Roofinox Expands Sales and Distribution of Products in the U.S.

Roofinox International, a European-based, 30-year-old manufacturer of metal roofing materials, has announced plans to expand sales and distribution of three key products in the U.S. through its subsidiary, Roofinox America Inc.

Products include Roofinox Classic, a brush-rolled material designed for roofing and wall cladding, Roofinox Plus .0157, a ribbed surface material for smoother roofing results and economy and Roofinox Terne-Coated with a tin-plated surface that develops a matt grey patina finish over time.

The announcement comes in response to an increasing demand for Roofinox products since 2012 when the only domestic manufacturer of terne-coated steel products went out of business.

“From then on we supplied to various projects all over the U.S. with increasing quantities every year,” notes Pascal Metzler, who with his brother, Marc, own the company. “In 2014 we decided to move to the U.S. by opening an office and warehouse from where we could service the increasing demand,” he notes. Meanwhile, sales in Europe were also continuing to grow with marketing and distribution to Poland, Russia, Slovenia and Sweden. The company also regularly supplied its unique products to various commercial projects in strong markets like Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia and Singapore. Last year, the company started selling the Roofinox product range in Turkey as well. And while Roofinox is currently examining business relations in several more countries, Metzler emphasizes the main efforts are now to grow market share in the U.S.

He notes the technology for his products date back to 1995 with the development of inoxidable (stainless) steel as a roofing material. The idea behind the product was to create a stainless steel specifically designed for roofing and roll-forming. “We found two major features that made it ideal for the application—mechanical properties and surface design with an architecturally distinctive matt finish for rollformed roofing panels. The product features within these two areas differentiated Roofinox from any other product in the roofing market, he contends and the success of Roofinox Classic and Roofinox tin-plated led to the development of several more products available today.

Architectural demand for Roofinox as a natural metal is very high, notes Metzler. “Aging is no problem for Roofinox because the surface is all natural and typically does not change over time.” In addition, he notes that Roofinox products achieve superior results for LEED-related construction and the sustainability of building products. “More and more building owners are looking into long-lasting and environmentally friendly products,” he notes. And there’s the issue of durability.

“Increasing weather extremes require more durable solutions for roofing and Roofinox stainless steel is the best solution for these environments because it was originally developed for Switzerland and Austria in a region known for challenging weather conditions.”

The current goal is to develop nationwide relationships with metal fabricators and installers who need a reliable source for quality architectural grade stainless steel and tin-plated materials the company offers.

Roofinox materials also offer growth potential to contractors who can now differentiate through specializing into more sophisticated work. “Some of the largest institutional building owners, such as the armed forces, school and education authorities, hospitals and churches, are specifying stainless steel for these reasons—it simply is a very high-quality roofing material,” Metzler notes.

One of the brothers’ first steps toward expansion has been the recruitment of David Rowe, a 28-year veteran of the metal roofing and wall panel industry, who has been named vice president-sales of Roofinox America Inc. Rowe joined Roofinox from Englert Inc., an American manufacturer of metal and aluminum roofing and wall panel coil, where he was director of product management responsible for the planning, development and introduction of all new products.

CENTRIA Releases Product Catalog for Architectural Metal Roof Products

CENTRIA releases its 2015 Product Catalog featuring enhanced photography of its wide range of architectural metal roof products.

CENTRIA releases its 2015 Product Catalog featuring enhanced photography of its wide range of architectural metal roof products.

CENTRIA releases its 2015 Product Catalog featuring enhanced photography of its wide range of architectural metal wall and roof products. As the new catalog illustrates, architects’ design options are endless with multiple profiles, metal substrates, coatings and colors.

“Our catalog continues to evolve along with our expanded product offerings. The images are larger, brighter and truly showcase the versatile styles we offer for each product,” says Julie Pawuk, manager of marketing communications at CENTRIA. “Our product options and other benefits are also easy to reference for architects who are considering metal for their next project.”

The updated 2015 catalog promotes CENTRIA’s popular line of products, including:

  • Intercept modular metal panel system – Introduced in 2014, this system is making its first appearance in the catalog. This modular metal panel system is a low-maintenance, economical way to design any façade.
  • Metalwrap insulated composite backup panels – This innovative backup panel system is spotlighted with even more in-depth content and imagery.
  • Formawall insulated metal panel system – As CENTRIA’s premier product line, Formawall Dimension Series and Graphix Series provide thermal efficiency and moisture control in a single panelized component.

METALCON Offers Education Sessions to Improve Techniques and Skills

For construction professionals in the field and those in the front office, METALCON 2015 has education sessions to improve their field techniques, management skills and business success. Each year METALCON attracts metal building, residential and roofing contractors, architects, engineers, developers, facility managers, fabricators and building owners from more than 52 countries who want to learn more about metal.

An impressive lineup of experts in metal, construction, leadership and business development will share their knowledge with these attendees at the 25th annual METALCON. This conference and exhibition takes place at the Tampa Convention Center in Tampa, Fla., from Wednesday, Oct. 14 through Friday, Oct. 16, 2015. It is the only event focused on the application of metal in residential, commercial, industrial, institutional and municipal construction.

Leading the group of experts at the 2015 METALCON is keynoter Clyde Fessler, retired vice president of business development for Harley-Davidson Motor Co. Fessler led the turnaround that brought the company back from the brink of disaster to its place as the leading motorcycle brand in the world. He will take attendees on an exciting journey of how he achieved this feat. He’ll share how the five P’s: People, Passion, Product, Price and Promotion can bring success to anyone in a competitive environment. His fascinating session takes place Wednesday, Oct. 14, from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m.

“We’re thrilled to have Clyde Fessler at METALCON. He has an amazing story to tell and his forward thinking philosophies fit perfectly with companies involved in our event. Since METALCON began in 1991, we have seen a continuous stream of product innovation and manufacturing development at this event. And the industry experts in the full conference program will add ideas about business development and field techniques to complete the cycle of knowledge,” notes Claire Kilcoyne, METALCON show manager.

Learning begins early at METALCON with special sessions on Tuesday, Oct. 13. General education programs run Wednesday through Friday mornings. The exhibit hall is open Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 14 and 15, from noon to 6 p.m., and Friday, Oct. 16, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The round-up of programs on field techniques starts with the popular STUD University on Tuesday and Wednesday. This combines classroom and hands-on workshops that offer an easy-to-understand, yet comprehensive exploration of framing with cold-formed steel.

Returning popular programs include: Understanding Metal Roofing, the Devil is in the Details, and Successful Flashings for Standing Seam Roofs. New offerings give attendees insight on the newest benefits of retrofit roofing; what chemicals in metal construction products might be dangerous; and how recent research findings prove metal roofing’s long-term value.

This year’s schedule has an extensive offering of business topics, such as dealing with emerging trends, legal issues, leadership techniques, and business succession strategies. Some specific management topics are:

  • Learn How to Think Like Your Clients
  • How to Win More Customers and Contracts
  • How to Compete on Value in Any Marketplace for Greater Profitability
  • Change Your Business Strategy to include Retrofit Metal Roofing
  • Get Your Business to Work for You! 7 Steps to Earning More, Work Less & Living the Life You Want
  • Developing Today’s Managers and Tomorrow’s Senior Executives.

A unique group of specialists come together in the comprehensive, two-part A/E/C Emerging Leaders Workshop: Developing the Best Project Managers into the Best Principals.

Residential roofing contractors will learn new strategies in the two-part program on the 12 Easy Steps to Closing More Sales of Residential Metal Roofing.

More specialty programs highlight the newest practices and equipment in roll forming for the metal construction industry; copper installation techniques and procedures; IAS accreditation and an AC478 workshop. For steel industry insiders the Focus on Steel Conference on Tuesday evening provides market intelligence and vital, targeted information that attendees can use in making thoughtful business decisions.

The education continues in the exhibit hall where attendees can learn about the latest products from the companies who make them. Attendees can also delve into a wide spectrum of topics at Learning Zones, mini-theaters located throughout the exhibit hall. These free 15-minute sessions focus on subjects such as roof details, field techniques and product applications.

Contractors can also apply their skills in the popular MCA Metal Roofing Championship Games. In this Battle by the Bay feature, contractors sign up each day to compete for $100 prizes in a number of different challenges. This year’s games will allow three individuals or teams of two people to compete in each of five games. The games will be held each of the three show days during exhibit hall hours. This year’s expanded game line up is:

  • Triangle Fastener’s Screw Gun Challenge (three individual competitors)
  • Roof Hugger’s Retrofit Challenge (three competing teams)
  • New Tech Machinery’s Standing Seam Install with DI Metal Works’ Panel Seaming Challenge (three competing teams)
  • The S-5 Snow Retention System Install Challenge (three competing teams)
  • Triangle Fastener’s “JJ’s Give it a Boot” Challenge (three individual competitors)

These games are great to watch and even better to participate in and win. Judges for the competition will be members of the local Florida chapter of the Metal Building Contractors and Erectors Association (MBCEA).

METALCON is sponsored by the Metal Construction Association and produced by PSMJ Resources Inc. It is supported by 60 participating associations and 20 media partners.

MBMA and the American Iron and Steel Institute Provide Faculty Fellowships

In a groundbreaking educational initiative, the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) is providing faculty fellowships in cooperation with the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). These awards will expedite development of a model program that partners the metal building industry with undergraduate engineering and architectural faculty and students. The fellowships will assist each selected faculty in developing a senior design class, referred to as a capstone course, with the focus on a metal building project.

Grant recipients are:

  • Dr. Justin Marshall – Auburn University
  • Dr. Ron Ziemian – Bucknell University
  • Dr. Mehdi Jalalpour – Cleveland State University
  • Dr. Michael Seek – Old Dominion University
  • Dr. John Cleary – University of South Alabama
  • Prof. Marci S. Uihlein – University of Illinois School of Architecture

“Even though metal buildings account for approximately half of all nonresidential low-rise construction in the U.S., most engineering/architecture students are not introduced to this form of construction as part of their formal education,” says W. Lee Shoemaker, Ph.D., P.E., MBMA’s director of research and engineering. “Our intent is to introduce metal building design and construction practices into the curriculum and foster an industry/academic partnership that provides real world experience for undergraduates.”

“This initiative has the ability to change our industry,” says MBMA Chairman, Tom Gilligan. “The more we educate future engineers, architects, contractors and planners, the more they will recognize the beneficial attributes of metal building systems techniques. As we train the next generation of designers, we can expect the industry to achieve even greater acceptance and market share.”

“MBMA will give the faculty who were awarded the fellowships the latitude to develop a program that works best considering their needs and resources,” says Shoemaker. “However, we are also interested in making the design experience as realistic as possible for the students. We would like this capstone to be more similar to a student’s first job, rather than their last college course.”

With regard to the engineering curriculum, Shoemaker stresses that appropriate standards and multiple realistic constraints within the capstone should prepare students for engineering practice in accordance with the expectations of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). “MBMA would like the model programs to address as many of the ABET Student Outcomes as possible,” he says.

ABET outcomes are:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • An ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context.
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning.
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

The selected university faculty will carry out the development of a capstone course at each of their schools in 2015-16, then make adjustments and improvements to the program based on their experiences. The final product will be a model capstone course program that is a combination of the best ideas created by the grant recipients. The final program will be made available to colleges and universities nationwide in 2017.

Mazzella Acquires New Tech Machinery to Enhance International Manufacturing Capabilities

Mazzella Companies has acquired New Tech Machinery (NTM) of Denver. New Tech Machinery is a manufacturer of portable rollforming equipment. To date, NTM has sold machines in more than 40 countries.

NTM manufactures quality portable rollforming equipment for the metal construction industry.

This acquisition adds to Mazzella’s diverse company portfolio. “It will enhance Mazzella Companies’ international manufacturing capabilities and further solidify our position in the architectural metal roof and wall industries.”

New Tech Machinery is based in Denver and has a manufacturing facility in Hermosillo, Mexico. New Tech employs approximately 80 people between both locations and has been in business since 1991.

MCA Study: Metal Roofing Market Sees Continued Growth

The market for metal products in the U.S. grew 4 percent annually during the past five years, according to an industry study released by the Metal Construction Association (MCA). This growth is significant because it occurred from 2009 through 2014, during the economic downturn when construction volumes declined and building owners and specifiers were particularly cost conscious.

The metal roofing market has seen even greater growth in both the residential and commercial sectors. In the residential market, use of metal roofing grew 7.1 percent in new construction and 4.1 percent in replacement roofing. In the commercial sector, metal roofing grew 9.7 percent in the five-year period. The industry also saw an 8.7 percent growth in metal wall panels in commercial building during this same time period.

“We are encouraged by this data because as the economy continues to improve and construction volumes further recover, we see even greater opportunities for growth in metal building materials,” says John Ryan, MCA’s director of marketing. “Metal meets the requirements of today’s builders from environmental responsibility to ease of construction to durability.”

MCA credits much of this growth to the metal industry’s efforts to educate the design community about the long-term value of metal roof and wall products. Key benefits of metal products over competitive materials include: energy efficiency and performance, LEED certification/green building, aesthetic appeal, life-cycle cost, durability, and speed of construction.

MCA joined together with five partner associations beginning in 2009 to compile the data for this industry study. The purpose was to create a custom market model using standard measures in order to track industry growth over time. Study participants included data from the key associations: The American Iron & Steel Institute (AISI), the Aluminum Association (AA), Metal Roofing Alliance, National Frame Building Association (NFBA) and the National Coil Coaters Association (NCCA).

S-5! Founder and CEO Receives Larry A. Swaney Award

S-5! founder and CEO, Rob Haddock, has been named the 2015 recipient of the prestigious Larry A. Swaney Award, which honors an individual in metal construction who selflessly fosters the growth and betterment of the industry.

S-5! Founder and CEO Rob Haddock has been named the 2015 recipient of the prestigious Larry A. Swaney Award, which honors an individual in metal construction who selflessly fosters the growth and betterment of the industry.

S-5! Founder and CEO Rob Haddock has been named the 2015 recipient of the Larry A. Swaney Award, which honors an individual in metal construction who selflessly fosters the growth and betterment of the industry. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) sponsors the annual award named after the organization’s first president and one of its founders.

The Swaney Award is bestowed at MCA’s Annual Meeting, held this earlier this year in Palm Springs, Calif. Recipients must exhibit generous commitment to the metal construction industry beyond personal gain, be involved in a leadership capacity, and have made significant contributions to the improvement of metal construction and its supporters.

“Rob has dedicated his professional career for the last 40 years to the advancement of metal roofing within the marketplace,” says S-5! Vice President Keith Lipps. “He has been an influential voice in the promotion, research, and technical advancement of the entire industry, and not just his own corporate product line. He has consulted to many major metal roofing suppliers, assisting them to advance their product lines, develop training programs, initiate technology transfers and more.”

Haddock is also a prolific author of dozens of articles, white papers and industry technical documents. His writings have been published in at least five languages, and he has lectured on metal roofing topics in a dozen countries. He is a generous philanthropist, donating his time, talents, and finances to numerous charitable endeavors around the globe.

“With his western hat, friendly smile, candid speak, and willing participation, Rob is one of the most recognizable personalities in the industry,” Lipps continues.

Rob Haddock began his career as a metal building erector before founding S-5! and becoming a sought-after metal roofing consultant, inventor (he holds more than 30 patents), speaker, and author. He serves as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Wisconsin School of Engineering, is the director of the Metal Roof Advisory Group Ltd., and pilots S-5!, which is a manufacturer of metal roof attachment systems. Haddock has been a Lifetime Honorary Member and advocate of MCA since 1985. He is also a member of CSI, MBMA, ASHRAE, ASCE and ASTM. In 2012 he was a charter inductee to the Metal Construction Hall of Fame.

At the award ceremony, Haddock made special thanks to his family in attendance: sons Dustin and Shawn, daughter Lara, and their spouses, Rebecca and Jessica Haddock and Shane Dunnam. In addition, Haddock expressed gratitude for his staff and the many MCA friends and peers present.

”I am both honored and humbled to receive such a distinguished award and be recognized among the esteemed previous winners, especially remembering that Larry Swaney was the guy who extended a hand of friendship to me and invited me to speak to the MCA group back in 1985,” Haddock says.

CENTRIA Launches Blog About Metal Building Products

CENTRIA launched its blog, The Reveal. With this new outlet, CENTRIA will utilize its expertise in exterior metal building products and services to provide key audiences—architects, building owners and contractors—with engaging, educational and relevant information.

“We’re very excited about The Reveal. It complements our content-rich website, nicely,” says Julie Pawuk, marketing communications manager. “The Reveal blog provides us an online forum and gives us yet another medium to reach architects and building professionals. Our goal is to elaborate and expound upon our technical expertise on exterior wall technology and building science.”

Posts on The Reveal are separated into several categories. The first section, dedicated to CENTRIA’s projects, includes eye-catching photos and narrative surrounding recent completed projects. Each project will feature a technical challenge or aspect that the build team encountered and overcame utilizing CENTRIA products and personnel. Readers will also find information about which CENTRIA products were used and which companies (architectural firms, contractors, etc.) were involved in the project.

The “Panel Discussion” section, written by CENTRIA’s product and technical experts, offers a behind-the-scenes look at CENTRIA’s product technology and focuses on the technological advancements that are solving today’s exterior building challenges.

The third section provides reader with past articles and expert columns from CENTRIA’s Metalmag magazine and e-newsletter publications, educating building owners, architects and contractors. Posts include product spotlights, in-depth case studies, and the latest industry news and trends.

EPDs Provide a New Level of Environmental Transparency to Building Products

The sustainability movement has impacted the building industry in many ways. Today’s architects, owners and occupants have much greater expectations for the environmental performance of the buildings they design, operate and dwell in. Part of this expectation is focused on the components that make up the building. For example, did the wood come from responsibly harvested forests? Is the metal made of recycled material? Do the paint and interior finishes contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs)?

An Environmental Product Declaration, or EPD, is developed by applying a Product Category Rule, or PCR. PCRs are developed, maintained and warehoused by program operators. Examples of program operators include ASTM, CSA, ICC-ES, Environdec and UL Environment. Program operators also verify that an EPD and its associated life-cycle assessment conform with ISO 14025 and the ISO 14040 series. PCR development is commonly a collaborative effort between industry associations, manufacturers, and/or others.

An EPD is developed by applying a Product Category Rule. PCRs are developed, maintained and warehoused by program operators. Examples of program operators include ASTM, CSA, ICC-ES, Environdec and UL Environment. Program operators also verify that an EPD and its associated life-cycle assessment conform with ISO 14025 and the ISO 14040 series. PCR development is commonly a collaborative effort between industry associations, manufacturers, and/or others. IMAGE: Quantis US

Information technology has encouraged and facilitated this increased demand for in-depth data about building components and systems. People have become accustomed to being able to gather exhaustive information about the products they buy through extensive labeling or online research.

In response to the growing demand for environmental product information, building component manufacturers have begun rolling out environmental product declarations, or EPDs.

It’s a term now commonly heard, but what are they? EPDs are often spoken in the same breath as things like LCA (life-cycle assessment), PCRs (product category rules) and many other TLAs (three-letter acronyms). The fact is they are all related and are part of an ongoing effort to provide as much transparency as possible about what goes into the products that go in and on a building.

“An EPD is a specific document that informs the reader about the environmental performance of a product,” explains Sarah Mandlebaum, life-cycle analyst with Quantis US, the Boston-based branch of the global sustainability consulting firm Quantis. “It balances the need for credible and thorough information with the need to make such information reasonably understandable. The information provided in the document is based on a life-cycle assessment, or LCA, of the product, which documents the environmental impacts of that product from ‘cradle to grave.’ This includes impacts from material production, manufacturing, transportation, use and disposal of the product. An EPD is simply a standardized way of communicating the outcomes of such an assessment.”

The concept of product LCAs has been around for some time and has often been looked at as a way of determining the sustainability of a particular product by establishing the full scope of its environmental footprint. The basic idea is to closely catalog everything that goes into a product throughout its entire life. That means the energy, raw materials, and emissions associated with sourcing its materials, manufacturing it, transporting it, installing it and, ultimately, removing and disposing of it. In the end, an LCA results in a dizzying amount of data that can be difficult to translate or put in any context. EPDs are one way to help provide context and help put LCA data to use.

“The summary of environmental impact data in the form of an EPD can be analogous to a nutrition label on food,” says Scott Kriner, LEED AP, technical director of the Metal Construction Association (MCA), Chicago. “There is plenty of information on the label, but the information itself is meaningless unless one is focused on one area. An LCA determines the water, energy and waste involved in the extraction of raw materials, the manufacturing process, the transportation to a job site and the reclamation of waste at the end of the useful life of a product. With that data in hand, the various environmental impact categories can be determined and an EPD can be developed to summarize the environmental impact information.”

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Galvalume-coated Metal Roofs Will Last at Least 60 Years with Minimal Component Repair

The term “infrastructure sustainability” continues to gain importance because of rapidly increasing building infrastructure components around the country needing major repairs and/ or replacements. Consequently, roof maintenance or replacement materials and methods must last at least 60 years; consider LEED v4 from the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council. For more than 30 years, millions of square feet of Galvalume-coated roofs have resisted the atmospheric conditions to which they are exposed with little or no maintenance and are well prepared to continue protecting building interiors for more than 30 additional years. Material science and professional project engineering and installation prove Galvalume-coated metal standing-seam roofs will perform for that period of time.

This is a nine-year-old painted Galvalume roof in Alabama.

This is a nine-year-old painted Galvalume roof in Alabama.

MATERIAL SCIENCE

The first standing-seam metal roof was introduced by Armco Steel Corp., Middletown, Ohio, at the 1932 World’s Fair in Chicago. Armco Steel ceased doing business many years ago, but its standing-seam metal roof design has been adopted by all manufacturers in today’s commercial metal roofing market. The second longest-lasting introduction into this market was in the early 1970s when Bethlehem, Pa.-based Bethlehem Steel introduced a Zinc/Aluminum coating—now known as Galvalume—for carbon-steel metal roofs. This coating, applied to both sides of the steel coil, has been successfully used for the majority of metal standing-seam roofs ever since.

Since Galvalume was introduced, there have been several evaluations, reports and predictions as to how this product would “weather” the test of time. In 2012, the Chicago-based Metal Construction Association (MCA) and Olympia, Wash.-based Zinc Aluminum Coaters Association (ZAC) commissioned a study to perform forensic tests at 14 existing Galvalume standing-seam metal roof sites throughout the country in varying climates and precipitation pH. The average age of these roofs was more than 30 years at the time of testing.

Initially, the sites were selected based on temperature and humidity zones throughout the U.S. As the field results were processed, however, it became apparent the expected lives of these roofs were directly dependent on the precipitation pH levels with very little correlation to temperature and humidity. The building sites chosen were located in the following states:

  • Massachusetts (2 sites)
    This Galvalume roof in Missouri is nine years old.

    This Galvalume roof in Missouri is nine-years old.


    Ohio (3 sites)
    South Carolina (2 sites)
    Georgia (1 site)
    Colorado (1 site)
    New Mexico (1 site)
    Arizona (1 site)
    Oregon (1 site)
    Wyoming (2 sites)

The study was directed by MCA and three independent consultants and their firms, which managed and performed the field work: Rob Haddock of Metal Roof Advisory Group, Colorado Springs, Colo.; Ron Dutton of Ron Dutton Consulting Services LLC, Annapolis, Md.; and me and my firm Metal Roof Consultants Inc., Cary, N.C. This group, plus Scott Kriner, MCA’s technical director, authored the actual report, which was issued by MCA and ZAC in November 2014 and is available online.

The team harvested and analyzed actual field samples of Galvalume-coated metal standing-seam roof panel materials and sealants and examined all the individual roofs’ ancillary components. Finally, it created an experienced assessment of the roofs’ conditions and associated costs to replace.

PHOTOS: METAL ROOF CONSULTANTS INC.

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