Community Center Sparkles With New Metal Roof

The community center was re-roofed using a structural sub-framing system from Roof Hugger that allowed the existing metal roofing to remain in place while the new roof system was installed above it. Photos: Roof Hugger, LLC

Just down the road from Pigeon Forge, Gallatin, Dollywood and other popular attractions in the Smokie Mountains is the thriving community of Sevierville, Tennessee. This beautiful mountain town has a community center and a civic center that hosts multiple events throughout the year. The community center is housed in a 1985 vintage metal building manufactured by American Buildings. Due to its age, the building recently underwent a complete re-roofing with metal in a process commonly known as a metal-over-metal retrofit. The building was originally constructed using American’s trapezoidal standing seam profile, so the decision was made to utilize a structural sub-framing system furnished by Roof Hugger, LLC. This type of retrofit allows the existing metal roofing to remain in place. The structural sub-framing is installed over the existing roof and then a new metal roof system is installed, which becomes the finished weathering surface.

The local community leaders were not new to this type of re-roofing for aged metal roofs because of their experience with a 2017 project at Lanier Elementary School in nearby Maryville. This project was designed by Chuck Howard of Metal Roof Consultants (MRC) from Cary, North Carolina, the same company selected for the community center re-roof. MRC has years of experience with retrofit roofing of existing metal roofs, as well flat roofs that receive an engineered light-gauge steel framing system to create a sloped roof plane. On the community center project, MRC consulted with Doyle E. Jones of Sevierville, the architect and roof consultant on the Lanier Elementary project.

Morristown Roofing was awarded the community center project through a public bid process in early 2019. Founded in 1962 by the late Paul Horner, Morristown Roofing now has a footprint of quality roofs in six states throughout the Southeast. With an overall staff of about 55 employees, the company installs all types of roofing from single-ply membranes to metal. The company’s motto: “No project is too large, nor too small for Morristown Roofing.”

According to Ashley Horner of Morristown Roofing, this project was only the company’s second Roof Hugger installation. The job went smoothly, even with the building’s roof geometry having had sloped rakes, varying slopes, multiple valleys and other difficult transitions. Horner went on to say the Roof Hugger product has the ability to increase snow loading and has little to no impact on the occupants of the building. It also helps control the contractor’s liability by eliminating the need to remove the existing metal roof. In addition, with existing trapezoidal metal roofs that are notorious for varying center-to-center major rib spacing, the Roof Hugger sub-purlin design compensates for this issue. Factory oversize notching of the Z-shaped sub-purlin’s vertical web permits easy installation directly over the existing roof panel high ribs, allowing for base flange attachment into the existing purlins. The result is a structurally correct, low-profile, finished retrofit framing assembly ready to receive the new metal roof panels.

The project finished out with 54,000 square feet of 24-gauge  System 2500 metal roofing by MRS Metal Roofing Systems, Inc. Approximately 12,720 linear feet of Roof Hugger’s standard Model “D” sub-purlin with a 4.5-inch web height was installed. The new roof included a ColorGard snow retention system manufactured by S-5!

TEAM

Consultant: Metal Roof Consultants (MRC), Cary, North Carolina, www.metalroofconsultants.net

Roofing Contractor: Morristown Roofing, Whitesburg, Tennessee, www.morristownroofing.net

MATERIALS

Structural Sub-Framing: Roof Hugger, LLC, www.roofhugger.com

Metal Roof: System 2500, MRS Metal Roofing Systems Inc.,  www.metalroofingsystems.biz

Snow Retention: ColorGard, S-5!, www.S-5.com

Versatile Pipe Flashing for Metal Roofs

Dynamic Fastener offers Versa-Flash Dyna-Flash pipe flashing for metal roofs. Versa-Flash can be used in the traditional pull-over method or cut down the designated track and used in retrofit applications. Cut lines are clearly marked to allow for easy installation for multiple pipe sizes. The base is designed to form a seal on most panel configurations and roof pitches regardless of pipe location. Weather protection made of black EPDM rubber. Each flashing comes with a stainless steel gripper to secure for retrofit use.

For more information, visit www.dynamicfastener.com.

Complex Metal Roof Replacement Becomes Award-Winning Project

The main roof on the historic Dilley-Tinnin home was made up of multiple roof planes and featured an internal gutter. Photos: Texas Traditions Roofing

Located just outside of Austin in Georgetown, Texas, the historic Dilley-Tinnin home dates back to 1879. When it was struck by lightning, the main roof was damaged beyond repair. The original soldered, flat panel roof would have to be removed and replaced as part of a restoration project that posed numerous challenges.

The roof was made up of some 20 roof planes and included an internal gutter system, numerous penetrations, and multiple low-slope transitions. The new metal roof would have to be watertight and durable — and meet strict guidelines for historical accuracy.

Crews from nearby Texas Traditions Roofing were up to the challenge. They removed the damaged sections of the existing roof and installed a striking red standing seam metal roof manufactured by Sheffield Metals.

Michael Pickel, vice president of Texas Traditions Roofing, was called in to assess the damage. The original roof had a standing seam look to it in some sections, but it was comprised of metal panels that were soldered together. “It was metal 100 percent, from the fascia, to the gutter, to the flat portion, all soldered together into one piece,” he notes.

Crews from Texas Traditions Roofing removed the damaged sections of the existing roof and installed a red standing seam roof manufactured by Sheffield Metals.

The entire main roof area would have to be replaced, while the gray metal roof system on one wing was left in place. The main roof was comprised of multiple roof areas with slopes ranging from completely flat to pitches of 3:12 and 4:12. “It really wasn’t that steep, and that’s what caused us to recommend the double-lock panels,” Pickel says. “Given all of the soffits and all of the transitions, the slope required us to use a double lock.”

The Texas Traditions team worked for eight months with the local historical committee to ensure that the new roof would meet its guidelines. The committee approved the 2.0 Mechanical Standing Seam roof manufactured by Sheffield Metals, and the roof restoration work began.

The metal panels of the original roof were removed, along with most of the internal gutter. “The home was leaking pretty bad,” Pickel recalls. “There was some significant damage to the integral gutter, and we had to rebuild at least 80 percent of it. It was flat, and we added slope to it. It was a beast. We tore the whole thing off and came in with all manufacturer approved products: high-temp synthetic underlayment, high-temp ice and water, and the metal panels and butyl sealant.”

The existing roof was damaged by lightning. The soldered, flat panel roof had to be removed and replaced.

Most of the deck was in good shape, but the fascia needed extensive repairs. Extreme care had to be taken to protect the custom carpentry just below the eaves. “It was a crazy custom fascia,” Pickel notes. “We’ve never seen anything like it before.”

After the internal gutter was rebuilt, it was lined with a 60-mil TPO membrane from GAF. “We did a metal fascia, and it was also lined with TPO. It ran about 18 inches up behind the field panels to give it some added security. It was also lined with ice and water shield.”

The metal panels were roll-formed on the site. “Due to all the different lengths, we took measurements, rolled them on site, and applied them one at a time,” Pickel explains. “All of the trim and accessories were manufactured in our metal shop and brought to the site.”

Panels were lifted into place with a rope-and-pulley system and installed over Viking Armor synthetic underlayment and GAF StormGuard leak barrier. The re-roofed area was approximately 2,500 square feet, but the project was a labor-intensive puzzle. “It was a small project, but it was really cut up,” Pickel says.

Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time at the eave and while installing the metal panels. “The nice part was it wasn’t too steep, and the lip of the integral gutter added another layer of safety as well,” Pickel explains. “From a safety standpoint, it was pretty basic; the steepest section was 4:12, and a lot of the work was done on the flat area.”

In the flat area, crickets were used provide adequate slope beneath the metal panels. The transitions made for some tricky details. “When you hit the low slope on metal — and that’s really 2:12 or less — you start to be more concerned about making sure you’re doing everything you can to get that water off that roof,” Pickel says. “If the water moves slowly, you have to do all you can to make sure that roof is fully sealed and ensure it just won’t leak.”

Crews tackled the challenges one at a time. “Just like any project, once you start to move on it, it gets a little bit easier,” Pickel says. “We learned a lot as we progressed. Each section made the next section a little bit easier.”

Texas Traditions submitted the project to Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) for its Best Residential Metal Roofing Project competition, and MRA selected Texas Traditions Roofing and Sheffield Metals as the first-quarter winners in the category.

“When we got the news, we were just ecstatic,” Pickel says. “I think roofers are very proud of the work they do, and to get that recognition is fun and exciting. It also gets the team fired up.”

Pickel credits his company’s success to a simple formula: quality craftsmanship by talented and experienced crews. “One of our owners has been in construction for 40-plus years,” he says, referring to his father, Mike Pickel. “He handled multi-million-dollar commercial projects for a very large general contractor. His experience and ability to manage our jobs, educate our crews, and educate our superintendents helps out gain knowledge beyond the roof. There’s more to it than just the roof, and being mindful of the entire building is a huge advantage.”

For more information about how to enter MRA’s “Best Metal Roofing” competition for the trades, visit www.metalroofing.com.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Texas Traditions Roofing, Georgetown, Texas, www.texastraditionsroofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: 2-inch mechanical lock panels in Cardinal Red, Sheffield Metals, www.sheffieldmetals.com

Underlayment: Viking Armor synthetic underlayment, VB Synthetics, www.vbsynthetics.com

Leak Barrier: GAF StormGuard, GAF, www.gaf.com

Petersen Adds Technical Representatives in Canada for Metal Roof, Wall Systems

Petersen is expanding its network of manufacturer representatives into Canada to meet the country’s growing demand for metal roof and wall cladding systems. The manufacturer representatives from Enercorp will support architects, consultants, installing contractors and others involved in the specification and installation of exterior metal cladding products from coast-to-coast across Canada.

Enercorp (enercorp.ca) will represent Petersen’s PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in Alberta, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec. The firm also represents products made by Carlisle Construction Materials, which owns Petersen. PAC-CLAD products will be shipped from its Elk Grove Village, Ill., facility.

“Partnering with Enercorp to represent Petersen is a significant step toward successfully servicing Canadian design and construction professionals who are looking for metal roof and wall products. The sales team at Enercorp will satisfy the architectural metal needs of Petersen’s existing and new customers in Canada as we grow the PAC-CLAD brand,” said Mike Petersen, president.

Petersen’s metal cladding products are used in Canada for a wide variety of projects, including commercial, educational, healthcare, residential and most other buildings to deliver a clean and elegant aesthetic. Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products include a high percentage of recycled material, which lowers their environmental footprint and supports sustainability, while being equally applicable for both new construction and restoration of existing building envelopes.

“One of Enercorp’s strengths is consulting architects on product specification, and Petersen is a spec-driven manufacturer, so this is a strongly aligned partnership,” said Dan Meskell, architectural representative at Enercorp. “Adding the PAC-CLAD product line to the Enercorp mix is a natural growth opportunity. We look forward to giving Canadian architects and construction professionals additional options for their exterior cladding needs with quality PAC-CLAD products.”

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.

Petersen Adds Rep to Meet Demand for Metal Cladding in Hawaii, Guam

Petersen continues to meet the growing demand for its PAC-CLAD metal roof and wall products in the Western United States by hiring representation to service U.S. islands in the Pacific Ocean. The firm BEST Hawaii (Building Enclosure Specialist Team Hawaii) will support architects, installing contractors and others involved in the specification and installation of exterior metal cladding products on all Hawaiian islands and Guam.

Grant Henry from BEST Hawaii, based in Honolulu and Maui, will represent Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products. Grant Henry can be contacted by calling 808 870-4922, by sending email to ghenry@best-hawaii.com or by visiting best-hawaii.com.

“Petersen is growing to meet demand for its products west of the continental United States by hiring BEST Hawaii to serve our customers. We look forward to satisfying the architectural metal needs of Petersen’s many existing and new customers on those islands,” said David Hedrick, regional manager of Petersen’s Phoenix location.


Petersen, a Carlisle company, manufactures PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. PAC-CLAD products include standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, flush- and reveal-joint panels, vented or solid soffit panels, perforated metal, coil and flat sheet, composite panels, column covers, plus fascia and coping. All are available in Kynar 70% PVDF finish in 45 standard colors that include a 30-year finish warranty. Most colors meet LEED and Energy Star requirements, and are rated by the Cool Roof Rating Council. Custom colors and weathertightness warranties are offered. Founded in 1965, Petersen’s facilities are located in Illinois, Georgia, Texas, Maryland, Arizona and Minnesota. 

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

New Steel and Aluminum Standing Seam Roof Panel Offers Bi-Directional Installation

Petersen expands its line of PAC-CLAD standing seam roof products with the addition of the T-250 panel. Combining structural performance with architectural aesthetics, architects will enjoy the bolder profile of the T-250, installing contractors will appreciate the bi-directional installation capabilities and building owners will benefit from the panel’s impressive strength.

The strongest of all PAC-CLAD roof products, the T-250 panel is available in 16- and 18-inch widths in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. T-250 features a nominal 2.65-inch seam height above the roof deck. It is available in all 45 standard PAC-CLAD colors, each of which carries a 30-year non-prorated finish warranty. A weathertightness warranty also is available.

“Our T-250 panel satisfies the needs of architects designing structures that include expansive roof areas requiring long panel runs” said Mike Petersen, president. “Plus, architects might also prefer the wider seam of the T-250 panel, which creates bold shadow lines. The T-250 panel follows Petersen’s drive to continue adding products that expand the creative palette of building designers.”

Standard panel condition for the T-250 is with striations, but smooth is an option. The T-250 is available in 24 and 22 gauge steel, and .032 and .040 gauge aluminum. The T-250 can be specified with a traditional intermittent fastening clip, or a continuous clip fastening system for high-performance open-framing scenarios where extra strength is required. Both clips allow for thermal expansion and contraction. Job-specific design calculations should be performed to determine the type of clip required.

The panel is bi-directional, which allows installers to position the first panel in the center of a roof and install simultaneously in both directions, making it easy to achieve an attractive symmetrical look, while allowing multiple crews to work at the same time.

Named for the shape created where two panels meet, the T-250 is a symmetrical panel whose seams form the letter T. A metal cap is placed over the T and a mechanical seamer bends each side of the cap under the top of the T to form a strong bond. The T-250 panel is equipped with the following tests: ASTM 283, 331, 1680, 1646, E1592 and E2140, plus FM 4474 as well as UL 580 and 1897.

PAC T-250 panels can be factory- or field-formed to length but must be field-seamed. The panels have been designed for application over a wide variety of substrates on roof slopes as low as 1/2:12. Sealant beads are factory-applied to the seam cover. The seam cover is roll formed in the factory.

Substrates may include 5/8-inch minimum plywood, nailboard insulation or equal with WIP 300 underlayment applied horizontally from eave to ridge. Other substrates may include metal decking, purlins or rigid insulation in conjunction with bearing plates, and open framing.

Maximum factory-produced panel length for the T-250 is 54 feet, but longer lengths are available through field forming. Seam covers will be limited to 30-foot maximum lengths and must be field-lapped.

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

South Carolina Resort’s Metal Roof Complements Classic Low Country Architecture

The new Inn at Palmetto Bluff was inspired by a mansion built on the property in the early 1900s. Photos: Nurnberg Photography, www.nurnbergphotography.com

The recently expanded Palmetto Bluff Resort in Bluffton, South Carolina, now boasts a new 74-room inn designed by Dallas-based HKS Architects. The new Inn at Palmetto Bluff sits alongside an expanded lagoon waterway and was inspired by the R.T. Wilson Jr. mansion built on the property in the early 1900s. Located in the Low Country between Charleston and Savannah, Palmetto Bluff is one of the largest waterfront properties on the East Coast. The resort is set within the 20,000-acre Palmetto Bluff community and conservation preserve that features an array of Southern-style residential neighborhoods ranging from multi-million-dollar legacy family compounds to more traditionally sized single-family homes.

The inn is finished with artisan James Hardie siding on the exterior façade, and a Petersen standing seam metal roof was chosen to complement the classic Low Country architecture. The roof features PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels finished in custom color Patrician Bronze. Approximately 75,000 square feet of the 24-gauge Galvalume panels were installed on a tight deadline.

Don Harrier, principal at HKS, said one of the greatest challenges was complying with a long list of restrictions designed to keep additions within the scope of the original buildings, such as a mandated three-story height limit and rules regarding waterways.

The inn is topped with a standing seam metal roof featuring Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels. Photos: Nurnberg Photography, www.nurnbergphotography.com

“It’s easy to get into a site like this for construction, but in our world we have staging areas for materials, contractor trailers, etc., and because of the environment, we had to build another building first to house back-of-the-house areas, maintenance, administration and parking,” Harrier says. “There were a lot of logistics involved as far as taking care of the site.”

Installation of the Snap-Clad panels on the 154,000-square-foot luxury inn was done by Southern Roof & Wood Care in Hardeeville, South Carolina. “It was a complicated job with three adjoining sections of the roof and lots of different elevations and planes and dormers. The flashing details were complex,” says David Swanson, president of SRWC.

Southern Roof & Wood Care has considerable experience with Petersen’s PAC-CLAD profiles. “We like Snap-Clad because it doesn’t require mechanical seaming. We use it whenever we can and when it meets the wind uplift requirements,” Swanson notes. “Of course, we also install a lot of Tite-Loc and Tite-Loc Plus, too. We like using the PAC-CLAD products and we can be competitive in the marketplace. We’re really happy with the Petersen relationship. They stand behind their products.”

The Snap-Clad panels were manufactured at Petersen’s plant in Acworth, Georgia. The general contractor was Choate Construction in Savannah, Georgia. The Petersen distributor was Commercial Roofing Specialties in Savannah, Georgia.

TEAM

Architect: HKS Architects, Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

General Contractor: Choate Construction, Savannah, www.choateco.com

Roofing Contractor: Southern Roof & Wood Care, Hardeeville, South Carolina, www.southernroof.com

Distributor: Commercial Roofing Specialties, Savannah, Georgia, www.crssupply.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Patrician Bronze, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Sealer Designed for Metal Roof Applications

Drop-Stop sealer was specifically designed for application to metal roofs and problem areas such as gutters, expansion joints, etc. Drop-Stop can easily be applied over sloped, contoured surfaces and will give long lasting, colorful protection, according to the company. Made from select synthetic rubbers, Drop-Stop is applied effortlessly as heavy bodied paints. This unique material actually stretches and recovers to bridge roof joints in which thermal movement can be expected. With 1500 PSI tensile strength and 600 percent elongation capabilities, Drop-Stop can single handedly tackle most metal repairs. White Drop-Stop is stocked in: 20 oz. sausage packs, 1 gallon pails, 5-gallon buckets and 55-gallon drums.

For more information, visit www.dynamicfastener.com.

Metal Roof and Wall Panels Add Sleek, Modern Look to New Medical Complex

The CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances Herrington-Ornelas HealthPark in Tyler, Texas, houses an urgent care clinic, medical offices, a physical therapy area and a fitness center. Photos Petersen.

When Brice Harris of Harris Craig Architects began designing a new health complex in Tyler, Texas, he knew his client wanted to maintain continuity with the company’s other medical facilities but at the same time update the look. The roof and wall panel systems became the key to meeting both design goals.

The standing seam metal roof and metal wall panel systems are now the signature architectural features of the CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances Herrington-Ornelas HealthPark. The new construction project encompasses some 43,000 square feet of space housing an urgent care clinic, medical offices, a physical therapy area and a fitness center.

The Design

Harris Craig primarily focuses on institutional projects, including schools. About a quarter of the firm’s work involves health care facilities. On this project, a merger while it was underway added a few wrinkles in the design process.

Crews from Tyler Roofing installed the metal wall panels, which included PAC-CLAD HWP panels and PAC-CLAD flush panels from Petersen, as well as Longboard Siding in Dark Cherry Wood Grain from Mayne Coatings Corp. Photos Petersen.

“The hospital system is CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances,” Harris notes. “When we began work on the project, it was for Trinity Mother Frances, and they partnered up with another hospital network, so part of the challenge on this job was switching the branding in the middle of the project. Luckily our overall design fit very well. The branding changes were more prominent on the inside of the building and didn’t have much effect on the exterior design.”

The property is strategically located at the intersection of two busy roads, and the highly visible site posed some concerns. “We really didn’t have a back of the building,” Harris explains. “The challenge of the design really was to efficiently present this building well both to the street and to the people who would be approaching it from the opposite side. That actually drove a lot of how the building form turned out, along with our desire to both help modernize the look of the clinic a little bit and to tie it back to some of the existing branding.”

The roof was designed to echo the other structures but uses different materials. “They share the prominent use of the gable on the building, but here we brought it forward into a contemporary design aesthetic,” Harris says.

For this project the design team specified a standing seam metal roof manufactured by Petersen that encompasses approximately 6,000 square feet. Low-slope roof sections over each wing were covered with 60-mil TPO roof system manufactured by GAF.

Wall panels were used to extend the sleek, modern look down to the ground, in contrast to the many brick buildings in the area. “We wanted to lighten up the look a little bit and bring in some new materials as part of the modernization,” Harris says. “We have composite panels, horizontal panels, and wood-look aluminum panels.”

Key concerns included making sure the various systems tied together perfectly. “The transition between the wall and roof is a very important detail for us,” Harris notes. “The most complicated areas for us on this project would be at the front of the building with the big glass windows and composite panels, and areas where the composite panel ties into the TPO roof and the metal panels. That was probably the trickiest part of the design.”

The Installation

Tyler Roofing was a natural fit for the project due to its established relationships with the architect and general contractor, WRL General Contractors, headquartered in Flint, Texas. “We do a lot of work in Tyler, and we’ve worked on a lot of Harris Craig projects,” says Tommy Ray Sukiennik, a 24-year veteran at the company, which was founded by his father and uncle 35 years ago. “We’re one of the competitive contractors in our area.”

Herrington-Ornelas HealthPark is located at a busy intersection and is visible from all sides, so the building was designed to present itself well to every vantage point. Photos Petersen.

The company’s share of metal roof and wall panel work is increasing, notes Sukiennik. “We’ve been doing standing seam roofs for more than 20 years. Lately we’ve been doing a lot of wall panels — Petersen HWP wall panels, flush mounts, things like that. As far as metal goes, we try to be diverse enough that we can install any system that comes out on the plans.”

Tyler Roofing installed the roof systems and wall panels on the project, along with gutters, soffits and trim. Work began with the fully adhered GAF EverGuard TPO roof system, which was installed over the metal deck, 4 inches of polyisocyanurate insulation and a half-inch cover board. The low-slope roofs over the wings house the HVAC units, but details involved were straightforward, notes Sukiennik. “It was all pretty basic,” he says. “At some points we had to tie in the TPO roof, the metal on the parapet wall, and the metal on the exterior wall all together.”

To dry in the gable roof, crews installed 4 inches of polyiso insulation and a self-adhering waterproofing underlayment. They also installed custom-fabricated gutters. “We built a gutter that hangs off the edge of the eave that a starter clip goes on top of, so it’s integrated into the roof,” Sukiennik notes.

The 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad roof panels in Champagne Metallic were delivered to the site. “We order all of the panels to length from Petersen,” Sukiennik says. “One of the plants is here in Tyler, and actually not far from the job, so it was very convenient. All of the rest of the trim, parapets, wall flashings and components we fabricated ourselves in the shop with metal they supplied.”

The roof panels were raised to the roof using a SkyTrak lift with specially built cradles. The wide-open jobsite and the flat roofs on either side of the gable made the roof area easily accessible. “It was just a straight run gable roof. There are no penetrations in the standing seam,” Sukiennik says. “The panels are easy to install. The Snap-Clad panels just pop together.”

The standing seam metal roof and metal wall panels were used to give the complex a modern look, while the prominent gable roof echoes the hospital system’s other facilities. Photos Petersen.

Tyler Roofing crews also installed the metal wall panels, which included 16-inch-wide, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD HWP panels in Dark Bronze from Petersen; 12-inch-wide, .032-inch aluminum PAC-CLAD flush panels from Petersen; and 6-inch-wide extruded Longboard Siding in Dark Cherry Wood Grain from Mayne Coatings Corp.

Wall panels were installed using scissor lifts and ladders. “We kept running a laser to make sure everything was horizontal and lined up,” says Sukiennik. “Then we finished it off with the trim and the cap. We tied everything into the expansion joints and trimmed it out so it was as clean as could be.”

The workload on this project was greater than usual, so skillfully managing the crews was important. “Usually we roof a building, and then we have to wait on the other contractors to do the brick and stucco on the exterior, and then we have to come back and trim it out and finish,” Sukiennik explains. “On this project, we did probably 70 percent of the exterior of the building, so we were working on the building continuously while we were doing other projects.”

The good news was that the crews had most of the work under their own control. “There were no issues of expecting someone else to make sure things were done the way we wanted them done. We tied everything in ourselves.”

Work was completed in the summer, so the heat was an issue. “When we put the wall panels on during July and August, it was pretty hot, so we had to work on one side of the building in the morning and then switch sides in the afternoon,” Sukiennik says, noting that his company is used to coping with extreme conditions. “In East Texas, we can have every type of weather there is within three days almost.”

Team Effort

Sukiennik credits WRL General Contractors for the well-coordinated jobsite. “We work on a lot of projects with the same contractors, so we all watch out for each other,” he says. “We do a good job of staying on top of things. We do a lot of work here, and this our family town, so we take pride in our work. We do the best we can.”

On the gable roof, Tyler Roofing installed 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad roof panels cut to length by Petersen. Tyler Roofing also fabricated and installed trim, parapet metal, wall flashings and gutters. Photos Petersen.

Comprehensive details and pre-production meetings ensured the installation was uneventful, according to Sukiennik. “The architect does a good job of making sure everything blends,” he says. “We usually don’t have issues with details and things like that. They try to make it as smooth as could be.”

During construction, members of the design and installation teams stayed in touch to make sure everything went according to plan. “This project was only about a mile from our office, so it was convenient to stop by, and it was a project we were really excited about,” Harris recalls. “We meet frequently with our installers to discuss details. We like to learn what works and what doesn’t work from the crews in the field. We want to listen to the wisdom of the guys who are out there actually doing the work.”

It’s all part of making sure the building owner is satisfied. “What we were excited about for this project was the opportunity to define a new look for CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances to help them match the quality of their facilities with the quality of care in Tyler and the region,” Harris says. “We see one of our strengths as building long-term relationships with our clients to give us the opportunity and trust to do that.”

TEAM

Architect: Harris Craig Architects Inc., Tyler, Texas, www.hcarch.com
General Contractor: WRL General Contractors, Flint, Texas, www.wrl-gc.com
Roofing Contractor: Tyler Roofing Company Inc., Tyler, Texas, www.tylerroofingco.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: 24-gauge, 18-inch PAC CLAD Snap-Clad Panels in Champagne Metallic, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com
TPO Roof Membrane: 60-mil EverGuard TPO, GAF, www.GAF.com
Metal Wall Panels: 24-gauge, 16-inch PAC-CLAD HWP panels in Dark Bronze, Petersen
Flush Panels: .032-inch, 12-inch Aluminum PAC-CLAD Flush Panels, Petersen
Wood Accent Panels: 6-inch Longboard Siding in Dark Cherry Wood Grain, Mayne Coatings Corp., www.longboardfacades.com

Standing Seam Metal Roof Is the Natural Choice for New Cottage in Wisconsin

A standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels was the natural choice to clad the roof of This new construction project in the North Woods of Wisconsin features a standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels. Photos: RHEINZINK

A standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels was the natural choice to clad the roof of a new cottage located in the North Woods of Wisconsin. Approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels met the owner’s criteria. “The multi-level roof was a key part of the design and we wanted it to blend into the environment as much as possible,” the owner says. “You won’t find another material that looks as natural and exquisite as RHEINZINK.”

The prePATINA blue-grey panels were fabricated by RHEINZINK systems partner Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois. The installation team was led by Lou Rondeau of Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire. Rondeau is an experienced zinc craftsman and instructor in fabrication techniques. He was assisted by Craig Hardin of Hardin Construction, Union Bridge, Maryland, and Chad Wolbert of W&W Construction, Williamsport, Maryland. The three men were on the job for five days. The general contractor on the project was Rod Flohr Construction, LLC, Tomahawk, Wisconsin.

“Rondeau did a fantastic job on the installation, including some beautiful detailing,” the owner says. He specifically mentioned the crescent seams at the eaves. “It’s a designer detail,” according to Rondeau. “Most guys will do a straight up and down 90-

Approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels were used to construct the roof. Photos: RHEINZINK

degree edge. But we like to spend a little extra time on the detailing and seaming. RHEINZINK can last a lifetime so it’s important to make the appearance as classic and timeless as possible. I really like working with the qualities and craftsmanship associated with it.”

Overall, the job was relatively straightforward, according to Rondeau. “The greatest challenge was getting to the site in the North Woods,” he says. “But the cottage turned out to be a real gem in that wilderness environment.”

TEAM

Metal Fabricator: Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois, www.sheetmetalsupplyltd.com
Roofing Contractors: Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire,
www.facebook.com/Natural-Metals-Associates-228362561021655/
Hardin Construction, Union Bridge, Maryland, hardinconstructionllc.com
W&W Construction, Williamsport, Maryland,
www.facebook.com/WW-Construction-LLC-430340303795069/

MATERIALS

Metal Panels: RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels in prePATINA blue-grey, RHEINZINK, www.rheinzink.us