‘The International Energy Conservation Code as Applied to Commercial Roofing’ Brochure Is Released

A new energy code brochure, “The International Energy Conservation Code as Applied to Commercial Roofing”, has been released explaining reroofing clarifications in the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The reroofing clarifications make it very clear that almost every commercial reroofing project involving the removal and replacement of the existing roof covering must be upgraded to the current IECC R-value levels.

The Institute for Market Transformation (IMT), with the assistance of the Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing (the Center) and the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Associations (PIMA), developed and released the new energy code brochure.

“Billions of square feet of low-slope of commercial roofs (roofs with insulation above the deck) are replaced every year in the United States,” said Jared Blum, President, PIMA. “The clarification in the IECC means that whenever an existing low-slope roofing membrane is removed before a new roofing membrane is installed, the underlying roof insulation must be brought up to current code-mandated R-value levels.”

The new code clarification establishes specific definitions for each major type of roofing activity that may occur on a commercial building:

    Reroofing. The process of recovering or replacing an existing roof covering. See Roof Recover and Roof Replacement.
    Roof Recover. The process of installing an additional roof covering over a prepared existing roof covering without removing the existing roof covering.
    Roof Replacement. The process of removing an existing roof covering, repairing any damaged substrate and installing a new roof covering.
    Roof Repair. Reconstruction or renewal of any part of an existing roof for the purposes of its maintenance.

The new brochure, similar in format to many other IMT brochures, contains:

  • A detailed listing of the key definitions and energy regulations that apply to commercial roofing.
  • Illustrations of typical roofing conditions.
  • A decision tree to determine the specific compliance path for any roofing application.

“Because it is considered a clarification rather than a new addition to the code, officials can start enforcing the update now and don’t have to wait until the 2015 version of the IECC is adopted in their jurisdiction. This brochure is succinct, easy to follow and clearly explains how to comply with the clarification,” added Blum.

“The International Energy Conservation Code as Applied to Commercial Roofing” brochure will help local code officials better understand the energy efficiency requirements for all types of commercial roofing projects and also serve as a useful guide to explain the code requirements to roofing contractors seeking construction permits, design professionals (architects, engineers, roof consultants) involved in roofing selection and specification, as well as building owners as the ultimate end-user of the code.

“The brochure is a part of a comprehensive effort by PIMA to inform members of the design community about their legal obligations to comply with the reroofing energy upgrade requirement,” added Blum.

In addition to advocating for increased building energy efficiency via improved building codes, IMT also works to increase compliance with energy codes by developing and distributing informational materials suitable for use in local code jurisdictions, not only for code officials but also for owners, designers, and contractors.

Washington, D.C., Habitat for Humanity Uses 8 Inches of Polyiso on Roof

Six passive townhomes that are part of Habitat for Humanity’s Ivy City community of Northeast Washington are including 8 inches of polyiso insulation on the roof. These passive townhouses are designed to reduce overall energy consumption by 70 percent and heating and cooling demand by 80 to 90 percent.

The six townhouses are being built to meet the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) Passive House specifications. Founded in 2007, PHIUS is the leading certifier of passive buildings.

“The Ivy City townhouses show the role high-performance insulation plays in the built environment, particularly when it comes to designing homes that are more affordable to operate,” said Jared Blum, president of the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA). “We are proud to be involved with this Habitat for Humanity project that will provide much needed affordable housing in the nation?s capital.”

PIMA member companies—Atlas Roofing, Firestone Building Products, GAF, Hunter Panels, JM, and R-max—donated the polyiso for this project in celebration of the association’s 25th anniversary.

“The passive house model embodies Habitat for Humanity’s vision that all people deserve safe, comfortable, affordable and sustainable housing, and the polyiso insulation contributes to that vision,” said Andrew Modley, production manager, Habitat for Humanity of Washington, D.C. “Passive housing will provide our homeowner families with an ability to consume significantly less energy overall by using passive integrated design, climate appropriate insulation, and airtight construction. These benefits will not only save the homeowners money, but will empower them to create a more sustainable lifestyle.”

French Kings, Solar Power and Sustainability

Louis XIV is not a frequent reference point in today’s discussions about the world’s energy and sustainability paths. However, this longest ruling French monarch (1643-1715) was known as the “Sun King” as he often referred to himself as the center of the universe and was enamored of the sun itself. He also was the builder of Versailles, the construction of which was viewed as very innovative for its day with gardens and roads that Louis XIV arrayed in a pattern to track the sun’s movements.

2014 International Solar Decathlon in Versailles, France. PHOTO: SDEurope

2014 International Solar Decathlon in Versailles, France. PHOTO: SDEurope

With this in mind, it is not such a stretch to understand why the organizers of the 2014 International Solar Decathlon chose the Versailles grounds in which to hold this extraordinary exhibition, from which I have recently returned. The 15-day exhibition featured more than 20 universities from around the world, with Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design and Appalachian State University as the two U.S. competitors.

During each day of the competition, the entrants were subjected to judges’ inspection to assess performance in categories, such as architecture, communications (ability to literally tell their house’s story to press and visitors), energy efficiency, engineering and construction, and sustainability.

PIMA’s sponsorship of Appalachian State and the providing of polyiso insulation by Atlas Roofing to ASU demonstrated the role high-performance insulation plays in the future of the built environment.

However, it is not individual product performance that most impresses the visitor to these extraordinary homes. Yes, they all make exceptional use of the solar power generated by their installed PV systems (they are limited by the rules to only 5 kWh of electricity production from which they must run refrigerators, air conditioning, washers and dryers) and each home has an array of innovative products. But it is the synergistic result of the products’ application combined with the unbelievable ingenuity of the students and professors that excited me the most.

2014 International Solar Decathlon PHOTO: SDEurope

The “decathletes” at the 2014 International Solar Decathlon in Versailles, France. PHOTO: SDEurope

Some buildings were representative of new construction. For example, the ASU entrant was a modular townhome with the potential to assemble into a collective urban building.

In addition, recognizing that existing buildings are the greatest energy challenge, the effort to improve our world’s retrofit capabilities truly caught my eye. For example, the Berlin Rooftop Project focuses on abandoned rooftop space in that city to create studios for younger urban dwellers, while the Dutch (Delft University) addressed the poorly insulated townhomes that make up over 60 percent of Dutch homes by applying a “second skin” while including a garden capability within the home.

The several days I spent at the event were educational, but nothing was more inspiring than speaking with the students themselves. Be they from Chile, France, Germany, Japan, the United States or any of the other countries involved, their passion was compelling. The intellect and commitment of these future architects, engineers, designers and urban planners to finding sustainable solutions for the planet gives me a distinct optimism for our future.

Coating a Roof? Don’t Forget Fire Ratings

Fire tests are one of the most important system tests for roof coatings, and it is essential when specifying and applying a coating over an existing roof in a maintenance or repair setting to ensure the roof system’s fire rating is not negatively affected.

TEST METHODS FOR FIRE TESTS

The International Building Code (IBC), first published in 2000, brought together several regional codes into one central, national code and facilitated the acceleration of code adoptions across the U.S. Today, most of the U.S. follows a statewide adoption process for the IBC for Roof Assemblies and Rooftop Structures; some areas do not, which can make code enforcement tricky. Some areas still follow local adoption and may refer to older versions of the code instead of the most current 2012 IBC.

According to the most recent IBC, roof assemblies and coverings are divided into classes A, B, C or “Nonclassified” and are tested in accordance with UL 790 or ASTM E 108. These tests measure the spread of flame, recording whether the material you put on the roof will cause the flame to spread too far on the roof. The UL 790 inaugurated modern fire tests about 100 years ago and, as such, incorporates a century of data and history about roof coatings that may broaden the reach of what certifications the test provides.

“Many see UL 790 as the preferred fire test,” notes Steve Heinje, technical service manager with Quest Construction Products LLC. “It is interesting to note the ASTM E 108 test is deemed by the code requirements an equivalent test.” The ASTM E 108 is a consensus version of UL 790 and can be run by any qualified and accredited test laboratory. Many test laboratories, such as FM Approvals, conduct testing using ASTM E 108.

COMPONENTS OF FIRE TESTING

The roof coating is just one component in the fire rating of a roof assembly; other components include slope, the coating substrate, whether the roof deck is combustible and whether the roof is insulated. These factors, taken together, will determine the roof system’s fire rating.

SLOPE
Although there are exceptions, most fire ratings are done for slopes of under 3/4 inch for commercial roofs, and coatings tend to be recommended for application to a roof with 2 inches or less slope. Slope is an important factor to consider because special coatings may be needed for high slope transitions.

SUBSTRATE
The substrate or membrane type is another vital component of fire testing because the substrate to which the coating is applied could affect the flammability of the roof system. When coating over an existing roof, one should note what existing roofing substrate is being coated over—whether it’s BUR, mod bit, concrete, metal, asphalt or another type of substrate.

COMBUSTIBLE VS. NON-COMBUSTIBLE ROOF DECK
Most coatings are tested over noncombustible decks, but additional and challenging tests are required for the use of combustible decks. It is much more difficult to achieve a Class A rating when covering a wood deck.

INSULATION
Again, it is important to note the materials of the existing roof being coated because these components can affect the flammability of the roof system. Polymeric insulations often reduce the allowable slope for a given system.

PROPER APPLICATION OF THE ROOF COATING

Another significant consideration is that the coating is applied at the appropriate thickness and rate.

“One big thing out of the coating manufacturer’s control is that the applicator uses the recommended or test-required thickness and/or rate at the point of application,” points out Skip Leonard, technical services director with Henry Co. Proper application encompasses parameters, such as the final dry-film thickness, the use of granules or gravel, use of reinforcements and even the number of coats. Accounting for these details is an integral part of installing a rated system.

Once assembled, the roof covering will be granted a Class A, B or C rating by approved testing agencies, typically through UL 790 or ASTM E 108, depending on how effective the roof proves to be in terms of fire resistance. Rated coating solutions exist for just about any existing roof system recover or coating application and often can achieve a Class A rating.

Learn More
Visit the Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association website to locate a roof-coating manufacturer who can help you choose a roof coating most appropriate for your roof system. For more information about roof-coating fire ratings, check out FM Approval’s RoofNav online database for up-to-date roofing-related information or the UL Online Certifications Directory.

CertainTeed Makes Multi-year Commitment to Homes for Our Troops

CertainTeed Corp. has made a multi-year commitment to Homes for Our Troops, a national non-profit organization dedicated to building specially adapted homes for severely injured veterans across the nation to enable them to rebuild their lives. The homes are provided mortgage-free to the veterans they serve. The company’s contribution of roofing, insulation and gypsum wallboard for 40 homes across the U.S. ensures that the homeowners will enjoy a lifetime of indoor comfort and sustainable performance.

“Having corporate partners like CertainTeed is essential to our mission of helping our nation’s most severely injured veterans regain their freedom and independence through the gift of a new home,” said Bill Ivey, Executive Director, at Homes for Our Troops. “It’s an honor to help these heroes rebuild their lives, and CertainTeed’s involvement ensures our homes are built using only the best materials and finest craftsmanship available, and will stand the test of time.”

The 1-story homes feature an open floor plan, going beyond ADA compliance, with roll-in showers, roll-under cooktops and sinks, and other standard accessibility items. The homes may also include specialized items including lift systems, keyless door entry and voice activation controls. Each home is constructed by teams of skilled laborers on site to build, paint and landscape.

Each home will be outfitted with a complete CertainTeed Integrity Roof System, comprised of underlayments, shingles, accessory products and ventilation all working together to provide optimum performance. Asphalt shingle choices will include the durable Landmark 30-year color-blended line of shingles with the widest array of colors and backed by an industry-leading, limited lifetime warranty.

CertainTeed is also providing complete interior wall systems for the homes, including Sustainable Insulation fiberglass batts and a variety of high-performance wallboard. Sustainable Insulation is made from recycled and renewable content, including a plant-based binder, and contains no formaldehydes, dyes, acrylics or unnecessary fire-retardant chemicals. For areas of the home prone to moisture, such as bathrooms and laundry rooms, the team will install M2Tech Moisture & Mold Resistant gypsum board and Diamondback GlasRoc tile backer. CertainTeed Type X gypsum board, which offers a one-hour fire rating, will be used in the garage and mechanical room, and each home¹s attic will be insulated with InsulSafe SP premium blowing wool.

A typical home takes five to seven months to build and costs an average of $430,000. The organization has built more than 166 such homes for wounded service members since 2004.

Sen. Cardin Reintroduces Bill to Increase Employment and Improve the Energy-Efficiency of Commercial Building Roofs

U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.), has reintroduced the “Energy-Efficient Cool Roofs Jobs Act,” S. 2388, which would boost job creation in the construction industry and significantly increase the energy efficiency of buildings throughout the U.S., lowering energy costs and saving money. The bill would improve investment returns on building energy-efficiency improvements by shortening the tax depreciation period for the installation of new roofs on existing buildings that meet certain thermal performance and “cool roof” requirements.

“We don’t need to choose between good jobs and helping the environment; we can do both with the same policy,” said Senator Cardin. “Cool Roofs provides an opportunity to reduce energy consumption and add nearly 40,000 jobs to a sector of our economy that still has not felt the full effect of our emergent recovery. It’s no wonder this bill, which provides incentives to install energy efficient roofs and simplifies the tax code, has such broad support across industries and labor.”

S. 2388 is co-sponsored by Sens. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) and Dean Heller (R-Nev.). Sen. Cardin also filed the Energy-Efficient Cool Roofs Jobs Act as an amendment (S. Admt 3186) to the EXPIRE Act (S. 2260). U.S. Reps. Tom Reed (R-NY) and Bill Pascrell (D-NJ) have introduced a companion bill in the House (H.R. 4740).

The bill reduces the depreciation period for commercial roof retrofits, lowering the current 39-year depreciation period in the current tax code to a 20-year depreciation period for energy-efficient cool roof systems. To qualify, roofs must include systems with insulation that meets or exceeds the ASHRAE Standard 189.1-2011, a model green building standard, and have a cool roof surface in climate zones one through five.

“Congress recognizes the value of commercial building roofs in terms of both national energy policy and providing an incentive for owners to increase the thermal performance of their buildings,” said Jared O. Blum, president, Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), a supporter of the bill. “Most buildings in this country were built before modern energy codes were in place, so upgrading the performance of those buildings with more energy efficient roofs can save lots of money.

“The legislation also offers a more fair treatment of roofs under the tax depreciation system. As currently structured, the tax code has created a disincentive for building owners to upgrade their roofs,” added Blum.

The Energy-Efficient Cool Roofs Jobs Act has attracted a wide range of supporters, including PIMA. The bill would create nearly 40,000 new jobs among roofing contractors and manufacturers; add $1 billion of taxable annual revenue in the construction sector; make the tax code simpler and more equitable for small businesses of all types; reduce U.S. energy consumption and save small businesses millions of dollars in energy costs; and reduce carbon emissions by 800,000 metric tons—an amount equal to the emissions of 153,000 cars. Additional supporters include:

Alliance to Save Energy
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association
Associated Builders and Contractors
Building Owners and Managers Association
Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing
Environmental and Energy Study Institute
Global Cool Cities Alliance
Institute for Market Transformation
Joint Roofing Industry Labor and Management Committee
National Roofing Contractors Association
NAIOP: The Commercial Real Estate Development Association
Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance
United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers

A significant opportunity to increase building energy efficiency lies within the commercial roofing sector. Waterproof membranes on commercial low-slope roofs (i.e., flat roofs) last, on average, 17 years. When these membranes are replaced, building owners could add a reasonable amount of insulation and substitute a white roof surface (i.e., a cool or reflective roof) for the traditional dark colored roof surface, a practice that would save $12.2 billion in energy costs in just the first ten years. The annual savings after ten years would be $2.4 billion. This activity would also avoid and offset 147 million tons of CO2 emissions, an amount that is equal to the annual emissions of 38 coal fired power plants.

Polyiso Industry Praises Proposal for Reduction in U.S. Carbon Emissions

This week, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a draft proposal under Section 111 (d) of the Clean Air Act calling for greenhouse-gas emissions reduction of 30 percent by 2030. The new rule is geared to cut carbon-dioxide emissions from coal- and gas-fired power plants across the United States by providing states with a flexible menu of policy options for compliance.

“The proposed regulation from the EPA and the White House provide the tipping point in coalescing this country’s already strong technical capabilities to lower our carbon output,” said Jared Blum, president, Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA). “It is PIMA’s strong belief that energy efficiency in buildings can achieve much of what needs to be done.””

According to the Sustainable Energy in America Factbook from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, America’s total annual energy consumption in 2013 was 5.0 percent below 2007 levels. This long-term trend was in part prompted by the economic downturn of 2008-2009, but as economic growth has returned, energy use is not growing at a commensurate rate, and today our economy is far more energy-efficient than before.

“Our military, industrial and scientific leaders have requested that our government provide an actionable path forward. The 111(d) proposal is one such path that deserves broad business support,” added Blum.

A significant opportunity to increase building energy efficiency lies within the commercial roofing sector. Waterproof membranes on commercial low-slope roofs (flat roofs) last, on average, 17 years. When these membranes are replaced, building owners could add a reasonable amount of insulation, a practice that would save $12.2 billion in energy costs in just the first ten years. The annual savings after ten years would be $2.4 billion. This activity would also avoid 105 million tons of CO2 emissions, an amount that is equal to the annual emissions of 27 coal-fired power plants.

Project Profiles: Health Care

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL, BOSTON

TEAM

Roofing contractor: Chapman Waterproofing Co., Boston
Architect/engineer: Cambridge Seven Associates Inc., Cambridge, Mass.
Membrane and waterproofing manufacturer: Kemper System America Inc.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, features a Kemperol waterproofing and roofing membrane for its green roof.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, features a Kemperol waterproofing and roofing membrane for its green roof.

ROOF MATERIALS

The Kempertec EP-Primer was used to prepare the substrate surfaces for membrane installation and served as a temporary waterproofing system, allowing the project to be exposed to the harsh New England winter while it was completed in phased stages.

The owners chose the Kemperol waterproofing and roofing membrane, a two-component with catalyst, high-performance, seamless and self-terminating cold-fluid-applied reinforced unsaturated polyester system. The monolithic edge-to-edge rot- and root-resistant Kemper membrane is engineered to resist degradation from UV exposure and heat intensity and is resistant to most common chemicals.

ROOF REPORT

Founded in 1811, Massachusetts General Hospital is the third oldest general hospital in the U.S. and the oldest and largest in New England. The 900-bed medical center offers sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic care in virtually every specialty and subspecialty of medicine and surgery. When MGH’s owners envisioned constructing a new 9,000-square-foot green roof above the MGH cancer wing, they had two chief concerns: safety and long-term durability.

The landscaped roof design includes four different gardens with extensive shrubbery, trees and grass designed to provide cancer patients with a haven for relaxation and meditation to aid in the healing process.

A key challenge concerning the hospital’s green roof was its hundreds of penetrations, spaced inches apart, for a sprinkler system to irrigate the landscaped roof. A leak-detection system was installed across the entire square footage of the project to detect water before it seeps into the interior of the building. The leak-detection system confirms the project’s seal-tight success. Upon completion, Kemper System provided a 20-year, no-dollar-limit warranty.

PHOTO: KEMPER SYSTEM AMERICA INC.

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Global Spray Polyurethane Foam Market Expected to Grow

According to a new market report published by Transparency Market Research, “Spray Polyurethane Foam (Open-Cell, Closed-Cell and Others) Market for Residential Walls, Residential Roofing, Commercial Walls, Commercial Roofing and Other Applications – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 – 2019,” the global spray polyurethane foam market was valued at USD 1,135.3 million in 2012 and is expected to reach USD 1,823 million by 2019, growing at a CAGR of 7.0 percent from 2013-19. In terms of volume, spray polyurethane foam consumption was 473.5 kilo tons in 2012.

Spray polyurethane foam (SPF) is an effective substitute for traditional insulation materials. Higher efficiency and lower carbon footprint during production have been major factors driving the SPF market. In addition, increasing threat of energy crisis leading to stringent government regulations for energy-efficient structures is expected to further augment the market growth. Isocyanates employed in the production of SPF cause severe occupational health hazards including asthma which has been a major factor restraining growth of the SPF market. Volatility of raw material prices has also restrained the demand for SPF. Developing low cost bio-based SPF is expected to offer huge growth opportunities in the market.

Open-cell and closed-cell SPF together constitute over 90 percent of the global demand for SPF and the trend is expected to continue during the forecast period. Growing demand for residential applications in developed countries is expected to fuel demand for open-cell SPF. Other application segments include one component foam and high density SPF. Demand in other segment is driven by innovation and higher degree of customization.

Demand for SPF can be segregated into five major application segments: residential roofing, residential walls, commercial roofing, commercial wall and other niche applications. Residential roofing application dominates the global demand for SPF. Other application segments include medical equipment and transportation, among others.

North America followed by Asia Pacific dominates the global demand for SPF. Increasing industrial investment mainly in the developing economies of Asia Pacific is expected to drive demand for closed-cell SPF. Europe is expected to be the fastest growing region for SPF market during the forecast period. Stringent government regulations are expected to drive SPF market in the developed economies of North America and Europe.

Some of the major industry participants include BASF Corporation, Lapolla Industries Inc., NCFI Polyurethanes, Bayer MaterialScience, Icynene Inc., Premium Spray Products, CertainTeed Corporation, Rhino Linings Corporation, The Dow Chemical Company and Demilec among others.

This report segments the global spray polyurethane foam market as follows:

Spray Polyurethane Foam Market – Product Segment Analysis

    Open Cell
    Closed Cell
    Others (Including high density spray polyurethane foam, one component foam, etc.)

Spray Polyurethane Foam Market – Application Analysis

    Residential walls
    Residential roofing
    Commercial walls
    Commercial roofing
    Others (Including Medical, Telecom, Transportation, etc.)

Spray Polyurethane Foam Market – Regional Analysis

    North America
    Europe
    Asia Pacific
    Rest of the World

Receive Pallets of Duro-Last ISO without Additional Freight Costs

Duro-Last Inc. announces that 11Ž2- and 2-inch thick, 4- by 8-foot Duro-Guard ISO (Polyisocyanurate) insulation is available from all Duro-Last manufacturing locations for contractors to pick up or to “fill up” a flatbed shipment. These locations include Saginaw, Mich.; Grants Pass, Ore.; Jackson, Miss.; Sigourney, Iowa; and Carrollton, Texas.

This is another cost-effective and convenient option for customers to take delivery of the most popular Duro-Guard ISO products where there is open space on a flatbed truck that is delivering a Duro-Last roof order. This means that Duro-Last customers can receive pallets of ISO without incurring any additional freight cost.