The Calcaire House Meets Strict Energy Codes — and Does it in Style

The residential compound is made up of five interconnected buildings and features both gabled standing seam metal roofs and low-slope TPO roofs. Photos: S-5!

The Calcaire House is a 15,000-square-foot modern Colorado single-family residential compound consisting of five interconnected buildings. Floor-to-ceiling glass connects the interior space to the exterior landscape, offering spectacular views of the Boulder Flatirons. A combination of exposed timber, stone and steel structural design elements, and exposed custom roof trusses complement the gabled standing seam metal roof.

Boulder Roofing Company and The Solar Revolution were charged with installing a metal roof and solar array with more than 60 kilowatts of solar dispersed over multiple rooftops. Boulder Roofing installed both standing seam metal and TPO roof systems on the project. Crews installed approximately 12,000 square feet of 14-inch, 24-gauge panels from Drexel Metals in traditional black over Titanium PSU30 high-temp peel and stick underlayment.

They also installed 3,000 square feet of 60-mil Versico TPO over low-slope areas. The TPO was adhered to quarter-inch DensDeck Prime over tapered EPS insulation. Boulder Roofing fabricated and installed custom flashings and coping, and also installed an S-5! snow-guard system incorporating the S-5! ColorGard bars, S-5-S Mini clamps, SnoClip IIs, and VersaClips.

The Energy Challenge

The city of Boulder has strict energy codes in place and requires all new construction to meet a certain level of efficiency. The requirements are based on the square footage of the home and are more stringent on larger homes — the larger the home, the more efficient it needs to be. The goal is to have a net-zero home, not taking energy from the grid, and the only way for a larger home to achieve this is with solar. A modest home or small addition might only require about 2 kilowatts. A large home might require 20-30 kilowatts.

The most optimal rooftops for solar were also the most visually prominent, and the homeowner was concerned about aesthetics. These concerns were alleviated after seeing a small-scale mock-up of the S-5! PVKIT 2.0 solution combined with an all-black solar module.

In addition, the area is considered a high-wind area and would require a study to account for windspeeds, as the solar installers could only rely on the roof itself and its attachment to the wood sheeting when attaching solar panels using S-5!’s zero-penetration system.

Another difficulty was finding a viable path to route the energy created by the solar panels back to the point of connection with the home’s distribution. The Solar Revolution worked with the builder and the architect, and analyzed photos and design plans to find ways to conceal the conduits. They ultimately found a viable path that was aesthetically pleasing, code compliant and cost-effective.

The Solution

The Solar Revolution installers utilized S-5!’s PVKIT 2.0 to build the solar array. The installation team started at ground level prepping S-5! PVKIT MidGrabs and EdgeGrabs. Another team member prepared the solar modules by installing the power optimizers and managing the various wires. By completing this work on the ground, the roof crew could focus on setting modules, and it minimized their time in harnesses on a steep metal roof. The solar installers prefer to install modules starting with the bottom row and working up. Extra care is taken when aligning the first row. This precision allows for subsequent rows to drop into place on the S-5! PVKIT MidGrabs.

The Solar Revolution installed a solar array that provides more than 60 kilowatts of power.

“The Solar Revolution has been utilizing the S-5! PVKIT 2.0 solution since it first hit the market,” says Doug Claxton, CEO of The Solar Revolution. “Hands down, it is the best solar mounting solution for metal roofing of any description. At first, we were a little worried about wire management and installing in landscape, but those worries were overcome with our first installation. It’s a piece of cake.”

Long-Term Outlook

With the S-5! PVKIT 2.0, the Calcaire House was able to meet the city code requirements for solar and establish itself as an energy-efficient, net-zero home. Because the PVKIT comes in black, it matched the roof nicely, pulling together all of the design elements in an aesthetically pleasing, cost-effective manner — saving the customer time and money on installation and materials.

TEAM

Architect: Surround Architecture, Boulder, Colorado, www.surroundarchitecture.com

General Contractor: Harrington Stanko Construction, Niwot, Colorado, www.harringtonstanko.com

Engineer: Anthem Structural Engineers, Boulder, Colorado, www.anthemstructural.com

Roofing Contractor: Boulder Roofing Company, Boulder, Colorado, www.boulderroof.com

Solar Installer: The Solar Revolution, Boulder, Colorado, www.thesolarrevolution.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: 175SS 14-inch, 24 gauge panels, Drexel Metals, www.drexmet.com

Underlayment: Titanium PSU30, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

TPO Roof: 60-mil Grey TPO, Versico, www.versico.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Solar Attachment: S-5! PVKIT 2.0 in black with S-5-S Mini Clamps, www.S-5.com

Snow Guards: S-5! ColorGard, S-5-S Mini Clamps, SnowClipIIs and VersaClips

XAP 360 and Owens Corning Introduce Touchless Roofing Inspection Platform to U.S. Contractors

XAP 360 is collaborating with Owens Corning to offer Owens Corning Roofing Contractor (OCCN) members an advanced inspection and reporting tool, OC ProScan. The new business service is designed to deliver transparent and accurate roof inspection experience for homeowners, helping claim payouts occur rapidly while also educating and protecting the contractor’s customer base.

XAP 360 and Owens Corning are working together to provide roofing contractors with a drone-based roofing inspections platform that offers a fully autonomous, touchless technology providing objective third party professional reporting.

“Owens Corning is proud to team up with innovative business services like XAP 360 whose innovative platform will enable Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network members to differentiate themselves in this virtual selling environment and take their business to the next level,” said Jon Gardner, Contractor Training Leader, Owens Corning.

“With XAP 360 powered by Kespry, roofing professionals and property owners can finally sit at the same table physically or virtually, and communicate honestly and openly,” said Phil Pratt, partner, XAP 360. “We can now bridge the existing uncertainty gap with transparency as XAP 360 is guided by sophisticated technological innovations in aerial intelligence from Kespry. We’ve pushed the roofing industry out of the shadows and into the information age, giving our contractors tools to allow them to seamlessly work in today’s  new business environment.”

For more information about Owens Corning, visit www.owenscorning.com

For more information about XAP 360, visit http://xap360.com/ocp

Creating a Homelike Environment at Flatrock Manor

Flatrock Manor’s main roof features a mechanically fastened TPO system from Mule-Hide Products Co. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co.

Flatrock Manor owner and chief executive officer Nicholas Burnett saw tremendous potential in the shuttered building. It was the right size. It was designed for providing health care, serving first as a hospital and later as a hospice. It was situated on 10 acres of scenic property complete with a nature trail, a gazebo and a pond that is home to swans, geese, ducks and painted turtles. Its exterior included beautiful Mid-century modern details.

Burnett had long been seeking an opportunity in Goodrich, Michigan, to open a new location for Flatrock Manor, a group of foster care centers in Mid-Michigan for adults with special developmental and behavioral needs. The empty building would fit the bill. But first, it would need some TLC and a more homelike atmosphere.

Tri-County Roofing of Flushing, Michigan, and Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects of Flint, Michigan, helped make that happen. A new TPO roofing system was installed to fix long-standing leaks and provide durable, low-maintenance performance. The additions of a mansard roof and gabled accents gave the building’s exterior a more residential aesthetic while retaining its distinctive architectural details.

The new facility opened in December 2019 and is now home to 30 residents.

Preserving the Look

The building is a fixture in Goodrich, a 1,900-resident suburb of Flint. Built in the early 1960s, the facility was originally a 53-bed, full-service hospital. In 1997 it became a hospice. That facility closed in 2013 and the building remained vacant until Flatrock Manor purchased it.

The exterior of the original 18,000-square-foot building embraced the Mid-century modern style popular in the era. Subsequent additions that brought the facility to 23,000 square feet followed suit for a cohesive look.

The building, shown here before renovation work began, was originally a full-service hospital. It was purchased by Flatrock Manor to serve as a foster care center for adults with special developmental and behavioral needs.

The existing roofing system was quintessential Mid-century modern. The built-up roof was surrounded by a slim, 1-foot-high parapet wall with an aluminum cap. A gabled front canopy shielded patients and visitors from the elements while arriving at or leaving the hospital.

While the exterior’s design perfectly suited a hospital, it was too institutional for a facility that would be its residents’ long-term home.

Happily, the task of adapting the building for its new purpose fell to Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects, the same firm that designed the original hospital nearly 60 years earlier. The team embraced the challenge of striking the right balance between preserving architecturally significant features and meeting regulatory guidelines governing the design of long-term care communities.

“Initially we tried to glorify the Mid-century style of the building,” says Michael Murphy, project manager with Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects. “We completed several elevation studies to incorporate some modern ways of dealing with the parapet. Ultimately, we had to go back to the drawing board to achieve a more residential look.”

The gabled roof above the canopy at the main entrance was the starting point from which other design elements took their cue. A mansard roof was incorporated around the building. To balance the main entrance, a gabled canopy was added at a second entryway on the building’s front. Twenty accent gables were spaced out along the building’s entire exterior and gables were added above rear and side entrances.

“We played with the value of scale when incorporating the mansard roof with the horizontal façade of the building,” Murphy says. “We made it more substantial, so it doesn’t look like a short little mansard roof that has been pushed onto the building.”

Owens Corning TrueDefinition Duration Designer shingles in Merlot were chosen for the mansard roof and gables, bringing added warmth to the façade. They were complemented by fascia and soffits from Quality Aluminum Products in Cranberry. Cultured stone in a sandy shade was added on the gable walls and around the windows to accent the original terra cotta-toned brick walls.

A Roof to Perform for the Long Haul

The building’s existing roofing system — ballasted EPDM on top of a built-up roof with fiberglass insulation — was leaking and the EPDM membrane was “in horrible shape,” according to Tim McKnight, president of Tri-County Roofing. “We found nothing but saturated insulation,” he adds. “The only reason that more water hadn’t gotten into the building’s interior was because the asphalt on the BUR roofing system kept it out.”

Both the EPDM and BUR systems would need to be torn off.

During the re-roofing process, a mansard roof was added to give the building a more residential appearance.

The steel 22-gauge B deck remained in good condition and original plans called for it to be retained, but requirements for the new HVAC system and ductwork meant that it, too, needed to be removed and replaced. Mother Nature chose to not make the process easy. Facing a month of frequent rain, the Tri-County Roofing crew worked as quickly as possible and did their best to keep the building’s interior dry; for example, tearing off the existing roof bit by bit around the edges to make space for the carpenters to frame in the new mansard roof before beginning work on the rest of the roof.

In selecting the new roofing system, longevity and hassle-free performance were the top considerations.

“The client wanted something that would last 20 years with no issues,” McKnight says, noting that such performance would require withstanding the broad spectrum of Mid-Michigan’s weather, which ranges from warm, sunny summers to cold, snowy winters.

The client’s original preference was to install a new EPDM system, but McKnight recommended a mechanically fastened TPO system for its durability, easy maintenance and cost effectiveness. A system featuring a white, 60-mil membrane from Mule-Hide Products Co. was specified.

Ensuring Positive Drainage

A new 22-gauge steel B deck was installed. It was dead level to accommodate the building’s plumbing system, which made getting the insulation right essential. Tapered expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulation is designed specifically for such applications, making it the ideal choice for this project.

The building’s existing drainage system — in which water flows from the roof to storm drains in the basement — did not change in the renovations. The Tapered Solutions team at ABC Supply Co. worked from drawings to design a take-off that would provide positive drainage. Even the best drawings are not 100 percent reflective of the reality on the roof, however, so the Tri-County Roofing installation crew inevitably encountered instances where the insulation was slightly off-center from the sump or the real-life walls were not quite where they were shown on the plans. In those cases, the crew fabricated pieces of EPS or polyiso insulation on the jobsite to achieve the proper drainage.

Completing the Installation

The TPO membrane was mechanically attached for a fast, cost-effective installation. “We were able to achieve the 20-year warranty the client wanted without the added labor and materials costs of a fully adhered system,” McKnight explains.

New roof hatches also were installed, providing safer, easier access to the roof — both during the reroofing project and for ongoing maintenance of the roof and rooftop equipment.

For the teams at both Tri-County Roofing and Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects, the most rewarding part of the project was learning about the residents who will live at Flatrock Manor and helping provide them with a comfortable home.

“It was cool to learn about what Flatrock Manor does for people with special needs and see how they’re helping families and meeting needs that you forget are out there,” McKnight says.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Tri-County Roofing, Flushing, Michigan, www.tricountyroofingofmidmichigan.com

Architect: Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects, Flint, Michigan, www.architectsinmichigan.com

Roofing Insulation Take-Off: Tapered Solutions (ABC Supply Co.), www.abcsupply.com/services/tapered-solutions

Roofing Materials Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.abcsupply.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membrane: 60-mil white TPO, Mule-Hide Products Co., www.mulehide.com

Shingles: TrueDefinition Duration Designer shingles, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com/roofing

Soffits and Fascia: Quality Aluminum Products, www.qualityaluminum.com

Talented Team Designs and Installs Multiple Roof Systems for Dickies Arena

Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, hosts the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as concerts and sporting events. Photos: Trail Drive Management Corp.

The new Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, was designed to echo the iconic Will Rogers Memorial Center, a historic landmark built in 1934. The site of the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as other concerts and sporting events, Dickies Arena was designed to provide a modern entertainment experience and configurable event spaces that would stand the test of time. The multiple roof systems on the project — including the plaza deck surrounding the arena — were essential in delivering on these goals.

Dickies Arena features a domed main roof with a cupola at the top that pays homage to its historic neighbor. “One of the major themes, especially of the dome roof structure itself, was to have a kind of throwback to the original Will Rogers Center, which is still there,” says Eric Nelson, AIA, RID, CCCA, vice president at HKS, the architect of record for Dickies Arena. “The Will Rogers Center was one of the first buildings of its type to have a long-span steel truss roof system. We used that existing structure as the inspiration for the roof structure inside the arena. We have these very thin, elegant looking trusses that are very art deco.”

The new structure’s domed roof is surrounded by low-slope roofs and complemented by two towers topped with metal roofs. Dickies Arena also features a pavilion with a standing seam metal roof, which sits on a plaza deck that serves as an outdoor event space as well as a giant roof system covering exhibit space and areas for housing rodeo livestock. The venue is also designed to provide excellent acoustics for concerts and features luxurious millwork and finishes throughout to provide a touch of elegance. “I like to say that it’s a rodeo arena, but it’s designed like an opera house,” Nelson says.

It took an experienced team of design and construction professionals to envision and execute the project, including HKS, the architect of record; David M. Schwartz Architects, the design architect; The Beck Group, the general contractor; Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., the roof system installer; and Sunbelt Building Services LLC, the insulation distributor and installer of the plaza deck.

The Dome

The roof system specified for the dome featured an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil. “The roof system is one that we use pretty regularly on our large sports projects, the Feltback PVC,” notes Nelson. “It’s a lot more durable than other single-ply roof membranes, so we really like it a lot. Dickies Arena is an arena that wasn’t just built for the next 20 years; it’s meant to be there for the next 100 years, so we wanted to make sure we used nothing but the highest-quality materials, especially with all of the hailstorms that we can get out there in Fort Worth.”

The pavilion has a Fabral double-lock standing seam roof system.

The roof system installer, Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas, tackled the dome roof first, followed by the low-slope sections and the metal roofs. Work on the dome roof began in July of 2018. “The project progressed pretty quickly,” says Jeff Eubank, vice president of Jeff Eubank Roofing Co. “The dome in and of itself was like two different projects. The top half of the dome is pretty workable and walkable, and the bottom 40 percent of the dome is almost vertical.”

The Sarnafil Decor system was installed over an Epic acoustical deck, which posed some logistical and safety challenges. “We had to engineer special anchors because a typical tie-off anchor could not be used,” Eubank explains. “Before we could set foot on the job, we had to engineer special tie-off anchors which nested into the acoustical deck.”

Eubank and a structural engineer worked with Epic Deck to construct anchor points that would meet requirements for fall arrest. The half-inch aluminum, F-shaped anchors were designed to rest in the flutes of the acoustical deck and featured a ring provide a tie-off point. They were set in place using a crane.

Safety concerns included the Texas weather. “Our biggest challenge came with the heat,” says Eubank. “Summers in North Texas are brutal enough, but at the end of last summer, a high pressure system just stalled over Fort Worth. We were in the middle of a drought, with temperatures up to 110 degrees. You’re up on a deck with nowhere to hide, and with it was pushing 200 degrees up there. From a life safety standpoint, we ended up pushing the dome installation to night work.”

The main roof on the arena’s dome was topped with an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil.

Crews applied approximately 250,000 square feet of material on a near vertical application at night, with lighting provided by six tower cranes. The project required 100 percent tie-off of men and equipment.

The original plan for the dome was to work top to bottom, but as work began, the cupola was incomplete, so the safety and logistical plans had to be radically changed. “We ended up basically making two rings around the dome, doing the near-vertical portion — the bottom 30 or 40 percent — first,” Eubank says. “We moved up and did another 360-degree loop around the top half of the dome once the cupola was done.”

The roof system was installed over the acoustical deck and loose-laid filler. After a 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime substrate board was installed, crews mechanically fastened two layers of Sarnatherm polyiso and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime. They adhered the Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback membrane, which was produced in a custom color called Agreeable Gray.

After the membrane was installed, the PVC ribs were heat welded into place to give it the look of a standing seam roof. “We installed over 16 miles of custom-color Decor ribbing,” notes Eubank.

The Logo on the Roof

The dome roof also prominently features the Dickies Arena logo, which took some advance planning. “We left an area of the ribs out on the east side anticipating the logo up there,” Eubank says. “That’s in another custom color. Sarnafil ran the custom color and templated the letters. The logo is roughly 130 feet by 10 feet, so we received a giant D, a giant I, a giant C, and so forth. Once these things are installed, there is no pulling them up — your only option is to tear the roof off. So, imagine working with a 10-foot letter, 200 feet up in the air, on a slope, and making sure it’s level.”

Eubank Roofing came up with a plan to use a section of 60-mil PVC membrane as a backer sheet. “We laid out this big backer sheet in Agreeable Gray and stenciled all of the letters across it,” Eubank explains. “We took the backer sheet up, got it lasered and leveled, and installed the solid backer sheet on the dome. It already had the stencils on it, so we were able fall back and install the individual letters. We didn’t need to line them up — we just had to fill in the blanks.”

The last steps in the dome installation included installing ribs in a second custom color to go through the letters. Helicopters also brought in three large Dickies signs, which were placed atop concrete pedestals treated with a Sarnafil liquid membrane.

Flat Roofs and Metal Roofs

On the low-slope sections that surround the dome, the Sarnafil G-410 Feltback was installed over structural concrete and fully tapered polyiso. “There is a tremendous amount of masonry work on this project, and it is gorgeous,” Eubank notes. “It was important, though, on the low-slope portions to let the brick work and stone work wrap up before any roofing membranes were installed.”

The design of the arena echoes the iconic Will Rogers Center, which was the inspiration for the thin, elegant steel trusses.

A vapor barrier was installed over the structural concrete deck. After masonry work was completed, crews installed a fully tapered polyiso system in ribbons of OM Board adhesive, then adhered 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime and the 80-mil PVC membrane.

The complex also features two different metal roof systems from Fabral. On the north side of the building, the two towers were capped with a flat-seam panel. Down at the plaza level, the pavilion was topped with a double-lock standing seam roof system featuring Fabral 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam panels.

According to Nelson, an area underneath the pavilion serves as a warm-up arena for horses during the rodeo, so the design was meant to evoke a rustic effect. “The cladding on that building is all quarter-inch steel with rivets on it,” Nelson points out. “Galvalume is finished to look like galvanized sheet steel, but it won’t tarnish or turn white or black like galvanized steel would — which is why they selected it — but it still has that kind of throwback look of a barn.”

Out of the Gate

Dickies Arena is now open to the public and is gearing up to host its first rodeo. The experienced team that built it has moved on to other projects, but they look back on their work on the new landmark venue with pride.

“I’m very proud of the people that I work with and the thought and care that they put into the project and the time that we take,” Eubank says. “A lot of our work is negotiated re-roofing, and I think that’s in large part because we take the time to think through a problem and come up with the best solution. I think that’s really highlighted here. You’ve got to take your time and do it right — and do it efficiently.”

Eubank commends the general contractor, H.C. Beck, for a smoothly operating jobsite. “The job was very well managed from a safety standpoint,” Eubank says. “The general contractor did a fabulous job of manipulating trade work and making sure no one was working overtop of anyone else.”

Nelson agrees, crediting the teamwork at every phase of the project for the successful outcome. “The partnership with David M. Schwartz as the design architect really worked very smoothly from our side,” Nelson says. “We worked very well with a talented team of consultants and who specialize in sports design. It’s a one-of-a-kind type of project.”

“My family has been in Fort Worth for five generations, and this is a project I’m just tickled to death about for the city,” says Eubank. “To be part of its install means a lot.”

TEAM

Architect of Record: HKS Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

Design Architect: David M. Schwartz Architects, Washington, D.C., www.dmsas.com

General Contractor: The Beck Group, Dallas, Texas, www.beckgroup.com

Roofing Contractor: Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, www.eubankroofing.com

MATERIALS

Dome Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC with Sarnafil Decor ribs, Sika Sarnafil, https://usa.sika.com/sarnafil

Acoustical Deck: Epic Metals, www.epicmetals.com

Cover Boards: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Low-Slope Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC, Sika Sarnafil

Cover Board: 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific

Metal Roof

Standing Seam Panel: 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam, Fabral, www.fabral.com

Underlayment: Fabral HT, Fabral

Plaza Deck

Waterproofing Membrane: TREMproof 6100, Tremco, www.tremcosealants.com

Insulation: Foamular 600, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

Brick Pavers: Hanover, www.hanoverpavers.com

Owens Corning Invites Attendees to Catch a Wave at IRE

Mention Texas and thoughts typically turn to cowboys and rodeos. But during the International Roofing Expo (IRE) February 4-6 in Dallas, Texas, Owens Corning will bring the spectacle of surfing to its booth (2604). Whether IRE attendees “hang loose” or “hang 10,” they can register to win a custom surfboard designed by Owens Corning and crafted in California.

Why surf in a land of turf? The one-of-a-kind pink surfboard pays homage to the Pacific surf culture as well as the relaxed, refreshing and unexpected vibe of Owens Corning 2020 Shingle Color of the Year Pacific Wave — a shingle color that looks equally at home on a coastal beach house, modern farm house or stately colonial.

No ocean? No problem! The surfboard makes a great conversation piece in any “man cave” or office showroom. Or strap it atop a van and take it on your next beach vacay. The color Pacific Wave and the surfboard help reset conventional notions of blue hues on a home by offering a fun way to “catch a wave” in land-locked Dallas, Texas. The surfboard giveaway is open to all who attend the IRE and the winner will be announced after the show closes. Visitors to the Owens Corning Booth can snap a photo with the Pink Panther and surfboard, then share it with the “surfer lingo” hashtags #OwensCorningRoofing #ShingleColoroftheYear. 

For more information, visit https://www.owenscorning.com/roofing.

Owens Corning Roofing “Imagine.Style.Win.” Grand Prize Winner Receives Exterior Consult With Two Chicks and a Hammer

Daniel Clark of Boonton, New Jersey, is the winner of the “Imagine.Style.Win.” contest sponsored by Owens Corning Roofing. The contest was designed to help consumers reimagine how an Owens Corning Duration Series roof can inspire their home’s exterior. Daniel submitted a mood board showing how color inspires his approach to design. Although a practicing architect, Daniel finds that the “color conversation” is something that is personal and color is not typically part of his conversation with clients. He drew on inspiration from his painting and artwork, his dog Carter and his own home in developing his mood board entry.

As the contest winner, Daniel and his partner Jim traveled to Indianapolis October 6-8, for a color consultation with home renovation and design experts, Karen E. Laine and Mina Starsiak of Two Chicks and a Hammer and HGTV design series, “Good Bones”. The mother-daughter remodelers and owners of Two Chicks and a Hammer are renowned for their use of exterior color on HGTV’s “Good Bones.” Along with the color consultation, the grand prize also included a behind-the-scenes tour of the Indianapolis Bates-Hendricks neighborhood, featured in many of the Good Bones remodels. During the tour, Mina Starsiak pointed out many of the homes remodeled by the Two Chicks, including homes appearing on the “Good Bones” program. “Jim and I had a fantastic visit to Indy which exceeded our expectations,” said Daniel following his visit.

5 Questions with Daniel Clark – Winner of Owens Corning Roofing’s Imagine.Style.Win. Contest

Some folks might refer to Daniel Clark as a “super fan” when it comes to remodeling and color. The New Jersey architect and color enthusiast never misses an episode of his favorite home remodeling show, “Good Bones.” When visiting family in Indianapolis, Daniel traveled to the historic Bates-Hendricks neighborhood where “Good Bones” is filmed. But he never expected he’d get to meet mother/daughter remodelers Karen E. Laine and Mina Starsiak — otherwise known as Two Chicks and a Hammer — who transform homes each week; and use color to bring out each home’s personal style.

So, when Daniel came across a post by Karen and Mina announcing Owens Corning’s “Imagine.Style.Win.” Roofing Style Board Contest, he knew he had to enter for a chance to meet the Two Chicks, participate in a personalized color consultation and tour the Bates-Hendricks neighborhood. Daniel entered . . . and won. In October, he and his partner traveled to Indy to meet with Karen and Mina at Karen’s home. Following are excerpts from a very colorful day as Daniel shared the experience.

As an architect, how do you approach color?

Color is so important – it’s a very personal thing, and it’s usually not something the architect helps choose. When it comes to the roof, so many homeowners go with beige, black or gray –– they don’t think about color on the roof. Owens Corning is helping to change that and get people to think beyond shades of beige and gray. Until now, I hadn’t really thought much about the impact color has on a roof. The roof is such a big part of a house and it is a huge opportunity for people to think of color as a way to add interest. 

What did you take away from the color consultation with Karen and Mina?

The roof is really the “forgotten cousin” when it comes to a home. It can add so much to a home’s curb appeal. Like the ceiling inside a home, the roof is an overlooked opportunity to bring a homeowner’s style into the exterior. If I have the opportunity to discuss color on the roof, it’s something I’ll definitely share with my client and the contractor. Painting is my hobby and I view color as for a way of putting my heart and soul into my work. And Karen and Mina do that each week on the show. As they use color on homes – including roofs – they are not just remodeling houses; they are revitalizing neighborhoods and spreading the love.  

How is Owens Corning changing the conversation about roofing?

Color is emotional. It can spark joy that is contagious as it moves from one house to another. We all need more joy in our life. Owens Corning is empowering women to become more involved in the construction and remodeling process. Women are the style authorities when it comes to home design, yet they often don’t get involved in the construction process. Karen and Mina are helping with that and the Design & Inspire resources Owens Corning has developed are putting tools in women’s hands as well.

How did you approach your mood board for this contest?

I looked at every video on the contest site – both Owens Corning videos and other entries. I felt there was an opportunity to really kick up the power of color. I’ve never been afraid of color. I use a lot of bright colors in my home, in my painting and in my gardening. I brought in all these elements I love – including our dog Carter. After all, Karen and Mina are dog people. It was hard keeping Carter still and he kept dropping his dog ball, but hey, it was another pop of color!

Anything else you’d like to share.

I was so excited to tell everyone I won the contest. I don’t get to talk to clients a lot about color, because others do. This gives me a chance to talk color. And I couldn’t be more grateful to Owens Corning for sponsoring this contest and allowing me to meet Karen and Mina. They are my remodeling heroes!

For more information, visit https://www.owenscorning.com/roofing.

Wyoming Roofing Named Small Employer of the Year by Wyoming Department of Workforce Services

Wyoming Roofing, LLC, an Owens Corning Contractor Network (OCCN) Platinum contractor, was named Small Employer of the Year by the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services (DWS). The award recognizes small businesses for their hiring and safety practices. 

The Wyoming Department of Workforce Services is committed to ensuring that all Wyoming businesses are safe places to work. Wyoming Roofing’s mission is to build the best company in the industry by putting their communities and employees first. The company hires most of its candidates from Wyoming Workforce Services, with a preference for hiring veterans. Wyoming Roofing provides safety training, personal development and other education that support its values of “Riding for the Brand, Being a Servant, Being Accountable, and Exhibiting Care, as they serve customers, employees, and communities.”

The Roofers Show Podcast Talks Leads, Conversions and Margins With Owens Corning Roofing

Owens Corning Roofing stepped into the podcast-space on August 23, as National Training Leader Jon Gardner joined Dave Sullivan, host of The Roofer Show, for a podcast conversation about critical challenges contractors face, including generating more leads, converting leads into sales, and achieving margins.

In Edpisode 125 of The Roofer Show, “Why You Should Develop Strategic Partnerships With Your Suppliers,” Sullivan discuss topics includingdifferentiate their business in a highly competitive marketplace through on-demand education, field training and networking with other contractors across the country. 

For more information or to listen to the episode, click here

Owens Corning University Brings Virtual Training to Roofing Education

While August is back to school season for students and teachers, education is always a timely topic for contractors who want to stay on top of the latest in roofing technology. And just as virtual learning is transforming classroom education, digital technology is also changing the game for roofing contractors. Case in point: Owens Corning University’s (OCU’s) expanded Learning Management System (LMS) recently rolled out to all members of the Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network (OCCN). The platform features easy-to-digest learning modules of 15 minutes or less that make it easy for roofing professionals to grab information anytime and anywhere – from their truck, on the jobsite, or between appointments.

Free to all OCCN members and offering an unlimited number of users, OCU is an on-demand education platform accessible from mobile and computer devices. Featuring multiple learning modules, sub-modules and educational videos, the platform compliments Owens Corning’s in-field courses and allows contractors to efficiently access information about Owens Corning products, warranties, business services, and more. 

Because contractors enjoy “getting their game on”, future phases will include a gaming element featuring leaderboards that allow contractors to track education points, award badges for completed educational tasks, and see how they rank compared to their peers. 

From helping onboard new employees to learning the fundamentals of roofing application, unlocking the mystery of warranties and more, the Owens Corning University platform builds on a portfolio of digital resources available to OCCN members. Additional  resources on OCU include product and system content such as the Duration Series shingles, SureNail Technology information, an overview of the Total Protection Roofing System, roofing fundamentals, business service offerings and access to the entire Owens Corning video library.  

Owens Corning Roofing’s Imagine.Style.Win. Contest Helps Consumers Get Inspired With Shingle Color

Some roofing conversations are more challenging than others. Color is a good example. While roof warranties, wind resistance and ventilation are topics most contractors can talk about with ease, few roofing contractors look forward to venturing into the color selection discussion. After all, color is personal. Thus, it can become easy for roofing contractors to “play it safe” and suggest a neutral shingle color when a homeowner asks for a color recommendation, missing out on the opportunity to utilize shingle color as a design element.

In 2016, Owens Corning Roofing launched the Shingle Color of the Year initiative, highlighting shingle color as a way to express a homeowner’s personal style. The Toledo-based manufacturer also introduced online inspiration and visualization tools to help homeowners virtually experiment with different colors on their home’s roof. 

Now, Owens Corning Roofing is encouraging homeowners to share their color inspirations in the Imagine.Style.Win. contest. Through August 15, 2019, consumers can submit a mood board and enter to win an all-expense paid trip for two to Indianapolis that includes a color consultation with home renovation and design experts, Karen E Laine and Mina Starsiak of the HGTV series, “Good Bones” and owners of Two Chicks and a Hammer. Along with the color consultation, the grand prize winner will receive a behind-the-scenes tour of the historic Indianapolis Bates-Hendricks neighborhood conducted by a member of the Two Chicks and a Hammer team. The neighborhood is featured in many of the Good Bones episodes. Karen and Mina previously teamed up with Owens Corning Roofing to help promote roofing color and developed an online videooffering practical tips for building mood boards.

As contest entrants create their exterior mood boards, they can use the Owens Corning Roofing online inspiration and visualization toolsto explore shingle colors, coordinate shingles with other exterior accents and express their personal style. In addition to the Grand Prize trip to Indianapolis, Owens Corning Roofing will award one First Prize package that includes a $500 cash prize and an exclusive Owens Corning tote bag filled with Two Chicks and a Hammer swag. Owens Corning Roofing will award 100 Second Prizewinners an exclusive tote filled with Two Chicks and a Hammer swag. 

Owens Corning online design tools help consumers coordinate their home’s exteriors.

“We developed the Shingle Color of the Year initiative to inspire homeowners to think about roof color as way to tie a home’s exterior together,” said Sue Burkett, strategic marketing manager at Owens Corning. She notes the initiative is particularly targeted toward women. “We know that women are key influencers when it comes to color and style inside and outside the home,” says Burkett. “We are particularly honored to have received the Women’s Choice Award for Most Recommended Roofing Products for the second consecutive year. We are the #1 choice in America for roofing products by women—and that’s really saying something with a design savvy audience.”

The Imagine. Style. Win. Competition is open through August 15. Contest details and information on entering are available at www.imaginestylewin.com.