Symmetrical Standing Seam Roofing System Installed Without Interrupting Operations

Northwest Distributors was able to keep operations running without interruption while a new seam roofing system installed was installed a re-cover application. Photos: McElroy Metal

The versatility of a symmetrical standing seam metal roofing system has given birth to a new way of dealing with damaged metal roofing.

Northwest Distributors in Hays, Kansas, is a busy warehouse, dealing with auto parts and supplies. The R-panel roofing on the original building and an addition both sustained damage in several hailstorms over the years. After a 2017 hailstorm, the insurance company for Northwest Distributors agreed a new roof was needed and it would cover the damage.

The tried and true method of replacement involves complete roofing tear-off and replacement. Obviously, this would expose the valuable contents of the facility to the elements. Roofmasters Roofing & Sheet Metal of Hays proposed the patented 238T tall clip re-cover using the 238T symmetrical standing seam roofing system from McElroy Metal.

The roof re-cover would not require the removal of any existing roofing panels and therefore, would not interrupt any activity inside. It would be business-as-usual at Northwest Distributors during the install.

The owners at Northwest Distributors decided to go with the re-cover. Project manager Andrew Bizzell and project superintendent Andy Littrel headed up the assignment for Roofmasters.

“The tall clip re-cover cost is about the same as a removal, but the benefit comes from the contents of the building not being exposed to potential damage from rain or wind or hail,” says Bizzell. “Plus, they were able to keep working without interruption. That saved Northwest money as well.”

To eliminate the problem of standing water behind curbs above the skylights, transverse panels were installed above the skylights using floating purlins that lift the transverse panels and skylights above the field of the new roof. Photos: McElroy Metal

Panels for the 58,000-sqaure-foot re-cover were produced onsite and stacked on the roof. Roofmasters owns its own roll former that produces the 238T symmetrical standing seam panel. The 24-gauge panels are 24 inches wide with striations in PVDF Regal White. Panels were approximately 64 feet long.

“It really was a straightforward job,” Bizzell says. “We have installed several re-covers with the 238T. We like the ease of installation. It provides a great benefit to the building owner because if a panel is damaged, a single panel can be removed and replaced anywhere on the roof. If a panel is damaged with another type of standing seam system, you have to start on an end and remove all of the panels up to and including the damaged panel. Obviously, that is a much greater expense.”

Bizzell says not all insurance policies cover cosmetic damage sustained in weather events like hailstorms. The symmetrical standing seam system allows for the replacement of a single panel or only damaged panels the owner feels the need to replace, reducing his financial hit.

Roofmasters installed 3 1/2 inches of batt insulation between the original roof and the new panels to eliminate the possibility of condensation forming between the two metal systems. It also provided the owner with an added R-value of R-12, which will help reduce heating and cooling costs.

Photos: McElroy Metal

It should be noted the Northwest Distributors warehouse roof includes 36 skylights, a feature the owner wanted to keep. To eliminate the problem of standing water behind curbs above the skylights, Roofmasters installed transverse panels from the top of the skylight to the ridge. Transverse panels are installed perpendicular to the slope using floating purlins that lift the transverse panels and skylights above the field of the new roof. This system lifts the leak-prone skylights out of the water plane. None of the exposed fasteners used for this detail penetrate the roof.

Beneath the center of the transverse panels, a center support was installed. In addition to support, it adds a little pitch to the transverse panels to aid water flow.

Roofmasters installed a polycarbonate skylight panel from MWI Components over the original skylight hole.

“We use transverse panels with skylights and other roof penetrations,” Bizzell says. “We also use the traditional curb. Installed correctly, they both do what they’re supposed to do.”

Attachment Protects Standing Seam Roofs From Damage Due to Retractable Lanyards

SeamSAFE, a provider of fall protection for standing seam roofers, offers its Retractable Lanyard Disks, which fit over SeamSAFE anchors to help protect standing seam roofs from damage caused by dragging or dropping retractable lanyards during roofing projects. The disks serve as a shield to minimize the potential for roof scrapes and surface indentations.

The Retractable Lanyard Disk is one of three new attachments designed to extend the utility and versatility of the company’s best-of-class safety anchors. The other new accessories are SeamSAFE’s ladder attachment and toe board attachment.

According to SeamSAFE inventor and owner Doug Mullins, “We developed our new accessories in response to feedback from roofers who are seeking better and more efficient solutions to the challenges of working on a standing seam roof.”

The new products add to SeamSAFE’s existing line of anchor accessories, which include SeamSAFE Roof Brackets and SeamSAFE Adapters. The company’s brackets are used by roofers for mounting a temporary rooftop walkboard or staging area for gear and materials. The adapters provide a means to temporarily or permanently install a wide range of equipment to rooftops.

For more information, visit www.seamsafe.com.

Standing Seam Metal Roof Is the Natural Choice for New Cottage in Wisconsin

A standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels was the natural choice to clad the roof of This new construction project in the North Woods of Wisconsin features a standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels. Photos: RHEINZINK

A standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels was the natural choice to clad the roof of a new cottage located in the North Woods of Wisconsin. Approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels met the owner’s criteria. “The multi-level roof was a key part of the design and we wanted it to blend into the environment as much as possible,” the owner says. “You won’t find another material that looks as natural and exquisite as RHEINZINK.”

The prePATINA blue-grey panels were fabricated by RHEINZINK systems partner Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois. The installation team was led by Lou Rondeau of Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire. Rondeau is an experienced zinc craftsman and instructor in fabrication techniques. He was assisted by Craig Hardin of Hardin Construction, Union Bridge, Maryland, and Chad Wolbert of W&W Construction, Williamsport, Maryland. The three men were on the job for five days. The general contractor on the project was Rod Flohr Construction, LLC, Tomahawk, Wisconsin.

“Rondeau did a fantastic job on the installation, including some beautiful detailing,” the owner says. He specifically mentioned the crescent seams at the eaves. “It’s a designer detail,” according to Rondeau. “Most guys will do a straight up and down 90-

Approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels were used to construct the roof. Photos: RHEINZINK

degree edge. But we like to spend a little extra time on the detailing and seaming. RHEINZINK can last a lifetime so it’s important to make the appearance as classic and timeless as possible. I really like working with the qualities and craftsmanship associated with it.”

Overall, the job was relatively straightforward, according to Rondeau. “The greatest challenge was getting to the site in the North Woods,” he says. “But the cottage turned out to be a real gem in that wilderness environment.”

TEAM

Metal Fabricator: Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois, www.sheetmetalsupplyltd.com
Roofing Contractors: Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire,
www.facebook.com/Natural-Metals-Associates-228362561021655/
Hardin Construction, Union Bridge, Maryland, hardinconstructionllc.com
W&W Construction, Williamsport, Maryland,
www.facebook.com/WW-Construction-LLC-430340303795069/

MATERIALS

Metal Panels: RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels in prePATINA blue-grey, RHEINZINK, www.rheinzink.us

Standing Seam Metal Roof Crowns Jaindl Farms Office Addition

The Jaindl Farms office complex sits on an a 12,000-acre turkey farm complete with its own feed mill. Photo: Steve Wolfe Photography.

Jaindl Farms is a multigenerational family business that encompasses a land development company and a fully integrated turkey farm. Its headquarters sits on 12,000 acres of farmland in Orefield, Pennsylvania, where the company grows the crops to make the feed for its turkeys. When the owners contacted MKSD Architects in Allentown, Pennsylvania, about adding space to their offices, the goals were to provide room to expand and to honor the Jaindl family’s history and legacy.

“The owner has a deep appreciation for all things agrarian and for old barns,” recalls Todd Chambers, partner, MKSD Architects. “One day we were meeting about the project, and he said, ‘What do you think about reusing the timber frame of an old barn?’ A light bulb went off.”

A large barn in Northampton County was located and dismantled, and the frame was repurposed for the office addition. The new two-story stone structure connects to the existing one-story office building, which was roofed with natural cedar shakes. A standing seam metal roof was specified for the new structure in

The new two-story addition was constructed with wood repurposed from a barn built around 1900. It was topped with a new standing seam metal roof. Photo: Steve Wolfe Photography.

keeping with the traditional architecture of the area. “We were concerned about the aesthetics, so standing seam was an obvious choice,” Chambers says. “We tried to keep the penetrations to a minimum and keep them out of the view of the main facade.”

The roofing contractor on the project was The Gehringer Company, headquartered in Whitehall, Pennsylvania. The company was called in to handle the project by the general contractor, Allentown-based Bracy Contracting Inc. The Gehringer Company’s president, Tom Gehringer, recommended a Dutch Seam roof system manufactured by ATAS International because it had the durability and aesthetics the project required, but was also easy to install. “It’s less labor-intensive than other systems because it doesn’t require a mechanical seamer,” he notes.

A Turkey Shoot

The roofing installation went very smoothly, according to Gehringer and Chambers. The Gehringer Company crews installed 6,400 square feet of ATAS MRD-110 Dutch Seam panels on the roof. They also installed approximately 500 square feet of metal panels as siding on the dormers. “It’s a 12-inch-wide piece with a raised section at the lock,” notes Gehringer. “When it’s installed looks like board and batten siding.”

The roof features dormers to bring in natural light. The dormers are sided with metal panels to minimize roof maintenance. Photo: The Gehringer Corporation.

Installation began in January 2017, so the weather posed the biggest challenge. “We did it when the temperatures were pretty low. The highs were in the 20s,” Gehringer recalls. “The nice thing is you can install the system in almost any temperature.”

After ATA-Shield high temperature synthetic underlayment was applied to the entire surface of the plywood deck, the roof panels were installed. “We worked from our aerial lifts,” Gehringer explains. “We purchased two aerial lifts several years ago and now use them for almost all of our steep roofing installations.”

Details included SL-2 Snow Meister snow guards from Berger Brothers. “In this climate, one of the tricky pieces with standing seam is sliding snow, so we specified snow guards that clamp to the standing seams,” Chambers says. “The ones we used emulate the turkey tail feathers.”

Roofing crews also tied in a small section of new cedar shakes to extend the hallway of the existing structure and connect it to the new addition. “We installed the original cedar shakes on the adjacent section for Bracy Contracting almost 20 years ago,” notes Gehringer.

The project went off without a hitch. Gehringer credits his company’s experienced crews and field supervisors for its

The snow guards installed on the project were chosen in part because they reminded the business owners of a turkey’s tail feathers. Photo: The Gehringer Corporation.

excellent track record. “I believe we’re one of the larger architectural metal roofing installers in our area and have virtually no callbacks on roofs we install,” he says. “What it boils down to is having people that know how to do it right — and having people that are committed to doing it right. And with architectural metal work, you have to take your time and do it right. This metal roof is going to look exactly like it looks now for at least 30 years.”

Looking back, what strikes Chambers is how different this project was from his typical assignments. “We’re commercial architects. We do a lot of health care work,” he says. “The ability to design something that’s not done every day, and is different than your typical approach, is refreshing and fun.”

TEAM

Architect: MKSD Architects, Allentown, Pennsylvania, www.MKSDarchitects.com
General Contractor: Bracy Construction Inc., Allentown, Pennsylvania, www.BracyConstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: The Gehringer Corporation, Whitehall, Pennsylvania, www.GehringerRoofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: ATAS Dutch Seam MRD110, .032 aluminum, Medium Bronze, ATAS International Inc., www.ATAS.com
Metal Siding Panels: ATAS Multi-Purpose Panels MPW120, .032 aluminum, Sierra Tan, ATAS International Inc.
Synthetic Underlayment: ATA-Shield, ATAS International Inc.
Snow Guards: SL-2 Snow Meister Snow Guards, Berger Building Products, www.bergerbp.com

S-5! Releases Updated Attachment Solutions & Products Brochure

S-5! has published its 2018 Attachment Solutions & Products brochure and made it available for download.

The 20-page brochure can be found at: https://www.s-5.com/resources/download-library/, with all other S-5! literature.

The Attachment Solutions & Products brochure contains information about what S-5! attachment products can be used for and how to correctly use them. The S-5! line of aluminum and brass attachment products are extremely versatile, fitting most standing seam and exposed fastener metal roof profiles, including most structural and architectural profiles.

In the brochure, find solutions for attaching solar panels, snow retention systems, signs, banners, pipes and conduits, HVAC and rooftop equipment, satellite dishes, lightning protection, fall protection and more.

For more information, visit www.s-5.com.

Metal Barrel Roof Tops the Rebels’ New Basketball Arena

The Pavilion at Ole Miss seats 9,500 fans.

The Pavilion at Ole Miss seats 9,500 fans. The building’s signature is its standing seam metal roof, which was manufactured by ACI Building Systems. Photos: Professional Roofing Contractors Inc.

The Pavilion at Ole Miss is a multi-purpose facility that is most famous for hosting the University of Mississippi’s basketball team. The arena cost approximately $97 million to build and seats 9,500 fans. The building’s signature arched metal panel roof was designed to complement the curved entrance and blend in with other architectural features on the university’s campus in Oxford, Miss.

Professional Roofing Contractors of Shelbyville, Tenn., was originally called in to assist with estimating the cost of the structure’s main roof, as well as a membrane roof system on the lower level. Upon final bid results, the decision was made to proceed with a standing seam metal roof on the upper portion of the building and a PVC roof on the lower level. Professional Roofing was the successful low roof bidder and selected ACI Building Systems to provide the standing seam roof materials and Sika Sarnafil to provide the PVC membrane roof materials. Professional Roofing installed both systems, with Jose Martinez as the crew leader for the membrane roofing portion and Dale Jones in charge of the metal roofing crew.

Larry W. Price, president of Professional Roofing, and Jonathan Price, the company’s vice president and the production manager on the project, oversaw the installation of 79,500 square feet of standing seam metal roofing and 46,500 square feet of PVC. There wasn’t much room for staging material on the jobsite, which didn’t give the company much room to maneuver. For the main roof, bundles of pre-cut metal panels were trailered in by ACI and loaded to the roof by crane.

“Logistics were complicated,” notes Larry Price. “Just getting a big enough crane in there and lifting the panels was difficult. Once we got the panels on the roof and they were situated, the roofers could just move ahead.”

Photos: Professional Roofing Contractors Inc.

Photos: Professional Roofing Contractors Inc.

Panels were installed with a 2-inch-high, double-lock standing seam, which was completed using a self-propelled mechanical seamer from D.I. Roof Seamers. The metal panels were curved into place by crews on the roof, who installed them over the staggered metal deck after it was covered with two 2-inch layers of polyiso insulation and Carlisle’s WIP 300 HT self-adhered underlayment. “The metal deck was segmented,” notes Jonathan Price. “We had to bridge some of those sections to make a nice, smooth curve.”

The scope of work included a large gutter at the roof edge. The gutter was 3 feet high and 2 feet wide, and crews from Professional Roofing flashed the gutter and lined it with the same Sika Sarnafil PVC used on the lower roof.

On the mezzanine level, crews installed a vapor barrier and mechanically fastened two 2-inch layers of polyiso insulation, as well as some tapered insulation for drainage. Once that work was completed, the 60-mil PVC was applied.

“Everything went pretty smoothly,” says Jonathan Price. “Logistics are usually tight on a new construction project, but once we adjusted to that, we just had to cope with the weather.”

“We had a lot of hot days and some rainy days,” Larry Price remembers. “Mississippi in the summer can get hot, hot, hot—and when it’s not hot, it’s raining.”

TEAM

Architect: AECOM, Kansas City, Mo.
General Contractor: BL Harbert International, Birmingham, Ala., Blharbert.com
Roofing Contractor: Professional Roofing Contractors Inc., Shelbyville, Tenn., Professionalroofingcontractors.com
Metal Roof Panel Manufacturer: ACI Building Systems, LLC, ACIbuildingsystems.com
PVC Roof Manufacturer: Sika Sarnafil, USA.sarnafil.sika.com

Liberty University Taps Experienced Team for Indoor Practice Facility

Liberty University

Photo: Leah Seavers. Copyright Liberty University

While he was a student in the 1970s at Liberty Baptist College in Lynchburg, Va., Craig McCarty took a job with a roofing company to help him pay his way through school. One of his business courses required students to set up a model business, so McCarty set up a fictional roofing company.

When a recession forced his boss to close down the company where he worked, McCarty turned his classroom project into reality. He got his contractor’s license and formed his own roofing business at the age of 20. More than 40 years later, he is installing roofs on the same campus he once took classes for a college now known as Liberty University.

McCarty is the president of McCarty Roofing, headquartered in Lynchburg, Va. This year the company installed the standing seam metal roof on Liberty University’s new indoor football practice facility, the fourth building the company has worked on at the school. McCarty has always been fascinated by metal roofs, and he estimates that 70 percent of the company’s business comes from the metal segment of the market. “It’s our passion, and we’re really good at it,” he says.

Liberty University’s new indoor practice facility encloses an entire regulation football field.

Liberty University’s new indoor practice facility encloses an entire regulation football field. The structural metal roof system is made of panels that run the entire width of the building.

He’s found a great place to ply his trade in Liberty University, which has made roofs manufactured by Fabral Metal Wall and Roof Systems into something of a signature architectural style. Other Fabral roofs at the university include those on Williams Stadium, Hancock Welcome Center, Jerry Falwell Library, and the LaHaye Recreation and Fitness Center.

According to Jerry Wandel, Fabral’s Mid-Atlantic territory manager, based in Richmond, Va., Fabral and distributor NB Handy in Lynchburg have partnered to provide architectural metal enclosure systems for 13 buildings on the campus since 2010.

The new practice facility encloses an entire regulation football field, and the design for the structural metal system on the vaulted barrel roof called for panels—many as long as 240 feet—that would run the entire width of the building.

Fabral’s Stand’N Seam 24-gauge panels in Dark Bronze were specified for the project. According to Wandel, the product features a unique stainless-steel clip design and double lock-seamed side joints that allow panels to expand and contract throughout their entire length. The system had been installed successfully on indoor practice facilities at other colleges, including Georgia Tech, the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech and Virginia Military Institute.

“When you run a panel that long, clearly one of the biggest concerns is expansion and contraction,” Wandel says. “Our Stand’N Seam product just lends itself to a project that has 240-foot panels. This one was right in our wheelhouse.”

Riding the Curve

The first task for McCarty Roofing was drying in the metal deck. Crews installed two layers of 2 ½ inch polysio and covered the insulation with Blueskin, a self-adhering underlayment manufactured by Henry.

The metal panels were fabricated on the site. Fabral supplied the roll former and brought in Ray Berryhill to operate the equipment. “Ray has done all of these jobs for us,” notes Wandel. “We want to make sure the contractor is in position to have a quality installation. Ray has so much knowledge about these jobs. He was the perfect person to execute this one.”

The panels were fabricated on the site.

The panels were fabricated on the site. The roll former was lifted into place at the edge of the roof by crane, and panels were rolled directly onto the roof and stacked for installation.

A crane was used to lift the roll former into place at the edge of the roof. “We were able to set the front two feet of the roll former in the built-in steel gutter, and then drop the back end of the machine down to the proper angle so we could roll the panels right onto the roof,” McCarty explains. “About every 15 or 20 feet up the roof we would stack some insulation, so the panel would float across the roof. Once it hit the top and went down the other side, it could just ride the roof down.”

The original plan was to install the panels as they came off the roll former, but McCarty decided it would be more efficient to run all of the panels, stack them on the roof, and install them once all of the panels were fabricated. “We had a large crane on site that was costing us money, and we had the people from Fabral there,” he recalls. “I went to the construction manager and said, ‘It’s going to make a lot more sense if we get all of the panels for the project up on the roof as quickly as possible.’”

The 4,000-pound metal coils typically supplied enough material for 8-10 panels, so Berryhill would run 8-10 panels at a time as crews from McCarty Roofing stacked them. When the roll former was lowered to the ground to load another coil, workers would strap the panels into place, figure out how much area the panels would cover, and set up again another 20 feet or so down the roof to receive the next batch. “We had a series of 15 or 20 straps for each bundle of panels,” says McCarty. “We had to be careful, but with eight people, you could pick up the panel and gently set it down.”

After the roll forming crew was done, the panels were pulled off of the stacks and installed. “It was a pretty extreme radius, but the panels just laid down on the roof perfectly,” McCarty recalls. “The design worked out really well.”

Liberty University

Photo: Joel Coleman. Copyright Liberty University

The built-in gutter gave crews a good location to set the bottom edge of the panels. “At the eaves, the roof pitch was very steep—maybe 12:12—and it was almost flat at the top,” notes McCarty. “We had to be tied off 100 percent of the time. We used retractables, but the safety equipment still limited our movement. It was pretty difficult for the guys working the first 30 or 40 feet.”

The roof featured large skylights, which made the metal panel layout critical. The design also featured upper and lower sections that stepped down around large windows, which made for some tricky details. “At the gable ends, we had to make the cuts at an angle,” McCarty notes. “We cut the panels in place with drill shears and hand turned them with tongs to lock then onto a cleat.”

The schedule was tight, and weather was also a concern. “It was in the dead of winter,” McCarty recalls. “We started laying panels in January. Fortunately, we had a mild winter, but at times it was like a wind tunnel. You’re not going to pick up a 240-foot panel in 35 mile-an-hour winds, so there were days we just weren’t able to work.”

The project was wrapped up at the end of May, and McCarty credits the decision to stack the panels as one of the keys to meeting the deadline. “It was the right call,” he says. “The time we saved made up for the lost days due to the weather and helped us complete the job on time.”

TEAM

Architect: VMDO Architects, Charlottesville, Va., VMDO.com
Construction Manager: CMA Inc., Lynchburg, Va., CMAinc.us
Roofing Contractor: McCarty Roofing Inc., Lynchburg, Va., McCartyroofing.net
Distributor: NB Handy Co., Lynchburg, Va., NBhandy.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Fabral Metal Wall and Roof Systems, Fabral.com

Roof and Cladding Panels Look Like Rusted Metal

Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

McElroy Metal has made available Cor-Ten AZP Raw, which offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding. Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet. It’s available in a variety of McElroy Metal standing-seam and through-fastened panel profiles.

Translucent Roofing Material Mechanically Locks Together

Topgal panels are linked together with easy-to-fit connectors that create a mechanical lock between the sheets, ensuring strength and water resistance. PHOTO: Plazit Polygal

Topgal panels are linked together with easy-to-fit connectors that create a mechanical lock between the sheets, ensuring strength and water resistance. PHOTO: Plazit Polygal

Plazit Polygal, a producer of polycarbonate building materials, has launched Topgal, a modular range of translucent roofing material that is attractive, economic, flexible and easy to install.

Suitable for any building that requires natural light, the Topgal range can be used everywhere—from sports stadiums and commercial buildings to domestic structures, such as pool enclosures.

Produced in five different colors—bronze, blue, clear, ice and polyshade silver—delivering different levels of light transmission, the Topgal sheets come in a variety of sizes and thicknesses to meet the most demanding needs. Although the Topgal system is translucent, all damaging UV rays are filtered out while heat transference is limited.

Durable and weather-resistant, the system, which consists of the panels and a number of connectors, edge protectors and fasteners, can be installed with a screwdriver.

Topgal panels are linked together with easy-to-fit connectors that create a mechanical lock between the sheets, ensuring strength and water resistance. Fixture points are hidden and the sheets can be flexed to suit any type of structure. Because the panels are modular, units can be added as needed. The Topgal standing-seam panels and components integrate the unique properties of multi wall structure to deliver strength, rigidity and thermal insulation Topgal sheets are manufactured in 600- and 1,000-millimeter widths (center to center) and in thicknesses from 8 to 20 millimeters. In addition to the standard colors, Plazit Polygal can tailor special colors and solar-radiation levels.

Roof Is Standing-seam and Through-fastened

Lester Building Systems has launched its patented Eclipse Roof System.

Lester Building Systems has launched its patented Eclipse Roof System.

Lester Building Systems has launched its patented Eclipse Roof System that combines the structural integrity, efficiency and ease of installation of a through-fastened roof with the sleek appearance and leak-free performance of a standing-seam roof. The 36-inch-wide panels install quickly; one-third to one-half the number of panels and fewer screws are required than when using typical standing-seam roof panels. The 26-gauge Eclipse panel can be installed over open purlins; no roof deck is required.