured building or taking a step back and asking, ‘Why cut holes in the deck? Why can’t we just cut these supports off above the deck because we are burying them in 6 inches of insulation anyway?’”

“The other piece for us is that we focus on the safety side of it, not only for our own people, but also the site safety and the safety of the people inside the building,” Flickinger continues. “We are very aware of that as we set our jobs up and decide where to set our materials and those types of things.”

The last component of a successful project is top-quality workmanship. “We focus on doing it right the first time,” Flickinger says. “Getting that customer satisfaction, not only at the end of the job with a great roof, but also during the project by trying to minimize the pain that an owner typically goes through in a roofing project, that’s one of our strengths that this project demonstrates.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Exterior Solutions Group, Parker, Colorado, www.exteriorsolutionsgroup.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membrane: 60-mil TPO, Johns Manville, www.jm.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Edge Metal: Anchor-Tite, Metal-Era, www.metalera.com

Mule-Hide Products Co. Launches New TPO Installation Training Videos

New training videos from Mule-Hide Products Co. guide viewers through the steps of correctly installing TPO roofing systems and completing essential maintenance and repair tasks, helping contractors deliver roofing systems that provide long-lasting, hassle-free performance.

The 26 videos cover installing mechanically attached and fully adhered TPO systems; insulation attachment; proper techniques for seaming, flashing and installing accessories; and best practices for completing common maintenance and repair jobs. 

The videos’ combination of live-action footage and animation create an engaging learning experience for viewers. Explanations of not only what to do, but the reasons for doing things, ensure that novice roofers and veteran contractors alike will learn something.

The video libraries can be accessed on the Mule-Hide Products YouTube channel  (youtube.com/user/MuleHideVideos/videos) or on mulehide.com.

For more information, visit www.mulehide.com.

Contractor Has the Right Prescription for Medical Office Building

Texas Traditions Roofing installed the metal and TPO roofs on the Pflugerville Parkway Medical Office Building, as well as the metal wall panels, soffit, fascia, gutters and downspouts. Photos: Texas Traditions Roofing

The Pflugerville Parkway Medical Office Building features a metal roof, a TPO roof, metal wall panels, soffit, fascia, gutters and downspouts. The new construction project was perfect for Texas Traditions Roofing, which prides itself on its versatility and quality craftsmanship.

Headquartered in Georgetown, Texas, the company handles a variety of commercial and residential work. “Residentially we do replacements and custom home new construction,” says Michael Pickel, estimator, Texas Traditions. “On the commercial side, we do mostly new construction, but we also do commercial repair and replacement as well.”

Pickel was the estimator on the project, but he feels the term “estimate” doesn’t begin to cover what his job entails. “We want to be the experts and provide all of the information for the general contractor, rather than just throwing an estimate at them,” he says. “We take that responsibility very seriously, whether it’s residential or commercial. We don’t necessarily like the word ‘estimate’ because it sounds like you’re guessing and just hoping it’s right. We understand that commercial new construction involves an estimate, but what we try to do is just be very specific and clearly define what we’re going to be doing, how we’re going to be doing it, and what the manufacturer and what the NRCA recommends us to do. That way nothing is incorrect, it’s not going to leak, obviously, and you have the backing of the manufacturer because it was installed properly.”

Multiple Systems

The scopes of work included two sections of metal roofing — a peaked section in the middle of the main roof and a shed roof off to one side of the building. A TPO roof system was applied over the main roof on either side of the metal roof in the center. “We started with the metal roofing panels on the top first, and then worked our way down to the lower section on the side,” Pickel notes. “Shortly after that, we came back and installed the TPO roof. It was pretty open, so it was fairly easy to put that down.”

The low-slope roof sections were covered with a 60-mil TPO system manufactured by GAF. Photos: Texas Traditions Roofing

The metal roof system manufactured by Sheffield Metals features 1.5-inch Snaplock 450 Panels in Ash Grey. Approximately 4,000 square feet of roof panels were installed over two layers of 2.2-inch polyiso insulation, which was mechanically attached. The underlayment used was Viking Armor from Viking Barriers.

The 6,000-square-foot low-slope roof was topped with a 60-mil TPO system manufactured by GAF. First, two layers of 2.2-inch polysio were mechanically attached to reach R-25. A tapered insulation system was then fully adhered across the entire roof to ensure proper drainage.

The safety plan utilized a Raptor safety cart, which was lifted to the roof with a SkyTrak. “The Raptor system was either on the left or right side of the roof, depending what side we were working on,” Pickel says. “Any time workers were on the roof, they were tied off.”

After the roofs were completed, the focus shifted to the wall panels. Berridge Vee Panels in Charcoal Grey were installed using a man lift. “We put Z-purlins down horizontally over the vapor barrier,” notes Pickel. “Then we installed the 1-inch, four-by-four mineral wool insulation, and attached our panels over that.”

Metal crews also installed 11-inch fascia across the entire edge of the roof, including both the metal and TPO sections. “There are some tricks involved with that because it was a fully tapered TPO system, so your height differences can vary,” Pickel explains. “Making sure the fascia wrapped smooth and properly, and was the proper height, was a little tricky.”

Gutters were not originally specified, but they were added at the suggestion of Texas Traditions. “We talked to the G.C. about talking to the owner because we felt they were going to want gutters,” Pickel recalls. “They came back to us and said they wanted gutters, so we issued a change order for it.”

The company installed 6-inch box gutters and four-by-four downspouts matching the metal roof.

A Challenging Schedule

The jobsite was relatively open, accessible and easy to navigate, so some typical problems that can crop up with new construction projects weren’t a big issue. The HVAC units were installed on a pad within a fenced-in area on the ground, minimizing roof penetrations as well as foot traffic on the roof. Crews were able to focus on doing the job right — and doing it safely. “Installation-wise, it wasn’t too tricky,” Pickel notes. “We just had to ensure that everything was installed to the manufacturer’s requirements.”

Manpower and scheduling posed the toughest hurdles, notes Pickel, but the general contractor, Lott Brothers of Austin, Texas, did a great job of keeping everyone on the same page. “We had weekly mandatory meetings that were set up by the G.C., and it was very helpful for us and other trades as well,” Pickel says. “Having to coordinate multiple trips is very common with new construction, unfortunately, but it’s great that we are able to do so much work. We did everything down to the gutters and downspouts — the full system — but it takes a lot of coordination and scheduling of the crews, especially when you have other jobs as well.”

One advantage of the multiple scopes of work was that Texas Traditions crews didn’t have to worry about coordinating transition details with crews from other companies. “It’s also nice for the owner,” Pickel adds. “If they have any issues or if they have any questions, they know the roofer did every bit of the metal on this job, and all of the TPO roof, and they know who to contact.”

Versatility is one of the company’s strengths, and for that Pickel credits the experience of the company’s owners, including his father, co-owner Mike Pickel, who has more than 30 years of experience in the construction industry, including 20 years working for a general contractor.

“He understands the complexity of coordinating multiple trades because he did it for so long from a G.C. perspective,” Pickel says. “His ability to know what needs to be done when allows us to be more effective and more efficient with our time. It allows us to be the expert in front of a general contractor because he was a general contractor. He worked with superintendents. He worked with multiple trades. His ability, knowledge and expertise within our company allows us to be the roofing expert.”

Texas Traditions strives to make the best use of that wealth of knowledge. “Each job is treated with care,” Pickel says. “It’s treated with expertise because it’s not just another job — it’s someone’s home, it’s someone’s office. We do apartment complexes, we do office buildings, we do residential homes, we do churches. Mike treats it with care, and it trickles down to everyone else to treat it with care as well.”

TEAM

Architect: Tim Brown Architecture, Austin, Texas, www.timbrownarch.com

General Contractor: Lott Brothers Construction, Austin, Texas, www.lottbrothers.com

Roofing Contractor: Texas Traditions Roofing, Georgetown, Texas, www.texastraditionsroofing.com

MATERIALS

Low-Slope Roof: 60-mil TPO, GAF, www.GAF.com

Metal Roof Panels: Snaplock 450 Panels, Sheffield Metals, www.sheffieldmetals.com

Underlayment: Viking Armor High-Temp, Viking Barriers, www.vikingbarriers.com

Metal Soffit Panels: FWP non-vented Soffit Panels, Sheffield Metals

Metal Wall Panels: Berridge Vee Panels, www.berridge.com

New Membrane Delivers UL Class A Fire Rating

Designed for attachment directly to plywood and oriented strand board (OSB) roof decks, new TPO Fleece Back FR membranes from Mule-Hide Products Co. deliver a UL Class A fire rating without the need for a fire-retardant barrier board or slip sheet.

“TPO Fleece Back FR is ideally suited for use in the West, where fire is a significant concern and building codes require many buildings to have Class A fire-rated roofing systems,” said Ken Schultz, West regional director for Mule-Hide Products. “Building owners get the necessary Class A fire rating. Contractors get a faster, easier installation by eliminating the need to add a fire-retardant barrier.”

Fleece reinforcement gives the membrane an added layer of protection against punctures. Splinters from OSB and plywood roof decks will not create holes in the membrane – a common issue when standard membranes are attached directly to these materials. More puncture-resistant than modified bitumen membranes, it stands up to hail and damaging debris exceptionally well.

Large sheet sizes and a wide window of weldability make installation quick and easy. TPO Fleece Back FR is available in 10-by-50-foot and 10-by-100-foot sizes; this is significantly larger than typical modified bitumen sheets, reducing the number of seams to weld by 67 percent. The ability to weld at wide ranges of temperature and humidity also means fewer stops to adjust the settings on the automatic welder and perform a test weld.

TPO Fleece Back FR membranes remain flexible in low temperatures and offer excellent resistance to impacts. They also stand up to acids, bases and restaurant exhaust emissions without degradation.

Like all Mule-Hide Products TPO membranes, TPO Fleece Back FR membranes include the Mule-Hide Products Weathering Package, ensuring that the membrane will withstand exposure to severe climate conditions. The weathering package is comprised of three heat-stabilizing antioxidants, three ultraviolet (UV) light stabilizers and two UV light absorbers, making the membrane highly resistant to heat, sun, ozone and oxidation.

TPO Fleece Back FR membranes contain no chlorine, plasticizers or volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and are odor-free, making them an environment-, crew- and building occupant-friendly choice. 

For more information, visitwww.mulehide.com.

New Products Added to Roof Coating Line

EPDM Coatings announces the addition of several new products to its roof coating line, including its 97 percent volume solid EnergyMax, Bonding Primers, Rust Inhibitors and Clear-Coat specifically designed for coating skylights, brick and stucco.

EPDM Coatings provides its customers worldwide with a full range of products, including many that have been ASTM tested and CRRC rated, Miami-Dade approved, as well as NSF approved for potable water applications. These diverse additions are designed to allow contractors to pass along those options and savings to their customers.

The company offers solutions for almost all types of roofs, including built-up, modified bitumen, metal, concrete, TPO, EPDM and foam. Also, for roofs on a budget, one base coat of the aromatic polyurethane can fix most leaks, and the application can be completed after a year to get the full benefits of a system. 

For more information, visit www.epdmcoatings.net.

New Roof Flashing Provides All-Weather Maintenance

New Seal-Fast Repair Hero roof flashing from Mule-Hide Products Co. is an all-system, all-weather maintenance and repair product.

A universal solution, the solvent-based, fiber-reinforced terpolymer sealant adheres to all roof substrates, including asphalt, modified bitumen, metal, TPO, EPDM, PVC, Kynar, concrete, Elvaloy/PVC, Hypalon (CSPE) and polyisobutylene (PIB).

Ready to work in all conditions, Repair Hero can be applied to dry or wet surfaces and under water. It can be used in any weather – rain or shine and in any ambient temperature.

According to the manufacturer, its exceptional elongation and high tensile strength enable Repair Hero to out-perform asphalt-based cements and silicone-based roof patches.

  • It delivers excellent adhesion, out-sticking silicone-based patches in TPO and EPDM applications.
  • It withstands soaring temperatures and intense exposure to ultraviolet light – conditions that can cause asphalt-based cements to become brittle and crack.
  • It is 50 percent more elastic and more than 9 times stronger than silicone-based roof patches, enabling it to better withstand building movement, foot traffic and the poundings dealt by Mother Nature.

Repair Hero complies with VOC-related regulations in all 50 states and does not need to be mixed or stirred before use and does not skin over or separate in the can after opening.

For more information, visit www.mulehide.com

 

Commercial Roofing Contractor Flexes Its Muscles on 1.3 Million-Square-Foot Project

The new Under Armour distribution warehouse roof encompasses 1,286,000 square feet. It was topped with a TPO roof system manufactured by Johns Manville. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

Industrial projects exceeding one million square feet of roofing might give some contractors pause, but at Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc., it’s just another day at the office.

The third-generation family run roofing contractor has been in business since 1953. Orndorff & Spaid services the Baltimore-Washington metro area, as well as parts of Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. It focuses primarily on large-scale commercial projects, including warehouses, distribution centers, retail businesses, schools and data centers.

Orndorff & Spaid routinely tackles roofing projects up to 1.5 million square feet. The company strives to keep as much work as possible under its own control, and the necessary supplies and equipment are always on hand at its 13-acre headquarters in Beltsville, Maryland.

“We’re a little bit unique as a roofing company in that we self-perform almost everything,” says Richard Harville, vice president of estimating. “We have our own cranes, all our own lifts. We do our own trucking. We have an in-house mechanic’s shop that repairs all of the equipment. All fuel servicing is done from our yard here. We also warehouse a fair share of material here because the logistics of running a job.”

Photo: Johns Manville

A recent new construction project at the former location of a Bethlehem Steel factory in Tradepoint St. John’s was right up their alley. “This was a new construction project, fairly conventional in most regards except for one, and that had to do with the site,” notes Harville. “Most of the site had been infilled over the years, and there was a lot of slag and other materials on this site, so it is not bedrock, for sure.” Due to the potential for movement, seismic expansion joints were specified. The gaps in the deck were as wide as 9 inches.

The owner of the complex was kept under wraps during construction phase, but the completed Under Armour distribution warehouse is now an area landmark. The roof encompasses 1,286,000 square feet, and the project had to be completed under a very tight schedule.

The general contractor on the project, FCL, reached out to Orndorff & Spaid during the design phase, and they recommended a TPO roof system manufactured by Johns Manville.

Harville shared his insights on the project with Roofing, along with members of the project team including Dane Grudzien, estimator; Carl Spraker, project manager, single ply; and Mike McKinney, project manager, sheet metal.

The Clock Is Ticking

Work began in April 2017 with a deadline to finish by the end of July. “The schedule was what made this project difficult,” notes Harville. “They had an end user set to come in and they were in an extreme hurry to get this thing done.”

Workers outside the safety perimeter were tied off 100 percent of the time using AES Raptor TriRex Safety Carts. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

Harville and Spraker were confident the experienced team would be up to the task. “Once we got our bearings, we rock and rolled this job,” Spraker says. “We had up to 40 employees on the site and worked six days a week.”

The roof system installed over the structure’s metal deck included two layers of 2.5-inch polyiso and a 60-mil TPO membrane. “This job was mechanically attached at 6 inches on center, with perimeter and corner enhancements as required by FM,” notes Grudzien.

The roof installation began with a 10-man crew, and crews were added as the work ramped up. “We ended up with four 10-man crews, with the foreman on the first crew in charge the team,” Spraker recalls. “We just did as much as we could every day and kept track of everything. We averaged 700 squares a day. One day we did 1,000 squares.”

Crews worked on half of the building at a time, with falling back as needed to install flashings or strip in the gravel stop. “We started on one side of the building and went from end to end, following the steel contractor,” says Spraker. “When we finished one side, we came all the way back to the end where they started and followed them down the opposite side.”

The roof system incorporates 276 VELUX skylights that provide daylighting in key areas of the facility. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

The roof also incorporated 276 VELUX skylights to illuminate key areas of the facility. Logistics Lighting delivered them all in one shipment, as Orndorff & Spaid requested. The 4-foot-by-8-foot skylights were stored on site and loaded to the roof with a crane for installation after a plasma cutter was used to cut holes in the deck. Prefabricated curbs were installed and flashed. “I had a separate crew designated just to install skylights,” Spraker notes

Safety precautions included perimeter warning lines, and workers outside that area were tied off 100 percent of the time, as they were when the skylights were installed. AES Raptor TriRex Safety Carts were used as anchor points.

Safety is always crucial, notes Harville, and the company makes it a priority on every project. “Our safety parameters go above and beyond standard state or federal mandating,” he notes.

Metal Work

The scope of work included large external gutters, downspouts and edge metal. According to McKinney, the sheet metal application was pretty straightforward. “There was just a lot of it — long, straight runs down two sides,” he says. “The coping was installed on the parapets on the shorter ends.”

Gutters were installed after the roof system was in place. “The roof wasn’t 100 percent complete, but once areas of the roof were installed and the walls were painted white, we could begin to install the gutters,” says McKinney. “After work was completed on one side, crews moved to the other side.”

The large gutter featured internal and external hangers, alternating 36 inches on center. All the metal was fabricated in house, and the exterior hangers were powder coated to match the steel.

Once the external hangers were installed, the gutter sections were lowered into place and secured by crew members in a man lift. “Once you had your hangers up, you could just lower the gutter over the side and into the external hangers,” McKinney explains. “We put the internal hangers into place after that. After the drip edge is installed, the single-ply crews come back and flash the drip edge into the roof system.”

Downspouts were custom-designed to match the building’s paint scheme. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

Installation of the downspouts had to wait until the walls were painted. One wrinkle was the change in color of the downspouts. About two-thirds of the way up the wall, the paint scheme went from black to white, and the building owner wanted the downspouts to change colors to match. “We reverse-engineered it,” notes McKinney. “We measured from the paint line up and put in a 30-foot section of downspouts there, because we put our bands at the joints and we didn’t want to have the bands too close together in the middle of the wall.”

Talented Team

The project was completed on budget — and a month early. FCL hosted a barbecue to celebrate. “FCL had a big cookout for the contractors with a steak dinner for everyone,” notes Harville. “They really went over and above on that.”

The Orndorff & Spaid team credits the effort of all companies involved for the success of the project. “The steel contractor was phenomenal, and FCL did an excellent job of coordinating everything,” Spraker says.

The large gutter featured internal and external hangers. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

The manufacturer also did an excellent job, notes Harville, who commended the work of Melissa Duvall, the JM sales rep on the project, and Barney Conway, the field rep, who visited the site at least once a week. “JM did a good job keeping us well stocked with material and getting us deliveries when we needed them,” Harville notes.

The team members at Orndorff & Spaid believe their confidence comes from experience and knowing that most of the variables are under control. “A lot of that has to do with the equipment we can bring to bear when we need to,” Harville states. “We control the logistics all the way through. Most companies are going to rent a crane or hire trucking — we do all of that. We have our own lifts, we have our own cranes, we do all of our flatbed trucking. We bring a unique process to the table. Beyond that, and our project managers are well versed at doing this. It’s not our first rodeo.”

TEAM

Architect: MacGregor Associates Architects, Atlanta, www.macgregorassoc.com
General Contractor: FCL Builders, Chicago, www.fclbuilders.com
Roofing Contractor: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc., Beltsville, Maryland, www.osroofing.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 60-mil TPO, Johns Manville, www.jm.com
Insulation: Two layers of 2.5-inch ENRGY 3 Polyisocyanurate, Johns Manville
Skylights: Dynamic Dome Skylights Model 4896, VELUX, www.veluxusa.com

Conductive Primer Designed for Electronic Testing of Conventional Roof Assemblies

Detec Systems has developed TruGround, a conductive primer which enables accurate electronic leak detection (ELD) testing on conventional roof membranes including black EPDM, TPO, PVC, modified bitumen, hot and cold fluid applied. According to the manufacturer, TruGround must be installed directly below the membrane per ASTM D7877. TruGround can be used for quality assurance testing on newly installed membranes and is chemically compatible with fully adhered, mechanically attached and torch-down membranes. Once applied, ELD testing can be performed for the life of the roof. Future breaches or seam voids can be quickly pinpointed, allowing repairs to be done immediately, preventing costly moisture damage from occurring.

For more information, visit www.detecsystems.com.

Industrial Maintenance Coating Designed for TPO and PVC Roofing Systems

EverprimeEverest Systems offers Everprime All Ply, a primer for various new and aged single-ply membranes. According to the manufacturer, this high-quality, plasticizer free, single component, solvent based primer can be applied by a spray brush or a roller. The product is designed to provide exceptional adhesion to new and aged TPO and PVC membranes. In addition, this high-performance coating provides excellent surface for subsequent application of acrylic, 100 percent solids Silicone and fluoropolymer coatings.

For more information, visit http://everestsystemsco.com.