Copper Is the Solution for Challenging Residential Roof Restoration

This home in Alexandria, Va., was retrofitted with a copper double-lock standing seam roof system

This home in Alexandria, Va., was retrofitted with a copper double-lock standing seam roof system installed by Wagner Roofing. The 16-ounce copper roof panels were 17 inches wide. Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

“We like the tough jobs,” says Dean Jagusch, president and owner of Wagner Roofing Company. “We like the intricate jobs.”

Headquartered in Hyattsville, Md., Wagner Roofing has served the Washington area market for more than a century. “We specialize in historic restoration and innovative architectural roofing and sheet metal,” Jagusch notes. “We’re full service. We do slate, copper, tile, and have a low-slope commercial division as well. But our trophy stuff tends to be of the steep-slope variety.”

A recent residential restoration project in Alexandria, Va., certainly qualifies as “trophy stuff,” taking home a North American Copper in Architecture Award from the Copper Development Association (CDA) in the “Restoration: Roof and Wall” category.

It’s easy to see why. The origami-inspired design features multiple roof angles, but the daring design was problematic. Even though the home was relatively new, the owners were plagued by leaks. Along with Restoration Engineering Inc. of Fairfax, Va., Wagner Roofing was called in to consult on the project, determine the source of the leaks, and come up with a solution.

The original galvalume standing seam roof channeled the water into a large, stainless steel internal gutter with roof drains. Jagusch found that the leaks were occurring at two types of critical points. First, there were leaks where the internal roof drains met the central gutter. The other problem spots were along the pitch transitions.

Jagusch felt that installing a conventional-style painted galvalume roofing system in those spots was almost impossible. “We felt that was since it was an area that was failing, we wanted a metal we could work with when we met a transition and turn the panels vertical where we needed to without having to break them and rely on rivets and caulk,” he says.

Custom five-sided downspouts were fabricated

Custom five-sided downspouts were fabricated, but large windows at the back of the home offered few options for support. The downspouts were attached up under the framing system. Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Copper was the answer. “The detailing was pretty tough to do, so we recommended changing it to copper so we could work with it, be able to solder and have a more seamless roofing assembly,” Jagusch recalls.

Another key to the project was redesigning how the roof drained. “We decided to push all the water to the exterior,” he says. “We collaborated with Restoration Engineering and we fleshed out the original redesign.”

The team decided that installing a copper roof system with a new drainage plan would be the best way to eliminate the leaks and keep the inspiring look the homeowners desired.

“We wanted to eliminate the drains and push all the water to the exterior, so that’s why we went for the re-slope of the big central gutter,” Jagusch says. “Also, at the transitions, we wanted to make sure we were 100 percent watertight, so we used a combination of turning up panels and soldered cleats to get everything into place.”

Solving the Puzzle

With its intersecting planes, the roof made laying out the panels an intricate puzzle. “You also had large expanses of roofing that changed pitch throughout,” Jagusch explains. “Panels had to be laid correctly because not only does the roof slope up, but it also slopes sideways. The layout of the panels was critical from the get-go. We all looked at it and agreed that we would follow parallel to the actual trusses, which we felt was the best solution.”

The old roof system was removed and stripped down to the 3/4–inch plywood deck. “We covered the entire roof deck with Grace Ultra,” said Jagusch. “We then used a slip sheet and installed 1-inch-high, double lock, 17-inch-wide, 16-ounce copper standing seam panels.”

Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Panels were roll formed at the Wagner metal shop out of 20-inch-wide coils using an ESE roll former and trailered to the jobsite. Approximately 5,400 square feet of copper panels were installed on the project. The double-lock seams were mechanically seamed. Twenty-ounce copper flat-seamed panels were used in the large valleys.

The safety plan included full scaffolding during every phase of the project. “We have our own safety scaffolding system,” Jagusch says. “Our guys demand it on our jobs, and we demand it of them to come home safely every day. We are very proud of our safety record. It’s front of mind for us.”

In addition to the roof, all of the metal cladding was replaced on the southeast feature wall. The top of the wall was reconfigured to accommodate the new sloped valley. Where the wall met the roof, a band was fabricated to match the top part of the fascia. Other details included copper cladding for the chimney.

Drainage was redirected to the perimeter, where custom-fabricated gutters were installed. “On the west side, the roof was originally designed to dump off straight onto a rock feature on the ground, but we fashioned a custom copper box gutter about 35 or 40 feet long,” Jagusch states.

At the either end of the large internal gutter and at the end of a large valley, shop-fabricated copper conductor heads were installed. Custom five-sided downspouts were fabricated, but installing them posed another challenge, as large window areas offered few options for support. The downspouts had to be snugged up under the framing system.

“Everything had to work with the other building components,” Jagusch explains. “One of the tougher things on this project was being able to have the function and the form both top of mind, in that order. The key was to make the functional stuff look good.”

Showpiece Project

The project was completed about a year ago, and the copper has begun to change in color. “The copper now has a gorgeous bronze, kind of purplish hue to it,” notes Jagusch. “I think it will eventually develop a green patina, but with the way the environment is these days, I think it will take 15 years or so before it gets to that point. That’s the cool thing about copper—it’s a natural, breathing material that is constantly changing, constantly evolving.”

Copper cladding was installed on a feature wall

Copper cladding was installed on a feature wall, which also featured changes in slope. The top of the wall was reconfigured and a band was added to match the top part of the fascia. Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Wagner Roofing has a maintenance agreement in place on the home, so Jagusch has stayed in touch with the owners and kept tabs on the project, which is performing well. “I’ve got just one hell of a team here,” he says. “It wasn’t just one estimator that went out and brought this thing in. In our business, estimating and roofing is a team sport. We kicked this thing around a lot with all divisions of the company, from estimating to operations to the actual installers before we finally settled on a number for this thing.”

“We work on some pretty spectacular places, and of course this is one of them,” he concludes. “We like a challenge, and this is the stuff that my team really loves to get their teeth into.”

Union Corrugating Opens Metal Roofing Facility in Upper Midwest

Union Corrugating announces they are opening a facility in the upper Midwest. The 40,000 square foot facility, located in Janesville, Wisconsin, will offer Union’s complete product line.

“Opening our 11th facility in Janesville gives us the opportunity to expand our geographic reach to an area that consists of Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota”, says Keith Medick, Union president and CEO. “We’re excited to grow our customer base there.”

Prior to opening their Janesville facility, Union Corrugating has been manufacturing and distributing products from 10 locations across the Eastern and Central United States since 1946.

“We are proud to provide the residential, commercial and agricultural markets with metal roofing, siding and accessories. This Janesville initiative is in response to our customers asking us to expand our footprint to this geographic area and demonstrates our strategy of being a convenient metal roofing supplier,” continues Medick.

Square Diffuser Caters to People Who Prefer Sharp-angled Shapes

The square diffusers are available in both the Solatube 160 DS (10-inch model) and Solatube 290 DS (14-inch model) and are available in OptiView or Just Frost styles.

The square diffusers are available in both the Solatube 160 DS (10-inch model) and Solatube 290 DS (14-inch model) and are available in OptiView or Just Frost styles.

Round versus square. Sharp lines versus curves. The human brain processes each of these differently, according to a Harvard Medical School study led by Moshe Bar and Maital Neta. In their study with round and square objects, they found that most people prefer rounded objects and shapes to sharp-angled ones. Over the past 25 years, Solatube International has been catering to this majority with its round diffusers. But what about those who prefer sharper lines?

Solatube introduces a square diffuser for residential Solatube Daylighting Systems.

The patented Spectralight Infinity transition box takes the round tube into the square hole at the ceiling. The square diffusers are available in both the Solatube 160 DS (10-inch model) and Solatube 290 DS (14-inch model) and are available in OptiView or Just Frost styles.

Solatube International Inc. invented TDDs, which harvest and distribute daylight in homes and commercial buildings.

Solatube International Inc. invented TDDs, which harvest and distribute daylight in homes and commercial buildings.

Solatube International Inc. invented TDDs (also known as tubular skylights), which harvest and distribute daylight in homes and commercial buildings. Solatube Daylighting Systems are installed as part of energy-saving and sustainability efforts in residential and commercial spaces in over 122 countries.

Using patented technology, a Solatube Daylighting System harvests daylight at the rooftop, transfers it down a reflective tube (which bends up to 90 degrees and can be up to 70 feet or more long) and distributes it evenly into an interior space through a diffuser at the ceiling.

Historic Home Receives Shingle Roof System after Devastating Storm

The big storm took a toll on the old house.

The big storm took a toll on the old house.

In the spring of 2011, a devastating storm brought heavy winds, torrential rain, baseball-sized hail and an unforgiving tornado to Centerville, Ohio. Sitting directly in the path of destruction was one of the oldest homes in town. Left unprotected, the building had suffered significant damage. After years of neglect, Thrush & Son LLC, Brookville, Ohio, a company with three generations of experience in restoring homes and a reputation for its attention to detail, was called in to survey the damage—and it did not look good.

The historic home was in need of new siding, windows, aluminum gutters, entry doors, garage doors and a roof. Thrush & Son was up to the task and came with a plan to reverse the storm’s destruction. To accomplish the team’s goal of restoring the historic roof, Thrush & Son relied upon the safety and security of a shingle roof system to get the job done.

Rebuilding History in Centerville

Thrush & Son provided the homeowners, the Utz family, with a detailed, step-by-step, analysis of the damage to their home, as well as a two-pronged proposal. The company’s immediate goal was to restore the home to the way it was before the storm. Thrush & Son also felt that improving the quality of the home was important. To be successful with its restoration plan, Thrush & Son recommended the Signature Select System featuring Starter Shingles, Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge, Gorilla Guard Underlayment and 76 squares of StormMaster Slate Blackstone. Thrush & Son believed this line would not only hold true to the character of the home, but also bring back some of its authenticity.

Thrush & Son recommended the Signature Select System featuring Starter Shingles, Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge, Gorilla Guard Underlayment and 76 squares of StormMaster Slate Blackstone.

Thrush & Son recommended the Signature Select System featuring Starter Shingles, Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge, Gorilla Guard Underlayment and 76 squares of StormMaster Slate Blackstone.


 
It didn’t take much to convince the Utz family, who liked the idea of a 20-year extended premium protection period (as well as the lifetime warranty), to choose the full Signature Select System for the home.

Corey Thrush, chief marketing officer for Thrush & Son, explained why the Signature Select System was chosen for the project: “Having new shingles installed is something homeowners will only have to do once or twice in their lifetime and we wanted to help them get it right the first time around. The home was not just important to the Utz family, but as one of the original homes in Centerville, it holds a special place in the hearts of the townspeople as well.”

Choosing Shingles

The big storm took a toll on the old house. Thrush & Son, who have been preferred contractors of the roofing manufacturer since 2012, knew right away that the Signature Select System’s products would be perfect for the job. “We have been using Atlas products for a number of years,” Thrush notes. “And we have seen the continued evolution of not only the products, but the company, as well.”

Thrush & Son had to make several changes to the home, including removing the box gutters, cutting off the rafter tails and installing new fascia board.

Thrush & Son had to make several changes to the home, including removing the box gutters, cutting off the rafter tails and installing new fascia board.

The original structure had undergone many modifications during the past century, including different roof pitches and dead valleys. Because of the alterations, Thrush & Son had to make several changes to the home. Removing the box gutters, cutting off the rafter tails and installing new fascia board were critical to the project. With the preliminary work out of the way, Thrush & Son was happy to put the Signature Select System to work.

Home Sweet Home

Despite the many challenges, Thrush & Son was soon able to restore the historic house. Thrush & Son used metal valleys during the StormMaster Slate application, which allowed the shingles to be installed from one pitch to the next without complications. This application also helps with the unsightly appearance of a hump in the roof due to a no-cut valley, a straight cut valley or a woven valley. Additionally, because the Signature Select System was so easy to work with, roofers were able to do the job quickly so the project was completed on time.

The newly finished roof will provide the Utz family with unmatched protection for years to come. StormMaster Slate shingles have a Class 4 impact resistance rating to help resist hailstorms. They also offer a 130-mph Wind Limited Warranty, which is the ultimate security against strong winds. Finally, the power of Scotchgard Protector will keep the architectural shingles beautiful year after year, as they prevent the ugly black streaks caused by algae.

Thrush & Son used metal valleys during the installation, which allowed the shingles to be installed from one pitch to the next without complications.

Thrush & Son used metal valleys during the installation, which allowed the shingles to be installed from one pitch to the next without complications.

Celebrating the successful completion of the project, Thrush praised the roofing system. “We believe the product is a great partnership for us, as well as for the homeowner,” he said. “We always install the entire Signature Select System to ensure the customer gets the extra 10 years of premium protection before the proration begins.”

Finally, with the warranty submitted and the renovations complete, the customer (and the entire town of Centerville) can rest easy because the historic home is now protected by a new roofing system.

Roof Materials

Signature Select System from Atlas Roofing

PHOTOS: Atlas Roofing

McElroy Metal Announces Website Relaunch

McElroy Metal, a metal roof and wall systems manufacturer serving the construction industry, announces its website relaunch at www.McElroyMetal.com.

McElroy Metal has dedicated sections of the new site to the specific markets it serves: residential, architectural/commercial, post frame, retrofit/recover, green building/solar and insulated metal panels. The site also contains animations highlighting installation sequences and a color visualizer enabling visitors to view their personal homes or businesses with McElroy Metal products and colors. The McElroy University portion of the site has been expanded to feature information on Hands-On Installation Classes, Substrate and Coating Facts, Finish and Substrate Warranty Education and Educational Videos.

Metal Roof and Walls Help Home Reach Lofty Design Goals

When Ilhan Eser and his wife Kamer decided to build their new home in Woodland, Calif., they had some ambitious criteria in mind. They wanted the home to not only be energy efficient, but to produce enough energy to be self-sustaining. They also desired a home with great aesthetics that fit in with the beautiful countryside and minimized impact on the environment.

Ilhan and Kamer Eser decided to design and build their own home on 80 acres of land in the California countryside. Their goal was to have a LEED-certifiable house powered by solar energy and protected by a highly insulated metal wall and roof system.

Ilhan and Kamer Eser decided to design and build their own home on 80 acres of land in the California countryside. Their goal was to have a LEED-certifiable house powered by solar energy and protected by a highly insulated metal wall and roof system.


As the CEO of Morin, a Kingspan Group company, Eser had another key design goal: to showcase his company’s metal roof and wall systems. “We wanted to do something that was good for the environment and the country,” Eser recalls. “So we said, let’s do a LEED-certifiable, net-zero house that will be a house of the future, if you will, using our company’s products. Our company is all about being environmental and being green and being sustainable, so that was the starting point.”

The result is a home that provides more than enough energy to meet its own needs with solar panels. It also captures graywater (gently used household wastewater) to use for irrigation and features a cutting-edge geothermal heating and cooling system that does not burn fossil fuels. All the household systems can be operated with a smartphone. “I believe in the future every house will be built like this, with your energy on top of your roof, basically,” Eser notes.

The metal roofing and wall systems are made of durable, highly recyclable materials and provide a high level of insulation to help keep energy costs down. The roof design features stunning angles, including an inverted “butterfly” roof over the great room to bring in the maximum amount of natural light.

As he began the project, Eser soon realized that he was breaking new ground in more ways than one. He found most residential architects and general contractors were unfamiliar with metal framing, roofs and walls, so he decided to tackle the design himself. He also served as his own general contractor, tapping into his 30 years of experience in commercial and industrial applications.

“I decided to look at it as if it were a light commercial building, and then I started finding people,” he says. “It was an interesting experience. I designed the house myself—although my wife had the overriding power, as always. She had to approve whatever I did, and when we had an argument, you probably can imagine who won.”

The Project Takes Wing

When it came time to discuss installing the roof and wall systems, Eser called Rua and Son Mechanical Inc., headquartered in Lincoln, Calif. According to President Louie Rua, the company focuses on metal roofing and wall panels—and that’s all they’ve done for the last 25 years. “We are very specialized in what we do,” Rua says. “We’re certified installers for most if not all of the metal roofing systems out there, and we also do our own custom fabrication. It’s become a niche market, so we travel around quite a bit.”

The roof of the Eser residence features unconventional angles, including a large section over the great room with an inverted butterfly design that required an internal gutter system.

The roof of the Eser residence features unconventional angles, including a large section over the great room with an inverted butterfly design that required an internal gutter system.

The company has made a name for itself by excelling on high-end, intricate and cutting-edge metal projects that transcend typical warehouse applications. “We’ve found that when we go outside the box and take on the real difficult projects, the ones that are a little bit intimidating for other companies, that’s where we excel,” Rua says. “We’ve been doing it so long, and our team has a wealth of experience. When the trickier jobs come around, we are well equipped to handle them.”

This project was right up the company’s alley. “Ilhan was pretty adamant he wanted us to do it,” Rua recalls. “This was his personal house, so it was quite a compliment. I took on the challenge, and we took it very seriously. We worked through what it would cost, how long it would take, all the dynamics. His design team did all the preliminary design and then our team got in there and played with it a little bit and made a few tweaks. We put a lot of thought into those details.”

Rua admits the high-profile nature of the client and the complexity of the project were daunting. “Any job when you first jump into it and see it’s outside the box can be intimidating,” Rua says. “But then as you get familiar with it and start breaking it down and working through it, it gets easier. One of my lead superintendents, Fernando Huizar, was knee-deep in it, and he and Ilhan really hit it off, which is important. The relationship with our clients is our first priority, and on every job we strive to meet and exceed their expectations. It couldn’t have gone any smoother.”

Rua and Son Mechanical installed the double-layered roof and wall systems, which consisted of insulated metal panels (IMPs) and aluminum finish systems. The 7,500 square feet of exterior walls are made up of 4-inch-thick IMPs, topped with concealed-fastener panels. The mechanically seamed roof incorporates 8,000 square feet of 6-inch IMPs. The custom finish is Kameleon Dusty Rose, which changes color from green to yellow to silver to bronze to brown, depending on the amount of sunlight hit-ting it and angle from which it is viewed.

PHOTOS: CHIP ALLEN ARCHITECTURAL IMAGES

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A Metal Roof Crowns a Residential New-construction Project

When Charles Callaghan purchased the two vacant lots next to his home in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., he thought they would form the perfect location for his family’s dream home. A team comprised of architects, contractors and manufacturers worked together to bring his ideas to life in the form of a new 7,500-square-foot residence. The building’s crowning feature is a metal roof system that was designed to complement the aesthetics of the home and stand up to the harsh oceanfront environment for decades to come.

The roof of the Callaghan residence in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., features 12,000 square feet of Petersen Aluminum’s Snap-Clad in Slate Gray.

The roof of the Callaghan
residence in Ponte Vedra
Beach, Fla., features 12,000 square feet of Petersen Aluminum’s Snap-Clad in Slate Gray.

“With the larger lot, we thought we could do something unique to the neighborhood,” Callaghan says. “When we first met with the architect, there were a few keys we wanted to stress. First, we didn’t want a boxy-looking house. We also wanted shingle-style siding and a metal roof. We like the look of the metal roof, we like the durability, and we thought it would be a good way of complementing the shingles on the house.”

At every phase of the project, the team of construction professionals ensured the project was executed with precision, down to the last detail of the metal roof.

THE DESIGN

The house was designed by Jaycox Architects & Associates, Jacksonville, Fla. According to William R. Jaycox, principal, the plan made the backyard pool the home’s focal point. “They wanted to do a casual, shingle-style beach house that wasn’t like everyone else’s house,” Jaycox notes. “We designed the house so it was mostly single-story and spread it out around the pool, which made for an interesting roof design. It’s all in small modules.”

The L-shaped home features a master-bedroom suite on one side while the other side contains the living room, dining room, kitchen, family room and guest bedroom. “This one also has a four-car garage under the main roof, and, because the house wraps continuously around the pool, you get a fun little foyer in the front with a little cupola up above, you get the dormers for the bedrooms in the attic, and the master suite is a little pod unto itself,” Jaycox adds. “The back has a pool pavilion separate from the house. When you put all of those elements together, you get a very interesting structure, and the metal roof was perfect because it accentuates the lines.”

The roof system specified included 12,000 square feet of aluminum panels in the cool-color Slate Gray. “This house is only a few blocks from the ocean, and in those cases we typically use aluminum,” Jaycox says. “We’ve had great success with that system. It’s absolutely bombproof from a corrosion standpoint with stainless fasteners, heavy-gauge aluminum and the Kynar finish.”

Thorne Metal Systems installed a high-temperature, self-adhered underlayment beneath the metal roof, as specified.

Thorne Metal Systems installed a high-temperature, self-adhered underlayment beneath the metal roof, as specified.

When applied by a certified installer, the system can qualify for a 20-year Oceanfront Finish Warranty from the manufacturer. In addition, the roof meets all Florida’s tough building-code requirements. The system, consisting of 0.040-gauge aluminum, 16-inch-wide panels with fastening clips spaced at 24-inches on-center, carries a Miami-Dade NOA with a -110 PSF uplift. (The UL 90 uplift is -52.5 PSF.)

THE INSTALLATION

The roofing contractor on the project was Thorne Metal Systems of Middleburg, Fla. Owner Bill Thorne has been installing metal roofs since 1989. He formed his own company 13 years ago, and it has become the go-to metal roof installer for Jaycox Architects
& Associates and the general contractor on the project, C.F. Knight Inc., Jacksonville.

Thorne has a lot of experience installing this particular aluminum roof system. “The system is a very easy system to install,” he says. “It’s very user- friendly. The panels have male and female joints that snap together and are held in place with stainless-steel clips.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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