At The Wharf, Vegetative Roofs Play a Key Role in Storm Water Management

The Wharf is a riverfront community spanning nearly a mile of the Potomac River. The neighborhood features high-end hotels, luxury condominiums, retail shops, commercial offices and a music hall. Photos: The District Wharf

According to the Washington D.C. Department of Energy and the Environment, the District is home to more than 3 million square feet of vegetative roof assemblies (VRAs). A commitment to responsible storm water management has helped the nation’s capital rank first among U.S. cities when it comes to green roofs installed. From the massive 500,000-square-foot VRA atop the Douglas Munro U.S. Coast Guard headquarters (featured in the September/October 2018 issue of Roofing) to elegant boutique cocktail bars, VRAs are helping Washington, D.C., manage storm water runoff and providing unique vantage points for taking in national landmarks. The Wharf, in the District’s Southwest quadrant, represents a “neighborhood” approach to green roofs.

A riverfront community spanning nearly a mile of the Potomac River, The Wharf is a mixed use, public-private development, including high-end hotels, luxury condominiums, retail shops, commercial offices and even a 6,000-seat music hall. While the design and aesthetics of different buildings at The Wharf project a sense of diversity, VRAs are a unifying element. In addition to providing visual interest and elevated spaces for public gatherings, VRAs help The Wharf achieve its sustainability and water management goals.

Managing Storm Water, Supporting Sustainability

Water has long been a defining element of life in the District, whose neighboring waterways include not only the Potomac, but also the Anacostia River, Rock Creek and Chesapeake Bay. To help manage storm water runoff, the District makes use of a massive cistern system, permeable pavements, and extensive use of vegetative bio-retention supported by VRAs. The District of Columbia’s Department of Energy & Environment mandates measures that retain runoff from a 1.2-inch storm event through green infrastructure and capture reuse systems. Specific storm water retention rates are specified relative to a building’s footprint.

The vegetative roofs help tie together the diverse types of buildings in the area. Photos: The District Wharf

In addition to helping manage storm water runoff, protected roof membrane assembly (PRMA) systems at The Wharf also help to support the development’s sustainability performance goals, which started at the master planning stage. Sustainability objectives supported by The Wharf’s VRAs include reducing storm water discharge and improving thermal performance through the cooling and shading properties of soils and plantings — an important consideration in a region renowned for its humid summers. VRAs are also desirable in urban areas for the role vegetation can play in helping filter pollution and providing habitats for birds and other wildlife. Finally, VRAs offer an aesthetically pleasing environment for employees, occupants and visitors.

The Wharf development was designed to achieve LEED Gold, while individual buildings targeted LEED Gold or Silver. Constructed in phases, Phase One opened in 2017 and took nearly 15 years to complete. While the Great Recession slowed construction, an “upside” of the delay was that a proliferation of PRMA assemblies across the District helped inform the assembly of green roofs at The Wharf. Several high-profile buildings that employ similar roofing systems include the MGM Casino, the National Museum of African American History and the National Archives.

A PRMA Approach to Support Performance

More than half of the roofs in The Wharf make use of an Owens Corning PRMA that includes Owens Corning FOAMULAR 404 and 604 extruded polystyrene insulation (XPS) supplied by PPSI Maryland. XPS delivers unique water resistance and strength properties that differentiate it from other insulation products and make it ideal for VRA applications. In fact, the demanding conditions on rooftops helped prompt the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) recommendation to use only XPS insulation for VRA applications. The innate water resistance of XPS helps a roofing system retain its R-value and energy-saving power while retaining its compressive strength to bear a significant amount of overburden. Strength is critical in a PRMA application, as the insulation must be able to withstand the weight of vegetation, rainfall, growing media, pavers and surrounding surface materials.

Sustainability objectives supported by The Wharf’s VRAs include reducing storm water runoff, improving thermal performance, and providing habitats for wildlife. Photos: The District Wharf

At the highest levels, the rooftop plants and vegetation help serve as a giant sponge to absorb the rainwater. In a PRMA roof, insulation under the plant layer, growing media and filter/drainage layer is placed above a waterproofing layer which directs water horizontally to a series of overflow vaults. A network of massive 700,000-gallon cisterns throughout the District collect and control the release of water.

In addition to water, wind was another consideration when planning VRAs at The Wharf. Rock curbs from Hanover Architectural Products help mitigate against winds coming in off the riverfront. Other roofing materials that help The Wharf PRMAs achieve performance include waterproofing membrane 790-11 Hot Rubberized Asphalt by the Henry Company, EMSEAL expansion joints to tie together air barriers, and Hanover Architectural Products pavers and sedum mats supplied by Sempergreen.

Contractor Coordination and Communications Are Key

As a community-focused development, The Wharf celebrated its grand opening with several public events. Hometown rock band the Foo Fighters performed for a sellout crowd at the Anthem music center on October 12, 2017. The enormous task of completing multiple buildings against a very tight timeline was a challenge felt by all of the contractor trades on site, according to Brian Davis, general superintendent at James Myers, the roofing contractor charged with installing green roofs at The Wharf. The immensity of the project required careful scheduling and logistics among roofers and other trades. Teams worked throughout the night and seven days a week as Phase One approached completion.

Photos: The District Wharf

As the countdown to the October 12 grand opening approached, construction teams followed tight schedules outlining exactly what team members would be working in what area at a particular time. The logistical demands of building nine buildings over six blocks made traffic bottlenecks an ongoing challenge throughout the project. Scheduling details had to consider not only the District’s notorious rush hour traffic but also events and attractions in the area. For example, the Washington Nationals baseball team played a number of weeknight baseball games at home. Trades working on The Wharf were required to clear the streets three hours before the first pitch of each Nationals home game. While navigating event schedules and a tight construction schedule, contractors also had to maintain high levels of safety and quality.

The public event commemorating the completion of Phase One celebrated a one-of-a-kind public space winding along one of the nation’s most historic riverfronts with an epic rock concert. More quietly, the completion of Phase One celebrated Washington’s role as a leader in the installation of VRAs while helping the District achieve sustainability goals and comply with storm water management mandates.

MATERIALS

Insulation: FOAMULAR 404 and 604 extruded polystyrene, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

Waterproofing Membrane: 790-11 Hot Rubberized Asphalt, Henry Company, www.henry.com

Expansion Joints: EMSEAL, www.emseal.com

Sedum Mats: Sempergreen, www.sempergreen.com

Pavers: Hanover Architectural Products, www.hanoverpavers.com

Owens Corning University Expands Contractor Educational Opportunities

Owens Corning Roofing is expanding its Owens Corning University educational platform with the introduction of Owens Corning University (OCU). Free to all Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network (OCCN) members on the OCConnectResource Center, OCU is the platform in which all live and online educational opportunities will be offered. OCU’s comprehensive platform will provide members leading edge, 24/7 “on demand” education and resources designed to help contractors build their business.

A gaming element integrated into OCU recognizes the competitive spirit of contractors. Leaderboards on the Learning Management Platform track education points, award badges for completed educational tasks, and allow contractors to see how they rank compared to their competition.     

Offering an unlimited number of users, OCU provides critical content to help contractors throughout their organization – from employee onboarding to installation best practices. OCU is the latest introduction to a portfolio of digital resources Owens Corning offers OCCN members.  “Owens Corning developed OCU to put relevant education directly in the contractor’s hands, regardless of time or location,” said Jon Gardner, Owens Corning’s Roofing Contractor Training and Education Leader. “Because each module is 15 minutes or less, users can easily fit learning into their schedule.”

As a dynamic, “living” resource, OCU will continue to evolve with the addition of new modules. Content included in Phase 1 includes informational courses on Owens Corning, on-boarding resources for new sales representatives, the ABCs of warranties, product and system news including the Duration Seriesshingles, SureNail Technologyinformation, an overview of the Total Protection Roofing System, roofing fundamentals, business service offerings and access to the Owens Corning Roofing video library.

OCU is available on the OCConnectResource Center.

For more information, visit www.owenscorning.com.

Owens Corning Roofing Introduces ProSell App

Owens Corning Roofing introduces ProSell, a digital app that streamlines and expedites the residential roofing sales process from sales pitch to order processing. Available to all Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network (OCCN) members on the iOS App Store, the ProSell app is a seamless, step-by-step resource that spans every phase of the residential roof sales process.

ProSell was developed using Leap, a digital platform that simplifies and automates the home services sales process including estimating, financing, contracting and real-time communication. ProSell includes a digital pitch book along with comprehensive product data to support efficient and accurate estimating. Once a homeowner selects products, ProSell generates an on-site estimate supported by EagleView and Hover. ProSell can also support financing and execute the contract with credit card and eCheck processing. “Owens Corning Contractor Network members know that time is money and by allowing the roofing presentation to naturally flow into product selection, financing and ordering, the ProSellapp aims to help convert more leads into closed purchases without interruptions or delays,” says Tim Keefer, Owens Corning Roofing Digital Marketing Leader.

For companies signing up for the ProSell app by April 1, Owens Corning will waive the $500 one-time set-up fee and monthly $35-per user license fee for one year. An optional upgrade is available providing extended benefits. “By using the app and becoming familiar with ProSell in the winter months, roofing companies will be able to maximize its efficiency when the busiest spring and summer selling seasons arrive,” says Keefer.

The introduction of ProSellexpands Owens Corning’s portfolio of digital contractor tools. In 2018, Owens Corning introduced the OC ConnectTM Resource Center, a redesigned web portal and one-stop resource for OCCN members to access tools that help support and grow their business.

For more information, visit www.owenscorning.com.

Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Boasts One of World’s Largest Green Roofs

The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building in Washington, D.C., has more than 550,000 square feet of green roof space. Photos: Owens Corning

Like a 550,000-square-foot sponge, the vegetative roof assembly (VRA) atop the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building in Washington, D.C., absorbs rainfall while managing its release into the city’s sewer system. Green roofs are a storm water management “best practice” in the nation’s capital, which boasts more than 3.2 million square feet of green roof space.

Gordon Contractors installed the green roof on the 11-level, 1.2-million-square-foot headquarters, which is also home to several independent field commands including the National Pollution Fund Center and Marine Safety Center. Key performance objectives included complying with D.C.’s stringent storm water regulations, as well as federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules requiring 95 percent of storm water to be collected onsite.

Beyond complying with local and federal storm water mandates, the project team creating the vegetative roof sought to create a rooftop habitat that supports biodiversity and helps birds and other wildlife thrive. The result of a careful and collaborative approach to moisture management is a high-performing roof that ultimately received LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. Working as a system, the roof’s components help reduce rainwater runoff while helping to reduce pollutant loads and protect natural resources such as the nearby Chesapeake Bay.

Numerous Challenges

As every roofer knows, no two projects are alike. The location of the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters on hilly terrain provided plenty of natural obstacles, including nine of the eleven levels being built into a hillside. The site

Gordon Contractors installed the green roof on the 11-level headquarters. Performance objectives included complying with D.C.’s stringent storm water regulations, as well as federal EPA rules requiring 95 percent of storm water to be collected onsite. Photos: Owens Corning

features a series of stair-stepped green roof terraces that help gradually move water from higher to lower levels and eventually into a pond through elevation changes of 120 feet. According to Steve Gordon, president of Preservation & Protection Systems Inc. (PPSI), the company providing design and installation support with the Owens Corning FOAMULAR extruded polystyrene insulation and Henry 790-11 Hot Rubberized Asphalt used in the VRA, the stair-step design required a complex approach to the roof’s varied elevations. To meet this challenge a complex network of expansion joints by EMSEAL tied together multiple air barriers within the system. Another challenge was the magnitude of the project, spanning more than a half-million feet across multiple levels and 176 acres. Timing was critical, as plants and vegetation required quick delivery and transplanting into their new environment, particularly during D.C.’s sweltering summers. These living materials couldn’t simply be covered with a tarp until better conditions prevailed, but had to be quickly transported, installed and irrigated.

The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters serves 4,000 occupants, so comfort and energy efficiency were important concerns. From the outset of the project, the integrated roofing team was tasked with designing a vegetative roof assembly that would help decrease the building’s heating and cooling energy usage, lower long-term maintenance costs and extend the life of the roof.

A Solution to Achieve Performance Goals

The project team selected a Protected Roof Membrane Assembly (PRMA) to deliver the water management required to meet storm water mandates, as well as deliver energy efficiency through R-value performance and strength to support vegetation requirements. The PRMA places the insulation layer above the waterproofing membrane, a reversal of traditional roof systems. PPSI recommended Owens Corning FOAMULAR 404 and 604 extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulations for use in the PRMA. The water resistance and compressive strength of the XPS insulation provided the integrity needed for long-term roof performance and helped the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building ultimately achieve LEED Gold certification.

The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters was built on hilly terrain, and nine of the eleven levels were built into a hillside. The stair-stepped green roof terraces help gradually move water from higher to lower levels and eventually into a pond. Photos: Owens Corning

Given the sheer size of the project, it was inevitable that the roofing team would encounter several scenarios requiring strategic problem-solving throughout the installation. For example, the team adjustedthe engineered soil specification to reduce the loads within the structural tolerances for the roof structure and carefully addressed a range of pH, moisture, organic matter and nutrient levels to support the variety of plants. Not only did such careful attention deliver strength performance, it’s also achieved the objective of attracting wildlife. The terraced landscape has welcomed not only birds and butterflies, but the occasional deer wandering onto a rooftop.

Evaluating Results

Since its completion, the VRA at the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters has attracted widespread attention from landscaping groups, engineering firms and organizations interested in sustainability. These groups are interested not just in the building’s unique design but in its resilience and performance. Steve Gordon of PPSI says the resilience of the headquarters’ roof is reflected in its record of no leaks. “We’ve had no leaks,” Gordon says. “The reason we use hot fluid applied waterproofing on green roofs is because we want to avoid any leaks in the building. At the end of the day, the biggest liability in a roof is water.”

After successfully navigating a range of challenges and opportunities, the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters’ VRA epitomizes the convergence of aesthetics and performance and is recognizedas one of the largest green roofs in the world.According to the Landscape Performance Foundation, the headquarters’ vegetative roof retains up to 424,000 gallons of rainwater.

In a small way, the performance reflects the integrity of a hero an Act of Congress honored when naming the headquarters, according to Captain Will Smith, Commanding Officer U.S. Coast Guard Base NCR. Captain Smith noted, “The Coast Guard’s only Medal of Honor recipient, Douglas Munro earned the award for his selfless sacrifice as a landing craft pilot at Guadalcanal while evacuating marines from a beachhead under heavy fire from enemy forces.”

TEAM

Architect: WDG, Washington, D.C., www.wdgarch.com
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, Bethesda, Maryland, www.clarkconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: Gordon Contractors, Capitol Heights, Maryland, www.gordoncontractors.com
Independent Rep Agency: Preservation & Protection Systems Inc. (PPSI), Laurel, Maryland, www.ppsimd.com

MATERIALS

Insulation: FOAMULAR 404 and 604 extruded polystyrene, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com
Waterproofing Membrane: 790-11 Hot Rubberized Asphalt, Henry Company, https://us.henry.com
Expansion Joints: EMSEAL, www.emseal.com
Pavers: Hanover Architectural Products, www.hanoverpavers.com
Sedum Mats: Sempergreen, www.sempergreen.com

Owens Corning Introduces 2019 Shingle Color of the Year

Owens Corning introduces Black Sable as the 2019 Shingle Color of the Year. As the newest addition to the Owens Corning TruDefinition Duration Designer Colors Collection series, Black Sable was inspired by color trends as well as feedback from homeowners, contractors and builders. “Black Sable provides a modern take on a classic color, making a sophisticated and timeless statement,” says Sue Burkett, Owens Corning Roofing Strategic Roofing Manager. “You could say this shingle is the ‘little black dress’ for the roof because it will never go out of style.”

As a twist to conventional monochromatic black palettes, Black Sable is a dark and intensely rich blend that uses classic black granules mixed with gray, umber and sable tones. The result is a dramatic yet grounded color complementing any number of architectural styles and exterior color palettes. “This is a new go-to color in roofing,” says Burkett. “Many people have asked me, ‘is the shingle black or brown?’ and my answer is ‘both’. Black Sable addresses a specific color gap we found in the market.”

The Shingle Color of the Year initiative highlights the roof as a design element expressing a homeowner’s personal style and enhancing a home’s curb appeal. “Research has shown that homeowners, especially women, embrace color and want guidance on how to use it on their homes’ exteriors,” Burkett says. Each year, Owens Corning introduces new online exterior style boards and other design and visualization resources to help. Three new style boards featuring Black Sable are supporting the product launch. These “design and inspire” tools are particularly popular with women. In 2018, Owens Corning earned the 2018 Women’s Choice Award as America’s most recommended roofing products.

HGTV’s “Good Bones” home renovation and design experts Karen E Laine and Mina Starsiak–renowned for their use of color as an exterior design element–announced the launch of Black Sable in a Facebook video. Laine and Starsiak have helped Owens Corning spread the message about color and curb appeal since the company announced its inaugural Shingle Color of the Year in 2017.  Black Sable becomes the third Owens Corning Shingle Color of the Year following Sand Dune in 2018 and Sedona Canyon in 2017. It will be available nationally in January, 2019. More information can be found at www.shinglecoloroftheyear.com.

For more information, visit www.owenscorning.com.

Owens Corning introduces Black Sable as the 2019 Shingle Color of the Year.

Owens Corning Earns 2018 Women’s Choice Award

Owens Corning announced that it earned the 2018 Women’s Choice Award, which recognizes the brand behind America’s Most Recommended Roofing Products. This designation is based on a national survey reflecting responses from thousands of women in the United States who were asked to select brands they would highly recommend to friends and family. The announcement coincides with National Roofing Week, June 3 through June 9.

“We are honored that women have expressed their confidence in Owens Corning Roofing with the Women’s Choice Award. Women have long driven design and style decisions inside and outside the home, including the roof,” says Sue Burkett, marketing manager, Owens Corning Roofing. “Women consider the functional features of a home’s roofing system that help seal and defend a home from the elements, as well as the aesthetic aspects of the roof.”

A new roof consistently ranks among the top home improvements that achieves a strong return on investment. As a home’s roof typically represents about 40 percent of a home’s exterior, the roof can play a significant role in boosting curb appeal. The summer provides an opportunity for consumers considering home improvements to view their roof as both functional and stylish.

The annual Owens Corning Shingle Color of the Year initiative, which highlights the roof as a design element, is informed by women’s influence in coordinating a home’s external color schemes. The company developed color tools, such as online style boards and visualization resources, to help consumers consider the important aesthetic aspect of a new roof.

Delia Passi, Chief Executive Officer and Founder of the Women’s Choice Award stated, “By carrying the Women’s Choice Award seal, brands like Owens Corning signify their commitment to empower women to make smart buying choices, which is important because women’s spending power continues to grow. They currently control the majority of the purchasing decisions for consumer goods in the United States.”

This award can serve as a competitive differentiator in the marketplace.  “When a woman is willing to recommend a brand or service to others, it means that business has earned her loyalty. We are pleased to salute Owens Corning Roofing for its focus on excellence, a commitment that is recognized by women consumers nationwide,” Passi continued.

For more information, visit www.owenscorning.com.

 

Owens Corning Roofing and Asphalt Welcomes Four Contractors to Platinum Advisory Board

Owens Corning Roofing and Asphalt, LLC is welcoming four roofing contractors to its Platinum Advisory Board. The prestigious honor is awarded to Owens Corning Roofing Platinum Preferred Contractors who have demonstrated a commitment to sustained excellence in all aspects of their business.

The newly announced Platinum Advisory Board members are: Levi Phillips, Idaho Roofing Contractors, Inc. (Boise, Idaho); Lenny Scarola, DreamHome Remodeling (Springfield, Va.); Wayne Holloway, Best Choice Roofing & Home Improvement (Hendersonville, Tenn.); and John Phillips, ARAC Roof It Forward (Kennesaw, Ga.). These new members join 13 existing members on the Owens Corning Roofing Platinum Advisory Board.

Owens Corning Roofing Platinum Advisory Board members provide in-the-field experience and business insights while collaborating with Owens Corning twice a year to offer perspective from the vantage point of leading contractors. Members of the Platinum Advisory Board also work with Owens Corning to evaluate products and provide suggestions for continuous improvement.

“We are excited to continue to grow our Platinum Advisory Board with roofing contractors who have demonstrated high levels of market leadership and customer service,” said Jason Lewinski, Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network Leader. “Our Platinum Advisory Board members play an important role in keeping us connected to emerging issues and opportunities that impact both contractors and the homeowners they serve.”

For more information, visit www.owenscorning.com.

Owens Corning Roofing Introduces the OCConnect Resource Center

Owens Corning Roofing launched the OCConnect Resource Center, an online 24/7 resource portal in response to input from members of the Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network. The all-new OCConnect will replace the previous ProConnect Resource Center to provide contractors with faster, user-friendly navigation features, a streamlined at-a-glance user dashboard and full access to a wide range of communication tools with enhanced capabilities.

A key highlight of the OCConnect Resource Center is the flexible and secure dashboard. The dashboard allows owners to assign multiple users and authorize varying levels of access based on a user’s role. Other enhancements include:

  • Mobile access anytime, anywhere
  • Quickly and easy uploading of multiple invoices, including Drag & Drop feature
  • The ability to view a company’s available promo balance
  • A pre-denominated and reloadable reward process with Mastercard
  • More self-service capabilities to access marketing materials and resources
  • Enhanced support services to facilitate faster resolution
  • An intuitive experience supported by PC and mobile platforms
  • According to Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network Leader Jason Lewinski, the new portal offers contractors flexibility to customize settings and navigate resources more easily today and into the future. “During research, contractors expressed a need for a system that provided expanded functionality and flexibility,” Lewinski said. “Our goal was to create a system that meets contractors’ needs today and will evolve to meet contractors’ emerging needs in the future.”

    Introduced in phases, the OCConnect Resource Center will continue to expand throughout the year, adding more features designed to enhance contractor engagement. Currently available to all Owens Corning Contractor Network members, the OCConnect Resource Center will eventually expand to support additional audiences including insulation contractors, dealers, architects and other stakeholders in the supply chain.

    The OCConnect portal may be accessed at www.owenscorning.com/connect.

    For more information, please visit www.owenscorning.com/roofing.

    Community Service Initiative Celebrates America’s Heroes

    Habitat for Humanity identifies veterans who are in need of a new roof, and Owens Corning donates the materials. Platinum Preferred Contractors donate their team members’ labor to install the roofing systems. Photos: Owens Corning Roofing

    Combine the expertise of a global humanitarian organization with roofing system materials donated by a manufacturer. Add the generosity and community-minded spirit of roofing contractors across the nation. Apply the parties’ collective efforts to honor and protect unsung heroes. What is the outcome? For veterans served by the Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project, the results are safer, more comfortable homes. This article shares the story of how one manufacturer connected its relationship with Habitat for Humanity with the expertise of roofing contractors already active in community service to create an integrated program serving American heroes.

    An Idea Is Born and Contractors Collaborate

    As the grandson of a veteran who proudly served under General Patton in World War II, Brad Beldon, CEO of Beldon Roofing in San Antonio, Texas, has long respected the service and sacrifice of America’s veterans. In fact, his grandfather’s selfless service inspired Beldon Roofing Company to develop a strong legacy of community outreach. When Brad broached the concept of a community service initiative honoring veterans during a Platinum Contractors Advisory Board meeting in San Antonio, his idea was met with broad enthusiasm. Beldon Roofing completed the first “trial project” which served as a model for the national Roof Deployment Project.

    Leveraging the humanitarian spirit of Platinum Preferred Contractors across the nation, the Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project is a multi-stakeholder initiative bringing together Habitat for Humanity, members of the Owens Corning Platinum Preferred Contractor Network and the Owens Corning Foundation to support American veterans. The program fuses Habitat for Humanity’s experience building and restoring homes with the expertise of the network’s members to provide veterans with new roof systems. Each partner in the program plays a distinct role. Habitat identifies veterans who are in need of a new roof but are unable to replace the roofs themselves. Owens Corning donates the roofing system materials including underlayment, shingles and other materials needed to replace roofs in disrepair. Platinum Preferred Contractors donate their team members’ labor to specify materials and install the roofing systems.

    Since its inception in Spring 2016, the National Roof Deployment Project has installed nearly 60 roofs, and the program’s momentum continues to grow. The practice of giving back is a time-honored tradition for Platinum Preferred Contractors. Owens Corning Contractor Network Leader Jason Lewinski says the program builds upon Platinum Contractors’ rich history of giving back to their communities. “When we rolled the program out at our Platinum national conference in San Antonio, we saw lots of hands go up and heard contractors say loud and clear, ‘I’m ready and willing to participate,’” said Lewinski. “Not one contractor has ever said, ‘this is new to us’ – as many of our contractors are already so community-minded. And many of them don’t stop at the roof. They often want to provide gutters, soffit, fascia, siding or whatever it takes to make the needed repairs.”

    Platinum Contractor Tripp Atkinson, owner of ContractingPRO in Memphis, Tennessee, is a good example of a roofer who is also a community servant. He and his team have donated roofing and siding labor for Brinkley Heights Urban Academy, a Christian missionary organization serving at-risk youth. In addition to ministering to the kids, feeding them or just listening to the kids, ContractingPRO finds opportunities to apply its remodeling expertise to the distressed homes of these under-served youth. Remarking on his involvement in the Roof Deployment Project, Atkinson says, “We’re not just putting on roofs, but giving back in a way that is changing lives and helping these veterans enjoy their homes more.” He adds that community service provides an opportunity for his team to make a difference that extends beyond the business. “It’s very important for us to be part of something that is bigger than ourselves and our company,” he said.

    Contractors Give Back to America’s Heroes and Communities

    The National Roof Deployment Project’s focus on supporting veterans has been especially appealing to contractors, notes Matt Schroder, communications leader at Owens Corning. “Many contractors have shared that they either served in the military or have close members of their family who are active service members,” Schroder said. He added that the Roof Deployment Project has also opened up opportunities for Owens Corning to partner with veteran-focused organizations such as Purple Heart Homes.

    The Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project brings together Habitat for Humanity, members of the Owens Corning Platinum Preferred Contractor Network, and the Owens Corning Foundation to support American veterans. Photos: Owens Corning Roofing

    Jon Sabo, owner of RoofRoof in Charlotte, North Carolina, is a good example of a Platinum Preferred Contractor who can relate to the program as a veteran. “As a former Marine myself, I’m personally honored that we’re able to partner with Owens Corning and Habitat to relieve a big stress,” said Sabo, following the donation of a new roof to a veteran. “One of our core values has always been to give back to the communities we serve, and we jumped at the opportunity to be able to give back to someone right in our own back yard.”

    Military members’ time away from home can mean maintenance on the home front is neglected. Nick Yadron, owner of M&M Remodeling Services in Crete, Illinois, says that the Roof Deployment Project is an opportunity to say thank you to veterans and help their families. “We all see so much value in this program as a way to say thank you to our veterans. All the Platinum Contractors were really excited when the program was announced a few years ago,” Yadron says.

    While he is active in the Chicagoland area, Yadron’s commitment to service goes much further. In 2013 and 2016, he traveled to India on a mission trip where he helped a team establish water wells and build schools. Closer to home, M&M supports Habitat for Humanity. Over the years, his company has also “adopted” a family experiencing hard times and provided new windows, siding and gutters.

    Employee and Community Engagement

    Even those not directly impacted by the Roof Deployment Project are engaged by the program. According to Don Rettig, Director of Community Relations and President of the Owens Corning Foundation, the Roof Deployment Project has resonated with both Owens Corning employees and the communities served by Platinum Contractors. Rettig says one welcome outcome of the project is the amount of conversation on Owens Corning internal communication channels and social media. “We’re always excited to see our people take pride in our community engagement,” Rettig says. “This partnership with our contractors to help our nation’s veterans has certainly been well received.”

    “We know from surveys that some 93 percent of our people appreciate working for a company that provides opportunities to be involved in supporting the local community,” Rettig notes.

    Communities have also taken notice of the contractors and veterans involved in the program. In multiple local markets, media outlets ranging from broadcast television stations to daily newspapers and online news sites have shone the spotlight on this program. In several markets, media have come out more than once to report live from veterans’ homes as contractors replaced a roof. “We’ve seen TV stations return to neighborhoods to produce stories about additional projects — even in the same market,” Schroder says.

    Making an Impact

    A November 6, 2017 article in The New York Times noted an emerging trend in corporate philanthropy is the desire by companies to show both customers and employees that their interests extend beyond making profits, and that companies today are determined to show an impact. As the National Roof Deployment Project illustrates, when roofing contractors, communities, and corporations align with non-profits to engage in service, the results can literally make an impact, one shingle at a time.

    Owens Corning Roofing Introduces 2018 ACCELERATE Sweepstakes

    The 2018 ACCELERATE Sweepstakes is rolling out to members of the Owens Corning Contractor Network, with new prizes and more than 425 chances to win. National prizes range from a 2018 Ford F150 Raptor to custom vacation packages. Regional prizes awarded each quarter include workspace storage solutions, coolers, and Bluetooth speakers. The breadth of prizes and quarterly drawings were selected to help fuel momentum for the Sweepstakes, which runs from January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018.

    Through the ACCELERATE Sweepstakes, members of the Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network are eligible for prize drawings based on their qualified purchases of Owens Corning Roofing products. As in 2017, the prizes align with products supporting Owens Corning’s Total Protection Roofing System and the Seal. Defend. Breathe. message.

    Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network Leader Jason Lewinski said the Seal. Defend. Breathe. message has resonated well with roofing contractors and the homeowners they serve. “The Seal. Defend. Breathe. message helps them convey the rationale for a roofing system in a manner that is easily understood by any homeowner, regardless of their understanding of building science,” Lewinski said. He added that participation in the ACCELERATE Sweepstakes has been robust among members of the Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network. “In developing the 2018 Sweepstakes prizes and quarterly drawings, we incorporated feedback from contractors in the field, including their interest in a variety of prizes awarded throughout the year,” he said.

    For complete details, see the Official Rules available at www.acceleratepromo.com/rules2018.

    For more information, please visit www.owenscorning.com/roofing.

    Ford F150 Raptor