PAC-CLAD Metal Wall Panels Approved For NFPA 285 Assembly With Spray Foam Insulation

PAC-CLAD metal wall panels from Petersen have passed the requirements of the National Fire Protection Association 285 Standard for exterior wall assemblies. The test results expand cladding options beyond masonry for designers and specifiers when using spray foam as continuous insulation on exterior walls of any height, while satisfying International Building Code requirements.

The NFPA 285 test provides a method for evaluating the fire propagation characteristics of exterior, non-load-bearing wall assemblies and panels. The test is intended to evaluate the inclusion of combustible components within wall assemblies and panels of buildings that are required to be of non-combustible construction. The test was backed by Carlisle Construction Materials, which owns Petersen, to test its spray foam insulation. Carlisle included PAC-CLAD metal cladding in the test to provide design professionals with a complete brand-specific NFPA 285 wall assembly.

“Because Petersen products are included in this successful wall assembly test, architects and specifiers can now confidently choose PAC-CLAD wall panels as a specific brand of exterior metal cladding for these applications. Petersen remains committed to investing in product safety and code compliance. It is our goal to provide architects with design flexibility, and confidence in their product selection,” said Mike Petersen, president.

The NFPA 285 compliant assembly can be found under UL file R40016 and incorporates the following products: SealTite PRO Closed Cell Spray Foam, DC315 intumescent coating and approved protective topcoat by IFTI, and PAC-CLAD aluminum cladding. This product combination met the acceptance criteria for NFPA 285 tested at Underwriters Laboratory fire labs in Northbrook, Illinois.

“Achieving continuous insulation and satisfying IBC requirements for use of spray foam on exterior building walls of any height should not limit building designers’ choice of cladding options to masonry,” said Kevin Wiacek, product marketing manager for Carlisle Spray Foam Insulation. “Meeting the acceptance criteria for the NFPA 285 test with Carlisle’s PAC-CLAD aluminum panels gives designers and architects a new wall panel option with 46 color choices.”

Petersen, a Carlisle company, manufactures PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. PAC-CLAD products include standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, flush- and reveal-joint panels, vented or solid soffit panels, perforated metal, coil and flat sheet, composite panels, column covers, plus fascia and coping. All are available in Kynar 70% PVDF finish in 46 standard colors that include a 30-year finish warranty. Most colors meet LEED and Energy Star requirements, and are rated by the Cool Roof Rating Council. Custom colors and weathertightness warranties are offered. BIM and CAD documents are available for most products. Founded in 1965, Petersen’s facilities are located in Illinois, Georgia, Texas, Maryland, Arizona and Minnesota.

For more information, visit pac-clad.com

New Box Rib Wall Panels Expand Design Options

Petersen expands its family of PAC-CLAD Precision Series wall panels with the introduction of the Box Rib line. The four new Box Rib wall panels feature 87-degree rib angles and a variety of rib spacing patterns.

The Box Rib architectural wall panels are 1-3/8 inches deep with a nominal 12-inch width. According to the company, they deliver design flexibility while combining bold visual effects with easy, cost-effective installation. Each of the four Box Rib profiles is offered in a no-clip fastener-flange option, or a clip-fastened panel to accommodate thermal expansion and contraction.

Architects and designers can specify one of the four panel profiles or combine multiple Box Rib panels on the same surface to create custom patterns of ribs and valleys. According to the company, Petersen’s Box Rib panels are ideal for practically any structure that requires exterior wall cladding such as schools, hospitals, banks, sports facilities, office and industrial buildings, and most other nonresidential applications, but also residential buildings.

“Petersen continues to respond to architects who tell us they want more options for wall cladding by introducing the Box Rib line,” said Mike Petersen, president of Petersen. “As architects’ creativity evolves, our product line also evolves with the same high-quality manufacturing, technical support and testing that Petersen is known for.”

The Box Rib panels are part of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Precision Series line of wall panels, which means they can be mixed with the seven Precision Series Highline wall cladding products to create a wide variety of custom patterns for a building’s exterior. The Box Rib panels are backed by the following tests: ASTM E-330, ASTM E-1592, ASTM E-283 and 331, AAMA 501.

Minimum Box Rib panel length is 4 feet; maximum lengths are 30 feet for steel, and 22 feet for aluminum on the no-clip fastener-flange version, with longer lengths available on clip panels. The Box Rib panels are available in 24 and 22-gauge steel, .032 and .040 aluminum in 46 standard PAC-CLAD colors, plus Galvalume Plus. BIM, CAD and related files are being posted on pac-clad.com as they become available.

Box Rib panels, as well as all Precision Series wall panels, can be installed horizontally or vertically. Additionally, Precision Series Box Rib, Highline and HWP panels can be specified as perforated, but only in aluminum for use in applications such as equipment screens, over graphics or for architectural flair.

Petersen, a Carlisle company, manufactures PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. PAC-CLAD products include standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, flush- and reveal-joint panels, vented or solid soffit panels, perforated metal, coil and flat sheet, composite panels, column covers, plus fascia and coping.

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

New Steel and Aluminum Standing Seam Roof Panel Offers Bi-Directional Installation

Petersen expands its line of PAC-CLAD standing seam roof products with the addition of the T-250 panel. Combining structural performance with architectural aesthetics, architects will enjoy the bolder profile of the T-250, installing contractors will appreciate the bi-directional installation capabilities and building owners will benefit from the panel’s impressive strength.

The strongest of all PAC-CLAD roof products, the T-250 panel is available in 16- and 18-inch widths in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. T-250 features a nominal 2.65-inch seam height above the roof deck. It is available in all 45 standard PAC-CLAD colors, each of which carries a 30-year non-prorated finish warranty. A weathertightness warranty also is available.

“Our T-250 panel satisfies the needs of architects designing structures that include expansive roof areas requiring long panel runs” said Mike Petersen, president. “Plus, architects might also prefer the wider seam of the T-250 panel, which creates bold shadow lines. The T-250 panel follows Petersen’s drive to continue adding products that expand the creative palette of building designers.”

Standard panel condition for the T-250 is with striations, but smooth is an option. The T-250 is available in 24 and 22 gauge steel, and .032 and .040 gauge aluminum. The T-250 can be specified with a traditional intermittent fastening clip, or a continuous clip fastening system for high-performance open-framing scenarios where extra strength is required. Both clips allow for thermal expansion and contraction. Job-specific design calculations should be performed to determine the type of clip required.

The panel is bi-directional, which allows installers to position the first panel in the center of a roof and install simultaneously in both directions, making it easy to achieve an attractive symmetrical look, while allowing multiple crews to work at the same time.

Named for the shape created where two panels meet, the T-250 is a symmetrical panel whose seams form the letter T. A metal cap is placed over the T and a mechanical seamer bends each side of the cap under the top of the T to form a strong bond. The T-250 panel is equipped with the following tests: ASTM 283, 331, 1680, 1646, E1592 and E2140, plus FM 4474 as well as UL 580 and 1897.

PAC T-250 panels can be factory- or field-formed to length but must be field-seamed. The panels have been designed for application over a wide variety of substrates on roof slopes as low as 1/2:12. Sealant beads are factory-applied to the seam cover. The seam cover is roll formed in the factory.

Substrates may include 5/8-inch minimum plywood, nailboard insulation or equal with WIP 300 underlayment applied horizontally from eave to ridge. Other substrates may include metal decking, purlins or rigid insulation in conjunction with bearing plates, and open framing.

Maximum factory-produced panel length for the T-250 is 54 feet, but longer lengths are available through field forming. Seam covers will be limited to 30-foot maximum lengths and must be field-lapped.

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

Metal Panels Create High-Tech Appearance for Energy-Positive School

Myrtle Beach Middle School is engineered to be net-energy positive, and the building’s façade was developed to reflect its high-tech performance goals. Photos: hortonphotoinc.com

The new Myrtle Beach Middle School in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, offers a vision of the future, in both its eye-catching design and award-winning performance. The school, like four other new elementary and middle schools opened in less than two years by the Horry County School District (HCSD), is engineered to be net-energy positive. This means the schools were designed to generate more energy than they use over the course of the year.

Designers mirrored that top-tier energy performance in their plans for a dynamic façade, punctuated by sharp corner angles, punched-out window shading and a dramatic entrance canopy. A bold color scheme created by broad expanses of PAC-CLAD Precision Series metal panels emphasizes this strong architectural statement.

“We felt we were creating a state-of-the-art facility. We wanted to create cutting-edge architecture to emphasize the cutting-edge approach of the school,” says Derrick Mozingo, AIA, senior partner and design principal with the hometown firm of Mozingo + Wallace, which designed the floor plans and exteriors of all five new schools in the HCSD system. “You don’t go by these buildings without noticing them.”

Designers developed a dynamic façade using PAC-CLAD Precision Series metal panels. The design features sharp corner angles and a dramatic entrance canopy.

Mozingo’s firm was a key member of the design/build team that brought HCSD’s five new schools — including two other middle schools, an elementary and intermediate school — online in only 18 months. FirstFloor Energy Positive led the effort, with SFL+A as design professionals of record and Stantec doing interior design and programing work. Panel and roofing installer Spann Roofing also was on board from the start. That company’s president, Jimbo Spann, says the fast-track schedule kept his installers on their toes.

“It was a big undertaking. There was a lot of design going on throughout the project,” he says. “There were time periods when we were working on several schools at the same time.”

In total, Spann’s team installed more than 100,000 square feet of PAC-CLAD 0.40-gauge aluminum HWP panels across all five schools, with colors chosen to highlight each facility’s athletic team’s colors. According to Mozingo, Petersen’s PAC-CLAD product supported both his budget and his aesthetic vision for the schools.

“It created a very affordable skin, and there was no other material out there that would create that look,” he says. “It gave us a surface that would weather well and gave us that architectural ‘tech’ look we were trying to achieve. We went through a number of studies to get what we ended up with.”

Mozingo notes he and his team also counted on Spann Roofing’s expertise as they went through their studies. “We have had a relationship with Spann Roofing for 30 years,” he says. “They worked with us through the design process and were a large component of that process.”

For Spann’s installers, familiarity with the product and with Petersen also were big advantages. With its responsibility for the wall panels as well as roofing for all five schools, Spann Roofing depended on the kind of responsiveness to questions and schedule demands they knew Petersen could provide.

“Petersen was very helpful, making site visits and making sure everything was going well and that we didn’t have any questions,” he notes, adding that the company also was critical in helping Spann keep up with HCSD’s aggressive timeline. “That took a lot from Petersen as well, in having the material ready on time. Without the material, we could have been in a world of trouble.”

With all five schools open, Spann now has had a little time to reflect on yet another successful project with Petersen and the company’s PAC-CLAD panels. “We know Petersen very well,” he says. “They’re like us – they do high-quality work and take a lot of pride in what they do, and it’s a top-of-the-line product.”

TEAM

Architect: Mozingo + Wallace, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, www.mozingowallace.com

Wall Panel Installer: Spann Roofing, Conway, South Carolina, www.spannroofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 0.40-gauge aluminum HWP, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

MSCI Bestows Lifetime Achievement Award on Petersen’s John Palesny

The Metals Service Center Institute bestowed its Lifetime Achievement Award on John Palesny, president of Petersen Aluminum Corp., in late November during its Aluminum Products Division Conference in Florida. The honor recognizes Palesny’s contribution to the metals industry during his 47-year career at Petersen, headquartered in Elk Grove Village, Illinois.

The Metals Service Center Institute is a trade association in Mt. Prospect, Illinois, representing metals producers, distributors and processors. MSCI provides its members with knowledge, thought leadership, data, education, industry advocacy, and a forum for debate, discussion and learning.

“I am honored to accept this award on behalf of all my colleagues at Petersen,” Palesny said. “Together we have built a great company that is recognized as an industry leader. So, it’s not really about me, it’s about the people who have made this company such a remarkable success and a joy to work with.”

Palesny said his approach to management has been to be hands-on while allowing people to do their work with the least amount of supervision. “I learned early in my career that it was critical to build a great team, set the goals and then let them have the necessary freedom to deliver,” he said. 

Palesny’s successes have not been achieved without challenges. “The biggest challenge in my career is keeping an eye on the competition and how we stack up against them on quality, service and product development. I think about that all the time.”

The list of people who previously won this award is filled with influential figures in the metals industry, said Robert Weidner III, CAE, president and CEO of MSCI. “These winners are iconic leaders. Their contributions within their respective companies, our industry and the communities within which they live are marked by their integrity, passion for metals and manufacturing, and empathy for others.”

The Roman god Janus was chosen as the symbol for the award for his ability to both reflect on the past and look toward the future, Weidner said. “John embodies the principles of Janus through his ability to look over the horizon to see what is coming and determine how the metals industry should respond. John is also able to reflect of the past and build on success.”

John Palesny is a true believer in the mission of the MSCI, said Mike Palesny, vice president of Petersen, and John’s brother. “John recognizes the value that MSCI brings to our industry, and has always been a cheerleader for the missions it champions. In more specific terms, John has supported the MSCI and its predecessor the National Association of Aluminum Distributors for a number of years with his time, expertise and wisdom.”

Volunteer leadership positions John Palesny has held includes president of the Chicago chapter of the former National Association of Aluminum Distributors, chair of MSCI’s aluminum division, and a term on the MSCI executive board. He also served on multiple committees and supporting groups in his career.

While John Palesny was a volunteer leader at MSCI, he embraced the concept of making MSCI greater than it was when he began, Weidner recalled. “He has a calling for giving back to the metals community. Right now the MSCI delegate level at our recently held conference was the highest it has been since 2004. I maintain that this is mostly because of the foundation for success John laid when he was in a leadership position during the recession. John’s approach to helping MSCI see itself through some of the most challenging issues has been collaborative and strategic for the good of the metals community.”

John was chair of the aluminum council when the recession began in 2008, Weidner recalled. “As it was ending, I remember John saying, ‘OK, this recession was bad and it took its toll on all of us, but the MSCI aluminum group members are not going to allow a recession to set this organization back.’ John worked in an unrelenting manner to be sure that companies in the aluminum industry had that same attitude. He said, ‘This group has been important and I’m going to put more sweat equity into helping MSCI and the industry get back to the level it was at before the recession hit.’”

John Palesny began his career at Petersen in 1970. “Over a 47-year span he rose from a warehouse position to become president of the firm. Over that time he was able to build annual sales from $3 million to its present day level of $170 million,” said Mike Petersen, CEO.

During his career, John Palesny has been a critically important counselor regarding every major decision that Petersen has faced, Mike Palesny said. “I believe the entire management group of the company would agree that John’s counsel and advice was invariably ‘spot on’ and helped PAC grow into the successful company and industry leader that it is today.”

“John possesses the rare combination of ‘book smarts’ and common sense. In my opinion, he’s the smartest businessman I have ever known,” Mike Palesny continued. “Furthermore, he’s an exceptionally good person with a true moral compass of what is right and what it wrong. He has used that internal compass to guide him in his dealings with customers, vendors and his fellow employees. I am proud of my brother John and sincerely thank him for his hard work both on behalf of PAC and MSCI. He has taught me many things through the years, and it’s my honor to work beside him.”

Mike Petersen feels similarly. “I am most fortunate to have had John as a co-worker and mentor for more than 40 years, and am proud to see his accomplishments recognized by the industry with this Lifetime Achievement Award.”

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.

Carlisle Companies to Acquire Petersen Aluminum Corporation

Carlisle Companies Incorporated, through its Carlisle Construction Materials (CCM) operating segment, announced that it has entered into a definitive purchase agreement to acquire Petersen Aluminum Corporation for approximately $197 million. 

Headquartered in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, Petersen’s primary business is the manufacture and distribution of architectural metal roof panels, steel and aluminum flat sheets and coils, wall panels, perimeter roof edge systems and related accessories for commercial, residential, institutional, industrial and agricultural markets. Founded by Maurice R. Petersen in 1965, Petersen, through its premier brand PAC-CLAD, has grown to become a company with approximately $160 million of annual revenue. 

Chris Koch, CEO and president of Carlisle Companies, said, “The acquisition of Petersen is part of our strategy of providing customers with a portfolio of high quality, innovative products and solutions that meet an increasing array of their building envelope needs. Petersen is an excellent fit with our recent acquisitions in the metal roofing space, including Drexel Metals, Sunlast Metal and Premium Panels, as well as a significant complementary addition to our single-ply roofing systems. We anticipate achieving annual synergies of $4.0 million across our metal roofing platform as a result of the acquisition. Petersen further broadens our scale and geographic penetration of the attractive and fast growing regions of Texas, Arizona, Georgia and the Midwest as we continue to execute on our metal roofing growth strategy. I look forward to welcoming the Petersen team to Carlisle and driving further growth and innovation with the help of the Carlisle Operating System.” 

Upon completion of the transaction, the business will be reported as part of the CCM segment. 

For more information, visit www.carlisle.com

PAC-CLAD Metal Roof Products Receive ICC-ES Code Compliance Verification

Four of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD metal standing seam roof systems are included in a new ICC Evaluation Service report. The ICC-ES Evaluation Report ESR-4173 provides independent verification that Snap-Clad, Tite-Loc, Tite-Loc Plus and PAC-150 180-degree double-lock standing seam roof panels meet the fire classification and wind uplift resistance requirements of the International Building Code, International Residential Code, California Building Code and California Residential Code.

ICC-ES Evaluation Reports are used by building officials, architects and contractors as a basis for specifying or approving PAC-CLAD metal standing seam roof systems in construction projects that conform to the IBC, IRC, CBC and CRC. The report proves that ICC-ES thoroughly examined Petersen’s PAC-CLAD roof panels to ensure the products are code-compliant.

“The ICC-ES report provides specifiers, architects and contractors with a broader scope of projects they can specify or bid utilizing Petersen’s PAC-CLAD standing seam roof panels,” said Josh Jacobi, national manager, technical services for Petersen. “With the opening of the PAC-CLAD facility in Phoenix and our desire to increase our presence in the Western United States, the ICC-ES Evaluation Report is critical to securing architectural specification of our roof panels in California and other Western states. Without this report, the amount of projects we could pursue is dramatically reduced, which would have placed limitations on our growth in this region of the United States.”

An ICC-ES Evaluation Report provides information about which code requirements or acceptance criteria were used to evaluate the product, how the product should be installed to meet the requirements, how to identify the product, and more. The reports are intended to safeguard the built environment and make the building official’s job easier when approving products for installation.

ICC-ES evaluates building products per various code requirements through ICC-ES Acceptance Criteria and code-referenced consensus standards. Evaluations address performance characteristics such as structural, seismic and fire resistance. Holding an ICC-ES Evaluation Report proves a manufacturer’s building product or system has undergone a rigorous technical and manufacturing quality evaluation conducted by ICC-ES staff. The ICC Evaluation Service is a member of the ICC family of companies and is a nonprofit, limited liability company.

Petersen manufactures PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. PAC-CLAD products include standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, flush- and reveal-joint panels, vented or solid soffit panels, perforated metal, coil and flat sheet, composite panels, column covers, plus fascia and coping. All are available in Kynar 70 percent PVDF finish in 45 standard colors that include a 30-year finish warranty. Most colors meet LEED and Energy Star requirements, and are rated by the Cool Roof Rating Council. Custom colors and weather-tightness warranties are offered.

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.

Petersen to Open PAC-CLAD Manufacturing Facility in Phoenix

Petersen is expanding the reach of its trusted PAC-CLAD brand by opening a new manufacturing facility in Phoenix. The 52,000-square-foot facility is scheduled to be fully operational in the first quarter of 2018, and will be equipped to provide the Western U.S. construction market with the full line of PAC-CLAD steel and aluminum cladding products, including standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, sheet, coil and more.
 
The expansion West provides a solution to growth challenges Petersen has faced, said Mike Petersen, CEO. “To date, we have been limited in our ability to effectively service customers in the Western United States, largely because of the challenges and high costs of transporting products from our Texas and Illinois facilities and over the Rocky Mountains. By opening this Phoenix facility, we’re creating a foundation on which to grow the PAC-CLAD brand into the West Coast market,” Petersen said.
 
The new facility will be managed by David Hedrick, whose background includes more than 15 years of management leadership in both the manufacturing and architectural metals industries. “I’m excited about joining the Petersen team and opening this new PAC-CLAD manufacturing facility. The Arizona PAC-CLAD team looks forward to providing the Western United States construction industry with the high-quality PAC-CLAD products and professional service the rest of the country has enjoyed for more than 50 years,” Hedrick said.
 
Petersen’s facility is located in existing commercial space south of downtown Phoenix. Questions and inquiries about the Phoenix facility can be directed via email to Rob Heselbarth at rheselbarth@petersenmail.com. The Phoenix location is the sixth for Petersen, joining the company’s other facilities in Elk Grove Village, Ill.; Acworth, Ga.; Tyler, Texas; Annapolis Junction, Md.; and Andover, Minn.

For information more information, click here.

New Siding Panels Provide More Options for Metal Walls

Petersen Aluminum PanelPetersen Aluminum expands its Precision Series line of metal wall panels with the addition of seven new Highline products. The Precision Series Highline siding panels feature varying rib patterns and widths for creative architectural effects in residential, commercial, institutional or many other applications. The Highline panels are 1 3/8 inches deep and showcase a range of rib patterns for visual interest and architectural creativity. Options include either 12-inch or 16-inch widths, a no-clip panel, or a clip-fastened panel to accommodate thermal expansion and contraction.

Offices & Warehouses

Workforce Essentials, Clarksville, Tenn.

Team

Roofing and Wall Panel Installer: Modern Heating Cooling Roofing, Clarksville, (931) 647-0815
Architect: Lyle Cook Martin Architects, Clarksville
Metal Panel Distributor: Commercial Roofing Specialties Inc., Nashville, Tenn.

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area.

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area.

Roof Materials

To meet design objectives, four different PAC-CLAD products were selected. The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels. The façade features 7,800 square feet of Precision Series wall panels finished in Sierra Tan and installed vertically. Complementing the façade is 4,000 square feet of 12-inch Almond Flush panels installed as soffit. In addition, 4,520 square feet of 24-gauge Medium Bronze flat sheet was used for fascia and trim.

“The Tite-Loc Plus panels were long—85 feet—and were rollformed onsite,” says Bill Kimbrough Jr., estimator and project manager for Modern Heating Cooling Roofing. “Getting them up to the high roof was a challenge. All other profiles were fabricated and delivered by Petersen. Currently, PAC-CLAD is about the only product we use.”

Metal Panel Manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels.

The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels.

Roof Report

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area in the middle of the state. Located on a highly visible urban-infill site, the new Workforce Essentials headquarters and career training center is situated at a “gateway entry” intersection to the downtown district. The new 40,000-squarefoot facility consolidates services that had been provided at agency offices previously scattered around the city. After initially considering renovation of an aging building on the site, the organization’s board of directors determined that construction of a new, energy-efficient headquarters was a better course of action. Good visibility and an easily identifiable aesthetic were important to site selection and building design criteria.

Different departments within the building are visually and strategically defined in separate wings and entrances. The administrative office wing to the south is defined by a vertical brick corner tower and sloping metal roof planes and cladding. The larger career training center portion of the building is introduced by metal wall panels in a calming color palette of Sierra Tan. Thematic entry canopies, protruding aluminum sunshades and aligned horizontal fenestration tie together the architectural composition. The overriding idea is for the building to serve as a machine with different parts working together for a common purpose.

Brad Martin, principal/designer at Lyle Cook Martin Architects, explains: “Workforce Essentials has a variety of regional offices throughout the area it serves. All are different and very few are freestanding. The organization has never really had a corporate look or identity. Now, with this new building, we can incorporate its design features and architectural aesthetics into future new buildings and renovations and begin to develop an iconic look.”

Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Pages: 1 2 3 4