Industry Q&A: RCI, Inc. Is Now IIBEC

Bob Card addresses the IIBEC audience at the Meeting of the Members.

A Conversation With Robert “Bob” Card, President of IIBEC

Q: RCI Inc. recently rebranded itself as the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants (IIBEC). Please describe the thinking behind the change. How does the new name reflect the nature and goals of the organization?

A: After many years of being known as the Roof Consultants Institute (RCI), it became apparent that a significant number of our members are also practicing in the disciplines of waterproofing and exterior walls. We wanted our name to better reflect who we are and what we do, and to describe our outreach beyond the North American continent. Additionally, the IIBEC (pronounced “eye-bec”) staff continually received calls from RCI timeshare customers mistaking that company with RCI, Inc.

Q: How has the membership reacted to the new name and rebranding effort?

A: Nearly all the comments I’ve received since the transition was announced have been positive. There are some who are not pleased, of course; change can be hard after so many years of familiarity with an organization’s name.

Q: How does your background help prepare you for the challenges you’ll face as president of IIBEC?

A: I have been in the building enclosure consulting industry for about three decades now, starting at a very basic level, and seen how technology has changed much of how we communicate and store and access Information. I expect our industry to continue to see an increasing rate of change, and I hope to leverage my experience to help determine how best to adapt evolving methods to best serve our members and the industry at large.

Q: What are some of the key initiatives IIBEC will be focusing on in the year ahead?

A: The rollout of our new IIBEC brand and logo will continue to be a priority, with lots of outreach planned for the next several months. We are working to develop a new credential, CBECxP (Certified Building Enclosure Commissioning Provider), which we believe will be a significant addition to our lineup of professional registrations. Our IIBEC Manual of Practice is being updated and should be completed by year’s end. We are also currently working to identify and hire a new EVP/CEO to replace Lionel Van der Walt, who is moving soon to a new challenge. Collaborations with other organizations are vital in an association. IIBEC cooperated with the National Women in Roofing (NWIR) and the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) prior to the rebranding and will continue to tighten these relationships, as well as explore other organizations to collaborate with. The core purposes and values IIBEC has laid out in 2018’s RCI, Inc. Strategic Plan will carry over to the new IIBEC branding. The Strategic Plan can be found at https://rci-online.org/rci-shares-new-strategic-plan/.

Q: What does the future hold? Can you share any long-term goals?

A: We want to strategically shape and position IIBEC so that the next generation of leaders can take the association to a significantly more impactful place in the building enclosure industry. We are working for greater diversity within the leadership pipeline to better reflect the changing workplace and improve the quality of our conversations. And, we’re working to implement a more global outreach, in order to both learn from the experience of others, and contribute to improving the quality of the built environment around the world.

Q: What are some of the educational resources and events IIBEC makes available to its members?

A: We offer numerous classes in the various disciplines related to the building enclosure, both on a national and a local level; we present a packed schedule of technical presentations at both our annual conventions and our building enclosure symposia, as well as at our biannual Canadian building enclosure symposia. Our members also regularly present technical education for other organizations within the design and construction industries. IIBEC chapters facilitate regular education programs through their chapter events, which expand internationally. A big step for IIBEC in 2020 is the partnership with the National Research Council of Canada to host the 2020 ICBEST conference.

Q: How does IIBEC help people who are not members of the organization, including people in such roles as end users, facility managers, school boards and others?

A: At the simplest level, IIBEC can provide contact information to building owners, managers, and design professionals for local consultant members who can assist with their projects. More strategically, by educating and advocating for our members, we are striving to improve the quality of the built environment for everyone. Through our advocacy initiatives, we have built recognition within the United States and Canada at federal, state and local levels.

Q: Where can people go for more information about the organization?

A: Our website (www.iibec.org) is a great place to start; one can find a lot of excellent information there about our organization and our members. Members themselves are also a great resource for information; most are happy to share about the benefits of IIBEC membership. Of course, our amazing IIBEC staff can also provide information related to most any aspect of the organization. Our chapters also hold local meetings and events, which is a great place for someone to learn about the resources IIBEC has both locally and nationally.

RCI Inc. Is Now the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants (IIBEC)

As of April 1, 2019, RCI Inc., a nonprofit association originally incorporated in 1983 as the Roof Consultants Institute (RCI), officially became the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants (IIBEC). (The acromyn is pronounced “eye-bec”).

The change, approved by the organization’s membership after extensive study, brand assessment, and industrywide feedback, aligns the association’s name and brand with its purpose and strategy heading into the future. RCI has grown from a small core of dedicated roof consultants to represent some 3,600 members, comprised of building enclosure consultants and other industry stakeholders specializing in roofing, waterproofing, and exterior wall specification and design. 

The evolving focus of the institute’s members in embracing the entire building enclosure called for a name that would clearly define its purpose as:

  • An international association 
  • A professional institute representing building enclosure consultants – architects, engineers and others such as ex-contractors who have gained the required education and experience 
  • A knowledge hub and leading authority on all things building enclosure (roofing, waterproofing and exterior walls) 
  • An institute attractive to professionals of all ages, races, and gender
  • An industry leader endeavoring to increase exposure, recognition, and usage of the institute’s resources by nonmember architects and engineers, government agencies (state and federal), as well as end-users such as school boards, universities, facility managers, etc. 

Kindly note that all correspondence, financial transactions, contracts, and references to RCI should be changed to the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants or IIBEC.

The IIBEC website is now under construction. For more information, visit https://rci-online.org.

NWIR Announces Affiliate Relationships With Other Industry Associations

National Women in Roofing (NWIR), a national organization focused on the empowerment of women within the roofing industry, has announced the establishment of affiliate relationshipswith other industry-related organizations/associations to identify areas of mutual interest, support, and cooperation. RCI, Inc. is the first association to become an affiliate with NWIR.

“As an industry, it is important that we all work together to advance each other’s efforts,” said Shari Carlozzi, NWIR Chair. “Our organizations have very similar goals and objectives – especially surrounding education and advancing the professionalism of the industry as a whole. It just makes sense to leverage each other in accomplishing our respective missions.”

Other industry associations who are interested in establishing an affiliate relationship with NWIR should contact Ellen Thorp at ellen@meridianconsultllc.com.

For more information, visitwww.nationalwomeninroofing.com and www.rci-online.org

RCI Issues Call for Abstracts for 2019 Building Envelope Technology Symposium

RCI, Inc. is seeking abstracts for consideration for the 2019 Building Envelope Technology Symposium, which will be held in Louisville, Kentucky, November 11-12, 2019. Abstracts of each paper (200 words) should be received at RCI headquarters by April 18, 2019. The RCI Building Envelope Symposium Committee will review abstracts, and authors will be notified regarding acceptance of abstracts by May 10, 2019. If accepted, papers should be received at RCI headquarters by July 12, 2019, for peer review.

Suggested topics include:
• Innovative Technologies & Practices
• Façade Systems and Technologies
• Unique Façade Design Solutions
• The Building Envelope as a Design
Statement
• Energy Conservation Design
• Designing Façades That Will Improve
Indoor Air Quality
• Economics and Life Cycle Analysis
• Panelized Stone or Masonry Systems
• Sealants – Design and Selection; Appropriate Specification Quality Assurance
• Hygrothermal Analysis in Façade Designs
• Façades Designed to Achieve Sustainability
• Unique Detail Design Work
• Curtain Walls
• Double-Wall Façades
• Roofing
• Brick Masonry
• Stone Masonry
• Waterproofing
• Stucco
• EIFS
• Metal Wall Panels
• Air-Barrier Systems
• Testing Wall Systems
• Construction Processes

Papers and abstracts accepted for presentation may subsequently be published in RCI publications. RCI reserves the right of first publication of all submitted materials accepted for presentation at any event sponsored by RCI and retains the copyright thereafter. All submitted abstracts and papers must be original to the author and not previously published or presented nor scheduled for publication or presentation in any other publication or venue. Exceptions may be granted at the discretion of RCI.

Those interested in submitting an abstract are invited to contact the RCI headquarters for a copy of the Abstract Submittal Form and RCI Guidelines for Presentations, complete directions on formatting, and acceptable formats for abstracts and papers. A topic description must be provided addressing the speaker’s subject knowledge and the level of knowledge that will be presented to the attendee (i.e., beginner, intermediate or advanced). Six RCI CEHs will be granted for an accepted paper. Additionally, presenters will earn triple credit for the length of the program (1 presentation hour yields 3 CEHs).

Note: Owners/clients (if applicable) must have been notified this abstract is being submitted for consideration of a presentation at the RCI Symposium on Building Envelope Technology and have given consent to do so.

For further information regarding abstract and paper submittal, contact:
Tina Hughes
RCI Assistant Director of Conventions and Meetings
1500 Sunday Drive, Suite 204
Raleigh, NC 27607
Phone: 800-828-1902
Email: thughes@rci-online.org

For more information, visit https://rci-online.org.

RCI Technical Advisory Committee Offers Position Statement on Cool Roofs

The RCI Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) has released a position statement, which has been published on the RCI website. RCI has previously released position statements for a variety of issues, but this is the first one written by the TAC.

TAC Chair Doug Stieve led the development of this position statement. As leader, he recruited officemate Kenrick Hartman to provide assistance. Hartman is a member of the RCI Emerging Professionals Committee, which approached the TAC a number of months ago, asking if it could use the assistance of EP Committee members. The TAC gladly accepted the experiment. The purpose of the resulting joint program is to provide young RCI members with a means of gaining professional involvement and experience by contributing to a real-world task that benefits RCI members. According to RCI, Stieve and Hartman’s teamwork was successful and such collaboration between the TAC and the EP Committee is planned to continue as the TAC produces future Technical Advisories or Position Statements.

Links to Position Statements and Technical Advisories can be found here.

For more information, visit http://rci-online.org.

RCI Manual of Practice Goes Digital

RCI Inc. announced that the RCI Manual of Practice is now available exclusively as an interactive PDF. According to the association, users can jump to various sections from the table of contents, search the document, and access it from any screen. The Manual of Practice Task Force is currently working on a revision of the 2010 manual.

The RCI Manual of Practice is designed to be a standard for practitioners performing roof, exterior wall, and waterproofing consulting and quality assurance functions. The manual is intended to provide a peer-reviewed structure for the practice of consulting in the construction of the building envelope, according to RCI. In simple terms, it describes what a professional consultant does and how the consultant does it.

For more information, visit www.rci-online.org.

Are You Meeting Thermal Insulation Code Requirements?

Photo 1. Conditions such as this, in which the fastener plates melt the snow, visually demonstrate the heat loss that is a known entity to roof installers and knowledgeable roofing professionals.

You may have overheard conversations such as this:

New Building Owner: “You promised energy conservation and savings.”

Mechanical Engineer: “We sized the mechanical unit based on the code required effective thermal value.”

New Building Owner: “But why are my cost 30 percent above your estimates and I am needing to run my units constantly and they still barely maintain a comfortable environment?”

Mechanical Engineer: “We have checked all the set points and systems and they are all working, albeit with a bit of laboring. We don’t know why there is not enough heat.”

New Building Owner: “Well, someone is going to have to pay for this!”

Scenarios and liability questions like this are being repeated across the northern North American continent, and to mechanical engineers, architects and owners, the cause is a mystery. Perhaps they should have talked to seasoned roofing professionals and consultants. They could’ve told them that many mechanically attached roofs, incorrectly promoted and sold as energy-saving systems, were actually energy pigs. One only needed to walk a mechanically attached roof with a few inches of snow on it to see the heat loss occurring. It doesn’t take scientific studies and long-winded scenarios to prove this — just get up on the roof and see it. (See Photo 1.)

Photo 2. When a light dusting of snow blew off this 2 million-square-foot facility in central Illinois, every single mechanical fastener and insulation joint could be identified by the ice visible at their locations. This roof needed to be replaced due to condensation issues several years after installation at a cost of more than $10 million.

I spoke on this topic back in 2007 at the RCI Cool Roofing Symposium. I always like being a soothsayer, and several recent studies are demonstrating and attempting to quantify this energy loss that most roofers could tell you was there.

For years the NRCA suggested a loss of thermal value of 7 percent to 15 percent through the joints in a single-layer insulation application and through mechanical fasteners used to secure the insulation. (The NRCA has since removed this figure and suggests that professionals be consulted to determine thermal heat loss.) The NRCA recommended a cover board to reduce this effect. This was at a time when roof covers were predominantly BUR, modified bitumen or adhered single plies. The upsurge in mechanically attached single-ply membranes, brought on by low-cost installation and the promise of energy savings, changed the game. No one was asking, if there could be a loss of 7-15 percent when mechanically attaching insulation, what could the effective R-value loss be when we install thousands of fasteners and plates 12 inches on center (or less) down a membrane lap seam? Gee, haven’t we seen that before?

Code Requirements

The code and standard bodies — ICC, IECC, ASHRAE — have been repeatedly raising required thermal insulation values over the past decade in an attempt to conserve energy; that is their intent. They listened to astute designers and

Photo 3.This is close-up of the roof shown in Photo 2. Heat loss through the screws and fastener plates and through joints in the single layer of insulation melted the snow. The water froze when the temperatures dropped and the ice was revealed when a light wind pillowed the membrane and the remaining snow blew away.

prescribed two layers of insulation, and then again to determine the minimum R-value and not allow averages. The intent is clear. The required R-value per ASHRAE zone is to be achieved.

Their goals were laudable, but not all roof systems achieved the in-place R-values required. So, this article is in part an attempt to educate code officials and explain the need for a change.

Words can explain the phenomenon of thermal loss, but photos are worth a thousand words, and since my editor has told me that I cannot have a 4,000-word article, I leave it to the photos to do the talking. (See Photos 2, 3 and 4.)

Scientific Studies

In their Buildings 2016 article titled “Three-Dimensional Heat Transfer Analysis of Metal Fasteners in Roofing Systems,” Singh, Gulati, Srinivasan and Bhandari (Singh) studied the effect of heat transfer through thermal bridging (mechanical fasteners) in various roof assembly scenarios.

Their study exposes a shortfall in many standards that have as their goal a reduction in energy loss through building envelope systems through prescriptive approaches. For roofing assemblies, standards prescribe a minimum R-value, but they do not take into consideration the heat loss that happens though metal fasteners. There are no guidelines or recommendations in regards to thermal loss, including the loss of heat through roof system fasteners. It’s actually ignored.

Figure A: The effect of mechanical fasteners below the roof cover in mechanically attached roofs is not negligible as considered by general standards. As can be seen here for systems 1A and 1 B, in which mechanical fasteners are used in the lap seams of the roof cover (systems 3A and 3B have the fasteners below a layer of insulation), the actual thermal value loss caused by mechanical fasteners can be as high as 48 percent, as seen in system 1A with a high density of mechanical fasteners. As the mechanical fastener density decreases (1B), the heat loss also decreases. Thus, a correlation appears to exist in which heat loss due to thermal bridging is proportional to the fastener density.

The results of the Singh study, as seen in the graph (Figure A), show that the effects of thermal shorts, e.g., mechanical fasteners used to secure the roof cover, is not negligible. In fact, thermal shorts can result in a loss of 48 percent of the effective value. Read that again! The thermal value of the roof insulation layer on which the mechanical engineer has in part sized the mechanical equipment — and which the owner is counting on for significant energy savings — could be about half of what was assumed. Add in gaps and voids, and the loss in the effective R-value could top 50 percent. What that means is that to achieve the code required R-30, say in Chicago, mechanically fastened roof systems need to have R-45 in the design to meet the effective code required R-value. This last sentence is for the code bodies — are you listening?

The value of this study cannot be underestimated, as thousands of buildings have been constructed since its publication that would not meet an effective R-value check in a commissioning study.

Changing the Code

The energy inefficiency of mechanically attached roof systems in ASHRAE zones 4 and above has been known to roofing crews for decades. Now, with the requisite scientific studies completed, the codes need to be revised to reflect the inherent thermal loss through mechanical fasteners. Additionally, studies from Oak Ridge National Laboratory highlight the energy increase required with inherent air changes below the membrane, confirming the need for air/vapor barriers on the deck on mechanically attached roof assemblies. (See “The Energy Penalty Associated with the Use of Mechanically Attached Roofing Systems,” by Pallin, Kehrer and Desjarlais.)

Photo 4: Heat loss also occurs through adhered roofs when the insulation is mechanically attached.

As a starting point for code groups and officials, I suggest the following code revisions:

  1. State that if a mechanically attached roof cover is being used that the prescribed thermal R-value shall be increased by 50 percent.
  2. State that if a mechanically attached roof cover is being used that an air barrier below the insulation must be used and that it shall be fully adhered to penetrations and roof perimeters.

Closing Thoughts

The goal of energy conservation is a laudable one. The American Institute of Architects’ goal of zero-energy building by 2030 will never be met until real-world empirical information can be presented at code hearings. (For those of you who do not attend code hearings or know the process, information is usually disseminated in two-minute sound bites without documentation.) This lack of information sharing is a travesty and has resulted in numerous code changes that have been detrimental to the goal of energy savings. Time has come for a new way of thinking.

IRCC Confirms Lionel van der Walt as 2018 Keynote Speaker

The 2018 International Roof Coatings Conference (IRCC) is pleased to have new RCI Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer Lionel van der Walt kick off the biannual event in Chicago. As an organizational strategy and analysis expert, van der Walt has a unique background to bring to the building industry with more than 20 years of international executive leadership and association experience.

The conference will be held July 23 – 26, 2018 at the Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park in Chicago, Illinois. Van der Walt will focus on bringing positive change to the workplace across the building industry. He will discuss the strong potential for increased collaboration within the roofing industry and the need to educate governments and consumers to the tremendous economic value of the roofing, waterproofing and building envelope industries, both globally and in the US.

For more information, visit https://roofcoatingsconference.com.

Abstracts for RCI Canadian Building Envelope Technology Symposium Due April 13

RCI Inc. is now accepting abstracts for papers to be presented at the RCI Canadian Building Envelope Technology Symposium. The symposium will take place September 13-14, 2018, at the Hilton Mississauga/Meadowvale in Mississauga, Ontario.

Abstracts of each paper (200 words) should be received at RCI headquarters by April 13, 2018. The RCI Canadian Building Envelope Technology Symposium Committee will review abstracts, and authors will be notified regarding acceptance of abstracts by April 20, 2018. If accepted, papers should be received by May 25, 2018, for peer review.

Potential authors should contact Tina Hughes at RCI headquarters via email at thughes@rci-online.org for a copy of the Abstract Submittal Form and RCI Guidelines for Presentations, complete directions on formatting, and acceptable formats for abstracts and papers. A topic description must be provided addressing the speaker’s subject knowledge and the level of knowledge that will be presented to the attendee (i.e., beginner, intermediate or advanced). Six RCI CEHs will be granted for an accepted paper. Additionally, presenters will earn triple credit for the length of the program (one presentation hour yields three CEHs).

Suggested topics include:

  • Innovative Technologies & Practices
  • Façade Systems & Technologies
  • Unique Façade Design Solutions
  • The Building Envelope as a Design Statement
  • Energy Conservation Design
  • Designing Façades That Will Improve Indoor Air Quality
  • Economics & Life Cycle Analysis
  • Panelized Stone or Masonry Systems
  • Sealants – Design & Selection / Appropriate Specifications/Quality Assurance
  • Hygrothermal Analysis in Façade Designs
  • Façades Designed to Achieve Sustainability
  • Unique Detail Design Work
  • Curtainwalls
  • Double-Wall Façades
  • Roofing
  • Brick Masonry
  • Stone Masonry
  • Waterproofing
  • Stucco
  • EIFS
  • Metal Wall Panels
  • Air-Barrier Systems
  • Testing Wall Systems
  • Construction Processes
  • For more information, download the 2018 RCI CBES Call for Abstracts PDF and visit http://rci-online.org.

    RCI Canadian Building Envelope Technology Symposium Call for Abstracts

    RCI, Inc. is excited to announce the first ever RCI Canadian Building Envelope Technology Symposium. The symposium will take place September 13-14, 2018, at the Hilton Mississauga/Meadowvale, Mississauga, ON.

    We are now accepting abstracts for papers to be presented at the Canadian Building Envelope Technology Symposium. Abstracts of each paper (200 words) should be received at RCI headquarters by April 13, 2018. The RCI Canadian Building Envelope Technology Symposium Committee will review abstracts, and authors will be notified regarding acceptance of abstracts by April 20, 2018. If accepted, papers should be received by May 25, 2018, for peer review.

    Potential authors should contact Tina Hughes at RCI headquarters for a copy of the Abstract Submittal Form and RCI Guidelines for Presentations, complete directions on formatting, and acceptable formats for abstracts and papers. A topic description must be provided addressing the speaker’s subject knowledge and the level of knowledge that will be presented to the attendee (i.e., beginner, intermediate or advanced). Six RCI CEHs will be granted for an accepted paper. Additionally, presenters will earn triple credit for the length of the program (one presentation hour yields three CEHs).

    Download the 2018 RCI CBES Call for Abstracts PDF for more details.
    Suggested topics include:

    • Innovative Technologies & Practices
    • Façade Systems & Technologies
    • Unique Façade Design Solutions
    • The Building Envelope as a Design Statement
    • Energy Conservation Design
    • Designing Façades That Will Improve Indoor Air Quality
    • Economics & Life Cycle Analysis
    • Panelized Stone or Masonry Systems
    • Sealants – Design & Selection / Appropriate Specifications / Quality Assurance
    • Hygrothermal Analysis in Façade Designs
    • Façades Designed to Achieve Sustainability
    • Unique Detail Design Work
    • Curtainwalls
    • Double-Wall Façades
    • Roofing
    • Brick Masonry
    • Stone Masonry
    • Waterproofing
    • Stucco
    • EIFS
    • Metal Wall Panels
    • Air-Barrier Systems
    • Testing Wall Systems
    • Construction Processes

    For more information, visit http://rci-online.org.