ATAS International Hosts Architects During Anniversary Conference

ATAS International hosted members of the Society of American Registered Architects during their 60th anniversary conference in Arizona.  Over 35 SARA members attended an educational presentation and toured ATAS’ manufacturing facility in Mesa, earning learning units for both activities.  David Srokose, architectural business development manager at ATAS, presented on sustainable building envelopes, and Dick Bus, president of ATAS, led the plant tour, which was followed by lunch for the guests.
 
During the educational presentation, attendees learned how metal cladding on roofs and walls can contribute to green building objectives, and how metal walls can use sunlight to provide a building with solar air heating.  Cool roof technologies, including UV reflective pigments and above sheathing ventilation, were discussed, as well as how metal roofing can provide a solar ready platform for photovoltaic systems.
 
Dick Bus states, “We were pleased to welcome the SARA members to our Mesa, Ariz., facility while they were in the area for their annual conference.  The plant tour allowed our guests to view the equipment and processes used to fabricate metal components for the building envelope.  All attendees were invited to visit our Allentown, Pa., headquarters, if they are ever in the area.”

MBMA Releases EPDs for Primary Rigid Framing, Secondary Framing and Metal Cladding

In order to meet the increasing demand for unbiased data about the environmental impacts of commercial construction, the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has released Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for three metal building product categories: primary rigid framing, secondary framing, and metal cladding for roofs and walls.

MBMA partnered with UL Environment (ULE) to develop and certify these EPDs, which summarize the cradle-to-gate environmental impacts of a metal building system. The cradle-to-gate method is used to describe the impact of producing products, from raw material extraction, through processing, fabrication and up to the finished product leaving the manufacturing facility.

EPDs provide specifiers, builders and other industry professionals with transparent third-party documentation of the environmental impacts of products, including global warming potential, ozone depletion, acidification and other factors. The LEED V4 green building rating system encourages the use of EPDs, which are important for earning credits in the program.

MBMA has been studying the sustainable attributes of metal buildings for several years, starting with the collection of the industry’s LCI data, and using it to perform whole-building LCA analysis to compare its products to other forms of construction. Through these studies, MBMA has shown that the structural efficiency of metal building systems is a key contributor to their sustainable performance when compared to conventional construction.

“There is a growing need to simplify and harmonize the decision-making processes for architects and specifiers that must choose building materials for construction,” says Dan Walker, associate general manager of MBMA. “MBMA members are dedicated to educating others about the sustainable performance of metal building systems, and these EPDs will effectively do that for the design community.”

Metal building systems are custom-engineered and fabricated in accordance with strict quality assurance standards, and with almost no scrap generated. Designers are beginning to realize that the structural efficiency of this approach brings tangible benefits, from a sustainability and cost-savings perspective. The completion of these EPDs gives designers the confidence that they are making a wise choice from financial and environmental aspects.

MBMA’s EPDs can now be found on the UL Environment website.