Restoring Multiple Roof Systems on Historic Structure Is a Labor of Love

The Evans family restored the mill’s main roof as well as the flat roof over a retail space. Crews also re-roofed the large covered porch on the side of the mill and the one-story log cabin residence added to the back of the mill. Photo: Evans Candy

The first thing longtime roofer Dave Fisher will do is correct your pronunciation of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania — it’s traditionally pronounced “Lang-kiss-ter” for anyone wondering. And tradition is important where Fisher’s from.

Founded in 1729, Lancaster County is one of the oldest communities in America. The area is the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch country and has a strong farming and milling history. At the height of the milling industry, the area had more than 300 various types of mills operating.

The list of historical buildings in Lancaster County is long, so working on old structures is nothing new to Fisher, who runs I & D Contracting Ltd. in Lancaster. But re-roofing a 130-year-old mill to protect the interior while preserving its key historic characteristics presents unique challenges. Throw in local attachment to the building and a personal relationship with the owner and the stakes for doing the project right get even higher.

The mill had many names and many owners over its history before the Evans family purchased it in 1983. Photo: Evans Candy

This was the challenge presented to Fisher’s crew in re-roofing the Evans Candy Store in Lancaster County, done in stages over the last several years, with the most recent project being completed in 2018. The candy store is located inside a flour mill that serves as a recognizable piece of Lancaster’s history. The structure was originally built in the 1700s, but dust from grinding flour was a perpetual fire risk, and the mill burned twice over its history. The existing structure has been in place since 1889.

The mill has had many names and many owners over its history, but the Evans family purchased the mill in 1983 and has worked to bring it back to its former glory. Coming from a line of Lancaster milling families themselves, the Evans have used the historic structure to create a destination retail location that keeps people coming back for more — more chocolate, that is — oftentimes long after they have moved out of the area.

The flour mill is an iconic structure in Lancaster County. The existing structure dates back to 1889. Photo: Lancaster Historical Society, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

“I refer to us as a very large mom-and-pop store. We still get most of our business from word of mouth and know many of our customers by name or what they order, but we’ve grown and branched out into grocery stores and specialty shops,” says Steve Evans, second-generation owner of the Evans Candy Store located in the old mill. “Still, about half of the people who order through our website are people who moved out of the area, but still want their Evans chocolate.”

Fisher is no stranger to the area, the old mill or the Evans family either. “I was born and raised in Lancaster County, so I’ve been familiar with this building since I was a kid,” Fisher says. “I’ve been doing work for the Evans family for 20 years now — sisters, brothers, parents. I’ve been glad to get to work on it and be a part of its story.”

Franken-Roof

Affectionately referred to as “Franken-roof” by both Fisher and Evans, the roof on the 10,000-square-foot Evans Candy Store consists of four separate roofs — a three-story, steep-slope roof; a two-story, flat roof over a retail space; a large covered porch attached to the side of the mill; and a long, one-story log cabin residence attached to the back of the mill. Each of these roofs has a different type and color of roofing installed for various reasons, and each presented its own challenges.

At one point, an owner of the mill covered the siding with red asphalt shingles, visible in this photo at the upper right. Photo: Evans Candy

The “Franken-roof” extended to nearly every part of the mill’s exterior as a previous owner nailed red-colored asphalt shingles over all of the building’s original 1889 wood siding in an effort to protect the historic structure.

“I’ve lived in this area my whole life and I’ve never seen anything quite like it,” Evans says of the shingle-covered exterior. “When my family started restoring the mill — I was like 10 or 11 years old — I can’t tell you how many dumb asphalt shingles I picked up. That was my job. My brothers knocked them off the house and I picked them up and put them in the trash.”

Since then, the entire bottom floor of the building has been retrofitted to house to the candy store, while the upper floors have been converted into 3,000 square feet of residential space that a number of Evans family members have called home over the years.

The Steep-Slope Roof

It’s difficult to know for certain, but Fisher thinks the original roof over the main portion of the mill was slate. By the time the Evans bought the mill in 1983, the roof had been replaced with asphalt shingles. Evans hired Fisher and the I & D Contracting crew to re-roof this largest portion of the building — a 2,400-square-foot steep-slope roof — 10 years ago. To protect the historic building, Fisher wanted to start from scratch and make sure the job was done right. When he tore off the old roof, he found no real roof decking, just old barn wood in random sizes fitted together.

To preserve as much of the historical nature of the building, Fisher kept the original board decking, shoring it up where needed, and applied TAMKO Moisture Guard Ice and Rain Underlayment. To help create a more uniform surface for the shingles, Fisher chose a thick felt paper — TAMKO No. 30 Underlayment — to cover the barn wood roof deck and started laying the Heritage Premium asphalt shingles.

The shingle application required some extra care and an attentive ear due to the old barn wood deck. “There were gaps between the old barn wood pieces, so we had to listen to the sound each nail made as it went in — you could hear the difference when the nail hit one of the gaps and didn’t get any wood,” Fisher says. “In those cases, we had to move the nail and try again, because we wanted to know that it was really solid.”

Evans chose the very light-colored Olde English Pewter shingle in an attempt to reduce the heat coming in to the third story. Energy efficiency is always a concern in buildings of this age. When the Evans family purchased the building, it had no drywall or insulation, just open studded walls. Over the years, the family added spray foam insulation, insulation batting and roof vents to help address heat flow in and out of the massive historic building.

Fisher notes his crew took extra care around the 130-year-old brick chimney, which had been re-pointed in the past but needed some additional work. Fisher fabricated aluminum flashing and counter flashing out of coil stock on an aluminum brake to further protect the historic structure from potential damage.

The Flat Roof

Before Evans befriended Fisher and the two started their working relationship, Evans hired another roofer friend, Josh Miller of Miller’s Roofing in Wellsville, Pennsylvania, to update the flat roof portion of the old mill. The existing asphalt roll roofing installed in the early 1980s had reached the end of its life and Evans and Miller worked together to add foam sheeting over top of the existing rolled roofing and finished it by installing a Versico EPDM roofing system in the late 1990s.

The original roof deck over the flat roof portion of the mill was tongue and groove, and the men worked carefully to preserve the integrity of the original decking as they modernized the covering.

The Covered Porch

Fast-forward to 2018, and Evans contacted Fisher to replace and repair the roof over a large covered porch connected to the side of the building. The 450-square-foot cedar shake roof was added in an effort to blend with the rest of the historical structure, but after several decades, the moss-covered shakes succumbed to water damage and began to fail.

Fisher and his crew removed the cedar shakes and found part of the reason for the roof’s failure — zero flashing connecting the shake to the side of the building, just some old caulk. As part of the re-roofing project, Fisher added new flashing where the porch roof connected to the side of the mill.

“We had to get creative — flashing underneath the existing siding to try and prevent the same problems from recurring,” Fisher says.

Evans loved the old cedar shake roof and felt torn when choosing a replacement shingle. He ended up going with Heritage Premium asphalt shingles for their durability and selected the Rustic Slate color to differentiate the covered porch from the rest of the structure.

“It was a toss-up — would I match the new shingles to the other parts of the building?” Evans recalls. “But then I realized, I kind of liked the covered porch being a separate entity unto itself. It had always had a different shade of roofing, signifying a separate area of the building, and I liked that. I chose the Rustic Slate color because it still gave that rustic, historic feel that I loved about the cedar shake.”

The Log Cabin Residence

The other roof Fisher’s crew updated on the old mill in 2018 was on the long, log-cabin residence attached to the side of the three-story structure. Despite looking like an original part of the mill’s construction, the log cabin was added to the building in 1992, as a retirement home for Evans’ aging parents.

The log cabin addition was constructed in 1992. The roof was recently replaced with TAMKO Heritage Premium asphalt shingles in Rustic Cedar to help it blend in with the rest of the historic structure. Photo: Evans Candy

By the time Fisher got a good look at the log cabin roof in 2018, he realized the existing asphalt shingles were at the end of their service life, and one particular section of the roof had been patched multiple times and had additional layers of shingles stacked on the roof in an attempt to repel water.

Fisher took the 1,600-square-foot roof down to the decking, installed ice and water shield, new felt paper and installed TAMKO Heritage Premium asphalt shingles. Evans chose the Rustic Cedar color for the new roof as it was similar to the previous shingle color that added to the rustic, historic look that Evans hoped the log cabin would have in an effort to have it meld with the rest of the 130-year-old mill structure.

“I liked that Rustic Cedar look, pairing it with the log front,” Evans notes. “I think back to olden times with the cedar shake and wanted to emulate that. And I think we accomplished it. It is fun — it makes us smile when people ask us, ‘How old is that log home?’ and we get to tell them it’s only 26 years old.”

Fisher has grown to appreciate what he calls the “hodge-podge” of roof styles and colors on the old mill, and says the most important thing is that the building’s owner got exactly what he wanted and is a happy customer.

“Sometimes if people want to see installed examples of different colors of TAMKO shingles, I just send them to the mill because they can see a variety there,” Fisher says, laughing. “I jokingly asked Steve the other day if he had a shed that we could roof for him … just to see how many different colors we could do.”

About the author: Melissa Dunson is an award-winning journalist with more than a decade of experience writing about a wide variety of business sectors, including the construction industry, and as a technical and creative writer for TAMKO Building Products.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: I & D Contracting Ltd., Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Roofing Contractor: Miller’s Roofing, Wellsville, Pennsylvania

MATERIALS

Underlayment: No. 30 Asphalt Saturated Organic Felt, TAMKO, www.tamko.com

Waterproofing: Moisture Guard Ice and Rain Underlayment, TAMKO

Asphalt Shingles: TAMKO Heritage Premium Laminated Asphalt Shingles in Olde English Pewter, Rustic Slate and Rustic Cedar

Low-Slope Roof: Versico EPDM Roofing System, www.versico.com

TAMKO, Blair Exteriors, Heely Brown Donate Roof for Tuscaloosa’s One-Stop Resource Center for Families in Need

For 20 years, Tuscaloosa’s One Place has been a resource hub for families in times of need. But last year, the group found itself in need of help.

Formed through a merger of three Tuscaloosa volunteer groups, all with the goal of improving the quality of life for children and families in the area, Tuscaloosa’s One Place serves as a one-stop-shop for families in need. The nonprofit offers a variety of services, including after-school care for children, parenting classes, teen intervention and mentoring, GED courses and workforce development. In the last two decades, the organization has become an important service provider in western Alabama.

But after purchasing a new building last year to expand their services even further, the organization known for offering help to the community, instead found itself in need of the community’s help. The roof of the new Tuscaloosa’s One Place building was in bad shape and desperately needed replacing.

“When I started to realize what all Tuscaloosa’s One Place does – serving 7,000 families in west Alabama each year – I was very impressed and told them I would install the roof for free if we could get the materials donated,” said Billy Reel, owner of Blair Exteriors in Birmingham, Alabama.

National shingle manufacturer TAMKO Building Products has been a major part of Reel’s life for 20 years, first as a contractor and later as his wife rose in the ranks of TAMKO’s sales organization. TAMKO has been a proud part of the Tuscaloosa community since breaking ground on a large manufacturing facility there in 1973. TAMKO’s 75 years in business and long history of philanthropy caused Reel to know immediately that he wanted TAMKO to donate the shingles. It was an easy decision for TAMKO, according to company leadership.

“Tuscaloosa’s One Place does so much for our Alabama community, so we jumped at the chance to help support them in their mission by donating the shingles for their new roof,” said TAMKO President and CEO David Humphreys. “The organization’s focus on children, families and education is right in line with how we focus TAMKO’s philanthropy in the communities where we operate.”

TAMKO donated the roof shingles and distributor Heely Brown donated the roof accessories and delivery. The new roof was installed in February, just in time to celebrate Tuscaloosa’s One Place’s 20th anniversary this year. The nonprofit will host an anniversary party open to the public from 2-4 p.m. Thursday, June 27 at their offices at 810 27th Avenue in Tuscaloosa.

“Installing a new roof was a critical need in our new home. Our agency could not serve as many families as we do if it were not for the generosity of others like Mr. Reel and TAMKO,” said Amanda Lightsey, executive director of Tuscaloosa’s One Place. “We cannot thank them enough and because of this donation we are able to focus on positively impacting families.”

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.

TAMKO Wins Best Employer Awards

TAMKO Building Products is again overwhelmed by the support from the four-states community it’s called home for over 75 years. The community recently voted TAMKO “Best Industrial Employer” for the second year in a row, and for the first time ever, “Best Employer” overall, in The Joplin Globe newspaper’s “2019 Readers’ Choice Favorites of the Four States” contest. The four-states refers to a region where Southwest Missouri, Southeast Kansas, Northeast Oklahoma and Northwest Arkansas connect and this is the area where TAMKO was founded in 1944.

These honors are particularly special this year as the company achieves a significant milestone: its 75th anniversary. Over 75 years, TAMKO has grown from just one location with 35 employees to multiple locations nationwide with more than 600 employees in the four-states area alone. 

TAMKO has worked hard to provide good jobs for its employees, and as a result, the company has become a preferred employer in the four-states area offering top of the scale salaries, wages and benefits. Production hourly employees at TAMKO’s four-states facilities average a gross annual income of more than $65,000.

TAMKO’s core values of honesty, integrity and compliance have attracted top talent and long-term employees with outstanding character, many of whom choose to stay at the company for 20 plus years. In fact, nearly 16% of current employees have been with the company more than 25 years and many choose to remain at TAMKO until retirement.

TAMKO is well known for its community stewardship, giving more than $3.2 million of charitable donations in recent years. The company’s good corporate citizenship extends through its employees as well. In a recent company survey, TAMKO employees reported volunteering more than 26,000 hours in the last year.

The public acknowledgement of TAMKO as “Best Employer” and “Best Industrial Employer” in the four-states is evidence of the company’s positive workplace reputation and quality work environment. 

“We’re immensely proud of this recognition, which is a testament to our strong company culture,” said TAMKO President and CEO David Humphreys. “We are grateful for this community endorsement and the support of everyone who helped make this possible.”

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.

New TW Seam Tape Offers Added Protection for Roof Decks

Contractors can now offer an additional layer of protection with the new TAMKO TW Seam Tape, which is used to close sheathing gaps on the roof deck and help keep water from entering the home. The new TW Seam Tape is a flexible, self-adhering SBS-modified bitumen membrane with a polymer film on the surface and a removable treated release film on the adhesive side. It has a textured, skid-resistant surface for added safety of the roofing crew. TW Seam Tape is applied to all roof deck joints and seams after the roof deck installation, before the underlayment is applied. 

“In the chance shingles and underlayment are torn or blown off during high winds, TW Seam Tape provides added protection against water,” said Brandon Knobloch, TAMKO corporate director of waterproofing. Unsealed roof deck seams are believed to be responsible for up to 60 percent of rain entering into an attic, according to the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety. 

“We’ll continue to give contractors what they need to get the job done with innovative applications of TAMKO’s Waterproofing products as part of our goal of delivering products and solutions that our customers rely on,” said Knobloch.

TW Seam Tape is designed for application on a variety of surfaces, including OSB, plywood and most other common roof deck materials. And TW Seam Tape works with all TAMKO shingles and underlayments. 

Manufactured at TAMKO’s Columbus, Kansas facility, TW Seam Tape comes in 4-inch rolls, with each roll covering 61 linear feet. This new product is available nationwide now and is UL classified in accordance with ASTM D1970 standards.  

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com/Waterproofing.

Colorful Exterior for Veterinary Hospital Comes Together Without a Hitch

The Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, features a colorful exterior constructed of metal roof and wall panels. Photos: Petersen

Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, is designed to provide top-notch care for its furry patients. The building includes surgical suites, treatment areas, and an in-house lab, as well as boarding and grooming facilities.

The state-of-the-art facility is housed in a striking complex highlighted by colorful metal roof and wall panels. It was a complicated new construction project on a tight jobsite, but experience and planning made for a smooth, textbook execution.

Complicated projects are nothing new for Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal. Headquartered in Longview, Texas, the company has been in business for 33 years and does a variety of commercial, industrial and residential work, including modified bitumen, built-up, single-ply and shingle roofs, as well as metal roofing and sheet metal fabrication. “We did all the metal on the project,” says Anthony McKinley, vice president of Curtis-McKinley. “We did the roof, the walls and soffit.”

McKinley was confident his crews could execute the project smoothly, and his confidence was bolstered by his experience working on other projects with the general contractor, Transet Company, and the manufacturer of the roof and wall panels, Petersen.

“We have a good relationship with Transet Company and we’ve done so much work with Petersen that they know our company and our guys,” McKinley says. “If there are any technical questions, they are very quick to help and get us answers, and inspections go great.”

The Roof and Walls

The roof and wall panels were manufactured from 24-gauge steel. The roof was covered with approximately 18,000 square feet of 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. The exterior also incorporates 4,400 square feet of 16-inch HWP panels in Slate Gray and 5,250 square feet of 12-inch Flush Panels in three colors: Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue.

The roof is comprised of Petersen’s 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. Photos: Petersen

Crews from Curtis-McKinley dried the roof in with TAMKO’s TW Metal and Tile self-adhered underlayment and tackled different phases of the project as the building came together. “We kind of did it all at one time,” McKinley recalls. “First, we had a roofing crew come out and put the peel-and-stick on the roof, and we measured for the roof panels. Then we started installing all of the trim and had a few guys start installing the wall panels.”

Petersen fabricated and delivered the wall panels, which were installed over plywood and cinder block walls using a man lift. On the cinder block walls, hat channels were installed to receive the clips. At two entrances, the Flush Panels were installed vertically. “We also installed regular flush soffit panels,” notes McKinley.

A representative from Petersen roll-formed the roof panels on the site. Some of the panels were more than 50 feet long, and this posed some logistical problems. “It was a very tight construction site,” McKinley explains. “We ran the panels on site and we had to lift them up with a crane. We couldn’t use a lift because there was no way to turn the lift around when the panels were loaded. There was one long driveway down one side, and we had to stack all of the panels in one direction and lift them straight up.”

Panels were lifted using a spreader bar as a cradle. “We strapped the panels to the spreader bar,” McKinley notes. “We only lifted about 10 panels at a time and our guys would receive them and stack them at points along the roof. We had about six or seven guys on the roof and the rest of the crew on the ground to strap down the panels.”

The walls feature Petersen’s 24-gauge HWP and Flush Panels in multiple colors, including Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue. Photos: Petersen

The crew started installing panels on the main roof and finished roof sections alongside the structure as the job progressed. Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time, using temporary anchor points screwed into in the deck. “We started off on the main roof area and worked our way from the back to the front,” McKinley recalls. “The shed roofs were incorporated as we worked our way forward.”

While the main crew worked on the roof, a smaller group sometimes split off to install the wall panels. “We had a crew with a few extra sheet metal guys on it, and we moved them around as needed,” McKinley notes. “That way they could start on the walls as the roof progressed and the job wouldn’t lag on.”

Planning Ahead

The main challenge on the project was the tight jobsite, according to McKinley. “It was a very limited site,” McKinley says. “Once we got the roof panels on, we could breathe a little easier.”

Despite the cramped conditions, communication between the crews kept conflicts to a minimum. “Working with other trades went fine,” McKinley says. “The superintendent on the site was easy to work with. We worked with other subcontractors in Longview we’ve worked with plenty of times. Our guys knew their guys, basically, and they just coordinate well and work around each other as needed.”

The project moved along smoothly and stayed on schedule. “We were blessed not to have any big weather delays,” McKinley says. “When they were ready for us, we were able to get right out there and move things along in a timely manner.”

McKinley also credits the manufacturer for help executing the project. “There are four or five different colors on it,” he says. “Each entrance was a different color, and the walls and roof. That was pretty interesting. Keeping it all straight with the guys was a challenge.”

Again, planning ahead was essential. “It just took a little more communication,” McKinley says. “When we were making our trim, we just had to make sure it was the right color. It’s very easy to work with Petersen. On a job like this one, the technical aspect of it was really very simple, but seeing all of the different colors on this project come together was pretty cool.”

Curtis-McKinley crew members were able to execute all of the transition details themselves as they installed the roof and wall panels. “They were all standard details, really,” McKinley says. “Almost all of the transitions were something the guys have done hundreds of times.”

Exceptions included the large, irregularly shaped windows at the entryways, which were trimmed in red. “There were two entrances with windows that were a little different,” McKinley says. “One set had a sort of triangular shape, which was pretty straightforward to flash. The other had a circular window, and that took a lot of time and coordination with the window people to ensure that we got it watertight with the flashing. Getting the trim for that wall custom made and fitting perfectly was a bit of a challenge.”

Taking a complicated project and making it look easy is one of the strengths of Curtis-McKinley Roofing. “The key is having the right guys,” McKinley says. “We are blessed to have very experienced professional roofers and sheet metal installers. Our sheet metal guys have done this for years. That’s getting harder to find these days, and we still have some older guys that know how to do it. They’ve done so much of it that I often rely on them to tell me, ‘This is how it needs to be done,’ or ‘This is a better way to do it.’ Then we just make sure everything conforms to the plans and specifications, and we ensure the installation integrity. Obviously the most important thing is to keep the water out.”

TEAM

Architect: Ron Mabry Architects, Tyler, Texas, www.ronmabryarchitects.com

General Contractor: Transet Co., Longview, Texas, www.transetco.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: 18-inch, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad in Charcoal, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Wall Panels: 16-inch, 24-gauge HWP, Slate Gray and 12-inch, 24-gauge Flush Panel in Slate Gray, Teal, and Berkshire Blue, Petersen

Underlayment: TW Metal and Tile, TAMKO, www.tamko.com

TAMKO Used 1.1 Billion Pounds of Recycled Material Since 2013

In honor of TAMKO Building Products’ 75th anniversary in business, the company is celebrating its sustainability accomplishments over the last five years, which includes using more than 1 billion pounds of recycled materials in manufacturing its products. For 75 years, TAMKO has taken a proactive approach to continuous improvement, including sustainable practices that are both good for the environment and make great business sense.

Since 2013, TAMKO has used 1.1 billion pounds of recycled paper, cardboard, sawdust, plastic and other materials to manufacture its products. At TAMKO’s Knoxville, Tennessee facility alone, more than 89 million pounds of recycled cardboard was used to manufacture products in 2018, which averages to more than 244,000 pounds every day that year.

As part of using recycled materials, TAMKO reused 54 million pounds of material during this time period, reintroducing it back into its production processes. Additionally, 549 million pounds of materials that could not be reused were sent to other recyclers rather than to a landfill.

“We are proud to use recycled materials and incorporate sustainable practices that benefit our business, customers, employees and communities,” said TAMKO President and CEO David Humphreys. “We care about the health and safety of our communities because our people live and work here too.”

In addition to its recycling efforts, TAMKO also continued its focus on reducing consumption of natural resources and promoting healthy environments for its employees and surrounding communities. Specifically, improvements at TAMKO’s Phillipsburg, Kansas facility, reduced potential air emissions by 70 million cubic feet per year. Other process improvements reduced parked idling truck traffic on the street outside TAMKO’s Dallas, Texas facility by 100 percent and reduced total loading time, resulting in a 25 percent reduction in potential idling truck emissions.

TAMKO also looks for ways to reduce its use of natural resources. A rainwater capture and recycling system reduced TAMKO’s Frederick, Maryland facility’s water consumption by approximately 100,000 gallons a year. A project at TAMKO’s High Street facility in Joplin, Missouri recycled water from within its own processes, resulting in a 74 percent savings in overall water use at the facility.

“We strive to protect the environment, and the health and safety of the public, our customers and employees through the goal of 100 percent compliance, 100 percent of the time by 100 percent of the people,” Humphreys said.

Since implementing a Zero Incident Safety Culture (ZISC) in 2005, TAMKO has reduced its number of OSHA recordable injuries by 74 percent. Through all its efforts, TAMKO continuously strives to work safely, produce quality products and protect the environment of the communities where the company operates.

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.

TAMKO Recognized by UL for More than 50 Years of Dedication to Product Safety

A first-of-its-kind award was presented to TAMKO Building Products, Inc. for more than 50 years of dedication to product safety and compliance by UL, a globally recognized third-party research and testing company.

UL presented the “50-years Dedication to Safety” award to TAMKO on February 11 at the International Roofing Expo in Nashville, Tennessee in honor of UL’s 125th anniversary. This year, TAMKO also celebrates a significant milestone of 75 years in business. The award was presented to TAMKO for its long, continuous relationship with UL and its focus on product safety, as evidenced by its product certifications.

“We are grateful to be a partner with TAMKO for over half of a century,” said Christopher Hasbrook, vice president and general manager of the Building & Life Safety Technologies division at UL. “We are privileged to have TAMKO’s loyalty, dedication to safety and continued support of our mission – ‘Working for a Safer World.’”

UL conducts product testing for manufacturers who choose to obtain third-party compliance certifications for their products, and UL has conducted product evaluations and certifications for fire, wind resistance and impact performance tests on TAMKO products for 57 years. TAMKO was also UL’s first ever roofing customer to receive a supplementary UL Evaluation Report, which demonstrates product compliance with building code requirements through technical evidence.

“We are committed to safety at TAMKO, for our employees and customers, which is why we seek to provide safe, high quality products,” said Stephen McNally, vice president of sales and marketing. “TAMKO is honored to have earned this significant achievement in product safety and compliance.”

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.

New IR Shingle Receives Highest Impact Resistance Rating

TAMKO Building Products, Inc. is expanding its popular Heritage line of laminated asphalt shingles to include a new Heritage IR shingle. The innovative new reinforced shingle is classified by the Underwriters Laboratories for compliance with UL 2218 Class 4 Impact Resistance.

The UL 2218 Class 4 Impact Resistance testing by UL involves a test where a 2-inch diameter steel ball is dropped onto the shingle from a height of 20 feet, impacting the same location twice and imparting 32 joules of impact energy per drop. Afterwards, the backside of the shingle is bent over a 4-inch rod and examined for visible cracks through the thickness of the shingle. The UL 2218 Class 4 rating is the highest impact resistance rating UL awards, and to receive this rating, the shingle must withstand the impact of the test without any visible cracks through the thickness of the shingle at each of six locations selected to represent the most vulnerable areas of the installed shingle. 

The UL 2218 Class 4 classification may qualify for homeowner insurance premium discounts. Requirements and discounts vary based on insurance provider and state. Homeowners should check with their insurance agent about potential savings on their home insurance premiums.

“Homeowners in our area specifically ask for IR shingles – that’s why this is important to us,” said Curt Boyd, owner of Academy Roofing Inc. in Denver, Colorado. “And TAMKO is our primary shingle manufacturer of choice, so this new product allows us to offer a full line of shingle choices that includes all the options our customers request.”

Heritage IR shingles feature the same natural beauty that has made the Heritage line such a popular choice among homeowners for more than 40 years. Naturally deep shadow lines portray the look of wood shakes, and four attractive color choices – Rustic Black, Rustic Slate, Thunderstorm Grey and Weathered Wood – will enable homeowners to find the Heritage IR shingle that best complements their home.

And the new Heritage IR shingles will come with TAMKO’s new Limited Lifetime Warranty, that includes a 10-year Full Start period.

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.

TAMKO Roadshow Features Rick The Roofer at 2019 International Tradeshows

Roofing products expert Rick “the Roofer” Taylor is taking the TAMKO national roadshow to some of the building industry’s largest events this year. Attendees will get to meet Rick and gain firsthand product and industry knowledge from his years of experience.

In February, Rick the Roofer and the traveling roadshow will make appearances in the TAMKO booth at both the International Roofing Expo in Nashville, Tennessee and the International Builders Show in Las Vegas, Nevada.

“We are so excited to have Rick this year for his first official IRE and IBS appearances,” said Stephen McNally, TAMKO vice president of sales and marketing. “Rick will have his custom rig at one show, and an innovative interactive display at the other. Contractors won’t want to miss this.”         

Rick the Roofer is a roofing products expert with nearly 50 years of roofing industry experience as a contractor, salesman and trainer, including the past 24 years at TAMKO. He kicked off a nationwide tour in 2018 in his recognizable custom-built truck and trailer. Since last summer, Rick the Roofer has appeared at a variety of public and private industry events providing education, resources and hands-on installation demonstrations for roofing industry professionals.

People are encouraged to connect with Rick the Roofer on social media for the latest information on products, industry news and updates on his upcoming show appearances. Rick can be found on Facebook at Rick the Roofer Taylor, on Twitter, @Rick_theRoofer, and on Instagram, @Rick_theRoofer.

Tradeshow attendees can see Rick the Roofer at TAMKO’s International Roofing Expo booth #2645 February 11-13, and International Builders Show booth #N527 February 19-21.

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.

TAMKO Donates Roof to Surprise Single Mother with Failing Roof

TAMKO shingles now cover what was gaping holes and the exposed roof deck of Phoenix single mother Rachel’s home only a few weeks ago. Rachel was the beneficiary of a new TAMKO roof and other home repairs during a Phoenix-area 3TV news feature called Arizona’s Family Surprise Squad.

Rachel had just found out she was pregnant with her second child when her fiancé was killed by a drunk driver in 2015. Recent storms tore a hole in her roof and water started leaking into her home, causing further damage. She was nominated for the Surprise Squad by her mother.

The repairs to Rachel’s home were made possible through donations of product and labor from members of the Arizona Roofing Contractors Association’s Young Professionals group, including TAMKO Building Products, Inc. who provided shingles for the roof.

“This story touched all our hearts,” said TAMKO President and CEO David Humphreys. “We’re so glad that we were able to play a part in helping ease the burden from this young mother’s shoulders. And we feel proud to be a part of a group like the Arizona Roofing Contractors Association that is always looking to make a difference in their communities.”

The ARCA Young Professionals group has been involved in several charitable projects in recent years, but the group’s leadership knew there was something special about this situation as soon as they heard Rachel’s story.

Eric Perry, COO of Azul Roofing Solutions and member of the ARCA Young Professionals, said, “The response was overwhelming with people willing to step up and help. I couldn’t be happier with the way it came together. Any time we have the ability to use our skills in this trade to help someone, especially so deserving, like Rachel, it’s a no-brainer. Her response made it all the better too. It just made us want to do more and more for her.”

Some of the other ARCA Young Professionals members involved in the repair project include employees from Lifetime Roofing Systems, Tecta America, Star Roofing, Elite Roofing Supply and Wrecorp.

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.