PrimeSource Receives Patent on Premium Grip-Rite ShingleLayment

PrimeSource Building Products recently was awarded a U.S. patent for its innovative design of a synthetic underlayment called ShingleLayment, the only synthetic underlayment in the market designed to protect your roof and look like a shingled rooftop during construction.

“Homeowners don’t want to be looking out at a sea of blue tarps or product logos covering unfinished roofs during a construction project,” said Peter Barrego, VP of Global Sourcing. “We decided to create an effective synthetic underlayment that also looks good.”

According to Barrego, synthetic underlayments have quickly become industry standard, replacing petroleum-laden asphalt roofing felt, known commonly as tar paper. But these products feature brand logos or bright colors. ShingleLayment is available in an exclusive patented shingle print pattern, making it the only AC 188 listed underlayment that gives the appearance of a finished roof while a home is under construction or under repair.

In addition to improving the look of a project provides immediate roof deck protection and a long-lasting secondary water-shedding layer ShingleLayment is made of tough UV-treated woven polypropylene and has a high tensile strength that resists wind blow-off and can resist the sun’s harmful rays for up to 180 days. Combine these features with a non-skid walking surface and you have the ultimate roofing underlayment, according to the company.

“PrimeSource is always looking for innovative products to add to our portfolio,” said Building Materials Group Manager Andy Spyhalski. “We know we are a key supplier and we want to respond to our customers’ needs and give them innovative choices.”

ShingleLayment® is available in three weight classes: lightweight ShingleLayment® LWE; mid-weight ShingleLayment-15 Pro; and heavyweight ShingleLayment Premium.

According to the manufacturer, all ShingleLayment styles are third-party tested to ICC AC 188, Florida Statewide Building Code and are backed by PrimeSource’s limited warranty.

For more information, please visit www.PrimeSourceBP.com.

Expert Crew Is Called in for Copper Roof Restoration Project

The dome on the Bradford County Courthouse was restored with copper panels during the first phase of a $3 million renovation project. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

The octagonal dome atop the Bradford County Courthouse has been a fixture on the Towanda, Pennsylvania, skyline for more than 120 years. It now shines brightly after being restored with copper panels as part of a $3 million renovation project.

Built in the Classical and Renaissance revival styles in 1898, the four-story courthouse was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1987. The dome’s original roof tiles were recently replaced as part of the project, which also included the complete restoration of the structure’s main roof.

The Charles F. Evans Company Inc., the union division of Evans Roofing Company Inc., headquartered in Elmira, New York, has a long history of successfully tackling projects with historical significance. C&D Waterproofing Corp., the general contractor on the project, reached out to the firm for support assessing the roofing portion of the project. The two companies teamed up on the project, with C&D Waterproofing handling the masonry restoration work and Charles F. Evans Company installing the roof systems.

The roofing work consisted of two phases. Phase One, which began in April of 2016, involved replacing the deteriorated terracotta tiles on the dome with soldered flat seam copper panels. Phase Two, which began in April of 2017, involved installing batten seam copper roofing on main structure and new copper flashings, gutters and downspouts.

Safety First

Construction Manager Bill Burge of Charles F. Evans Company was thrilled to be part of this historic project. Before

Originally completed in 1898, the courthouse was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1987. The building’s main roof was removed and replaced with a copper batten seam roof after work on the dome was completed. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

concentrating on the installation details, he knew the company would focus on the top priority. “Safety is number one,” says Burge. “Safety comes before profits. Safety comes before everything. We always want to make sure we have the right safety plan going into the job, and throughout the job, we are maintaining that plan and working that plan. We want our guys to go home to their families at the end of the day, so that’s key for us.”

Burge worked as a union carpenter for 10 years before joining the company more than seven years ago. He found he had an affinity for sheet metal work. “The craftsmanship and quality goes hand in hand with carpentry,” Burge says. “Everything starts with the carpentry. You have to have your base perfect; otherwise, everything from there on out doesn’t work. Sheet metal is a finished product, typically, especially in our business, so things have to be done right. Things have to be done to the highest standard of quality, because that’s what people see.”

The dome was designed to be a showpiece, and Field Superintendent Brian Babcock and his crew of qualified union sheet metal mechanics knew they would be held to an exacting standard. “The key to this project and every project is our talented mechanics in the field,” Burge says. “Charles F. Evans Company is nothing without this talent—they deserve all of the credit.”

Around the Dome

Phase One began with the removal of the tiles on the dome. “The ceramic tile was laid over open steel purlins,” Burge notes.

Charles F. Evans Roofing Company handled the roofing portion of the project, while C&D Waterproofing Corp. served as the general contractor and performed masonry restoration work. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

“There was open framing with quarter-inch steel angle for the purlins, and each piece if tile was wired on. The removal process was fairly simple. You could actually lift up the bottom of the tile and snap it off.”

The removal work had to be done in sections and dried in every night. “One of the hardest things about this process was we had to install two layers of half-inch plywood over the steel purlins and anchor those down,” says Burge.

The plywood was attached to vertical two-by-fours, which were screwed into the purlins. The plywood was covered with one layer of Warrior 30-pound felt paper, Meadows Red Rosin Paper, and Grace Ultra High Temp underlayment in gutter areas.

The built-in gutter at the base of the dome was torn out and re-framed. The new gutter was wider and deeper according to the recommendation of Levine & Company Inc., the architect on the project. “We did everything to specification as Levine & Company drew it,” says Burge.

Once the cladding was completed on the gutter, the copper panels of the dome were installed. The 20-inch panels were made of 20-ounce, cold rolled copper, supplied by Revere Copper Products. Both the panels and cladding were fabricated in Charles F. Evans Company’s fabrication shop. The copper panels clip to each other and have a hem on four sides that clips

Custom flashing pieces were fabricated and installed where the copper roof panels met the base of the dome. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

to the adjacent panel fastened to the deck. At the top of each panel, a hook clips off to the plywood, and the hook is covered by the panel directly above it.

Burge points out that the octagonal structure of the dome helped speed up the installation of the copper panels. “There are eight hips on the dome,” he notes. “Every section of the dome is like a piece of pie, basically, so we were able to start the panels in various locations. We didn’t have to start at one end and go around the dome. We could move around.”

Repairing the statue on the top of the dome was also part of the scope of work. “We soldered copper patches on any damage the statue had,” Burge says. “C&D Waterproofing completely cleaned and buffed the statue and applied a copper coating.”

Across the Roof

After the work on the dome was completed, work began on the main roof. The existing roof was removed down to the existing steel deck. The lower roof also had a built-in, copper-clad gutter that had to be removed and reconstructed. After

Scaffolding systems were constructed for both phases of the project. Shown here is part of the system installed around the lower roof, which featured planks and guardrails at the eave and rake edges. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

the gutter was completed, work on the main roof began. “After we completely cleaned the metal decking, we had to install a layer of Grace Ultra High Temp underlayment,” Burge recalls. “We then installed two-by-four wood sleepers, 2 feet on center.”

Crews installed 1.5 inches of polyiso insulation between the two-by-fours, followed by another 1.5-inch layer of polyiso. Pieces of 5/8-inch plywood were then screwed down to the sleepers. The plywood received 30-pound felt, and the battens were installed 20 inches on center. The seams were completed using a custom-designed mechanical seamer manufactured by Roll Former Corp.

Installation of the 12,000 square feet of copper panels went smoothly, but where panels met the dome, details were tricky. “Everything is pitched, and the dome has eight different sections sitting right in the center of the structure,” Burge explains. “A lot of time and energy went into fabricating and installing custom flashing pieces at the base of the dome.”

The Safety Plan

A scaffolding system was the key to the safety plan for both phases of the project. “For Phase One, we had to remove a portion of the roofing system and put down some plywood on top of the existing roofing in order to build a scaffold to access the dome,” Burge says.

This photo shows the main roof before restoration work began. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

Scaffolding was constructed to the eave edge of the copper dome, allowing the gutter to be removed. Ladders were used to access the dome and personal fall arrest systems were attached into HitchClips from Safety Anchor Fall Equipment, LLC, which served as individual anchor points. “We continued that process as we went up, using ladder jacks,” says Burge. “We continued with that plan, and never deviated.”

After Phase One was completed, the scaffolding was removed, and another scaffolding system was installed around the entire lower roof. Phase Two required planks and pre-engineered guardrails at the eave and rake edges. “Part of process of installing this roof included installing new safety anchors at various locations, and as we finished up, we were able to use those anchors as tie-off points,” Burge points out.

Phase Two is scheduled for completion in early November, and Burge has high praise for everyone involved with the project. “Levine & Co. Inc. is the architecture firm on the project,” he says. “We didn’t deter from any details developed. They drove this thing. We have worked with them on a great many projects in the past, and we have a great comfort level with them.”

Copper panels, cladding and details were fabricated in Charles F. Evans Company’s metal shop. Photos: Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc.

The masonry and roofing work had to be well coordinated. “C&D Masonry & Waterproofing progressed ahead of us with items that we needed to be done, and then came back behind us to mortar all of the counter flashings back into the dome,” Burge says. “They were right there with us every step of the way.”

Finding the right combination of workers for this project was crucial, according to Burge. “We had one of our best crews on this project for a reason,” he says. “This project was led by Brian Babcock of Sheet Metal Local 112, and he was essential in putting this whole thing together. He’s been with Charles F. Evans Company for 20 years, and his leadership and focus is the reason this project is going to be successful.”

Ornate sheet metal work is rare these days, but the art is not lost at Charles F. Evans Company. “We’ve been doing this work for 60-plus years,” Burge says. “This knowledge and this workmanship has been handed down generation after generation. We wouldn’t have taken on this project if we didn’t have the confidence in our employees that we do.”

Historic restoration projects are becoming an increasingly bigger chunk of the company’s portfolio, notes Burge. “We do a lot of work with older universities and businesses that have these types of buildings,” he says. “A lot of buildings need this type of work, and it’s a trade not everyone else has. This is a craft that takes years to master. We harness that, we build from within, and we bring in young guys and teach them how to do it the right way. We have a great mix of people ages 23 up to 60, and it’s learned, it’s taught, and it’s preached.”

Burge is hopeful the new roof will last at least as long as its predecessor. “This is the one thing that makes Charles F. Evans Company special to me: the fact that what we do from an architectural sheet metal standpoint, from a slate, copper, tile roof standpoint—these roofs will last 100, 150 years, and it is artwork,” he says. “The fact that you’re a part of something that’s been around since the turn of the last century—to me it doesn’t get any better than that.”

TEAM

Architect: Levine & Company Inc., Ardmore, Pennsylvania, Levineco.net
Construction Manager: C&D Waterproofing Corp., Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, CDwaterproofingcorp.com
Roofing Contractor: Charles F. Evans Roofing Co. Inc., Elmira, New York, Evans-roofing.com

MATERIALS

Copper Supplier: Revere Copper Products, Reverecopper.com
Synthetic Underlayment: Grace Ultra High Temp, GCP Applied Technologies, GCPat.com
Mechanical Seamer: Roll Former Corp., Rollformercorp.com
Anchor Points: HitchClip, Safety Anchor Fall Equipment, LLC, Hitchclip.com

High-Performance Synthetic Underlayment Designed for Durability, Traction

CertainTeed offers RoofRunner, a high-performance synthetic roofing underlayment, bringing additional versatility to CertainTeed’s roofing product line. At just 23 pounds per 250-foot roll, RoofRunner is easy to handle, according to the company, with a high-traction surface designed for wet or dry walkability.

According to the manufacturer, RoofRunner is very durable and water resistant. The product features 90-day UV exposure and resists tearing caused by stretching, high winds and foot traffic. The underlayment is designed to firmly grip to the roof deck, providing a stable surface for builders and reducing pulling against mechanical fasteners. Its light gray surface offers a cool working environment, so those working on roofs all day have fewer worries about overheating. 

RoofRunner exceeds the performance requirements of ASTM D226 and D4869, notes the company. It conforms to UL 790/ASTM E108 for Class A fire resistance, is Florida Product Control Approved, and also conforms to the ICC-ES AC188 standard. RoofRunner qualifies as a component in CertainTeed’s Integrity Roof System
RoofRunner high-performance synthetic inderlayment from CertainTeed

RICOWI to Host Underlayment Seminar on March 17

The underlayment systems play a vital role in today’s roof designs for long-term performance. The challenges of selecting the right materials, application techniques and performance criteria can be challenging to the roofing professional. RICOWI‘s Spring Seminar, which will be held March 17, 2017, in Anaheim, Calif., will provide an in-depth look at the two styles of underlayments—organic and synthetic—that might be used in low- and steep-slope roof designs. This seminar will touch upon the product designs, product approvals and code language that address how to select and properly use these various underlayment products in roof system applications.

Underlayment Speakers
Organic Underlayment: Doug Thagard, Fontana Paper Mills
Synthetic Underlayment: Mark Strait, Synthetic Roof Underlayment Institute

When underlayments are installed as part of a roof system, they may have special requirements for how they are designed, selected and installed to meet the anticipated roof performance. To better understand the relationship of the components, the speakers will cover the various styles of roof applications that will help inform the audience of best practices from the various industry associations.

Association Speakers
Low-slope Underlayment Applications: Mike Ennis, SPRI
Steep-slope Underlayment Applications:

For more information, visit RICOWI’s website or contact Joan Cook, executive director, at (330) 671-4569.

Synthetic Underlayment Can Be Used on Nearly Any Roof

Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

Based on contractor demand, the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System launched a synthetic underlayment named Surround VR.

Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

Designed with the installer in mind, Surround VR Underlayment reduces the amount and weight of material needed for roofing jobs. In fact, one roll of Surround VR covers the same area as five rolls of 30# felt, yet weighs seven times less and is 10 times stronger.

The waterproof product was developed to work in nearly any roofing application, including with shingles, shakes, tile, slate or metal roofs. “With our new Surround VR Underlayment, installers will make fewer and easier trips up and down the ladder while experiencing faster installs, all while providing a more durable roofing system to their customers,” says Jorge Martinez, senior director of Product Marketing, TYPAR brand.

Made from a waterproof, synthetic polymer material, Surround VRUnderlayment is engineered to repel moisture and will not warp or buckle when wet, thus helping to maximize the life of the roof system. Surround VR is also slip-resistant on dry surfaces and provides better traction when wet.

The underlayment maintains its integrity year-round, performing well in temperatures ranging from -40 to 240 F. In cold temperatures, the material will not crack or wrinkle, which helps ensure smooth installs. In warm temperatures, its heat-reflecting, gray-colored surface reduces heat buildup on the roof. Surround VR also can withstand up to six months’ exposure to UV light and high winds and storms, even those experienced by coastal regions.

Surround VR Underlayment is backed by a 15-year product replacement warranty and is suited for residential and commercial applications.

Learn More

Visit Typar.com
Call (800) 284-2780

Synthetic Underlayment Is Approved for New and Reroofing Applications

Summit 180 synthetic underlayment by Atlas Roofing offers many advanced benefits not available with conventional felt.

Summit 180 synthetic underlayment by Atlas Roofing offers many advanced benefits not available with conventional felt.

Roof underlayment is the last line of defense that protects a home from serious damage if a roof covering is blown off or damaged in a storm. Summit 180 synthetic underlayment by Atlas Roofing offers many advanced benefits not available with conventional felt. It is an approved underlayment for new and reroofing applications and can be used with most types of code-approved steep-slope roof coverings, including metal.

On certain roof projects, underlayment may face a long exposure time from the dry-in to the completed roof covering. Atlas developed Summit 180 with performance characteristics that ensure its reliability during extended uncovered exposure to damaging UV rays. This lightweight, extremely strong, polypropylene fabric contains UV and water-resistant coatings that allow for up to 180 days of open exposure before being covered.

Summit 180 can withstand extreme temperatures from -40 F to 240 F. Unlike conventional saturated felt, Summit 180 is not prone to wrinkling or buckling. This allows it to lie more flat, which helps a roof protect against invasion from water.

Roofing crews benefit from a textured, wrinkle-free top surface and a slip-resistant coating applied to the face and base surfaces of this underlayment. This dial coating slip resistance provides improved grip to allow safer walkability during installation.

Summit 180 synthetic underlayment exceeds ASTM D226 Type I and Type II, the standard specification for asphalt saturated felt. It has earned ASTM D6757, the inorganic shingle underlayment standard. It is also UL 790 compliant for fire resistance.

Summit 180 roof underlayment is packaged for convenience in 10 square rolls weighing approximately 30 pounds each. For more details on Atlas Roofing’s synthetic underlayment, contact an Atlas sales representative.

Owens Corning Completes Acquisition of InterWrap

Owens Corning has received all regulatory clearances and completed the acquisition of InterWrap, a manufacturer of roofing underlayment and packaging materials.

“It’s an exciting day for our company,” says Brian Chambers, president of Owens Corning’s Roofing and Asphalt business. “This transaction strengthens our capabilities to support the conversion from organic to synthetic underlayments and accelerate our growth in the roofing components market. The acquisition also provides new growth opportunities for us. The people of InterWrap should be extremely proud of the company they have built,” Chambers adds. “We have been impressed with their talent and innovative spirit. In so many ways, they mirror our own employees. We are proud to welcome them to our team.”

Synthetic Underlayment Provides More Coverage per Roll than Traditional Felt

Atlas Roofing, a producer of felt underlayment, produces a lightweight, synthetic alternative to organic felt known as Summit 60.

Atlas Roofing, a producer of felt underlayment, produces a lightweight, synthetic alternative to organic felt known as Summit 60.

Atlas Roofing, a producer of felt underlayment, produces a lightweight, synthetic alternative to organic felt known as Summit 60. This underlayment, manufactured from strong woven polypropylene fabric, offers advanced benefits not available with traditional felt.

Summit 60 Synthetic Underlayment, which has high-temperature stability and offers greater resistance to UV breakdown than felt, has the durability needed for jobs that have a long open time from the dry-in to the completed roof covering. On certain steep-slope roof projects, underlayment can sometimes face such exposure for up to 60 days. For these roofing projects, underlayment must be able to maintain its reliability; Summit 60 meets these demands.

Roofing crews will appreciate that Summit 60 has a textured wrinkle-free top surface fabric and a slip-resistant polymer coating applied to its bottom surface, for safer walkability during installation. This slip-resistant polymer provides improved grip for reduced slippage between the underlayment and the roof sheathing.

Installation is easier because Summit 60 is manufactured with pre-printed lay lines. This water-resistant underlayment is packaged in 10 square rolls, each weighing less than 30 pounds. It provides more coverage per roll than traditional felt.

Summit 60 Synthetic Underlayment can be mechanically fastened to many different types of substrate, making it a solid underlayment choice for both new and re-roofing applications. This excellent synthetic product can be used with asphalt shingles, clay and concrete tiles, slate, and wood shakes, or any other code-approved steep slope roof covering.

Summit 60 underlayment has earned ASTM D6757, the inorganic shingle underlayment rating standard. Its performance exceeds ASTM D226 Type I and Type II, the standard specification for asphalt saturated felt and it is UL Classified as demonstrating conformance to critical fire testing requirements for a prepared roofing accessory. It also received FL 16226, the Florida Building Code approval.

Designed to enhance the life of a roof, Summit 60 qualifies as an Atlas Signature Select Roofing System component. Atlas Signature Select Roofing Systems are offered at three system levels allowing contractors to target all market segments.

Synthetic Underlayment Minimizes Labor Expense

REX SynFelt from Alpha ProTech Engineered Products

REX SynFelt from Alpha ProTech Engineered Products

REX SynFelt from Alpha ProTech Engineered Products is a high-strength woven synthetic roof underlayment that can save you 50 percent in labor and time expense, compared to 30# felt. Here’s why:

    The most slip-resistant underlayment in the industry
    20-times stronger than 30# felt; it won’t tear-off or buckle when wet
    10-times lighter per square
    10 squares per roll weighing only 28 pounds (250-foot roll)
    5 squares per roll weighing only 14 pounds (125-foot roll)
    UV-resistant and can be exposed for up to six months
    Light gray color reduces heat and provides cooler working surface

Pre-printed nailing pattern speeds installation.