Regular Roof Inspections Help ‘Keep the Door Open’

A roof inspector makes field observations. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

Regular roof inspections give consultants and contractors a chance to maintain relationships with building owners and managers and create value beyond any immediate repairs.

Commercial roofs should be inspected at least twice a year, typically in the spring and fall. Roof inspections are also advised after major weather events, though contractors may already be deluged with repair requests. Of course, building managers will be more receptive to discussing regular inspections during such times, even though time is short. A service flyer and readily available letter-of-agreement can help quickly close the deal, and be used after any major job throughout the year to create recurring business. Customers should clearly understand the service offer and any special provisions for emergency repairs or exceptions such as during wider emergencies.

Common Sources of Roof Leaks

  • Cracks in or around flashings and penetrations
  • Breaks in and around gutterways and drains
  • Poor drainage or debris-clogged drainage systems
  • Storm damage, tree branches, ice dams, etc.
  • Incidental damage by other trades during construction or maintenance
  • Excessive foot traffic at rooftop access points and around HVAC units and other rooftop infrastructure
  • Old or deteriorating roofing materials

While roof leaks can be caused in several ways, many common sources of leaks can be prevented with liquid-applied coating and membrane systems that fully adhere to substrates and are both self-terminating and self-flashing. Membrane systems are fully reinforced and create a seamless surface. High-quality systems are designed to withstand ponding water, ice, snow, UV light, as well as most chemicals. Unreinforced roof coatings can be used for repairs or complete restoration of the roof surface.

If only a small area is damaged, a limited repair is best, and usually possible with compatible materials over an existing system in good condition.Check if a warranty is in place, and if possible contact the manufacturer before the repair. Perform any repairs within the guidelines of the warranty.

For wider areas, a roof recovery is often possible right over the existing roofing. If interior leaks from a field area are evident, core samples can verify the condition of the existing roof assembly down to the deck. Built-up roofs (BUR), in particular, are susceptible to sun and temperature cycling. Tiny spider cracks and micropores can develop in the surface, and the layers below can absorb moisture and deteriorate. Water always travels to its lowest point and, if left unchecked, will damage the underlying structure.

On low-slope roofs, areas of ponding water are a prime target for inspections. If the roof is covered by aggregate or overburden, it must be cleared from around the lowest point of any low-lying areas, and other areas of suspected damage. A visual inspection can locate the source of an active leak, but there may be more than one source or a larger issue that may not always be visible. Broader sampling is needed to evaluate the general condition of the roof and the scope of any deterioration.

Quality workmanship and materials help avoid callbacks and ensure long-term relationships. After completing any necessary repairs, a PMMA, polyurethane or elastomeric membrane or coatings system can be installed to extend the service life of an existing roof. Elastomeric-based coatings are generally the best value for straightforward repairs and can be ideal for recovering metal roofs. Roof restoration, in general, can enhance building performance with “Cool Roof” products, especially those with a high solar reflectance index (SRI).

At the end of the day, an ounce of prevention and a prompt response to issues can help building owners avoid expensive headaches. People remember expert advice and quality service, especially in times of need. They also may tell others — which is another way regular inspections can help keep the door open to recurring business.

Contractor Conquers Tough Weather, Tight Schedule

The roof on the new Goodman Logistics Center (the building on the right) encompasses more than 1 million square feet. The roof system installation met an aggressive timeline that spanned the winter months. Photo: Goodman Carlisle LLC

Goodman, an international commercial and industrial property group, approached Donald B. Smith Inc. of DBS Roofing in November 2017 to support the roofing of the company’s new Logistics Center in central Pennsylvania.

Founded in 1948, DBS Roofing is a second-generation, privately held company whose principles of quality and workmanship have earned the team countless awards. Among those honors include the Firestone Master Contractor recognition, the Baltimore Builder’s Exchange “Craftsman of the Year Award” and numerous industry publication recognitions for notable projects.

The Logistics Center roof was 1,010,000 square feet and was established on a very aggressive timeline that spanned through the tough Northeast winter months. The initial specifications of the job called for a mechanically fastened TPO roof system, which was going to be challenging with the size and timeline of the project. Additionally, the condensation levels in central Pennsylvania are not ideal for mechanically fastened solutions, as it would require applying a vapor barrier and foam around all perimeters, exceeding the original budget and schedule.

To save time and keep the project moving forward during the unfavorable winter conditions, DBS Roofing elected to use one of the company’s favorite “box world” solutions — Firestone Building Products (FSBP) UltraPly TPO SA with Secure Bond Technology.

Photo: Goodman Carlisle LLC

The TPO roofing system is comprised of a self-adhering membrane with factory applied, pressure sensitive adhesive and technology designed to ensure uniform adhesion coverage across the entire membrane. According to the manufacturer, the system can be installed in weather as cold as 20 degrees Fahrenheit.

“Commercial roofing in central Pennsylvania can be very challenging during the winter season, but Firestone UltraPly TPO SA allows our business to continue working through those conditions and prosper,” says Donnie Sanders, president of construction, DBS Roofing. “Being able to apply the Firestone TPO SA at 20 degrees resulted in a successful year for us.”

The Goodman Logistics Center roofing project began on November 1, 2017 and was completed on time March 1, 2018.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Donald B. Smith Roofing Inc., Hanover, Pennsylvania, www.dbsroofing.com
General Contractor: ARCO Design/Build Northeast, King Of Prussia, Pennsylvania, http://arcodbi.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: UltraPly TPO SA with Secure Bond Technology, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com
Insulation: 2.5-inch ISO, Firestone Building Products

Commercial Roofing Contractor Flexes Its Muscles on 1.3 Million-Square-Foot Project

The new Under Armour distribution warehouse roof encompasses 1,286,000 square feet. It was topped with a TPO roof system manufactured by Johns Manville. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

Industrial projects exceeding one million square feet of roofing might give some contractors pause, but at Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc., it’s just another day at the office.

The third-generation family run roofing contractor has been in business since 1953. Orndorff & Spaid services the Baltimore-Washington metro area, as well as parts of Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. It focuses primarily on large-scale commercial projects, including warehouses, distribution centers, retail businesses, schools and data centers.

Orndorff & Spaid routinely tackles roofing projects up to 1.5 million square feet. The company strives to keep as much work as possible under its own control, and the necessary supplies and equipment are always on hand at its 13-acre headquarters in Beltsville, Maryland.

“We’re a little bit unique as a roofing company in that we self-perform almost everything,” says Richard Harville, vice president of estimating. “We have our own cranes, all our own lifts. We do our own trucking. We have an in-house mechanic’s shop that repairs all of the equipment. All fuel servicing is done from our yard here. We also warehouse a fair share of material here because the logistics of running a job.”

Photo: Johns Manville

A recent new construction project at the former location of a Bethlehem Steel factory in Tradepoint St. John’s was right up their alley. “This was a new construction project, fairly conventional in most regards except for one, and that had to do with the site,” notes Harville. “Most of the site had been infilled over the years, and there was a lot of slag and other materials on this site, so it is not bedrock, for sure.” Due to the potential for movement, seismic expansion joints were specified. The gaps in the deck were as wide as 9 inches.

The owner of the complex was kept under wraps during construction phase, but the completed Under Armour distribution warehouse is now an area landmark. The roof encompasses 1,286,000 square feet, and the project had to be completed under a very tight schedule.

The general contractor on the project, FCL, reached out to Orndorff & Spaid during the design phase, and they recommended a TPO roof system manufactured by Johns Manville.

Harville shared his insights on the project with Roofing, along with members of the project team including Dane Grudzien, estimator; Carl Spraker, project manager, single ply; and Mike McKinney, project manager, sheet metal.

The Clock Is Ticking

Work began in April 2017 with a deadline to finish by the end of July. “The schedule was what made this project difficult,” notes Harville. “They had an end user set to come in and they were in an extreme hurry to get this thing done.”

Workers outside the safety perimeter were tied off 100 percent of the time using AES Raptor TriRex Safety Carts. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

Harville and Spraker were confident the experienced team would be up to the task. “Once we got our bearings, we rock and rolled this job,” Spraker says. “We had up to 40 employees on the site and worked six days a week.”

The roof system installed over the structure’s metal deck included two layers of 2.5-inch polyiso and a 60-mil TPO membrane. “This job was mechanically attached at 6 inches on center, with perimeter and corner enhancements as required by FM,” notes Grudzien.

The roof installation began with a 10-man crew, and crews were added as the work ramped up. “We ended up with four 10-man crews, with the foreman on the first crew in charge the team,” Spraker recalls. “We just did as much as we could every day and kept track of everything. We averaged 700 squares a day. One day we did 1,000 squares.”

Crews worked on half of the building at a time, with falling back as needed to install flashings or strip in the gravel stop. “We started on one side of the building and went from end to end, following the steel contractor,” says Spraker. “When we finished one side, we came all the way back to the end where they started and followed them down the opposite side.”

The roof system incorporates 276 VELUX skylights that provide daylighting in key areas of the facility. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

The roof also incorporated 276 VELUX skylights to illuminate key areas of the facility. Logistics Lighting delivered them all in one shipment, as Orndorff & Spaid requested. The 4-foot-by-8-foot skylights were stored on site and loaded to the roof with a crane for installation after a plasma cutter was used to cut holes in the deck. Prefabricated curbs were installed and flashed. “I had a separate crew designated just to install skylights,” Spraker notes

Safety precautions included perimeter warning lines, and workers outside that area were tied off 100 percent of the time, as they were when the skylights were installed. AES Raptor TriRex Safety Carts were used as anchor points.

Safety is always crucial, notes Harville, and the company makes it a priority on every project. “Our safety parameters go above and beyond standard state or federal mandating,” he notes.

Metal Work

The scope of work included large external gutters, downspouts and edge metal. According to McKinney, the sheet metal application was pretty straightforward. “There was just a lot of it — long, straight runs down two sides,” he says. “The coping was installed on the parapets on the shorter ends.”

Gutters were installed after the roof system was in place. “The roof wasn’t 100 percent complete, but once areas of the roof were installed and the walls were painted white, we could begin to install the gutters,” says McKinney. “After work was completed on one side, crews moved to the other side.”

The large gutter featured internal and external hangers, alternating 36 inches on center. All the metal was fabricated in house, and the exterior hangers were powder coated to match the steel.

Once the external hangers were installed, the gutter sections were lowered into place and secured by crew members in a man lift. “Once you had your hangers up, you could just lower the gutter over the side and into the external hangers,” McKinney explains. “We put the internal hangers into place after that. After the drip edge is installed, the single-ply crews come back and flash the drip edge into the roof system.”

Downspouts were custom-designed to match the building’s paint scheme. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

Installation of the downspouts had to wait until the walls were painted. One wrinkle was the change in color of the downspouts. About two-thirds of the way up the wall, the paint scheme went from black to white, and the building owner wanted the downspouts to change colors to match. “We reverse-engineered it,” notes McKinney. “We measured from the paint line up and put in a 30-foot section of downspouts there, because we put our bands at the joints and we didn’t want to have the bands too close together in the middle of the wall.”

Talented Team

The project was completed on budget — and a month early. FCL hosted a barbecue to celebrate. “FCL had a big cookout for the contractors with a steak dinner for everyone,” notes Harville. “They really went over and above on that.”

The Orndorff & Spaid team credits the effort of all companies involved for the success of the project. “The steel contractor was phenomenal, and FCL did an excellent job of coordinating everything,” Spraker says.

The large gutter featured internal and external hangers. Photo: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc.

The manufacturer also did an excellent job, notes Harville, who commended the work of Melissa Duvall, the JM sales rep on the project, and Barney Conway, the field rep, who visited the site at least once a week. “JM did a good job keeping us well stocked with material and getting us deliveries when we needed them,” Harville notes.

The team members at Orndorff & Spaid believe their confidence comes from experience and knowing that most of the variables are under control. “A lot of that has to do with the equipment we can bring to bear when we need to,” Harville states. “We control the logistics all the way through. Most companies are going to rent a crane or hire trucking — we do all of that. We have our own lifts, we have our own cranes, we do all of our flatbed trucking. We bring a unique process to the table. Beyond that, and our project managers are well versed at doing this. It’s not our first rodeo.”

TEAM

Architect: MacGregor Associates Architects, Atlanta, www.macgregorassoc.com
General Contractor: FCL Builders, Chicago, www.fclbuilders.com
Roofing Contractor: Orndorff & Spaid Roofing Inc., Beltsville, Maryland, www.osroofing.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 60-mil TPO, Johns Manville, www.jm.com
Insulation: Two layers of 2.5-inch ENRGY 3 Polyisocyanurate, Johns Manville
Skylights: Dynamic Dome Skylights Model 4896, VELUX, www.veluxusa.com

Ponding Water Basics: Proper Drainage Design and Low-Slope Roofs

Roofing professionals install a new asphalt roof on the Broward County Stephen Booher Building in Coral Springs, Florida. Photo: Advanced Roofing Inc.

A low-slope asphalt roofing system is cost effective, durable and reliable. Multiple layers of weatherproof membranes protect a building, its residents and the property it houses. There are a few design elements that will help building owners get the most from their roofing system. Managing ponding water is essential to properly maintaining a roof.

Ponding water is defined as the water which remains on a roof 48 hours or longer. Water may accumulate on a low-slope roof due to rain, snow or runoff from rooftop equipment. Ponding water can have major negative consequences, regardless of the type of roofing system. Proper design, installation and maintenance of roofing structures can prevent this condition and its associated problems.

The adverse effects of ponding water on roofs can include:

  • Deformation of the deck structure:Ponding water can substantially increase the load on roof decks. As water accumulates, deck deflections can increase, thereby resulting in additional ponding water, which could compromise the structural integrity of the deck.
  • Damage to the roof surface:Ice formations develop and move constantly with changes in temperature. This movement can “scrub” the roof membrane to such an extent that considerable physical damage to the membrane can occur.
  • Growth of algae and vegetation:When water stands for long periods of time, algae and vegetation growth will likely occur, and may cause damage to the roof membrane. Additionally, vegetation can clog drains and cause additional ponding.
  • Accumulation of dirt and debris in the ponding area:Dirt, debris, and other contaminants can affect and damage the membrane surface. The can also lead to clogged drains.

Proper design and installation are crucial factors in roof system performance. This photo shows an Atactic Polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane being applied by torch to a low-slope roof. Photo: ARMA

Ponding water may lead to accelerated erosion and deterioration of the membrane surface that can result in failure of the roof system. Allowing even relatively small amounts of moisture beneath the roof membrane may reduce the thermal efficiency of the insulation. More importantly, moisture intrusion can cause serious damage to the deck, insulation, and membrane as well as the building’s interior.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recommends that roof designs provide adequate slope (minimum of ¼ inch per foot) to ensure that the roof drains freely throughout the life of the building and to thereby avoid the effects of ponding water. Model building codes also require a minimum ¼ inch per foot slope for new construction projects, and require positive drainage for re-roofing projects. These requirements are intended to prevent water from ponding on roof surfaces.

Managing Ponding Water

Here are a few best practices to manage ponding water:

  • Adequate sloping should be taken into account during the design process. A roof’s structural frame or deck should be sloped, and drainage components like roof drains and scuppers should be included in the design.
  • In addition, secondary (or emergency) drains may be required by local plumbing codes to help reduce the risk of a structural failure due to clogged drainage systems. Talk to your roof membrane manufacturer and/or roof system designer to determine the proper location of these components.
  • If a deck does not provide the necessary slope to drain, a tapered insulation system can be used. A combination of different approaches — single slope, two-way slope, and four-way slope — is often used to achieve the necessary slope and to allow for moisture drainage.
  • Additionally, crickets installed upslope of rooftop equipment and saddles positioned along a low-point between drains, can help prevent localized ponding in conjunction with a tapered insulation system.
  • Building designers and owners should work with contractors and roof manufacturers to determine which methods are best and appropriate for a roof assembly’s long-term performance, whether it’s a new construction or re-roof project.

The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015, states the following: “NRCA recommends that designers make provisions in their roof designs for positive slope.”

The manual spells out that slope generally is provided by:

  • Sloping the structural framing or roof deck
  • Designing a tapered insulation system
  • Proper location of roof drains, scuppers and gutters
  • A combination of the above

By following the proper drainage practices detailed above, building owners can positively impact their low-slope roofing system and help to ensure it will remain durable and reliable throughout its service life.

To obtain specific information about ponding water on particular products and systems, contact your roof material manufacturer. For more information about low-slope asphalt roofing systems, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

Roof Restoration Project Brings Back Luster to Quicken Loans Arena

The 170,000-square-foot roof of Quicken Loans Arena was completely restored using a liquid-applied system from Tremco Roofing. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

Re-roofing sports and entertainment venues presents its own set of challenges. Sports arenas usually host concerts and other events, so scheduling and logistics can be difficult. Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland — also known as “The Q” — is home to the Cleveland Cavaliers of the NBA, and it hosts some 200 other diverse events every year, including concerts and conventions. In 2015, realizing the roof was reaching the end of its useful life, the owners looked for advice on their next move. A team of roofing professionals recommended a roof restoration system that would provide the protection and recreate the aesthetics of the original roof — and keep disruption to the facility at a minimum.

Ohio companies stepping up to help the home team included architect Osborn Engineering, headquartered in Cleveland; roof consultant Adam Bradley Enterprises of Chagrin Falls; roofing manufacturer Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance, headquartered in Beachwood; and roofing contractor Warren Roofing & Insulating Co., located in Walton Hills. After comprehensive testing revealed that more than 90 percent of the roof could be restored, they developed a plan to clean, repair and completely restore the 170,000-square-foot main roof of Quicken Loans Arena using a liquid-applied system from Tremco Roofing.

John Vetrovsky of Warren Roofing and Joe Slattery of Tremco Roofing shared their insights on the project with Roofing magazine. Both men were brought in during the planning stages of the project and saw it through to completion. “We were helping to budget the project with Adam Bradley and Osborn Engineering,” notes Vetrovsky. “They were asking about a few different systems, and the Tremco system was the best fit for the project.”

Warren Roofing has served the greater Cleveland and Akron area since 1922, and Tremco’s roots in northeast Ohio go back to 1928. Warren Roofing served as the general contractor and roofing contractor on the project. The scope of work included updates to the lightning protection system, the safety cable system, and the heat trace system used to melt snow in the gutters.

Repairing the Existing Roof

The existing system was the structure’s original roof. It was 24 years old, and consisted of a mechanically attached hypalon membrane over two layers of polyisocyanurate insulation totaling 3 inches. The roof membrane was showing some wear, and sections had sustained damage from an interesting source: fireworks from nearby Progressive Field, home of the Cleveland Indians, launched after the Indians hit home runs. After the damage was detected, the team changed the direction the fireworks were launched, and the problem ended.

Crews from Tremco Roofing cleaned the roof using the company’s RoofTec system, which recaptures the water and returns it to a truck to be filtered. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

Despite the damage, visual analysis and a nuclear roof moisture test using a Troxler meter confirmed the roof was an excellent candidate for restoration. “There was some wet insulation and warped insulation, and we marked off those areas that had to be replaced,” notes Slattery. “It was a small fraction of the total job.”

Crews from Warren Roofing removed and replaced the damaged insulation, cutting through the membrane all the way down to the existing 6-mil vapor barrier on the deck. “All of that insulation had to be stair-stepped back so we could properly lap in the new material,” Vetrovsky says. “We got rid of all of the damaged insulation, and we repaired the vapor barrier. Then we staggered the two new layers of insulation, matching the existing thickness.”

Where possible, the existing membrane was pulled back and glued into place. In sections where new membrane was needed, crews adhered pieces of EPDM.

The plan specified adding the fasteners in the existing roof and any repaired sections before the coating system was applied. Tremco Roofing conducted uplift testing through Trinity ERD to ensure the results met or exceeded the specified design. “There was a significant upgrade to the fastening,” Vetrovsky says. “Because of the shape of the building, the perimeter enhancement was probably the greatest I’ve ever seen.”

Screws and 3-inch plates were used. In the field, the minimum was 4 feet on center, 12 inches apart. In the perimeter, fasteners were installed 2 feet on center, 8 inches apart. “It worked out nicely because the fastening ended up in the middle of the sheet, and now the sheet has fasteners that are original at the seam, and a foot or two over, there is a row of new fasteners,” notes Vetrovsky.

Cleaning Up

Prior to the fasteners being installed, the membrane was cleaned by crews from Tremco Roofing using the company’s RoofTec system. “We cleaned the membrane no more than 30 days ahead of what Warren Roofing was doing,” notes Slattery. “We had to mobilize at least three times to clean the roof so the time elapsed would never be more than 30 days.”

The three-step restoration process consists of a primer, a base coat with a fiberglass mat embedded in it, and a topcoat. Here, crews embed the fiberglass mat in the base coat. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

The cleaning solution is applied using a custom-designed tool that looks like a floor polisher. It has a 2-foot diameter head that spins to clean the surface and a vacuum that recaptures the water, which is returned via hoses to a truck so contaminated waste water, environmental pollutants and high-pH cleaning solvents can be filtered out. “All of that water goes back into the sanitary system after it’s filtered,” Slattery explains. “It does not go into the sewer system.”

“It’s very fast, it’s very effective, and it’s very efficient because you can easily see the areas that have been cleaned,” notes Vetrovsky. “With power washing, you don’t have any way to filter the water.”

The biggest challenge on the cleaning portion of the project was the arena’s sheer size. Approximately 500 feet of hoses were needed to supply water and return it to the truck for filtering.

Cleaning of the substrate is a crucial step, according to Vetrovsky. “The system really does a nice job cleaning the membrane, and that is the key to any restoration project,” he says. “You’re only as good as the surface you’re applying it to.”

Applying the New Roof System

After the sections were cleaned, crews installed the liquid-applied AlphaGuard MT system. The three-step process consists of a primer, a base coat with a fiberglass mat embedded in it, and a topcoat. In this case, the primer was applied with rollers. “The area that we primed each morning was the section we would apply the first coat of AlphaGuard MT with the fiberglass mat that afternoon,” Vetrovsky says. “We did not prime ahead. We didn’t want to take the chance of dust adhering to the primer.”

The top coat was applied with both rollers and spray equipment. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

Care had to be taken with the schedule to complete the work efficiently. “Once the base coat is on, you have 72 hours to apply the top coat,” Vetrovsky explains. “We would install the base coat and the fiberglass mat for two to three days to get a big enough area. The topcoat would go on faster because you’re not embedding any mesh into it. You really had to always keep an eye on the future weather to make sure you could get the topcoat on within the 72 hours.”

The topcoat was applied with both rollers and spray equipment. After the topcoat was applied, crews installed a second coat with sand embedded in it as a wear surface. Because of the roof’s curved surface, walk pads were not feasible, so the sand was used to provide additional traction for any workers conducting ongoing maintenance.

The sand was broadcast by hand and back-rolled into the coating to maintain a uniform appearance. “Part of this project was to make sure the sand looks uniform when it is visible from a blimp overhead,” notes Vetrovsky. “That was a difficult task, but the guys did a great job.”

The roof features three different finish colors, which were custom designed to match the roof’s original color scheme. The main roof is light gray, with black under the large LED sign. The sections over the wings are white, as are the 2-foot-wide stripes.

“They wanted black under the new LED sign so it would really show the letters nice and clear, even during the day,” says Vetrovsky. “We also put the white stripes back to match the roof’s original appearance. That was a challenge, to keep everything straight. It’s hard to chalk lines on a curve, but it came out nice. Everything matches what the original roof looks like.”

Penetrations for the sign included round posts that held the rails about 2-1/2 feet above the roof level. The liquid-applied membrane made coping with details easy, according to Vetrovsky. “The liquid membrane makes the flashing details all one piece with the roof system,” he says. “We removed the existing boot flashings so that we could seal directly to the conduit or steel posts.”

Gutters, Lightning Protection and Safety Systems

The large commercial gutters also needed to be refurbished. The gutters were 4 feet deep and 4 feet wide, and were outfitted with a cable snowmelt system, which had to be removed. “The gutters had a lot of damaged insulation, so material in the gutter sections was 100 percent torn off,” notes Vetrovsky.

After the roof surface was cleaned, the restoration system was applied. The three step process consists of a primer, a base coat with a fiberglass mat embedded in it, and a topcoat. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

In the gutters, tapered insulation was installed, and a cover board — DensDeck from Georgia-Pacific — was added for increased durability. New EPDM membrane was installed and cleaned prior to the three-step coating application. New heat trace cable was also installed.

The lightning protection system also required repair, and close coordination with the subcontractors was critical. “The existing lightning protection had to be removed to apply the new roof system, but we couldn’t remove it 100 percent, because we still had to have an active lightning protection system for the building,” says Vetrovsky. “We rearranged the lightning system and installed new stanchions to try to eliminate as many horizontal lines as we could.”

During construction, key to the safety plan was a perimeter barrier system, which was installed by workers who were 100 percent tied off. After the system was in place, workers inside the barricades did not need to wear personal fall arrest systems. “The entire perimeter had a barricade system put on before any material was even loaded,” Vetrovsky says. The company makes its own barricade sections, which are anchored to the parapet walls and gravel stop edges and feature a downward leg for added support.

As part of the project, crews also installed permanent safety equipment. “There was an existing tie-off system out there, but it was not a certified system and we couldn’t use it,” Vetrovsky says. “We brought that to the owner’s attention and replaced it with a new certified tie-off system manufactured by Guardian Safety.”

Challenging Schedule

Progressive Field and the Quicken Loans Arena are right next to each other, and logistics and scheduling around the stadiums was difficult. Work began in 2016 and finished in 2017, and the demanding schedule was made even more difficult when both the Indians and the Cavaliers made deep runs into the playoffs. In 2016, the Cavs became NBA Champions. But it was the Indians making it to the 2016 World Series that posed bigger logistical problems for the re-roofing project.

The restored roof recreates the original color scheme, which features three different custom colors. The main roof is light gray, with black under the large LED sign, while the sections over the wings stripes are white. Photos: Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance

“The first part of the schedule was the most difficult, as we had the get the black coating on the roof under the sign prior to the playoffs,” Vetrovsky says. The sign covered approximately 30,000 square feet of roof area, and it was difficult to access the roof surface beneath it. “Crews had to work on their hands and knees to apply the coating beneath the steel framing. That was towards the fall, when the weather started changing, and one of the biggest hurdles was just getting the roof dry in the morning. It got colder and colder as we got down to the wire, but we made our deadline for the work under the sign.”

The staging area was also limited, and the crane could only lift material to one section of the roof. Some material had to be moved by hand some 2,000 feet. “It was an awfully long walk from one end of that roof to the other,” Vetrovsky recalls.

Concerts and other events held during the construction cycle made the schedule even more challenging. “The most notable event was probably the Republican National Convention, which totally shut the site down for more than a week because of security,” notes Slattery.

Concerts usually necessitated loading in the early morning and clearing the staging area by 8 a.m., but usually work could continue during the day. “We had to do a lot of coordination to make sure we had what we needed to work the entire day and also not go against our commitment to the owner that we would not work past certain hours,” Vetrovsky says. “Many of the special events started after 7 p.m., so we would be long gone by then.”

Championship Caliber

The project was wrapped up earlier this year. Vetrovsky and Slattery agree that the system chosen was a great fit for this project for several reasons. With restoration, there is less noise, less disruption, and less equipment than with a re-roofing project, and the roof has a warranty for the next 20 years. The process also limits negative impact on the environment by preventing removal and disposal of the old roof system.

“The weight was also a factor,” notes Vetrovsky. “With the existing structure, there wasn’t a lot of room for a different type of roof system with heavy cover boards. This roof system was perfect because it doesn’t add a lot of weight.”

The coating also minimized installation time, notes Slattery. “The disruption of a roof replacement in a hospitality setting like that, where they need 250 days of revenue stream, restoration becomes a real attractive option,” he says. “I can’t think of one day where we really disrupted anything.”

Vetrovsky points to his talented crews as the key to meeting tough schedules with top-quality production “What we can offer is skilled labor,” he says. “We’re a union contractor and our guys are well trained. The harder, the better for us. We can handle projects that most other contractors won’t even put a number to — this project being one of those.”

He credits Adam Livingston, a third-generation foreman for Warren Roofing, for his work on the project.  “With his experience and attention to detail, we were able to complete this project on time, meet the expectations of the client and Tremco, and match the unique aesthetic requirements of the roof,” says Vetrovsky. “We have a lot of great employees who take pride in their work. Take all of that together, that’s why we can be successful on projects like the Quicken Loans Arena.”

The Cavaliers taking the NBA Championship during the project only added to the excitement. “It’s a great feather in our cap,” notes Slattery. “Restoration is a growing segment of the market. Instead of letting the clock run out on these roofs, if you catch them at the right time, it can be a phenomenal way to keep costs down and it’s good for the environment because it’s not adding waste to landfills.” 

TEAM

Architect: Osborn Engineering, Cleveland, Ohio, www.osborn-eng.com
Roof Consultant: Adam Bradley Enterprises, Chagrin Falls, Ohio, www.adambradleyinc.com
General Contractor: Warren Roofing & Insulating Co., Walton Hills, Ohio, www.warrenroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Cleaning System: RoofTec, Tremco Roofing, www.tremcoroofing.com
Roof Restoration System: AlphaGuard MT, Tremco Roofing

Self-Adhering Vapour Permeable Membrane Is Mold Resistant

The self-adhering vapour permeable membrane can be applied to common substrates such as gypsum, oriented strand board (OSB), block, concrete, concrete masonry unit (CMU) and plywood.

The self-adhering vapour permeable membrane can be applied to common substrates such as gypsum, oriented strand board (OSB), block, concrete, concrete masonry unit (CMU) and plywood.

IKO AquaBarrier VP Self-Adhering Vapour Permeable Membrane provides a primerless vapour permeable membrane solution with mold resistance for a variety of building envelope applications.

Self-Adhering, Versatile Applications
A self-adhering, primerless membrane, AquaBarrier VP, provides superior performance in wall assemblies where a vapour permeable, weather-resistive air barrier is required.

Thanks to the vapour permeable matrix of AquaBarrier VP, it is compatible and can be applied to common substrates such as gypsum, oriented strand board (OSB), block, concrete, concrete masonry unit (CMU) and plywood. The membrane is also designed for various applications, including masonry cavity walls, metal cladding systems, renovations and retrofits, siding, curtain walls and parapets.

The design of the AquaBarrier VP membrane allows for installation ease, with no mechanical attachments or primer required for standard application. Coated with a proprietary acrylic adhesive on the back surface, AquaBarrier VP offers performance for common wall applications and features a polypropylene release film to aid in removing the membrane.

AquaBarrier VP is an effective vapour permeable membrane when installed according to IKO specifications.

AquaBarrier VP is constructed of a polyolefin synthetic polymer (fibre) membrane with low water retention capacity and is therefore mold and mildew resistant.

The IKO AquaBarrier line includes a full range of membrane and accessory products that provide protection in wall assemblies with air and vapour barrier systems. Engineered to meet or exceed industry standards, the line includes self-adhering and torch-on wall membranes, through-wall flashing membrane, foundation protection and flashing tapes.

For more information on AquaBarrier VP and details on IKO’s commercial wall and roofing system solutions and accessories, visit the IKO website.

Shingle Starter Material Is Non-porous

SBS Shingle Starter is a SBS modified starter strip coated on both sides with SBS rubberized asphalt compound and surfaced with black ceramic granules.

SBS Shingle Starter is a SBS modified starter strip coated on both sides with SBS rubberized asphalt compound and surfaced with black ceramic granules.

MB Technology’s SBS Shingle Starter is a premium SBS modified starter strip completely coated on both sides with SBS rubberized asphalt compound and surfaced with black ceramic granules. The SBS rubberized membrane provides a flexible starter roll and, because it’s non-porous, it provides a watertight membrane by itself. The fiberglass-reinforced product is used for eave and rake starter material for composition roofing. It is used with minimum 3/8-inch head roofing nails, fastened 12 inches on center and at 4 to 6 inches above the edge of the roof or as required by the shingle manufacturer.

Kemper System Celebrates 60 Years Building Envelope Solutions

Kemper System is celebrating 60 years of success and building on its strengths to address the entire Building Envelope.

“Kemper System was built on novel approaches to challenges, product quality and customer service, and those continue to be the bedrock of our relationships,” says Richard Doornink, president and managing director of Kemper System America Inc. “Our role is to help architects and other specifiers find the balance between often competing goals on projects across the Building Envelope. The right technology makes those choices easier,” he states.

Today, the company offers an expanded range of Building Envelope solutions to protect against weather, preserve the integrity of surfaces and enhance the comfort and value of public buildings and commercial real estate.

As part of the company’s expansion efforts, Kemper System America acquired STS Coatings Inc. in December along with four flagship brands, and is exploring additional technologies to build its portfolio, Doornink stated. In addition to the technologies from STS Coatings, this encompasses Kemperol reinforced membrane systems, and COLEAN durable coatings systems for protecting surfaces prone to heavy wear.

Technology Roots

Kemper System traces its roots to polymer chemist Heinz B. Kemper, Ph.D., who founded the original company in 1957 after developing a roofing system using a cold liquid-applied resin reinforced with polyester fleece. After conducting over 200 trials, in 1969 he patented Kemperol V210, a reinforced membrane system which proved to be effective, and could stand up to sun, rain, snow, ice and standing water longer term.

That led to further advances in cold, liquid-applied membranes including the company’s flagship solvent-free and odor-free Kemperol 2K PUR membrane system, launched in the U.S. in 1999, and more recently, Kemperol 022 reinforced waterproofing system for indoor tile, and fire-rated Cool Roof systems – the odor-free Kemperol Reflect 2K FR and fast-curing Kemperol AC Speed FR.

Today, Kemper System products protect surfaces under a range of climatic conditions spanning: new and existing roofs, white roofs, green roofs, blue roofs, interior and below-grade waterproofing, parking garages, balconies, terraces, plazas and historic restorations. In North America, Kemperol membrane systems protect projects including the Empire State Building in New York, CN Tower in Toronto and Marketplace Tower in Seattle.

Kemper System America Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Kemper System GmbH & Co. (KG | Holländische Straße 32-36 | D-34246 Vellmar). Kemper System is part of the IBG Group of companies, a mid-sized industrial holding company with more than 50 sales and distribution sites, as well as production companies all over the world.

OMG RhinoBond Projects Are Being Completed Across Europe

OMG Roofing’s RhinoBond System has left marks across Europe with more than 125 completed projects and more in the pipeline. Collectively, these projects represent more than 300,000 square meters (3.2 million square feet) of single-ply roofing.

“In last two years, the RhinoBond System has started to take off across Europe, as more roofing contractors have seen the roof performance benefits that the system can offer,” states Web Shaffer, vice president of marketing for OMG Roofing Products. “We have completed projects across Europe and we are expanding to new countries in the region, most recently, into South East Europe.”

RhinoBond is a method for installing thermoplastic and now also clean EPDM membrane. The system consists of a stand-up induction welding tool and magnetic cooling clamps. Contractors install roofing insulation using fasteners and specially coated plates designed specifically for the type of membrane being installed – PVC, TPO or Clean EPDM. Each plate is then bonded to the roof membrane installed over the top with the RhinoBond plate welding tool. The result is a roofing system that can provide wind performance with fewer fasteners, fewer membrane seams and zero penetrations of the new membrane.

The RhinoBond System is approved for use in Europe by many roof system providers, including Bauder, Carlisle/Hertalan, Danosa, Fatra, FDT, Firestone, GAF, IcoPal, IKO, Renolit, Sika, Siplast, and Soprema/Flag.

Headquartered in Agawam, Mass., OMG Roofing Products is a supplier of commercial roofing products including specialty fasteners, insulation adhesives, roof drains, pipe supports, emergency roof repair tape as well as productivity tools such as RhinoBond. The company’s focus is delivering products and services that improve contractor productivity and enhance roof system performance. For additional information, please contact OMG Roofing Products at (413)789-0252 or visit the OMG Roofing website.

Fleece-Backed Thermoplastic Membrane Exceeds Weathering Tests

KEE-Stone FB 60 fleece-backed thermoplastic membrane stands up agains harsh weather and UV radiation.

KEE-Stone FB 60 fleece-backed thermoplastic membrane stands up against harsh weather and UV radiation.

Garland has released the KEE-Stone FB 60 fleece-backed thermoplastic membrane which exceeds standard weathering tests and stands up against harsh weather and UV radiation. In accelerated weathering tests, KEE-Stone showed no signs of cracking or cratering even at 100 times magnification, which is 10 times more than the ASTM D 6745 standard requires. KEE-Stone’s compound, formulated using DuPont Elvaloy HP Ketone Ethylene Ester (KEE), provides resistance to UV degradation and heat resistance while retaining low-temperature flexibility, which translates into a lasting roof.

KEE enhances the performance of the PVC by permanently locking in its flexibility, eliminating plasticizer migration and allowing the membrane to remain tough and flexible throughout the entire lifecycle of the roof. Garland’s KEE-Stone membranes contain the KEE formulation throughout the entire sheet, further increasing its level of performance. The membrane is also reinforced with a polymer-coated scrim. The design of the scrim allows the KEE compound above and below the scrim to fuse together, imparting puncture, tear and tensile strength to the membrane.

Garland’s two-ply, hybrid KEE-Stone system will provide the protection of a traditional modified bitumen roof system with the appearance of a single-ply system.

For more information, visit here or call to be connected with your local Garland representative at 1.800.321.9336.