Improve Your Relationship with Condo Associations

Is your roofing company struggling to make ends meet, or are you searching for new ways to make your company thrive? I think at some time in every business owner’s career they come to a point where they realize that just being “good” isn’t good enough in today’s competitive marketplace unless your service or product is truly niche.

In the roofing industry, let’s be honest, there are quite a few of us out there. In my neck of the woods it’s not difficult to find two-dozen or more competitors. This is why my firm has to come up with ways to set ourselves apart from the pack. One of the best ways to do this is by improving our business relationship with condominium associations and board members, as well as property managers. These relationships have led to us not only being the first contractor called when there’s a problem at a building, but we also have received a number of referrals.

There are many ways to build relationships with condo associations and management companies, and I can almost guarantee that if you do it right your company will see gains like never before.

Network

To get your foot in the door, search the Internet for “condo management associations”. In my area of southwest Florida, the Falls Church, Va.-based Community Associations Institute is active. We joined the group and attend its chapters’ networking events. Groups like these are where condo managers decide on their “favorite” contractors. They talk to each other; “word of mouth” is a huge marketing tool. If you want to be on their minds, you need to be on their invitation list for these meetings. Once these relationships are built, managers won’t be looking for cheap bids anymore. You put yourself closer to the driver’s seat for potential negotiations.

If you personally don’t have a profile on LinkedIn, you’re missing a HUGE opportunity to network on America’s largest social-networking platform for professionals. Join LinkedIn for free and, if you own a company, be sure to build your company page, too. Then search for groups in your state or city that relate to property managers or condo associations. Most importantly, don’t just be a fly on the wall in these groups. Comment on other members’ posts and share your knowledge. This is how you add value and what makes your company unique. Being active online will increase activity toward your website; by the way, you should have a website worth sharing.

Don’t Sell; Educate

When joining these groups, don’t just sell yourself or your company because people are tired of being sold. Instead of touting how great your company is to every property manager you meet, try finding out their pain-points and objections and then educate them about how your services will make life easier for them. This is HUGE!

We recently asked approximately 50 building managers via email what frustrated them the most in dealing with contractors. We received informative answers that will help our business. Consider the following frustrations building managers cited:

  • Long response times: 25 percent
  • Taking too long to perform tasks: 25 percent
  • Not returning phone calls: 25 percent
  • Not following HOA rules/regulations: 15 percent
  • Dirty contractors and vehicles: 10 percent

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