Cornell University Restoration Project Puts Team to the Test

Photo: Cornell University

Originally built in 1868, Morrill Hall was the first newly constructed building on Cornell University’s campus in Ithaca, New York. It is one of three structures built using Ithaca bluestone that are collectively known as “Stone Row.”

Buildings don’t last forever. Some need to be renovated every 150 years or so, and Morrill Hall is no exception. This year Cornell University and Charles F. Evans Company, Inc. completed an ambitious and extensive structural renovation project designed to restore the building to its former glory.

The scope of work included replacing the entire roof system at Morrill Hall, including the slate on the mansards and the standing seam metal on the main roof — a total of 3,780 square feet in all. Additional work included rebuilding and waterproofing the built-in gutters, replacing all 27 fourth-floor windows, repairing the ornamental wood cornice, and repointing the stone chimneys.

Morrill Hall was originally built in 1868. It was constructed from Ithaca bluestone. Photo: Charles F. Evans Company, Inc.

The installation challenges were daunting, but so were the environmental concerns posed by the existing materials, which included asbestos and lead. It would take a talented team of design and construction professionals to make it happen. Companies formulating and executing the overall plan included architect Bell & Spina, the construction team at Cornell University, and Charles F. Evans Company, Inc., which served as both the construction manager and roof system installer on this project.

Members of parent company Evans Roofing Company Inc. and Charles F. Evans Company, Inc., who shared their insights on the project with Roofing magazine included Bob Pringle, vice president at Evans Roofing Company; Don Sewalt, construction manager at Charles F. Evans Company; and Dan Nowak, corporate risk manager at Evans Roofing Company. They cited the teamwork of everyone involved on the project as the key to overcoming its many challenges. “The success story for this project was the working partnership we developed with all of the stakeholders,” says Pringle.

Environmental Concerns

Before restoration work could begin, known hazardous materials had to be removed. “There were multiple environmental issues on this job, including asbestos, lead in the metal and lead in the piping of the window glazing,” notes Pringle. “We had to abate all of these areas prior to even tearing off the existing roof.”

Ventilators were custom fabricated in Charles F. Evans Company, Inc.’s sheet metal shop. Crews also installed permanent anchor points pre-engineered by Thaler Industries. Photo: Charles F. Evans Company, Inc.

The company is licensed and all personnel certified in both asbestos and lead abatement for the construction industry. “We are licensed and certified in New York State to remove roofing, which is a significant benefit for our client in reducing costs,” Pringle says. “New York State has very stringent standards, which Charles F. Evans Company, Inc. goes above and beyond for their abatement practices.”

Care had to be taken to ensure no faculty members, students or pedestrians inside or outside the building would be exposed to contaminants or debris. Proper barricades and signage were used to keep everyone away from the abatement areas during the removal process.

Due to the lead time required for the abatement process and the windows, work began at the mansards. W.L. Kline was called in as a subcontractor to rebuild the cornice, remove and install the windows, and handle finished carpentry on the window frames.

The radiused roofs over the dormer windows were field fabricated. Photo: Charles F. Evans Company, Inc.

As the slate was being removed, roofing crews began the process of removing and rebuilding the gutters. The existing gutter system had to be removed according to the abatement standards, as it was constructed of lead-coated copper and lined with a built-up system containing asbestos in the felt. After the original structural sills were replaced, the gutter was rebuilt and topped with Kemperol 2K PUR, a membrane-reinforced, liquid-applied waterproofing system manufactured by Kemper System.

The next step was replacing the curved dormer roofs. “As we installed plywood on the mansard, we also removed the radiused roofs over the dormer windows,” says Sewalt. “We were field fabricating all of the sheet metal, which was a Freedom Gray flat seam. Everything was covered with ice and water shield. We used Polystick MTS, and then covered that with 30-pound felt from CertainTeed before all the radiused roofs were hand soldered in place.”

Installing the Roof Systems

As crews continued on the mansard sections, others began to tackle the main roof. On the mansard, crews installed North Country Unfading Black roofing slate supplied by New England Slate Company. The slate was custom cut to a hexagon shape to match the originals. The slates were all hand nailed in place. Some of the slate had to be hand cut to fit precisely around the curved dormer roofs. Making sure the courses lined up perfectly where they met up at the top of the dormers was critical. “It was meticulous work,” Sewalt says.

The building was fully scaffolded at the eaves. All scaffolded surfaces are fully planked and included a guardrail system and debris netting. Photo: Charles F. Evans Company, Inc.

Where the mansard roof meets the upper roof, attention to detail was crucial. “We shop fabricated our own cornice metal and counter-flashed the top course of slate,” says Sewalt. “We tied in to the eave of the Terne-coated stainless on the upper roof.”

Metal for the upper roof was purchased from Roofinox in coils, and the stainless-steel panels were fabricated in Charles F. Evans Company’s sheet metal shop. After the old roof was removed, new three-quarter-inch plywood was installed over the top of the existing random rough-cut deck boards. Crews then applied Polystick MTS self-adhered underlayment and rosin paper before installing the double-lock metal panels.

The original Ithaca bluestone chimneys were repointed by R.E. Kelley, the masonry restoration subcontractor, and new shop-fabricated step flashings were installed. Charles F. Evans Company also fabricated the large ventilators. “The louvered ventilators were very detailed,” Sewalt points out. “They were all custom fabricated in our sheet metal shop.”

One of the last phases of the roofing portion of the project was the installation of low-slope roofs on two lower-level areas that covered mechanical rooms. “We installed a two-ply modified bitumen system by Soprema,” Sewalt says. “We used Sopralene 180 sanded as a base, and Sopralene 180 FR GR White as the cap.”

The Safety Plan

The height, age and nature of the work posed numerous safety concerns, according to Pringle, but experience on other similar projects helped the company structure a detailed safety, health and environmental plan for Morrill Hall. “Charles F. Evans Company, Inc. is a VPP Mobile Workforce STAR contractor, the only union roofing company in the United States to have this prestigious status,” notes Pringle. “We had to make sure all of our employees were safe, as well as students, faculty, and the members of the public.”

The black roofing slate supplied by New England Slate Company was custom cut to a hexagon shape to match the original. Photo: Charles F. Evans Company, Inc.

A scaffolding system was central to the safety plan. “We had this one fully scaffolded,” notes Nowak. “We try to do this on all of projects if we can. We do it for safety, of course, but secondly it makes it a little bit easier for our crews. Going up a scaffolded stair tower sure beats a ladder any day for safety, and all scaffolded surfaces are fully planked with a guardrail system and debris netting. This way, it protects everyone occupying it and staging our materials and tools are allowed with the proper load ratings. It makes it so much easier to look at the work right in front of them and do the work in a safe manner.”

On the upper roof, workers were tied off 100 percent of the time. As part of the project, crews also installed permanent anchor points pre-engineered by Thaler Industries.

“Cornell has always been on the forefront with safety, not only for the public, the students and the faculty, but their maintenance crews as well,” Nowak says. “We are seeing a lot more permanent fall protection being installed on campus buildings, which is a great thing.”

The safety plan had to also protect people entering the building, as it was in use for much of the installation process. “We had to have proper barricades, signage, and of course entryway protection,” Nowak says. “We basically created a tunnel system with overhead protection so people could access the building.”

Landmark Renovation

Roofing work began in June 2018 and was completed in December 2018, so inclement weather was another big challenge, but the project was completed on time with zero safety incidents. According to Pringle, one key to meeting the deadline was the company’s ability to handle the abatement work itself, which optimized efficiency. “Everybody on that rooftop was certified for abatement, so we could tear and go and keep moving without calling in a subcontractor,” Pringle states. “It’s critical that we can do this work ourselves.”

Pringle and Sewalt commended everyone who worked on the project, including Jim Wilson, roofing superintendent; Brian Babcock, sheet metal superintendent; Brett Sewalt, slate foreman; and Brent Spencer, sheet metal foreman. The roofing crew included Brian Sewalt, Nate Uram, Cal Uram, and Bill Jordan. The sheet metal crew included Sam Morich, Neal Brown, Matt Denson, Bob Corwin, Tony Hoskins, and Jeff Worsfol.

To rebuild the historic landmark with the products of today, bring it up to code, and maintain the original look, is a tremendous accomplishment. “This was a collaborative effort between Charles F. Evans Company, Inc., Cornell University, and Bell & Spina,” Pringle says. “What we leave behind is our craftsmanship. Our client, Cornell University, once again depended on us to deliver another landmark renovation for them. Morrill Hall will continue to dominate ‘Stone Row,’ offering students and faculty a place to learn for years to come.”

TEAM

Owner/Representative: Cornell University (Patrick Conrad), Ithaca, New York, www.cornell.edu

Architect: Bell & Spina, Syracuse, New York, www.bellandspina.com

Construction Manager and Roofing Contractor: Charles F. Evans Company, Inc., Elmira, New York, www.evansroofingcompany.com

Window Contractor: W.L. Kline Inc., Binghamton, New York

Masonry Contractor: R.E. Kelley, Bowmansville, New York, www.rekelley.com

MATERIALS

Slate: North Country Unfading Black Roofing Slate, New England Slate Company, www.newenglandslate.com

Metal Roof Panels: Terne-Coated Stainless Steel, Roofinox, www.roofinox.com

Underlayment: Polystick MTS, Polyglass U.S.A., Inc., https://polyglass.us

Felt: Roofers’ Select 30-pound Felt, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

Flat-Seam Dormer Roofs: Revere Freedom Grey copper, Revere Copper, www.reverecopper.com

Modified Bitumen Roof: Sopralene 180 and Sopralene 180 FR GR, Soprema, www.soprema.com

Gutter Lining: Kemperol 2K PUR, Kemper System, www.kemper-system.com

High Wind-Resistant Roofing System

Polyglass announces the new Velociflex high wind-resistant roof assembly system. Independently tested, the Velociflex system provides for high-speed wind protection up to 270 psf (pounds/square foot).

The core of Velociflex is two or three plies of reinforced modified bitumen membranes. Suitable for new or re-roofing projects, this multi-ply system comprises of a mechanically fastened base sheet, optional interply, and a heat-welded or cold-applied cap sheet. According to the manufacturer, Velociflex is ideal for both steel and concrete decks.

The self-venting Velociflex system’s “loose-laid,” mechanically attached base sheet reduces the likelihood of blistering from substrate to membrane. Attached at the seams only, it also limits material and labor costs. Plus, the watertight system acts as a temporary roof once base sheet seams are heat-welded. Fast and efficient to install, the Velociflex system dries in fast, so projects can proceed with phased construction before cap sheet installation. 

Installed with a Polyfresko G cap sheet with initial Solar Reflective Index 96, the Velociflex system complies with 2016 Title 24 Part 6 Cool Roof Requirements and is ENERGY STAR Certified. The Velociflex system is also compatible with a variety of SBS and APP cap sheets from Polyglass, including Elastoflex, Polyflex, and Elastoshield membranes.

For more information, visit polyglass.us and view the Velociflex YouTube video.

Polyglass Helps Fight Cancer With the Dolphins Cancer Challenge Partnership

Polyglass U.S.A., Inc., announced that it will support the Dolphins Cancer Challenge (DCC) for the third consecutive year. The Challenge will take place at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida on April 6. As a “Fighter Partner,” Polyglass helps the DCC raise funds for innovative cancer research at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. Polyglass employees will walk, run, and bike as part of the charitable event.

“This opportunity to support the fight against cancer aligns perfectly with our values as a company,” said Scott Lelling, director of strategic marketing. “We are proud to support life-saving research that touches so many in our communities.”

The DCC is dedicated to improving lives by financially supporting cancer research at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center (SCCC) at the University of Miami. Since 2010, DCC participants have raised over 27.5 million dollars for the SCCC.

For more information on the DCC visit https://dolphinscancerchallenge.com/.

For more information about Polyglass, visit polyglass.us.

Redesigned High-Temp Underlayment Offers Improved Walkability, Reduced Bleed-Through

Polyglass U.S.A. Inc. announces that Polystick MU-X self-adhered, high-temperature underlayment has been redesigned. A secondary water barrier for roof coverings, Polystick MU-X features an enhanced black polypropylene film, improving membrane walkability and reducing bleed-through.

Polystick MU-X is designed especially for high-temperature environments. It is rated as temperature resistant to 250 degrees Fahrenheit and has an exposure window of 90 days for job flexibility. Polystick MU-X features a proprietary SBS modified bitumen upper compound and patented ADESO dual-compound self-adhered technology on the bottom side of the reinforcement. A split-release film on the bottom of the roll allows for ease of application. Convenient 3-inch lay lines printed on both edges allow bi-directional installation, saving time and labor. 

“We are excited about the performance improvements we have made to the Polystick MU-X underlayment,” said Polyglass CEO Natalino Zanchetta. “We made the enhancements based on customer feedback and our commitment to adding value by meeting or exceeding customer expectations and increasing customer satisfaction.” 

For more information, visit https://polyglass.us.

White Mod-Bit Cap Sheets Offer Superior Granule Embedment

Polyglass U.S.A. Inc. announces important new updates to Polyfresko, a highly-reflective, white modified bitumen membrane cap sheet used as the final layer in a multi-ply roof system or as a flashing membrane. 

According to the manufacturer, independent laboratory testing confirms Polyfresko’s superior granule embedment and documents its aged reflectivity performance. Granule embedment was tested using ASTM D4977 Standard Test Method for Granule Adhesion to Mineral Surfaced Roofing by abrasion. The recently completed three-year aged reflectivity testing was conducted in three different climate zones, and demonstrated that Polyfresko maintains reflectivity performance over time. The product was deemed suitable for most Cool Roof specifications due to Polyfresko’s initial and aged reflectivity and emissivity performance. The laboratory testing results enabled Polyfresko to gain Energy Star Certification.

Polyfresko is manufactured with proprietary CURE Technology, a thin film technology infused with ceramic microspheres, ultraviolet (UV) stabilizers, and proprietary resins. This increases weatherability and decreases maintenance costs by “locking-in” the granules, so the high-performing Polyfresko membrane maintains reflectivity performance over time, decreases UV degradation, and increases abrasion and impact resistance. 

In addition, all Polyfresko products are now manufactured with FASTLap technology, a patented granule-free end lap that helps make the membrane watertight and increases speed of installation. Polyfresko is available in Polyglass’s APP (Atactic Polypropylene) and SBS (Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene) formulations and is adhered to the roof deck or other approved substrates by torching or self-adhered application.

“Granule loss is one of the challenges with modified bitumen membranes, and our new granule adhesion testing results show that Polyfresko is a premium solution, firmly positioned as a top performing product,” says Polyglass CEO Natalino Zanchetta. “The granule adhesion results achieved with our CURE Technology, together with our new three-year weathering milestone, demonstrate our leadership with asphaltic membrane cap sheet performance.”  

For more information, visit https://polyglass.us

Water-Repellent Sloping Material Promotes Positive Drainage

Polyglass U.S.A. Inc. launches Polyslope, a water-repellent, fiber reinforced, cementitious compound is designed to address standing water, promote positive drainage, and divert water off the roof.

According to the manufacturer, theproduct can be used to create positive drainage on roofs that have low spots and divert standing water. Polyslope is a blend of special binders, fiber, admixtures, selected aggregate, and powder polymers formulated to produce high bond strength and easy finishing. The product is mixed with 1.2 gallons to 1.3 gallons of water per 50-pound pail. Polyslope is ready to use after adding water and mixing. It is easy to screed and paintable after 48 hours.

“We are proud to bring this product to market and enable contractors to quickly resolve roof challenges,” said Ariel Lender, director of product management and codes and compliance. “Our mission is to deliver quality and innovative solutions to the roofing industry that are sustainable and help prolong the life of the roof.”

LEARN MORE

Visit: https://polyglass.us
Call: (800) 222-9782

Meticulous Preparation Sets Up Restoration Project for Success

Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Officials at Roma High School in Roma, Texas, knew they needed a new roof. The tile roof on the main complex was more than 25 years old, and some components were clearly failing. They didn’t realize that many of the leaks and resulting wall deterioration were caused by other problems as well. Luckily, they reached out to design and construction professionals who did their homework, diagnosed all of the key problems, and developed a plan to fix them. The crowning touch of the building envelope restoration plan was a beautiful standing seam metal roof, and the success of the project is proof that hard work pays off not only in the classroom, but on top of it.

The Consultant

As its building envelope consultant, Roma Independent School District chose Amtech Solutions Inc., headquartered in Dallas, Texas. The full-service architectural, engineering, and building envelope consulting firm has been in business since 1982. Working out of the company’s Rio Grand Valley (RGV) office located in Pharr, Texas, Amtech Solutions inspected and evaluated the entire site and reviewed legacy documents to identify the underlying issues.

They found quite a few, notes Michael Hovar, AIA, RRO, LEED AP, a senior architect and the general manager of the company’s RGV office. “They thought all they had was a roofing problem,” he notes. “But we saw right away that not properly managing water off the roof was the cause of wall deterioration, which then became leaks into the building. Our experience with the entire envelope and all facets of design and construction really helped us on this one.”

Roma High School in Roma, Texas, underwent a three-phase building envelope restoration plan in 2016-2017. After the walls were repaired and restored, the roof and mechanical equipemt were replaced. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Amtech Solutions put together a presentation for the school board to detail what they discovered and the plan they proposed to remedy the situation. The company also worked with the school district to help develop a budget.
The restoration plan was split up into three phases. The first phase focused on restoring the walls and windows. The second phase encompassed roof replacement and installing new mechanical equipment. The third phase involved improving drainage, grading and other site repairs.

Amtech Solutions decided not to bid the project out to a general contractor, but rather to bid each phase separately. “We decided to split it up into stages and do it logically, starting with the walls first,” Hovar says. “For the walls, we got restoration contractors who specialize in wall restoration work.”

Restoration Services Inc. (RSI) of Houston, Texas handled the first phase in the summer, as the wall repairs would be louder and more disruptive to students. The roof replacement project was scheduled for the fall. “Once all of the stuff on the ground was done, that allowed us to do the re-roofing work throughout the school year, which also helped the price,” notes Hovar. “Our experience has always been that if we have good cooperation with the contractors and the school staff, at the end of the job they end up being best friends. And that’s exactly what happened. At the end of the job, they were sad to see the roofers go.”

Amtech Solutions convinced the school district the plan would work. “It took some coordination, communication and cooperation, and it took a motivated owner that was willing to do this and trust us,” Hovar says. “They looked to us for guidance, and we said, ‘We do this all the time. We do roofing projects throughout the year, occupied and unoccupied, and we do it in a way that respects what the occupant’s needs are.’”

When it came time to specify the roof system, school board members were divided; one faction wanted to install a new tile roof, and the other wanted to go with metal. “The interesting thing is, for the historical architecture of the area, both of those roofs are appropriate, so from the standpoint of historical significance, either one works,” Hovar says. “In the end, it was quite a bit more expensive to utilize tile than it was to utilize a metal roof.”

The Roof Systems

The decision was made to go with a standing seam metal roof from McElroy Metal on the vast majority of the complex, including the main roof, the gymnasium, and two freestanding structures — the art and industrial arts buildings — that had been added over the years. The main tile roof was removed and replaced with McElroy’s 138T Panel, a 16-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel in Brite Red. McElroy’s 238T Panel, a 24-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel, was specified for the gym, as well as the art and industrial arts buildings. In a cost-saving measure, the color on the gym roof was changes to Galvalume Plus. In all, more than 233,000 square feet of metal roofing was installed.

Before

“The reason we picked this roof system is we’ve had a lot of great experience with it,” Hovar says. “We love that panel because they can actually bring the roll former to the jobsite. That gives the roofing contractor a lot more options on how he can load the roof and sequence the job. The other beauty of this panel is that it has unlimited movement. The panels itself slides back and forth over a fixed clip. It also flashes like a dream.”

Low-slope roof areas adjacent to the gym were replaced with a two-ply modified bitumen system from Siplast. CPI Daylighting manufactured a new skylight for the atrium.

As part of the roofing phase, gutters and downspouts were added. “There was nothing controlling the water before on this project,” Hovar says. “We designed a gutter system with expansion joints as per SMACNA guidelines. The contractor made absolutely beautiful shop-welded aluminum downspout boots.”

The most crucial detail was a custom-made saddle that solved the problem of water infiltration at the transition between the roof and walls on the wings. “This ultimately simple solution addressed one of the major design flaws that plagued the facility from the first days of occupancy,” Hovar notes. “We modeled the three-dimensional design of those saddles, and the contractor welded them in his shop. He fabricated them out of .080 aluminum and they were seamless. The restoration contractor had already installed all of the through-wall flashing, so all the roofer had to do was put counterflashing in and do his work around it. He was able to fly without being slowed down by a mason on the job.”

The Roofing Contractor

The roofing phase of the project was handled by Rio Roofing, headquartered in Harlingen, Texas. The company primarily installs low-slope and metal roofs, and its focus is on large commercial and institutional projects. ““We do nearly 90 percent public bonded work,” notes Hedley Hichens, vice president of Rio Roofing. “We found out that whether it’s a small job or a big job, the paperwork is still the same, so we try to make it worthwhile.”

The company worked on the Roma High School project for about a year, wrapping up the roofing phase of the project in November 2017.

After the structure’s main roof was removed, the tile was replaced with a standing seam metal roof featuring McElroy’s 138T Panel in Brite Red. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

The decision was made to tackle the wings on the main roof first. “During the pre-con meetings, we met with the principal and the superintendent and asked, ‘Which wings are the worst?’” Hichens notes. “There was one wing that was the most problematic, so we started with that area first.”

Rio Roofing began by tearing off the existing tile roof. “There were about 1,925 squares of concrete tile we had to remove,” Hichens notes. “We had crews on the roof tearing off tile, crews on the ground palletizing the tile and storing it in the parking lot.”

As crew members removed the old tile and felt, others followed behind and installed polyisocyanurate insulation and Polystick MTS, a waterproofing underlayment designed for high-temperature applications. “We did 40 or 50 squares a day, moving down the wing,” Hichens says. “We dried in the whole school. Then we came back with the 138 panel.”

On top of the gym and other buildings that received the 238T panel, the existing metal roofs were left in place. “We put flute fill on top of the old panels. Then we screwed down 3/8-inch Securock, primed it and put the Polyglass underlayment down on top of that,” Hichens explains. “That 24-inch panel is a great panel to work with because every time you put one down, you’re 2 feet closer to finishing.”

Installing the New Roofs

The school’s main roof covers a central hub with eight wings coming off of its octagonal skylight. Where the wings tie together, access was limited.

“It was a tight squeeze,” Hichens says. “Getting in there and getting out was difficult. I think our fork lift only cleared one of the walkways by 2 or 3 inches. It’s a big campus, but the layout was difficult at the school.”

Once the wings were dried in, sheet metal crews installed the edge metal and 4,000 linear feet of gutters. They also started forming the panels.

Typically, Rio Roofing lifts the roll former to the roof edge, but it was difficult to get a large lift next to the building, so in this case the roll former was left on the ground. It was moved from wing to wing as the job progressed. “We used a New Tech roll former on this project,” Hichens says, “We would put the roll former parallel to each wing and store the panels on the ground in each area.”

Panels were hemmed and notched using a Swenson Snap Table Pro and lifted to the roof with a fork lift and a special cradle. Crews used a hand seamer to set temporary seams and followed up with a robotic seamer from D.I. Roof Seamers. “The panels are easy to install,” Hichens says. “You get about four guys 10 feet apart to engage the panels and clips and you just keep going. At the end of the day crews put the seam caps on.”

On the low-slope areas, Rio Roofing installed approximately 47,000 square feet of the Siplast two-ply SBS modified system, which was torched down over new lightweight concrete. “For their size, the low-slope areas had a ton of mechanical equipment and ductwork up there,” notes Hichens. “There were a lot of key details.”

Rio Roofing custom-manufactured numerous curbs and details, including the saddles over problem areas at the walls. “We have a full welding shop,” Hichens notes. “We have a full machine shop. We make all of our own curbs here, so there is no lead time for ordering curbs, and we are sure they’ll fit.”

Teamwork

Work on the project has now moved on to a fourth phase: installing translucent panels over the swimming pool. Hovar believes teamwork was the key to the project’s success. “We had such a good contracting team, we did good field work to begin with, and we had an understanding owner,” he says. “Designing it wasn’t easy, but thankfully our experience helped. We just had a really good team to execute it, all the way around. That’s what makes for a great, project, right? When everybody is invested in a good outcome, they always support everybody else.”

Communication was also essential, and Building Information Modeling (BIM) helped keep everyone on the same page. “We modeled the project on our BIM software, and it helped everyone understand the scope and challenges. The BIM model allowed the owner see exactly what the project would look like, and it helped the contractor understand the staging and logistical challenges before the project was bid,” Hovar says. “There were no surprises.”

TEAM

Architect and Consultant: Amtech Solutions Inc., Pharr, Texas, www.amtechsls.com
Roofing Contractor: Rio Roofing, Harlingen Texas
Wall Restoration Contractor: RSI-Restoration Services Inc., Houston, Texas, www.rsi-restorationservices.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System
Metal Panels: 138T panel (16 inches wide, 24 gauge) and 238T Panel (24 inches wide, 24 gauge), McElroy Metal, www.mcelroymetal.com
Underlayment: Polystick MTS, Polyglass, www.polyglass.us
Cover Board: Securock, USG, www.usg.com
Skylight: CPI Daylighting, www.cpidaylighting.com

Low-Slope Roof System
Modified Bitumen Membrane: Paradiene SBS, Siplast, www.siplast.com

Miami-Dade County Approves PolyPUF Foam Systems From Polyglass

Miami-Dade County Department of Regulatory and Economic Resources issued several Notices of Acceptance (NOA) for Polyglass’ PolyPUF Foam Systems, certifying the commercial roofing solution for use in high velocity hurricane zones.

“We are delighted to have the quality and safety of our Spray Polyurethane Foam System affirmed by Miami-Dade County, a Florida building code agency recognized nationally for its rigorous testing methods for building materials,” said Maury Alpert, codes and compliance manager at Polyglass U.S.A., Inc. “This certification allows us to provide roofing products and systems to roofers building in cities with extreme weather.”

PolyPUF is a closed cell sprayed in place polyurethane foam that acts as an air barrier, insulation and roofing system in a single application. The NOAsconfirm that PolyPUF (2.5, 2.8 and 3.0 lb densities) is designed and tested in accordance with Miami-Dade Product Control Section requirements and is approved for use over wood, steel, recover and concrete decks. Aside from its durability and long-term performance, PolyPUF offers a high R-value, which means greater potential for energy savings. To maximize the performance of PolyPUF apply Polyglass’ Miami-Dade approved PolyBrite 70, 90 or 95 roof coatings.

For more information, visit www.polyglass.us.

 

NRCA Announces Polyglass Has Joined One Voice Initiative

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has announced Polyglass U.S.A., Inc., Deerfield Beach, Fla. has joined NRCA’s One Voice initiative, upgrading its associate membership to “partner member.”

In 2017, NRCA launched its One Voice initiative to unite the roofing industry and speak with one voice about matters critical to the roofing industry’s continued success.

To ensure all industry sectors are given an opportunity to participate, NRCA amended its bylaws to allow manufacturers, distributors, architects, engineers and consultants that choose to participate to become full members of the association, meaning they will be granted voting rights and eligible for leadership roles within the association. Previously, such rights were reserved only for contractor members.

“NRCA’s One Voice initiative offers a unique opportunity for the roofing industry to address the major issues we face. However, our work can only be accomplished with commitments from leaders from all sectors of this great industry,” says Reid Ribble, NRCA’s CEO. “Only together as a roofing community can we take this transformational approach to address our issues and concerns and achieve success in the future.”

Issues currently affecting the roofing industry include workforce development and certification; advancing the industry’s public policy agenda; building codes and insurance; and increasing professionalism throughout the industry.

“We are excited about the One Voice initiative, a great forum for enacting change in the roofing industry,” says Scott Lelling, director of strategic marketing for Polyglass U.S.A., Inc. “As industry leaders, our collective response can accelerate change and shape the future. We are committed to doing our part.”

For more information, visit www.nrca.net/onevoice.

Canadian Association Adds Polyglass Solutions to Roof Guarantee Program

Polyglass U.S.A. Inc. announced that its products are approved for the RoofStar Guarantee, a comprehensive program offered to Canadian building owners and is backed by both the contractor and the Roofing Contractors Association of British Columbia (RCABC).

According to the company, the inclusion of Polyglass’ solutions in the RoofStar Guarantee program recognizes the products as high-quality solutions. Established by the RCABC, the RoofStar Guarantee was introduced to ensure quality installations and acceptable standards for roofing materials. RCABC certifies that only the best materials are used for installations and also provides reputable contractors, well-trained installers, and independent inspections.

“We are excited about this achievement and look forward to providing more of our premium solutions to the Canadian roofing industry,” said Director of Sales, Technical and Customer Service Todd Homa. “As a member of the RCABC, we appreciate the standards in place to maintain quality and provide all parties in the process with peace of mind and security.”

For more information, visit https://polyglass.us.