NRCA Voices Regulatory Accountability Act Support

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has voiced its support for the Regulatory Accountability Act in a letter sent to Speaker of the House Paul Ryan. NRCA joins 380 associations and chambers of commerce from throughout the U.S. in urging Ryan to make consideration of the legislation an early priority for the 115th Congress. 
 
Associations joining NRCA in signing the letter come from 47 states and the District of Columbia and represent a multitude of sectors including agriculture, energy, transportation and manufacturing.
 
“We believe federal regulations should be narrowly tailored, supported by strong and credible data and evidence, and impose the least burden possible, while still implementing Congressional intent,” the groups wrote in the letter to Ryan. “The Regulatory Accountability Act builds on established principles of fair regulatory process and review that have been embodied in bipartisan executive orders dating to at least the Clinton administration.”
 
“Our members, nearly all of whom are family-owned businesses, tell us they simply can’t cope with the layers of regulations they must contend with,” says William Good, CEO of NRCA.  “Too often, regulations are not based on good science and are difficult to understand.”
 
The Regulatory Accountability Act would reduce the burden of regulations on employers and economic growth by requiring agencies to invest more effort earlier in the rulemaking process to gather data, evaluate alternatives, and receive public input about the costs and benefits of its rules.

WalletHub Small Business Study: Best and Worst Cities to Work

The personal finance social network WalletHub conducted an in-depth analysis of 2015’s Best & Worst Cities to Work for a Small Business.

In order to help job seekers consider small businesses as attractive employment prospects, WalletHub examined the small business environment within 100 of the largest U.S. metro areas across 11 key metrics. Our data set includes such metrics as net small business job growth, industry variety and earnings for small business employees.


    Best Metro Areas to Work for a Small Business      Worst Metro Areas to Work for a Small Business 
 
1
 
 
Charlotte, N.C.
 
 
91
 
 
Springfield, Mass.
 
 
2
 
 
Raleigh, N.C.
 
 
92
 
 
Tucson, Ariz.
 
 
3
 
 
Oklahoma City, Okla.
 
 
93
 
 
Augusta, Ga.
 
 
4
 
 
Austin, Texas
 
 
94
 
 
New Haven, Conn.
 
 
5
 
 
Omaha, Neb.
 
 
95
 
 
Bakersfield, Calif.
 
 
6
 
 
Nashville, Tenn.
 
 
96
 
 
Fresno, Calif.
 
 
7
 
 
Salt Lake City
 
 
97
 
 
Scranton, Penn.
 
 
8
 
 
Dallas
 
 
98
 
 
Toledo, Ohio
 
 
9
 
 
Houston
 
 
99
 
 
Stockton, Calif.
 
 
10
 
 
Boston
 
 
100
 
 
Youngstown, Ohio
 


Key stats:

  • The number of small businesses per 1,000 inhabitants is two times higher in the Miami metro area than in the Bakersfield, Calif., metro area.
  • The earnings for small business employees adjusted for cost of living are three times higher in the Houston metro area than in the Honolulu metro area.
  • The median annual income adjusted for cost of living is two times higher in the Ogden, Utah, metro area than in the McAllen, Texas, metro area.
  • The unemployment rate is four times higher in the Fresno, Calif., metro area than in the Provo, Utah, metro area.

By 2042, the Cape Coral, Fla., metro area is projected to experience the highest population increase, at 103.4 percent, and the Youngstown metro area the highest population decrease, at 11.1 percent.