Expert Tips For Shingling A Cone-Shaped Roof

Cone-shaped roofs are one of those projects that contractors either love to do or avoid like the plague.

A prominent architectural feature on Queen Anne- and Norman-style homes, cone-shaped roofs are also found on Armenian and Georgian churches and medieval towers and castles. Their sloping and curved geometric surfaces can be difficult and labor intensive to shingle, especially for roofers who are accustomed to working only with straight lines.

Whereas a simple pitched roof typically has two or more sides and a hip roof has at least four sides, a conical or turret-style roof can appear to have an infinite number of sides. Some cone-shaped roofs have three to eight flat sides that create more of a geometric shape, such as a pyramid.

So, the challenge is: How do you install flat shingles on this intricate, rounded surface?

The underlayment should be applied vertically, perpendicular to the eave, as shown in this figure from the ARMA Technical Bulletin titled “How to Shingle a Cone Roof.” (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

Getting Started

Thanks to their flexibility, modern asphalt shingles can be installed on roofs of any shape.

To begin shingling a cone roof, you need to know three measurements: the length of the rafter, the diameter of the cone and the widest piece of shingle you’ll be using.

To determine the distance around the base of the cone, multiply its diameter by 3.14. For example, if the diameter is 20 feet, the perimeter would equal 62.8 feet. With a 12-inch-wide shingle, you would need 63 shingles in each row around the cone.

Precise calculations are necessary because shingle pieces will need to change shape and become narrower as you move from the base of the cone up to its peak.

Cutting the shingles is a task you can do ahead of time, by creating a template, or when you get to a particular part of the installation.

Safety Concerns

Because cone-shaped roofs are usually steep and high off the ground, consider hammering footholds into the roof for stable support while you work. Better yet, use scaffolding, which not only provides a platform for leaning a ladder onto the roof, it also serves as an easily accessible shelf for your roofing materials and tools.

On a flat-sided cone roof, use the standard hip and ridge installation method. (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

Underlayment and Ventilation

With preparations complete and safety equipment in place, you’re ready for the fun part: installation.

First, start by applying a good quality underlayment to the deck per the manufacturer’s instructions.

The underlayment should be applied vertically, perpendicular to the eave, following the flow pattern from the cone’s peak to its base. This process will help to prevent the material from wrinkling or buckling. You should end up with an overlap near the peak, which can be trimmed during underlayment application and before installing shingles.

Continue to overlap the underlayment vertically as you progress up the cone and use asphalt plastic cement to cement the lap edge. Alternatively, you can use a peel-and-stick underlayment. A self-adhering underlayment protects the eaves and flashing from wind-driven rain and covers any possible gaps between abutting shingles.

Next, check the ventilation. If the cone is open to the attic area, it should be part of the ventilation system. To accommodate static ventilation in the main portion of the attic, increase the requirement for the net-free area by the same square footage as the cone-shaped room. If the area is open to the living space, a ceiling fan can help force moisture and heat from the cone-shaped room to the main living area for dispersal. Using a room dehumidifier may also be helpful.

When working with a completely circular cone, use an off-peak, roll-type ridge vent at the peak for positive ventilation. The formula for cone-shaped rooms is consistent with any other residential area:

  • Equal intake and exhaust vents: 300 square feet of attic area = 1 square foot of net-free vent area
  • Exhaust vents only: 150 square feet of attic area = 1 square foot of net-free vent area

In cases with no ventilation, make the homeowner aware of potential issues with accelerated wear and how it can affect the product’s warranty. For more specific requirements, contact the shingle manufacturer.

Shingling Flat-Sided vs. Rounded Cones

After installing underlayment and addressing ventilation, you can start applying shingles.

When shingling a rounded cone roof, divide the roof into three distinct zones. (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

If you’re working with a flat-sided cone roof, you can use the standard hip and ridge installation method. Snap vertical chalk lines from the cone tip to the eave center on each of the flat sides. Then apply shingles to the flat areas, cutting at the hips or joints. Use a standard hip and ridge shingle to complete the hip joints.

To ensure a continuous roofing line, snap horizontal chalk lines around the cone so that shingles will line up on adjacent sides.

Shingles on steep-sided cone roofs — those greater than 21/12 slope — may need to be hand sealed with asphalt plastic cement. Check the manufacturer’s instructions for steep-slope application.

When shingling a rounded cone roof, you won’t have a horizontal line to follow because of the curvature. If you try to create a line, butting the sides of the shingles together, the shingles will gradually curve downward and won’t correctly align when you encircle the cone.

To make installation easier, divide the roof into three distinct zones. Start applying shingles to zone one, at the bottom of the cone, and then work your way up to zones two and three.

While you are nailing, have another crew member help hold the shingles down around the curve so they are flush against the surface.

Side overlap of shingles is more noticeable in the upper portions of each cone. Trim shingles at an angle to make the joint parallel to water flow. (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

Because the cone shape tapers from the base to the peak, succeeding courses require less material.

The degree of horizontal offset and varied shingle cutouts will create a random appearance. When using standard three-tab shingles, trim each shingle for proper vertical alignment. A simpler alternative would be to use a randomly applied shingle that doesn’t need to be vertically aligned.

Shingling a cone-shaped roof may be challenging, but with the proper knowledge and execution, you can restore this architectural focal point to its full glory.

For more information from Atlas Roofing, including technical bulletins, installation instructions and product data sheets, visit atlasroofing.com.

Adjustable Roof Anchor Also Aids Ladder Access on Steep-Slope Roofs

The RIDGEPRO is a versatile and adjustable roof anchor that can be connected to the peak before stepping onto a steep-slope roof, allowing a safe transition on and off ladders on roofs with pitches ranging from 6/12 to 12/12. The innovative arch straddles ridge vents, and the adjustable, pitch-specific settings are designed to maximize contact between the RIDGEPRO and the roof surface, offering faster access to the peak than standard rope-and-harness techniques, according to the manufacturer.

The product offers integrated rope-and-harness connection capabilities, is easy to assemble and install, and can be anchored for extended-access roofing requirements. Constructed from solid, aircraft-grade aluminum, it exceeds industry standard of 5,000-pound tensile strength test when anchored.

The RIDGEPRO features an etched pitch grid that allows the user to customize the setting for pitches ranging from 6/12 to 12/12 and four pre-drilled holes in its cross members for anchoring capabilities.

Using its integrated wheels, the user can push the RIDGEPRO to the peak of the roof with an extension pole, grip it to the ridge, and secure a lanyard to a personal fall arrest system before stepping onto the roof. It also helps make accessing the ladder more safe and secure when leaving the roof.

For more information and a demonstration video, visit www.theridgepro.com.

ARMA’s Newest eBook Provides Guidance for Installing Three-Tab Asphalt Shingles

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has converted its popular manual, a Good Application Makes A Good Roof Better: A Simplified Guide – Installing Three-Tab Asphalt Shingles For Maximum Life & Weather Protection, into an eBook, making it easier for contractors to access it on the jobsite.

ARMA’s Good Application Guide serves as a resource for roofing professionals installing three-tab asphalt shingles, including for new-roof construction, reroofing/roof replacement and roof recovery projects.

The recently updated guide also includes special procedures for both low and steep-slope roofing systems, proper attic ventilation, ice dam protection, correct nailing methods, roof deck preparation, hip and ridge application, and underlayment, drip edge and flashing installation. As with all technical guidance, installers should also follow manufacturer’s recommended installation instructions. View a preview of the guide by clicking here.

“Three-tab shingles come in a variety of colors, styles and textures, but like with any asphalt roofing system, they have to be properly installed in order to achieve the best performance,” said Tim McQuillen, ARMA’s director of technical services, a 25-year building products industry veteran. “By converting the Good Application Guide: Three-Tab Shingles into an eBook, we can ensure contractors can access expert asphalt roofing installation techniques directly on their smartphone or tablet.”

The Good Application Guide: Three-Tab Shingles is available for $9.95 as a print-on-demand copy or $8.95 as an eBook from the ARMA Bookstore. It is also sold on other prominent digital platforms such as Amazon’s Kindle Store, Kobo, Barnes and Nobles’ Nook, Apple’s iBookstore and the Google Play store. To purchase the guide, visit www.asphaltroofing.org/arma-bookstore.

ARMA also offers several other technical publications for both residential and commercial asphalt roofing applications. They are available for purchase as print-on-demand and eBooks, and include the Good Application Makes a Good Roof Better – A Simplified Guide: Installing Laminated Asphalt Shingles for Maximum Life & Weather Protection, the Modified Bitumen Design Guide for Building Owners, and the Residential Asphalt Roofing Manual – Design and Application Methods.

For more information visit www.asphaltroofing.org

Green and Sustainable Roof Systems Highlight Durham Custom Home

The custom home in Durham, North Carolina features a standing seam metal roof, a balcony, a roof deck and a garden roof. The carport roof is made from solar panels. Photo: David Solow.

When Alison Trott purchased a vacant corner lot in the historic Cleveland-Holloway neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina, she wanted to use the space to construct her dream home. She wasn’t sure exactly what she wanted, but she had several priorities in mind. “When I built the house, I wanted to try and focus on sustainability as much as possible,” says Trott. “I wanted to try to focus on green building, and I wanted to try to utilize local resources as much as possible — local materials, local builders, local companies, and local craftsmen.”

She worked with a talented team of design and construction professionals to bring her vision to life, and the sustainable roof systems on the home became a crowning focus of the project.

At some point in the design process, the architect mentioned the possibility of incorporating a garden roof, and Trott jumped at the idea. “I said, ‘I want that!’” Trott recalls. “I was very excited about the idea, but I’d only seen green roofs on large commercial projects.”

The Lead Architect

Tina Govan, now principal of Somos Design, located in Raleigh, North Carolina, hit it off with Alison Trott right away. The two worked together on the design for several years, inviting CUBE design + research, an architecture firm in nearby Chapel Hill, to collaborate on the project.

The goals included constructing a modern home that would blend in with the historic neighborhood. The house was also designed to be part of the natural landscape. A key priority was saving two large oak trees on the property. “We wrapped the house around the trees,” notes Govan. “That way the house bends to nature.”

The key themes of the overall design are exemplified by the roof systems. The house features a metal gable roof with a balcony at one end, echoing historic homes in the area. The 950-square-foot garden roof was installed over the master wing of the house, and the roof of the carport was constructed from solar panels.

“It’s a very green house,” Govan notes. “Solar panels over the carport take care of most of the energy needs of the home. The green roof replaces what was disturbed — the ground below — and brings it up. The green roof blends well with the landscape, and with it the house doesn’t seem as big.”

The green roof is visible from many parts of the house, including the roof deck, which is separated from it by a glass railing. “I love green roofs,” says Govan. “They replace habitat and make building softer. It’s alive. It’s so much more dynamic and rich than any other type of hardscape.”

The Builder

Bob Wuopio is the owner of Form Design/Build LLC, headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina. The company specializes in one-of-a-kind, complex projects, so this custom house was right up its alley. “We love unique projects,” Wuopio says. “Our preference is to make everything — the doorknobs, the pulls, the lights, the cabinets. We try to fabricate everything. That’s our niche.”

Located on a corner lot in the historic Cleveland-Holloway neighborhood, the modern home was designed to preserve two large trees and wrap around a courtyard to provide privacy. Photo: David Solow.

Numerous custom details throughout the house put the company to the test. For its relatively small footprint — 3,400 square feet — the house has its fair share of different roofing systems. “We have almost every type of roof system on that project,” says Wuopio. “We have a standing seam metal roof on the high gable. We have standing seam metal roof that becomes a metal wall. We have a built-up roof with a floating deck and a glass railing system. There is a green roof over a whole wing of the house.”

Getting the deck and green roof areas sloped perfectly was essential, and that begins with the substructure. “Getting a roof with a slope of 1/8 inch per foot right requires a pretty good framer,” Wuopio notes.

Form Design/Build served as the general contractor on the project, and Wuopio was responsible for scheduling multiple trades at the site. One key concern was making sure that the low-slope roof system wouldn’t be damaged after it was installed. “You don’t want anyone poking holes in it,” says Wuopio. “We spray foamed underneath the deck, so if you did have a small leak, you might not notice it for years, potentially.”

Wuopio knew the roof under the garden roof assembly was crucial. “I knew we needed a bulletproof roof, so I called Jim Pickard. He knew exactly what we needed.”

The Roofing Contractor

James Pickard III is the owner and president of Pickard Roofing Company Inc. in Durham, North Carolina. He represents the third generation of his family to run the business, which is more than 90 years old.

Pickard Roofing handles all types of commercial and residential projects, including historical restoration work. Most of the company’s projects are within 25 miles of the office, including this one, which was just two miles down the road.

The red metal roof is complemented with matching half-round gutters, which incorporate “rain chains” as downspouts. Photo: David Solow.

Crews at the company don’t do as much hot-mop BUR work as they used to, but they still have that club in their bag for below-grade waterproofing projects and garden roof assemblies. For this green roof project, Pickard recommended a coal tar pitch roof system. “We use hot-mopped coal tar pitch in situations where the material is in constant contact with water because the pitch doesn’t degrade,” Pickard notes. “You don’t want to have to take the dirt off of a garden roof and start looking for leaks. You have to do everything you can to make sure nothing can cause problems.”

That includes making sure the deck is secured with screws and not nails, which can back out and damage the roof assembly. Gravel stops should either be copper or stainless steel so they won’t corrode. “The whole idea is permanence,” Pickard says.

The hot-mopped system manufactured by Durapax consists of four plies of tar-coated fiberglass felt, which were set in four layers of coal tar pitch. A fifth layer of pitch was added as a top coat.

Pickard Roofing also installed the metal roof system. Snap Lock panels were custom fabricated in the company’s metal shop from 24-gauge Kynar-coated steel from Firestone Building Products in a wine-red color chosen by the homeowner. A synthetic underlayment, Titanium PSU 30 from InterWrap, was applied to the wooden deck before the panels were secured in place.

“The great thing about the Snap Lock system is there is virtually no fastening through the face of the metal,” Pickard says.

The 950-square-foot green roof covers one wing of the house. Pre-vegetated sedum mats were installed in most of the green roof area, and native plants are also featured in areas with more growing media. Photo: Living Roofs Inc.

“The panels are secured with cleats and clips in the seams.”

Snow guards from Berger Brothers were attached to the seams using non-penetrating screws. Half-round gutters were fabricated from the same metal as the roof and complemented with “rain chains” that serve as downspouts.

Many of the copper details and flashings were custom fabricated on site. “One of our strengths is in our flashing design,” notes Pickard. “The company has a lot of soldering irons. We still use a lot of the old techniques.”

The roofing installations went smoothly. As Pickard Roofing completed the roofs on the home, crews from Southern Energy Management, headquartered in Morrisville, North Carolina, constructed the carport roof from partially transparent solar panels.

“Everyone’s priority was on doing the job right,” Pickard says. “In this case, the emphasis was on the quality, not just the cost. The cost is important, don’t get me wrong, but in this case the budget was increased if there was a product that could do the job better. Ultimately, you have to put the quality where it counts, and that’s why this project worked out so well.”

The Green Roof Installers

Landscape architect Kathryn Blatt Ancaya co-founded Living Roofs Inc. in Asheville, North Carolina, along with her husband, Emilio Ancaya. The company handles all aspects of green roof and living wall projects, including design, installation and long-term maintenance. “Our work ranges from small residential projects to large complex commercial and institutional projects — and of course, everything in between,” she says.

These photos show the roof right after it was installed (left) and after three months of growth. Photos: Living Roofs Inc.

Living Roofs is a certified installer with garden roof system manufacturer Xero Flor America LLC, which is headquartered in Durham. Clayton Rugh, the director of Xero Flor, contacted the Ancayas after Trott and Govan toured the company’s own garden roof. They asked for help designing a version of the company’s lightweight extensive roof system for the project. As Rugh notes, “One of the benefits of the Xero Flor green roof system is its adaptability to nearly any roof situation — load limits down to 10 pounds per square foot, dynamic slope changes between zero and 45 degrees, and compatibility with most commercial waterproofing, including TPO, PVC, modified bitumen and asphaltic BUR assemblies.”

“We collaborated with the architect, Tina Govan, and Xero Flor to design an extensive pre-vegetated green roof with areas of deeper soil to support native grasses and perennials,” Ancaya explains.

The Living Roofs crew installed the Xero Flor XF300 green roof system with growing media depths ranging from 2.5 to 5 inches. After the root barrier was installed over the coal tar pitch roof, it was covered with a drain mat and filter fleece. The growing medium was then lifted into place using a telehandler.

Most of the garden roof area was overlaid with pre-vegetated Xero Flor sedum mats. Plugs of herbaceous plants were inserted in the deeper areas. “The grasses we used were grown by Hoffman Nursery, a local grower, and we used perennials by North Creek Nursery,” Ancaya notes.

The sedum mats are an attractive option because they are fully covered when they are installed, notes Ancaya. “Incorporating the areas of deeper soil also allowed us to create a more dramatic visual effect by contrasting the low-growing Xero Flor mats with taller and more textured plants,” she says.

The green roof installation took less than eight hours over the course of two days. “Kate is the design arm of Living Roofs, and Emilio is the installation arm, and the two of them teamed up on this project to knock it out of the park,” Rugh says.

A Happy Home

Trott enjoyed watching the building process. “I learned a ton,” she says. “I just love watching craftsmen who are passionate about what they do. I had fun out there!”

The home was completed in the spring of 2017, and Trott is thrilled with the result. “It’s better than I even imagined it would be,” she says. “I love it, and my cats love it. In fact, I think they are pretty sure that I did all of this just to entertain them.”

The growth and changing color palette of the rooftop garden has been interesting to watch. “The green roof has been amazing,” she says. “It’s just been one year, but the green roof keeps getting lusher and lusher. Every feature is my favorite feature in the house, but the green roof — I love it. I really do.”

In fact, Trott has become something of a residential green roof ambassador. “I’ve been spreading the word,” she says.

TEAM

Architects: Tina Govan, Architect, Raleigh, North Carolina, www.somosdesign.us, in collaboration with CUBE design + research, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, www.cubedesignresearch.com
General Contractor: Form Design/Build LLC, Raleigh, North Carolina, www.formdesignbuild.org
Roofing Contractor: Pickard Roofing Company Inc., Durham, North Carolina, www.PickardRoofing.com
Green Roof Installer: Living Roofs Inc., Asheville, North Carolina, www.livingroofsinc.com
Solar Installer: Southern Energy Management, Morrisville, North Carolina, www.southern-energy.com

MATERIALS

Low-Slope System
Coal Tar Pitch: Coal Tar Roofing and Waterproofing Pitch, Durapax, www.Durapax.com
Fiberglass Felt: Tar Coated Fiber Felt, Durapax

Steep-Slope System
Synthetic Underlayment: Titanium PSU 30, InterWrap, www.InterWrap.com
Metal Panels: 24-gauge Kynar-coated steel, Firestone Building Products, www.FirestoneBPCO.com

Green Roof System
Extensive and Semi-Intensive Garden Roof: Xero Flor XF300, Xero Flor America LLC, Durham, North Carolina, www.xeroflornorthamerica.com

Copper Is the Solution for Challenging Residential Roof Restoration

This home in Alexandria, Va., was retrofitted with a copper double-lock standing seam roof system

This home in Alexandria, Va., was retrofitted with a copper double-lock standing seam roof system installed by Wagner Roofing. The 16-ounce copper roof panels were 17 inches wide. Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

“We like the tough jobs,” says Dean Jagusch, president and owner of Wagner Roofing Company. “We like the intricate jobs.”

Headquartered in Hyattsville, Md., Wagner Roofing has served the Washington area market for more than a century. “We specialize in historic restoration and innovative architectural roofing and sheet metal,” Jagusch notes. “We’re full service. We do slate, copper, tile, and have a low-slope commercial division as well. But our trophy stuff tends to be of the steep-slope variety.”

A recent residential restoration project in Alexandria, Va., certainly qualifies as “trophy stuff,” taking home a North American Copper in Architecture Award from the Copper Development Association (CDA) in the “Restoration: Roof and Wall” category.

It’s easy to see why. The origami-inspired design features multiple roof angles, but the daring design was problematic. Even though the home was relatively new, the owners were plagued by leaks. Along with Restoration Engineering Inc. of Fairfax, Va., Wagner Roofing was called in to consult on the project, determine the source of the leaks, and come up with a solution.

The original galvalume standing seam roof channeled the water into a large, stainless steel internal gutter with roof drains. Jagusch found that the leaks were occurring at two types of critical points. First, there were leaks where the internal roof drains met the central gutter. The other problem spots were along the pitch transitions.

Jagusch felt that installing a conventional-style painted galvalume roofing system in those spots was almost impossible. “We felt that was since it was an area that was failing, we wanted a metal we could work with when we met a transition and turn the panels vertical where we needed to without having to break them and rely on rivets and caulk,” he says.

Custom five-sided downspouts were fabricated

Custom five-sided downspouts were fabricated, but large windows at the back of the home offered few options for support. The downspouts were attached up under the framing system. Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Copper was the answer. “The detailing was pretty tough to do, so we recommended changing it to copper so we could work with it, be able to solder and have a more seamless roofing assembly,” Jagusch recalls.

Another key to the project was redesigning how the roof drained. “We decided to push all the water to the exterior,” he says. “We collaborated with Restoration Engineering and we fleshed out the original redesign.”

The team decided that installing a copper roof system with a new drainage plan would be the best way to eliminate the leaks and keep the inspiring look the homeowners desired.

“We wanted to eliminate the drains and push all the water to the exterior, so that’s why we went for the re-slope of the big central gutter,” Jagusch says. “Also, at the transitions, we wanted to make sure we were 100 percent watertight, so we used a combination of turning up panels and soldered cleats to get everything into place.”

Solving the Puzzle

With its intersecting planes, the roof made laying out the panels an intricate puzzle. “You also had large expanses of roofing that changed pitch throughout,” Jagusch explains. “Panels had to be laid correctly because not only does the roof slope up, but it also slopes sideways. The layout of the panels was critical from the get-go. We all looked at it and agreed that we would follow parallel to the actual trusses, which we felt was the best solution.”

The old roof system was removed and stripped down to the 3/4–inch plywood deck. “We covered the entire roof deck with Grace Ultra,” said Jagusch. “We then used a slip sheet and installed 1-inch-high, double lock, 17-inch-wide, 16-ounce copper standing seam panels.”

Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Panels were roll formed at the Wagner metal shop out of 20-inch-wide coils using an ESE roll former and trailered to the jobsite. Approximately 5,400 square feet of copper panels were installed on the project. The double-lock seams were mechanically seamed. Twenty-ounce copper flat-seamed panels were used in the large valleys.

The safety plan included full scaffolding during every phase of the project. “We have our own safety scaffolding system,” Jagusch says. “Our guys demand it on our jobs, and we demand it of them to come home safely every day. We are very proud of our safety record. It’s front of mind for us.”

In addition to the roof, all of the metal cladding was replaced on the southeast feature wall. The top of the wall was reconfigured to accommodate the new sloped valley. Where the wall met the roof, a band was fabricated to match the top part of the fascia. Other details included copper cladding for the chimney.

Drainage was redirected to the perimeter, where custom-fabricated gutters were installed. “On the west side, the roof was originally designed to dump off straight onto a rock feature on the ground, but we fashioned a custom copper box gutter about 35 or 40 feet long,” Jagusch states.

At the either end of the large internal gutter and at the end of a large valley, shop-fabricated copper conductor heads were installed. Custom five-sided downspouts were fabricated, but installing them posed another challenge, as large window areas offered few options for support. The downspouts had to be snugged up under the framing system.

“Everything had to work with the other building components,” Jagusch explains. “One of the tougher things on this project was being able to have the function and the form both top of mind, in that order. The key was to make the functional stuff look good.”

Showpiece Project

The project was completed about a year ago, and the copper has begun to change in color. “The copper now has a gorgeous bronze, kind of purplish hue to it,” notes Jagusch. “I think it will eventually develop a green patina, but with the way the environment is these days, I think it will take 15 years or so before it gets to that point. That’s the cool thing about copper—it’s a natural, breathing material that is constantly changing, constantly evolving.”

Copper cladding was installed on a feature wall

Copper cladding was installed on a feature wall, which also featured changes in slope. The top of the wall was reconfigured and a band was added to match the top part of the fascia. Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Wagner Roofing has a maintenance agreement in place on the home, so Jagusch has stayed in touch with the owners and kept tabs on the project, which is performing well. “I’ve got just one hell of a team here,” he says. “It wasn’t just one estimator that went out and brought this thing in. In our business, estimating and roofing is a team sport. We kicked this thing around a lot with all divisions of the company, from estimating to operations to the actual installers before we finally settled on a number for this thing.”

“We work on some pretty spectacular places, and of course this is one of them,” he concludes. “We like a challenge, and this is the stuff that my team really loves to get their teeth into.”

Steep-Slope Roofing Manual Is Updated

To provide the roofing industry with the most comprehensive information about the design, materials and installation techniques applicable to all materials used in steep-slope roof system applications, NRCA has released “The NRCA Roofing Manual: Steep-slope Roof Systems—2017”. The new volume updates the 2013 volume under the same title and serves as a reference for contractors, architects and roof consultants.

The manual consists of five sections addressing materials used in steep-slope roof system applications:

  • Asphalt Shingle
  • Clay and Concrete
  • Metal Shingle
  • Wood Shingle
  • Slate and Wood Shake

The 2017 volume and boxed set can be purchased in hardbound versions or downloaded for free by NRCA members at Shop.NRCA.net.

NRCA Releases Market Survey on Sales Volume Trends

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has released its 2014-15 market survey providing information about overall sales volume trends in the roofing industry, roofing experiences, material usage and regional breakdowns. It is an important tool to measure the scope of the U.S. roofing industry, and the data provides a glimpse into which roof systems are trending in the low- and steep-slope roofing markets.

This year’s survey reports sales volumes for 2014 and 2015 projections averaged between $7 million and just more than $8 million, respectively, and revealed a near-steady ratio of low- to steep-slope sales of 72 percent to 28 percent.

For low-slope roofs, TPO remains the market leader with a 31 percent share of the new construction market and 26 percent of the reroofing market for 2014. Asphalt shingles continue to dominate the steep-slope roofing market with a 44 percent market share for new construction and a 58 percent share for reroofing.

Polyisocyanurate insulation continues to lead its sector of the market with 75 percent of new construction and 70 percent of reroofing work.

In addition, roof cover board installation for 2014 was reported as 24 percent in new construction, 46 percent in reroofing tear-offs and 30 percent in re-cover projects.

NRCA’s market survey enables roofing contractors to compare their material usage with contractors in other regions, and provides manufacturers and distributors with data to analyze, which can affect future business decisions.

ABC Supply Opens Additional Branches on Opposite Sides of the Country

Building products distributor ABC Supply Co. Inc. has opened additional branches on opposite sides of the country—one in Cumberland, Md. and the other in Sacramento, Calif.

The Cumberland location serves contractors in the western Maryland and south central Pennsylvania markets where ABC Supply has not previously had a presence. The branch in Sacramento is the second in the area and provides contractors working on the south side of the city a convenient alternative to the company’s store in Roseville, north of the city. Both stores carry steep- and low-slope roofing materials, accessories and related roofing supplies, along with other exterior building products appropriate to each market.

ABC Supply Moves Three Branches into New Facilities

Three branches of building products distributor ABC Supply Co. Inc. have moved into facilities that will enable them to better serve local contractors and builders.

The Bloomington, Ind. store moved to 1600 N. Curry Pike. The East Peoria, Ill. branch relocated to 399 Truck Haven Road. The Oklahoma City facility is now at 1500 W. Reno Avenue. All three locations carry steep-slope and low-slope roofing products and systems, siding, windows and doors, and related supplies. Other product offerings are determined by local market conditions.

ABC Supply is a wholesale distributor of roofing, siding, windows and other exterior building products. Since its founding by Ken and Diane Hendricks in 1982, ABC Supply’s focus has been serving professional contractors and offering the products, services and support they need to build their businesses.

Projects: Office

DPR Construction, Phoenix

Eighty-two Daylighting Systems were installed in the renovated 16,533-square-foot building.

Eighty-two Daylighting Systems were installed in the renovated 16,533-square-foot building.

Team

Roofing contractor: Arithane Foam, Corona, Calif.
Architect/engineer: SmithGroupJJR, Phoenix
Daylighting systems distributor: Norcon Industries, Guadalupe, Ariz.

Roof Materials

Eighty-two Daylighting Systems were installed in the renovated 16,533-square-foot building, formerly an abandoned retail boutique at the corner of 44th Street and Van Buren in Phoenix.

“The use of the Daylighting Systems was an integral part of our sustainability and lighting energy savings plans for the renovated space,” says Dave Elrod, regional manager of DPR Construction, Phoenix. “The products are a cost-efficient solution to provide lighting since they nearly eliminate the need for artificial daytime lighting.”

In addition, the roof is composed of foam with an R-25 insulation value (approximately 4-inches thick) over plywood sheathing.

Daylighting systems manufacturer: Solatube International Inc.
Foam roofing manufacturer: Quik-Shield from SWD Urethane

Roof Report

DPR Construction is a national technical builder specializing in highly complex and sustainable projects. In less than 10 months, the design-build team researched, designed, permit-ted, and built a highly efficient and modern workplace with numerous innovative sustainability features.

In addition to natural daylighting, the office features an 87-foot zinc-clad solar chimney, which releases hot air from the building while drawing cooler air in; shower towers that act as evaporative coolers to regulate building temperatures; 87 operable windows designed to open and close automatically (based on indoor/outdoor temperatures); and two “vampire” shut-off switches to keep electrical devices (radios, cell-phone chargers, microwaves) from using plug energy when no one is in the office.

Access to the building was limited during construction. Spray foam roofing, which took about seven days to complete, had to be done in small quadrants because of the tight schedule as work was progressing in the other sections. The roofing workers were challenged by the barrel-shaped roof, which created footing difficulties, and the many penetrations that had to be flashed, including all PV support legs, Solatubes, skylights and HVAC penetrations. Work was completed in the middle of winter, so additional protections and efficiencies were required.

The circa-1972 building has been officially certified as a Net-Zero Energy Building by the Seattle-based International Living Future Institute through its Living Building Challenge program. It also has received LEED-NC Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, Washington, D.C.

PHOTOS: Ted Van Der Linden, DPR Construction

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