New PVC Single-Ply Systems

Firestone Building Products, LLC (FSBP) announces the addition of a new category, Firestone PVC, to the Firestone brand. Firestone PVC single-ply systems provide durable, long-term commercial roofing solutions ideal for a variety of low-slope building types, including those often found on restaurants, airports and other commercial facilities. Highly resistant to impact, puncture, chemicals, grease and fire, Firestone’s PVC systems produce exceptional performance in harsh environments. With highly reflective roofing membranes and UV inhibitors, it is a cool roof solution designed to help mitigate heat transfer, drive energy savings and support sustainability priorities.

For more information, visit www.firestonebpco.com

PVC and KEE Membranes With Protective Film

Carlisle SynTec Systems introduces Sure-Flex PVC and KEE HP membranes with APEEL Protective Film. APEEL guards the membrane’s surface from scuffs and dirt accumulation during installation, eliminating the need to clean the roof upon project completion. 

Patented Sure-Flex PVC and KEE HP membranes with APEEL Protective Film are ideal for re-roofing, re-cover, and new construction projects; and can be used on the whole roof or only in areas that are subject to heavy soiling, such as loading areas. 

Durable, recyclable, and easy to remove, APEEL Protective Film helps to save time and labor, improves aesthetics and long-term reflectivity, and increases customer satisfaction, according to the company. The film is designed to withstand the most intense heat and UV exposure for up to 90 days and its gray color reduces glare, helps any accumulated moisture to dry more quickly, and warms the membrane. 

For more information, visit www.carlislesyntec.com.

Custom Single-Ply Accessories

New custom single-ply accessories from Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. make it easy for contractors to deliver professional-looking TPO and PVC roofing systems when the aesthetic of the roof is key and accessories in standard sizes and configurations will not work.

The new program is an extension of the company’s existing collection of prefabricated accessories. Designed for use on unusually sized or shaped roof protrusions that will not accommodate standard accessories, the custom accessories provide a neater, more polished appearance than is possible with field wrapping. 

Seven types of accessories are available – round boots (split and closed), square tube wraps (split and closed), conical boots (split and closed), scuppers (throughwall and overflow), curbs, breather vents (one-way and two-way), and sub base and boot assemblies. 

Accessories for TPO roofing systems are available in White, Tan, Gray and the five TPO Colorway colors – Patina Green, Medium Bronze, Rock Brown, Slate Gray and Terra Cotta. Accessories for PVC roofing systems are available in White, Tan and Gray.

To request a quote, contractors can complete an easy-to-use order form, specifying the roofing system type, the accessory dimensions needed, and the color desired. A grid section allows contractors to sketch protrusions to provide additional details. Completed accessories are typically shipped within three days of order placement.

Breather vents, sub base and boot assemblies, and custom-drawn accessories are not approved for use in projects seeking a Mule-Hide system warranty. 

For more information, visit www.mulehide.com.

New PVC Trimboard Accessories Added to Product Lineup

Palram Americas has launched a new family of PVC trimboard accessory products for its Color2Core (C2C) product lineup. The C2C line (home to a full offering of matching dimensional foam PVC trimboard) now includes PostWrap Column Wraps and Corners, plus two extruded decorative mouldings – Bead Board with Nail Flange and Brick Mould. The new accessories are available in three C2C colors – White, Sand and Clay – in multiple widths and lengths.

The new PostWrap Column Wraps use the patented Wrap-n-Snap design for quick installation by just one person. The flat-pack design makes it easy for both dealers and contractors to handle the material. There’s no waste by storing and moving “air” as with box-style column wrap designs. Palight PostWraps are available for 4, 6 and 8-inch posts in 8’6-inch and 10-foot lengths, and either smooth or woodgrain finish.

Palight Trimboard Corners are milled and glued from a single Palight Trimboard. The fabrication process leaves a thin “skin” of surface material in the center, so there is no visible joint or seam to finish during installation. Palight Corners come with EverClean Protective Film. Corners are available in 4, 6 and 8-inch widths and 20-foot lengths, with either a square or a rabbeted edge, and a smooth or woodgrain finish.

Palram is also adding two C2C decorative mouldings to its moulding lineup. The new 6-inch Bead Board with Nail Flange gives contractors new options for no-paint solutions for porch ceilings and wainscoting. And the Brick Mould provides the finish touch of color for many window and door surround designs.

For more information, visit https://go.palram.com/palight-trimboard.

PVC Pressure-Sensitive Cover Strip Eliminates Need for PVC-Coated Metal

Carlisle SynTec Systems introduces Sure-Flex PVC Pressure-Sensitive (PS) Cover Strip, a groundbreaking new product designed to help contractors save time, labor, and money. Carlisle’s new PVC PS Cover Strip is used for stripping-in flat metal edging and eliminates the need for costly PVC-coated metal or two-piece clip-on edge metal. PVC PS Cover Strip is compatible with a variety of metal finishes and is quick and easy to install; no welding is required. Simply apply PVC Step 1 Activator, followed by PVC Step 2 Primer, then install the PVC PS Cover Strip. 

For more information, visit www.carlislesyntec.com.

Conductive Primer Designed for Electronic Testing of Conventional Roof Assemblies

Detec Systems has developed TruGround, a conductive primer which enables accurate electronic leak detection (ELD) testing on conventional roof membranes including black EPDM, TPO, PVC, modified bitumen, hot and cold fluid applied. According to the manufacturer, TruGround must be installed directly below the membrane per ASTM D7877. TruGround can be used for quality assurance testing on newly installed membranes and is chemically compatible with fully adhered, mechanically attached and torch-down membranes. Once applied, ELD testing can be performed for the life of the roof. Future breaches or seam voids can be quickly pinpointed, allowing repairs to be done immediately, preventing costly moisture damage from occurring.

For more information, visit www.detecsystems.com.

Industrial Maintenance Coating Designed for TPO and PVC Roofing Systems

EverprimeEverest Systems offers Everprime All Ply, a primer for various new and aged single-ply membranes. According to the manufacturer, this high-quality, plasticizer free, single component, solvent based primer can be applied by a spray brush or a roller. The product is designed to provide exceptional adhesion to new and aged TPO and PVC membranes. In addition, this high-performance coating provides excellent surface for subsequent application of acrylic, 100 percent solids Silicone and fluoropolymer coatings.

For more information, visit http://everestsystemsco.com.

New Roof Provides Security at Senior Living Complex

Photo: Johns Mansville

The Preserve At Palm-Aire is a landmark senior living community in Pompano Beach situated on 13 acres of lush, beautiful grounds in South Florida. Offering both independent living and assisted living programs, the health care facility’s primary focus is on preserving residents’ quality of life in every way possible.

The independent senior lifestyle at The Preserve At Palm-Aire is all about maintenance-free living, and that philosophy influenced the choice of a new roofing system for the facility.

The re-roofing of The Preserve At Palm-Aire was complicated by Mansard-style roofs and 5-foot to 6-foot high parapet walls that greatly restricted access to the existing roofing system, which was installed on a lightweight structural concrete deck. The use of trash chutes was impossible, so a large crane and dumpster were used to remove the roofing debris.

“What concerned us most was using such a large crane around an immaculately landscaped property fully occupied by tenants especially sensitive to excess noise and vibration,” says Geo Madruga, commercial project coordinator for A-1 Property Services Inc., the Miami-based roofing contractor on the project. Another important concern was that the low-slope roof had numerous penetrations, including those for 30 large HVAC units and various pipes and stack vents.

Finding a Solution

A-1 Property Services Inc. competed with several other contractors on an open spec bid. With the help of JM Sales Representative Lewis Buckner, A-1 advised the property owner that a 60-mil fleece-backed PVC membrane with DuPont Elvaloy KEE would provide the longevity, energy efficiency and chemical resistance required for the project. “We really pushed the PVC fleece backed as the superior roofing system and a unique solution for this building,” says Madruga. “We also felt more comfortable with JM’s PVC membrane due to our long track record with the product.”

Adhered directly to the concrete deck with a water-based adhesive, the fleece-backed PVC exceeded Broward County’s 175-mph wind resistance requirement. The PVC membrane’s high reflectivity also earned an energy efficiency rebate from Florida Power & Light Company. The product was also easy to install, depite the numerous penetrations, notes Madruga. “While there were definitely many unique penetrations, our 10-man crew had no problems with the heat-weldable PVC membrane,” he says.

Madruga’s concerns — and his company’s name — both reflect A-1’s desire to create long-term relationships with clients that include expert maintenance services. “We met the expectations of the owner’s roof consultant, but with offices in Washington D.C., the client placed a tremendous amount of trust in the roofing manufacturer and contractor,” adds Madruga. “We are specialists, and we don’t just walk away from any roofs that we install.”

TEAM

Building Representative: CRP Preserve Palm-Aire LLC, Washington, D.C.
Roofing Contractor: A-1 Property Services Inc., Miami, Florida

MATERIALS

Roofing System: 60-mil Fully Adhered Fleece-Backed PVC, Johns Manville, www.JM.com

Building to Last With Asphalt-Based Roofing

The property owner of this building opted for a BUR/modified-bitumen hybrid system with reflective white coating. Photos: Johns Manville

The advantages of a built-up roofing (BUR), modified bitumen, or hybrid roofing assembly include long life, a variety of maintenance options, and outstanding puncture resistance. This durability means property owners will spend less time worrying about fixing leaking roofs and the associated hassles — lost productivity, disruption in operations, slips and falls, repair bills, and other liabilities.

Recommending clients install a roof system that gives them the best chance of eliminating unproductive distractions is a good business decision for design/construction professionals. A more durable roof will enable property owners to focus on making profits instead of dealing with the aftermath of a roof leak.

“I have no problem endorsing asphalt-based roofing,” says Luther Mock, RRC, FRCI and founder of building envelope consultants Foursquare Solutions Inc. “The redundancy created by multiple plies of roofing is really what sets systems like BUR and modified bitumen apart.”

One can argue BUR’s closest cousin — the modified bitumen (mod bit) assembly — is actually a built-up roof made on a manufacturing line. The reality is the plies of a BUR create a redundancy that can help mitigate any potential oversights in rooftop workmanship.

BUR systems are offered in a variety of attractive and reflective options with a proven track record of performance. Photos: Johns Manville

“I’ve replaced BURs for clients I worked with 30 years ago,” says Mock. “We recently replaced [a BUR] specified in the early 1980s. And the only reason was because some of the tectum deck panels had fallen out of the assembly. Meanwhile, the roof was still performing well after 30 years.”

According to the Quality Commercial Asphalt Roofing Council of the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA), one of the main drivers of the demand for BUR systems is the desire of building owners for long life cycles for their roofs.

“A solid core of building owners and roofing professionals in North America continue to advocate asphalt-based roofing systems because of their long lives,” says Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s executive director.

Benefits of Asphalt-Based Roofing

Over the years, asphalt-based roofing assemblies have earned a reputation for reliability with building owners, roofing consultants, architects, engineers, and commercial roofing contractors. The original price tag tends to be greater than other low-slope roofing options, but these assemblies offer competitive life-cycle costs. BUR enjoys a track record spanning more than 150 years; it provides a thick, durable roof covering and can be used in a broad range of building waterproofing applications.

An aerial view of a reflective roof membrane. Photos: Johns Manville

Available as part of fire-, wind-, and/or hail-rated systems, BUR and modified bitumen assemblies offer proven waterproofing capabilities, high tensile strength, long-term warranties, and a wide choice of top surfacings (including ‘cool’ options). Their components include the deck, vapor retarder, insulation, membrane, flashings, and surfacing material. The roofing membrane can be made up of a variety of components, including up to four high-strength roofing felts, modified bitumen membranes (hybrid systems) and standard or modified asphalt. Hot-applied asphalt typically serves as the waterproofing agent and adhesive for the system.

The roofing membrane is protected from the elements by a surfacing layer — either a cap sheet, gravel embedded in bitumen, or a coating material. Surfacings can also enhance the roofing system’s fire performance and reflectivity ratings.

Another surfacing option is gravel, commonly used in Canadian applications where the existing roof structure can handle the extra weight. There are also several smooth-surface coating options, the most popular of which are aluminum or clay emulsion products offering greater reflectivity than a smooth, black, non-gravel-surfaced roof. These reflective roof coating options are typically used in warmer regions when required by code. Reflective white roof coatings are also becoming more popular.

Cold-Process BUR

Cold application of BUR has provided an alternative to traditional hot-applied systems for more than 48 years. The term ‘cold-applied’ means the BUR roofing system is assembled using multiple plies of reinforcement applied with a liquid adhesive instead of hot asphalt. These cold adhesives are used between reinforced base/ply sheets to provide a weatherproof membrane.

The owner of this shopping mall chose BUR primarily due to its redundancy. Multiple plies of roofing can provide extra insurance against water intrusion. Photos: Johns Manville

In BUR cold-process roof systems, manufacturers typically require that only fully coated, non-porous felts (such as standard base sheets) are used as base and ply sheets. Generally, an aggregate surfacing or a coating is then applied over the completed membrane to provide surface protection and a fire rating for the roof system.

“In the re-roofing market, we’re definitely seeing more cold-applied systems being specified, particularly with modified bitumen,” says Mock. “It’s a natural alternative when a building may be occupied during the reroofing process and hot asphalt is not an option.”

Adhesives can be manually applied with a squeegee, brush, or spray application equipment. When numerous roof penetrations or rooftop access become issues, manual application of adhesives is usually the best option. Proper coverage rates are vital to a successful, long-term, cold-applied roof system. Both spray and manual application methods require the proper amount of adhesive material be installed. If too little adhesive is applied, there is a potential for an improper bond to be formed between the felts. If too much is applied, then the potential for longer setup times and membrane slippage is increased. Additionally, ambient temperatures must be 40 degrees Fahrenheit (5°C) and rising before installation. This limits, but does not preclude, use of cold-process BUR in much of the northern United States and Canada.

“I’m also comfortable specifying BUR, because I’m confident I will have a seasoned contractor on the job,” says Mock. “The commitment in terms of skilled labor and equipment is simply too great for these contractors to be first-timers.”

Flashings are another critical component of every roofing system, particularly in cold-weather applications. Four-ply BURs use modified bitumen flashings almost exclusively. These membranes are predominantly styrene butadiene styrene (SBS)-modified and offer greater elongation in frigid climates where it counts most — at the interface of the roof system with other building components.

Use of a modified-bitumen base ply is one way of handling general flashing requirements, although modified bitumen cap sheets are more common.

BUR Repair and Maintenance

Like all roof systems to some extent, the life expectancy of a BUR system depends on the property owner’s commitment to routine maintenance. All roof systems can benefit from an owner willing to undertake a proactive management plan. BUR installed over an insulation package lends itself well to non-destructive testing in the future (e.g., infrared) as a means to maximize service life.

“Asphalt roofing systems have the potential for a very long life, and preventive maintenance is the key to realizing that potential,” says Hitchcock.

Non-gravel BUR surfacing options include aggregate, a mineral surface cap sheet, or a smooth, surface-coated membrane. Photos: Johns Manville

The goal is for problem areas to be detected and fixed before they develop into leaks. Inspections can reveal potentially troublesome situations, such as a loss of gravel surfacing, which could lead to felt erosion or brittleness. Less commonly, punctures and cuts to the membrane can occur, so it is wise to remove sharp objects and debris from the roof. Clogged drains or poorly sealed flashings also present problems that are repaired easily. The effects of chemical exhausts on roofing materials should also be monitored.

Preventive maintenance actions can help catch problems before they damage larger areas of the roof system. Inspections should be performed not only on aging roofs, but also on newly-installed roofs to guard against errors in installation, design, or specifications.

BUR and modified bitumen also have a long history of proven performance in the northern United States and Canada, where snow and ice buildup are common. Perhaps more than any other roof membrane, the BUR system shrugs off minor abuse.

BUR has proven to be a low-maintenance roofing system, and it can also be effectively repaired when needed. This means property owners can usually get more life out of a BUR. The ability to enhance the performance of existing BUR membranes with coatings, mod bit cap sheets, or flood coats of asphalt explain the long service lives of these systems in demanding applications.

“Property owners rarely have to replace a four-ply BUR until it is absolutely, positively worn out,” says one roofing contractor who asked to remain anonymous. “Based on experience, these asphalt-based systems ‘hang in there’ longer than less-robust roof options.”

When BUR Is Not the Best Option

There is no roofing product solution that will fit every building specification, and that certainly holds true for BUR. Probably more than any other roofing system (except spray polyurethane foam), the built-up roofing application is more of a skill than a science. As alternative systems have been introduced into the market, the job of finding experienced BUR contractors has become more difficult. This is especially true for the hot mopping of multi-ply BUR systems.

BURs are labor intensive and their installed cost will fluctuate with crude oil prices. However, as oil prices have continued to fall, BUR manufacturers have enjoyed the lowest asphalt pricing since the 2008-09 recession. (The price of oil peaked at about $117 a barrel in September 2012 and is $50 a barrel at this writing.) Typically BUR manufacturers will pass on a portion of these savings to their customers.

BUR has always held up well in life-cycle cost analyses. However, if a roof is not expected to last 20 years or more, it usually does not make sense to specify a premium four-ply BUR.

On larger projects, gravel-surfaced BURs are typically not practical from a cost standpoint unless a source of gravel is available locally. Projects where roof access is difficult often present challenges when roofing kettles are used. And despite the preponderance of low-fuming asphalts and kettles, re-roofing occupied buildings is often unacceptable to neighbors and/or the property owner.

Built-up roofing systems have sufficient strength to resist normal expansion and contraction forces that are exerted on a roof; however, they typically have a low ability to accommodate excessive building or substrate movement. Rephrased, if the roof must be used to “hold the walls” together or if the use of “loose-laid insulation” has a benefit, then a traditional three- or four-ply built-up roofing system is not a good choice.

A built-up roof typically provides high tensile strength with low elongation. Guidelines about where expansion joints should be installed in the roofing system should not be ignored by the designer. These guidelines include installing expansion joints where the deck changes direction, approximately every 200 feet (61 meters), although many consider that this dimension can be expanded for single-ply roofing membranes; where there is a change in deck material; and, anywhere there is a structural expansion joint, etc. Based on these requirements, on some projects it simply isn’t practical to use a BUR.

BUR materials must be kept dry before and during installation to prevent blistering in the roof system. Proper storage is the key: Do not overstock the roof; use breathable tarps to cover material on the roof; store material on pallets to minimize the possibility of material sitting in water; and store rolls on-end to prevent crushing. In general, polymeric single-ply membranes like TPO (thermoplastic polyolefin) are less susceptible to storage issues.

Many roof consultants and product manufacturers clearly state that there should be no phased construction of a built-up roof. If phasing is required, then a BUR should not be specified. This is a clean and simple rule to understand; if the roof being constructed is a four-ply BUR, then only as much insulation should be installed as can be covered the same day with all four of the plies in the built-up roofing membrane. Phased construction of a built-up roof greatly increases the potential for blistering of the membrane and does not allow for the total number of plies to be installed in a shingled fashion. Phased application contains other perils, such as roofing over a small amount of overnight precipitation or dew that, even with the best of intentions, can cause harm.

As stated above, costlier modified bitumen materials should be specified for flashings and to strip in metal. Stripping in two plies of felt will most likely result in splitting at the joints in a gravel stop because the two-ply application cannot accommodate the movement in the edge metal. On new or existing buildings where significant expansion/contraction is expected, a TPO, PVC or EPDM roof membrane can save the property owners money and eliminate premature roof failure due to roof splitting.

Conclusion

Manufacturers across North America are making asphalt roofing systems like BUR better and more versatile for architects, builders, contractors, roofing consultants, and building owner/managers. Thanks especially to the addition of polymers that add stretch and strength, architects can now specify a commercial, low-slope roof as part of a multi-ply BUR system any way they want it — hot, cold, torch, or self-adhered (hybrid BUR) — to meet the individual low-slope roofing project’s needs.

Most importantly, asphalt-based roofing products offer exceptional life-cycle cost performance. They have proven to be reliable, easy to maintain, and are trusted to perform exceptionally well in extreme weather conditions.

Portable RhinoBond Hand Welder Designed for Use in Tight Spaces

OMG Roofing Products introduces the RhinoBond Hand Welder. Based on patented Sinch Technology, the portable RhinoBond Hand Welder is designed to help roofers weld RhinoBond Plates in tight spaces such as under raised rooftop equipment and on vertical surfaces. The ergonomically designed tool features a vibrating handle and an indicator light that lets roofers know when the tool is activated and when the weld cycle is complete. The base is recessed and features centering indicator lines to help users properly align the tool over installed RhinoBond Plates for optimum bonding and improved productivity.

The new tool weights just six pounds (2.7 kg), and operates on 110V and 220V power sources for global use. Each tool comes with three, eight-inch tall magnets, and a durable carrying case that protects the induction tool when not in use. Using a 12-gauge RhinoBond Power Cord (sold separately), the independent Hand Welder can be operated up to 100-feet (30 m) from the power source. A quick connect power cord pig-tail enables international users to quickly switch to the local plug configuration for global use (international pig-tails sold separately).

“Many roofers understand the tremendous productivity and performance benefits that RhinoBond offers,” said Web Shaffer, vice president of marketing for OMG. “In fact, some roofers have seen productivity rates increase by 30%. To enhance the systems’ overall productivity, we wanted to offer a solution that can be used everywhere on the roof, even in tight spaces. This new product makes that possible.”

The RhinoBond System is designed for use with TPO and PVC roofing membranes and approved by most roofing system manufacturers. The System uses advanced induction welding technology to bond roofing membranes directly to specially coated plates used to secure the insulation to the deck. The result is a roofing system with improved wind performance that requires fewer fasteners, plates, and seams, and zero penetrations of the new membrane. Since it was introduced in 1998, nearly 2.0 billion square feet (185 million square meters) of membrane has been installed with the RhinoBond System around the world.

For more information, visit OMGRoofing.com.