Dual-Class Self-Retracting Devices Meet Both Class A and Class B Guidelines

Malta Dynamics introduces the Hybrid Hog, the new Dual Class Self-Retracting Lifeline that gives you the advantages of both Class A and Class B retractables, all in one. The Hybrid Hog comes in both a 20′ Dual Class SRL and a 30′ Dual Class SRL.

Self-retracting lifelines (SRLs) are a staple piece of personal fall protection equipment used to keep workers safe when working at heights. SRLs generally come in two versions—Class A and Class B—established by ANSI standard Z359.14-2012. Both types of SRLs limit the maximum peak arresting force to 1,800 pounds as required by OSHA (OSHA 1926.500 subpart M) when worn with a body harness, but the two classes differ on two key dimensions: maximum arrest distanceand average arresting force.

Class A SRLs are defined as devices that provide a maximum arrest distance of 24 inches (610 mm) and an average arresting force not exceeding 1350 pounds (6kN). This class of SRLs is designed to arrest a falling worker very quickly, and is typically used in areas where fall clearance is limited. Think of it like slamming on the brakes in your car when you need to stop immediately—it may be a little jarring, but what matters is stopping before you hit anything.

Class B SRLs are devices that provide a maximum arrest distance of 54 inches (1372 mm) and an average arresting force not exceeding 900 pounds (4kN). This type of SRL also stops a falling worker safely but arrests the fall a bit more gently. Slowing to a stop over a longer distance makes the stop less jarring. This is why you gradually slow to a stop when you’re driving up to an intersection instead of slamming on the brakes—it’s a lot more comfortable if you can afford to slow down gradually.

The new Hybrid Hog from Malta Dynamics combines the advantages of each class into a single device that meets the standards for both classes. The Hybrid Hog offers a maximum arrest distance of just 24 inches to qualify as Class A while alsolimiting the average arresting force to 900 pounds to qualify as Class B. 

For more information, visit www.maltadynamics.com.

Roof Perimeter Safety System Now Features Stainless Steel Adjustable Threaded Parts

FallBan is made in the United States in Jefferson City, Missouri, to meet all your roof fall protection needs. Introduced in 2005 and patented in both the United States and Canada, the FallBan Cableguard System is designed to provide a temporary or permanent safety barrier around the perimeter of the roof. Horizontal steel cables are anchored to the roof and attached to vertical steel stanchions spaced at 20-foot intervals and then tightened to form a barrier to protect anyone on the roof from accidental falls.

According to the company, the addition of stainless steel adjustable threaded parts has made the FallBan Cableguard System better than ever. With just a few simple parts, quickly and easily installed, your roof can be OSHA and/or SOR compliant. Roofing or maintenance on a rooftop, under construction or on an existing structure, installed as a temporary or permanent system, FallBan protects everyone on the roof.

For more information, visit www.fallban.com

New Rescue Harnesses Feature Lightweight Design, Breathable Padding

The Malta Dynamics adds a new line of rescue and retrieval safety harnesses. Featuring a comfortable, lightweight design with breathable padding, the Razorback Elite and Elite MAXX Rescue Harnesses get the job done even when working in confined spaces.

“The built-in rescue handles make this safety harness ideal in situations where you are able to retrieve a down worker,” said David Ivey, Fall Protection Engineer.

According to the company, the Razorback Elite’s lower chest strap is perfect for female workers. Other key features include quick-connect buckles, reflective stitching, a new back D-Ring design and two additional D-Ring attachment points.

“We want to keep you and your workers in the safest and most reliable fall protection systems,” Malta Dynamics President Chris Holland said. “That’s why we never stop innovating.”

The Razorback Elite harnesses are now available in the following lightweight models:

B3001: Razorback Elite Rescue Harness (SML) Weight = 3.8 lbs.

B3002: Razorback Elite Rescue Harness (XL-2XL) Weight = 4 lbs.

B3201: Razorback Elite MAXX Rescue Harness (SML) Weight = 5.5 lbs.

B3202: Razorback Elite MAXX Rescue Harness (XL-2XL) Weight = 5.7 lbs.

This new product launch from Malta Dynamics complements the premium fall protection systems and services offered by the manufacturing company.

For more information, visit www.maltadynamics.com.

U.S. Department of Labor Reminds Employers About Submitting Injury and Illness Data to OSHA

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is reminding employers who have not already done so to submit their 2018 OSHA Form 300A (Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses).

Who is required to submit Form 300A?

How to submit Form 300A:

Submit injury and illness data electronically at www.osha.gov/300A.

For questions about submission requirements, complete the Help Request Form at www.osha.gov/injuryreporting/ita/help-request-form.

For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

Rotating Deck Anchor Features 360-Degree Self-Orienting D-Ring

The FallTech Rotating Deck Anchor is designed for maximum versatility and safety with a 360-degree self-orienting D-ring for use in temporary fall arrest or restraint applications. The reusable Rotating Deck Anchor is designed for installation onto exposed #10 rebar and threaded rod and is secured with user-supplied rebar wing nut or hex nut.

The anchor is designed for installation onto 1-inch diameter exposed threaded rod or exposed #10 rebar. It features a plated stainless steel anchoring plate, steel plated D-ring and bushing, and its 360-degree self-orienting D-ring follows the user’s movement. The product requires a user-supplied fastener to complete the installation. According to the manufacturer, the product meets ANSI Z359.18-2017 and OSHA 1926.502,1910.66.

A Youtube video of the product is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xUOY-6nx0s.

For more information, visit http://falltech.com

New Cut-Resistant Gloves Designed to Prevent Jobsite Injuries

PrimeSource Building Products introduces a new range of cut-resistant gloves under its GRX brand. According to the manufacturer, the new range will meet the demands of American contractors and workers, who are looking for better cut protection, and more durability and value, without sacrificing comfort or dexterity.

“GRX offers workers the latest glove technology in comfort, fit and performance,” said Jarrett Adams, Director of Building Accessories. “We’re adding more cut-resistance options for workers while offering the same levels of breathability and dexterity. This is a strong package to increase job-site safety, which is a big push for us.”

Some of the main features of the new GRX cut-resistant glove line include:

·The 700 Series features PalmWick Breathable Palm Technology, which allows the hand to breathe on the palm side of the glove. The special nitrile coating allows sweat and moisture to wick away through the palm.

·The 600 Series features the ExaGrip Latex Palm, which combines best in class durability and grip. This proprietary palm coating can handle the toughest and most abrasive tasks.

·The 500 Series features classic polyurethane palm coatings in multiple styles, offering an ergonomic fit in traditional cut-resistant liners.

According to the company, each series offers a great grip in wet, dry, and abrasive applications. The gloves are available in sizes S-XXL

“Our time on the jobsite with contractors showed that workers would often remove their cut-resistant gloves to perform certain tasks. We found that this was due to the gloves either being inflexible and bulky, or not breathable, which left workers hands hot and uncomfortable. With GRX gloves, workers will not need to take them off to perform dexterous tasks, this increases worker safety,” said Adams. “Our new technology is like a second skin that breathes and provides and a higher level of hand protection than anyone has been able to offer.”

The new cut-resistant technology meets ANSI standards and comes in a range of ANSI A-2 (500 grams to cut) for light to medium cut protection, all the way up to ANSI A-6 (6,000 grams to cut) for extreme cut hazards on the job. 

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the National Safety Council, the average hand injury claim now exceeds $6,000, with lost time workers’ compensation claims reaching nearly $7,500. The average reported hand injury results in six days off work. Hand injuries are the second most common injury on the jobsite, with cuts and lacerations being the number one hand injury.

 “Hand injuries sideline millions of American workers every year, “Adams said. “Our cut-resistant GRX gloves are designed to help workers avoid injury. This ensures the gloves are being worn, not left on their belt.” 

For more information, visit www.primesourcebp.com.

Ladder Extension System Helps Provide Safe Access to Rooftops

The Safe-T Ladder Extension System from Dynamic Fastener easily attaches to most standard extension ladders and allows for safe and easy access to rooftops. According to the manufacturer, it requires no tools, drilling, or bolting to install, and is one of the most effective means of improving the safety of nearly any ladder. Once installed, it provides two offsetting handrails that offer a point of walk-through to step on or off the ladder.

This item will allow workers to comply with OSHA standard 1926.1053(b), which states, “When portable ladders are used for access to an upper landing surface, the ladder side rails shall extend at least 3 feet above the upper landing surface to which the ladder is used to gain access.” 

For more information, visit www.dynamicfastener.com.

What Every Roofer Should Know About Ladder and Fall Protection Safety

Fall protection equipment should be inspected by the user before every use.

Roofing can be a dangerous profession, even in optimal weather and working conditions. Working at high elevations, on steep slopes and near unprotected edges are routine in the work life of a professional roofer. Alone, these situations can pose significant risk to the health and safety of roofers. Combined with the common environmental factors of windy weather and rain-slicked surfaces, the job can go from risky to outright dangerous on any given day.

What’s more, roofers face another risk every day on the job — injuries relating to ladder use or falls. Since 2017, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) has closed more than 90 Federal and State investigations into workplace fatalities relating to ladder use on jobsites across the country, and many of these fatalities result from falls. The American Ladder Institute (ALI) reports that more than 300 ladder deaths occur every year, while the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported 697 fatal falls from a higher level to a lower level in 2016.

All roofers know that ladder safety is important, yet many lack the training and education needed to safely maintain their climbing equipment. It’s essential that professionals understand that in addition to proper ladder use, they must also learn how to inspect a ladder for optimal safety. Education is the most important factor in improving jobsite safety and saving lives.

The Importance of Ladder Safety Training

The first step in ensuring that roofing professionals utilize ladders safely and effectively on the jobsite is to provide training on the essential components of ladder use. In fact, ALI notes that 76 percent of companies believe ladder accidents that occurred in their workplace could have been avoided with ladder safety training. When roofers feel confident in climbing and working on a ladder, they can protect themselves and promote a culture of safety among other professionals.

Figure 1. A ladder inspection form such as this one should be accessible on the worksite.

Ladder safety training sessions can either be conducted online or in-person on a jobsite. While online training provides greater accessibility and convenience, an onsite training session offers the ability to demonstrate real-world examples by job application and explore trade usage scenarios. Equipment manufacturers and various national organizations provide free ladder safety training in both formats. For example, OSHA conducts hundreds of ladder and fall protection safety training sessions every May as part of its National Safety Stand-Down initiative. A typical training for jobsite participants may include topics such as:

  • Safety protocols by application.
  • How to safely climb and work for extended periods from a ladder.
  • Common dangers posed by improper ladder use.

For a quick refresher or reference tool, take a look at the right and wrong ways to use a ladder. Even commonsense reminders can prevent against workplace injury.

Using a Ladder the Right Way

  • Prior to using a ladder, be certain that it is on a completely flat surface to prevent tipping.
  • Center your body on the ladder and keep your waist between the rails while maintaining a firm grip on the ladder.
  • Climb facing the ladder, move one step at a time and firmly set one foot before moving the other one. This is important to remember on your descent as well — don’t take any shortcuts to get down quicker.
  • If possible, have one person hold the ladder at the bottom while another person performs the task.
  • Move materials with extreme caution so as not to lose your balance or tip the ladder.

Using a Ladder the Wrong Way

  • Don’t stand above the fourth rung from the top of an extension ladder. This is very important as you can easily lose your balance and fall.
  • Don’t climb a ladder if you are not physically and mentally up to the task.
  • Don’t place the base of an extension ladder too close to, or too far away from, the house/building.
  • Don’t over-reach or lean to one side.
  • Don’t try to move a ladder while on it or from above. Climb down and then reposition the ladder closer to where you are working.
  • Don’t exceed the maximum weight of a ladder.
  • DO NOT permit more than one person on an extension ladder.

Ladder Inspection Checklist

Many roofers feel confident operating a ladder to perform their job duties. However, many take for granted the state of the equipment itself. Ladder inspections are just as important as general ladder use training. Both roofers and contracting business owners should know how to properly inspect all climbing equipment prior to each use.

Figure 2. The correct positioning of fall protection equipment and the connecting device is crucial.

While there are many ladder styles and models, there are several aspects of a safety inspection that apply to every ladder. The following should always be inspected before climbing a ladder.

1. Steps: Inspect each step of the ladder to search for cracks in the material, looseness between the step and the body of the ladder, missing pieces of hardware such as screws and bolts, or any missing steps.

2. Rails: Inspect each rail of the ladder for cracks in the material, frayed rail shields, or bent angles. These are indicators of compromised stability.

3. Labels: Ensure the ladder still has labels that are legible. Labels will often list important user information, such as the load capacity for the climber and their materials, directions for climbing safely, as well as any compliances with OSHA or the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

4. Material quality: Ensure the ladder’s material is in good condition. Check for corrosion, rusting, or any loose parts, which can pose a danger to the user if left unchecked.

5. Hardware: Check to see that all bracing, shoes and rivets on the ladder are uniform and securely placed.

Proper fall protection training is essential. Photos: Werner Ladder

Each item on this five-part checklist can be inspected with a quick and thorough scan. If any of these five aspects of a ladder are not secure and sound, a ladder is not fit for climbing and should be immediately removed from service until it is either repaired or permanently discarded.

It’s also important to understand the unique aspects of ladders that are frequently used on the worksite. The most common types of ladders chosen by roofing professionals are stepladders, extension ladders and podium ladders, which all pose various benefits and have notable differences in their construction. Below are important attributes to check for each ladder style. A sample ladder inspection form is shown in Figure 1. To find ladder inspection forms tailored to your exact ladder model, visit your manufacturer’s website.

Stepladders

When using stepladders, ensure the spreaders are not loose, bent or broken. They should smoothly unfold when the stepladder is opened.

1. Top: Check the top of the ladder for any missing hardware or looseness. Many roofers rest tools and equipment on the top of the ladder, which may become damaged over time.

2. Pail shelf: Some roofers choose to add a pail shelf to their ladder, which can hold a bucket for tools and materials. Inspect the shelf to make sure it is properly secured to the ladder, doesn’t contain any material cracks, and is not bent out of shape.

3. Spreader: Look at the spreaders to make sure they are not loose, bent or broken. They should smoothly unfold when the stepladder is placed in an open position.

Podium Ladders

On podium ladders, the podium must be carefully inspected, as it often carries most of the user’s weight.

1. Platform: Inspect the platform to be sure it does not contain cracks, does not have missing hardware, and is not bent out of shape. The podium often carries most of the weight of the user, so be aware of any damages in the material.

2. Spreader: Similar to a stepladder, be sure to inspect both the top and the spreaders of the podium ladder.

Extension Ladders

Inspect the rung locks to make sure that they are not loose, bent, missing or broken.

1. Rung locks: The rung locks on an extension ladder are essential to maintaining structural integrity while climbing. Inspect these pieces to make sure that they are not loose, bent, missing or broken.

2. Shoes: Take a look at the shoes of the extension ladder to see whether they are worn, broken or missing. The shoes may experience significant wear over time, as they support the weight and position of the ladder.

3. Rope/pulley: Ensure that the rope is not frayed or damaged and make sure the pulley is not loose, bent or broken before climbing.

Products That Improve Roofing Safety

While ladder inspections will protect against equipment failure, safety accessories can complement these efforts and provide additional safety measures by making ladders more stable and secure. To combat the possibility of slips and falls from ladders, especially in rainy weather, manufacturers now offer ladders with slip-resistant treads on ladder steps and non-marring rubber foot pads to maximize a ladder’s ground contact.

Roofing professionals working at the edge of a low-height roof may consider utilizing a podium-style ladder with an extra-wide platform step to support a greater range of motion and stability while working. Hardware enhancements, such as shatter-proof locks and sturdy latch designs, enhance the durability of equipment. A ladder leveler is another accessory that can help prevent accidents. It attaches to the bottom of a ladder and helps provide an evenly supported working surface when working on sloped ground or a staircase.

Use of Fall Protection Equipment and Ladders

Roofing professionals may find themselves using fall protection equipment in tandem with extension ladders as they transition from standing on a ladder to standing on a roof. This is especially the case with high-sloped roofs, which require additional safety protocols to reduce the risk of injury.

OSHA specifies that a professional working on a steep roof must be protected by a guardrail system, safety net system or personal fall arrest system. When on a low-slope roof that features an unprotected edge 6 or more feet above a lower level, professionals must use fall protection. Below are three common scenarios in which roofers should consider using fall protection equipment.

When standing next to:

1. An unprotected edge — any side or edge (except at entrances to points of access) of a walking work surface where there is no wall or guardrail system of at least 39 inches.

2. A leading edge — the edge of a floor, roof or deck, which changes location as additional floors, roofs, decking or sections are placed, formed or constructed.

3. Holes — including skylight roof openings.

Just as it’s important for roofing professionals to be trained in proper ladder use, fall protection training carries the same weight. All roofing professionals should have an understanding of the primary components of a secure fall protection system and how they work in tandem to ensure a user’s safety. The graphic in Figure 2 demonstrates the correct positioning of a fall protection anchorage, a connecting device, and a harness.

Fall Protection Inspection Checklist

Just like ladders, fall protection equipment should be inspected by the user before every use, as broken or degraded equipment will not ensure the user’s safety. When inspecting a harness, it’s important to watch out for the following five items:

1. Fraying in the material.

2. Significant discoloration of materials (especially around clasps and joints).

3. Rusting of metal appliances.

4. Missing rings and buckles.

5. Excessive dirt or grease (this can be removed with warm, soapy water).

If any of the above items are found, the harness should not be used. It should be immediately taken out of service and removed from the jobsite. It may sound obvious, but simply wearing fall protection gear — even gear that passes your checklist — doesn’t automatically protect the user. Proper positioning must also be inspected after the worker has put on the harness. Roofers can self-inspect or use a buddy system to ensure maximum protection.

1. Make sure the harness’s centered chest strap has been properly fitted and routed. The chest strap should always be located at the sternum. Loose straps can cause injury, and the mispositioning of your straps could result in gear failure.

2. Connecting devices must be self-locking and closing, require a minimum of two separate steps for release and a 5,000-pound minimum breaking strength.

3. Always use a 3-foot lanyard and ensure your vertical lifelines are above the D-ring or adjusted for safe reach as you move.

Create Your Own Culture of Safety

In a high-risk profession like roofing, a commitment to safety is essential. This often begins and ends with equipment use training, which educates workers on the proper way to use a ladder or fall protection equipment. While this is an essential step in creating a safe environment, both business owners and roofing contractors can take safety a step further by introducing equipment inspections as a part of your jobsite protocols. Taking the time before each use to scan equipment for flaws has the potential to save lives.

Be sure to include inspections as part of your next safety training and consider printing off these important safety checklists to keep on hand. While roofing professionals may face many hazards at work, the one thing that can be controlled is your commitment to equipment safety.

Safety Resources:

For free online ladder safety and fall protection safety training, please visit Werner Ladder’s website, www.wernerco.com/us/support/training.

For more information on ladder safety and to review comprehensive literature and other safety resources, visit OSHA’s Portable Ladder Safety guide, www.osha.gov/Publications/portable_ladder_qc.html.

About the author: Chad D. Lingerfelt is the National Safety Training Manager at WernerCo. In this role, he oversees all of the Fall Protection and Ladder Safety Training. For the past 32 years, he has worked in the safety field making sure everyone goes home at the end of the day. For more information, visit www.wernerco.com/us.

New Personal Fall Arrest Systems Available in Complete Kits

Malta Dynamics’ new line of Personal Fall Arrest System bags is designed for safety and convenience. Available with 25-foot and 50-foot options, these personal fall arrest systems are designed to be convenient, save time and ensure the safety of crew members working at heights.

This complete all-purpose and ready-to-go carry bag includes:

  • A full body harness
  • A 25-foot or 50-foot vertical lifeline assembly with a shock pack and positioning device with a lanyard extension
  • One heavy-duty reusable anchor
  • A durable bag with a detachable, adjustable shoulder strap and handles

According to the manufacturer, all components meet ANSI regulations and OSHA requirements, including ANSI Z359.13-13, ANSI A10.32-12, OSHA 1926 Subpart M, and OSHA 1910.

“The PFAS Kit is the ultimate solution when you or your staff work at heights,” said Malta Dynamics President Chris Holland. “The portable unit allows you to save time, show up to the jobsite prepared and feel confident about the fall protection equipment you are using each day.”

Find your fall protection solution in one convenient bag today.

For more information, visit www.maltadynamics.com.

Standing Seam Roof Clamp Accommodates Variety of Seam Profiles

Dynamic Fastener offers the Standing Seam Roof Clamp, which installs over the clip on a completely seamed, attached roof section a minimum 4 feet or further from the edge with no damage to roof panels or finished seams and no roof penetrations. The clamp accommodates seams up to 1 inch wide, and the unique “flip” design of the DFSSRC-03 allows for fit on both the Butler MR24 and Butler VSR-style seams just by removing the bolts, turning one side of the clamp around the ring and replacing the bolts. According to the company, any roof that meets similar loadings, specifications, and codes of the Butler styles will accept these anchors for safety tie off. 

A safety lanyard, of a maximum length 6-foot length, with a deceleration (shock absorber) device and full body harness should be used with the clamp. Clamps have been tested to meet and exceed the following OSHA standards: 1926.502 (d) (2), (3), (4) and (15): Anchorages for attachments of personal fall arrest equipment.

For more information, visit www.dynamicfastener.com.