Complete Cool Roof System Extends the Service Life of New and Existing Roofs

Rhino Linings released a complete cool roof system engineered to improve building energy efficiency while extending the service life of new and existing roofs.

Rhino Linings released a complete cool roof system engineered to improve building energy efficiency while extending the service life of new and existing roofs.

Rhino Linings Corp., a manufacturer and distributor of spray-on protective linings, coatings and foam, released a complete cool roof system engineered to improve building energy efficiency while extending the service life of new and existing roofs.

The DuraTite spray polyurethane foam (SPF) roofing system holds a UL 790 Class A fire rating and is designed to provide a lightweight insulation system over various roof constructions and configurations. Unlike traditional roofing methods, DuraTite SPF roofing system offers a high R-value for superior thermal insulation, covers complex geometrical shapes and protrusions and applies directly to existing substrates in new and retrofit applications.

In addition to DuraTite SPF roofing system’s high-performance, it also offers significant life-cycle cost savings. An SPF roofing system is seamless and requires little-to-no maintenance. Roofing topcoats, like DuraTite acrylic, silicone, urethane and polyurea coatings may be reapplied numerous times, increasing the life of the roof.

The complete system combines spray foam with a full range of acrylic, silicone, urethane and polyurea coatings for a total roofing system that insulates, seals and protects. Products in this system include:

  • Acrylic Coatings — DuraTite 1065 and DuraTite 1070 single component, acrylic roof coatings demonstrate excellent adhesion to polyurethane foam, concrete, masonry, primed metal, primed wood and primed asphalt roofs. When applied at 12 DFT (dry film thickness) and fully cured, DuraTite 1065 and 1070 exhibit exceptional weatherability and resistance.
  • Silicone Coatings — DuraTite 1380 and DuraTite 1395 are high-solid, single-component, silicone coatings with low VOCs and excellent chemical and abrasion resistance. When applied, DuraTite 1380 and 1395 form a breathable membrane, making it an ideal choice for new and recoat applications over metals, single-ply membranes, masonry block, concrete and spray polyurethane foam roofing systems where moisture may be present.
  • Urethane Coatings — DuraTite 1175 and DuraTite 1285 are high-solid, single-component urethane coatings that can be applied in a wide range of ambient temperatures and humidity levels. Both offer superior impact and crack resistance. DuraTite 1285 also offers enhanced UV stability.
  • Polyurea Coatings — DuraTite 2185 is a fast set, rapid cure, 100 percent solids, plural component aluminized polyurea spray-applied lining offers enhanced UV stability and remains flexible in cold temperatures. DuraTite 2185 demonstrates exceptional adhesion to spray polyurethane foam, concrete, bitumen and asphaltic roofing felts, steel, wood and most substrates in extreme cold and warm climates.
  • Spray Polyurethane Foam — DuraTite CC 2.5, DuraTite 2.8 and DuraTite 3.0 closed-cell polyurethane foam products’ lightweight, seamless construction ensures leak-proof performance and allows for value engineering labor and material cost savings.

DuraTite SPF roofing system guide specifications and five-, 10-, 15- and 20-year warranties are available for use on roof substrates, such as metal, built-up roof membrane, single ply, wood recoat and concrete.

CertainTeed Building Products Receive Top Ratings

Just in time for spring home improvement projects, CertainTeed building products are receiving a definitive thumbs up from building professionals through Builder magazine’s 2016 Brand Use Study. Based on input from more than 1,300 builders and general contractors, CertainTeed insulated and vinyl siding products were overall brand leaders for the 20th consecutive year. CertainTeed’s exterior mouldings and columns, synthetic and asphalt roofing shingles and photovoltaic roofing systems enjoyed a near-sweep of their respective categories. And CertainTeed insulation products received top ranking in brand familiarity among the building community.

“Builder magazine’s annual study represents the voice of building professionals and value they place on the various key products. We have a long-standing track record as a brand that building professionals trust for beautiful, innovative and sustainable materials,” says Mara Villanueva-Heras, vice president of Corporate Marketing for CertainTeed Corp. “We value their confidence and loyalty and appreciate their continued support. As a benchmark for the industry, it confirms that CertainTeed offers a credible, one-stop resource for builders looking to boost the curb appeal, energy efficiency and value to the homes they build.”

Each year, Builder magazine publishes its Brand Use Study to provide an in-depth look at the brands that builders, developers, and general contractors recognize and use most. Conducted by The Farnsworth Group, products were ranked by ‘Brand Familiarity,’ ‘Brand Used in Past Two Years,’ ‘Brand Used Most’ and ‘Quality Rating.’

For the 20th year in a row, CertainTeed vinyl siding and CedarBoards insulated siding were selected as the No. 1 choices across the board. A highly engineered alternative to wood siding, vinyl siding offered in more than 40 different colors and the widest selection of lap and vertical siding options. Molded from real cedar boards and backed with polystyrene insulation, CedarBoards insulated vinyl siding can increase overall thermal performance, helping to reduce heating and cooling costs. All CertainTeed siding products offer durability, ease-of-maintenance, and are backed by a lifetime, limited warranty.

In addition, this year CertainTeed exterior mouldings and columns were recognized as No. 1 in familiarity, brands used in the past two years and the brand used most. The product category includes low-maintenance EverNew vinyl porch post columns and Certa-Snap vinyl post wraps; as well as Restoration Millwork cellular PVC post wraps for easy, accurate installation around existing wood load bearing posts and long lasting curb appeal.

For the fifth year running, CertainTeed’s solar systems have been selected as industry leaders in the photovoltaic roofing system category. And in 2015 and 2016, the panels ranked No. 1 in all classifications. Apollo II features 60-watt monocrystalline PV panels that fully integrate with asphalt roofing shingles for a clean, seamless appearance. Apollo Tile II is also available for integration with flat, concrete tile roofs. Solstice, CertainTeed’s rack-mounted solar solution, utilizes 60-cell monocrystalline or polycrystalline panels with power ratings from 260 to 285 watts. All modules are made in the U.S. and backed by the industry’s most comprehensive roof and solar warranty.

CertainTeed offers a wide array of designer, luxury and traditional roofing shingle options with a variety of durable profiles, textures, colors and styles. For two consecutive years, the manufacturer ranked number one across the board in the Synthetic/Concrete/Clay Tile category for Symphony, a specially-engineered composite shingle manufactured to mimic the look and feel of natural slate—but in a lighter and more durable form that is a fraction of the price. And in the highly competitive asphalt shingle category, CertainTeed proudly ranked No. 1 in quality, brand familiarity, and as the brand used most in the past two years.

The company’s interior products also got a big nod this year, with insulation ranking No. 1 in brand familiarity. The comprehensive line of CertainTeed insulation products and equipment include time-tested and trusted fiberglass insulation batts and rolls, fiberglass blow-in insulation, polyurethane spray foam, innovative vapor retarder technology, and highly regarded HVAC products, as well as insulation blowing and foam application equipment. The high-performance product line helps contribute to a family’s complete indoor comfort through advanced thermal performance, moisture management to help prevent mold and mildew growth; air tightness to help reduce energy demand and costs; and acoustics by reducing sound transmission between rooms.

Concise Details and Coordination between Trades Will Lead to a Quality Long-term Solution for Roof Drains

PHOTO 1: Roof drains should be set into a sump receiver provided and installed by the plumbing contractor.

PHOTO 1: Roof drains should be set into a sump receiver provided and installed by the plumbing contractor.

The 2015 IECC roof thermal insulation codes have forced roof system designers to actually think through the roof system design rather than rely on generic manufacturers’ details or the old built-up roof detail that has been used in the office. Don’t laugh! I see it all the time. For the purpose of this article, I will deal with new construction so I can address the coordination of the interrelated disciplines: plumbing, steel and roof design. In roofing removal and replacement projects, the process and design elements would be similar but the existing roof deck and structural framing would be in place. The existing roof drain would need to be evaluated as to whether it could remain or needs to be replaced. My firm typically replaces 85 percent of all old roof drains for a variety of reasons.

The new 2015 IECC has made two distinctive changes to the 2012 IECC in regard to the thermal insulation requirements for low-slope roofs with the continuous insulation on the exterior side of the roof deck:

  • 1. It increased the minimum requirement of thermal R-value in each of the ASHRAE regions.
  • 2. It now requires that this minimum R-value be attained within 4 feet of the roof drain.

Item two is the game changer. If you consider that with tapered insulation you now need to meet the minimum near the drain, as opposed to an aver- age, the total insulation thickness can increase substantially.

PHOTO 2: Roof drains need to be secured to the roof deck with under-deck clamps so they cannot move.

PHOTO 2: Roof drains need to be secured to the roof deck with under-deck clamps so they cannot move.

THE ROOF DRAIN CHALLENGE

The challenge I see for designers is how to properly achieve a roof system design that will accommodate the new insulation thicknesses (without holding the drain off the roof deck, which I believe is below the designer’s standard of care), transition the roof membrane into the drain and coordinate with the related disciplines.

For the purpose of this tutorial, let’s make the following assumptions:

  • Steel roof deck, level, no slope
  • Internal roof drains
  • Vapor/air retarder required, placed on sheathing
  • Base layer and tapered insulation will be required
  • Cover board
  • Fully adhered 60-mil EPDM
  • ASHRAE Zone 5: Chicago area

FIGURE 1: Your detail should show the steel roof deck, steel angle framing coped to the structure, the metal sump receiver (manufactured by the roof drain manufacturer), roof drain and underdeck clamp to hold the roof drain to the roof deck.

FIGURE 1: Your detail should show the steel roof deck, steel angle framing coped to the structure, the metal sump receiver (manufactured by the roof drain manufacturer), roof drain and underdeck clamp to hold the roof drain to the roof deck.

Once the roof drain locations have been selected (for those new to this, the roof system designer should select the roof drain locations to best suit the tapered insulation layout), one should try to locate the roof drain in linear alignment to reduce tapered insulation offsets. The drain outlets should be of good size, 4-inch minimum, even if the plumbing engineer says they can be smaller. Don’t place them hundreds of feet apart. Once the roof drain location is selected, inform the plumbing and structural engineers.

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER COORDINATION
The first order of business would be to give the structural engineer a call and tell him the plumbing engineer will specify the roof drain sump pan and that the structural engineer should not specify an archaic, out-of-date sump pan for built-up roofs incorporating minimal insulation.

When located in the field of the roof, the roof drains should be at structural mid spans, not at columns. When a structural roof slope is used and sloped to an exterior roof edge, the roof drains should be located as close to walls as possible. Do not locate drains sever- al or more feet off the roof edge; it is just too difficult to back slope to them. Inform the structural engineer that the steel angles used to frame the opening need to be coped to the structure, not laid atop the structure. There’s no need to raise the roof deck right where all the water is to drain.

FIGURE 2: A threaded roof drain extension is required to make up the distance from deck up to the top of the insulation and must be screwed to a proper location (top of the insulation is recommended). To do so, the insulation below the drain will need to be slightly beveled. This is shown in the detail.

FIGURE 2: A threaded roof drain extension is required
to make up the distance from deck up to the top of the insulation and must be screwed to a proper location (top of the insulation is recommended). To do so, the insulation below the drain will need to be slightly beveled. This is shown in the detail.

PLUMBING COORDINATION
Now call the plumbing engineer and tell him you need a metal sump receiver (see Photo 1), underdeck clamp (see Photo 2), cast-iron roof drain with reversible collar, threaded extension ring capable of expanding upward 5 inches, and cast-iron roof drain clamping ring and dome.

Send the structural and plumbing engineer your schematic roof drain detail so they know exactly what you are thinking. Then suggest they place your detail on their drawings. Why? Because you cannot believe how much the plumbing roof-related details and architectural roof details often differ! Because details differ, the trade that works on the project first—plumbing— leaves the roofing contractor to deal with any inconsistencies.

Your detail at this point should show the steel roof deck, steel angle framing coped to the structure, the metal sump receiver (manufactured by the roof drain manufacturer), roof drain and underdeck clamp to hold the roof drain to the roof deck (see Figure 1).

PHOTOS AND ILLUSTRATIONS: HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP LLC

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Using Engineered Geofoam for Garden Roofs

For most of the past century, the rooftops of commercial and institutional buildings have largely been places to locate unsightly mechanical systems. Architectural treatments, such as parapets and screens, provide visual relief from such equipment. Now, roofing professionals and building owners increasingly look at the roof as “found space”—a place to be planted and used, instead of hidden.

Facebook’s Frank Gehry-designed MPK 20 building sports a 9-acre green roof using EPS geofoam from Insulfoam.

Facebook’s Frank Gehry-designed MPK 20 building sports a 9-acre green roof using EPS geofoam from Insulfoam.

Throughout the U.S., garden roofs (or living roofs) are growing in popularity with more than 5.5 million square feet installed in 2014, according to Green Roofs for Healthy Cities. Most of that total was for private rather than public projects, indicating this is not just a government trend. In addition to providing attractive and usable open space, garden roofs offer environmental benefits, such as helping to slow and filter urban run-off.

Some of America’s largest companies have installed green roofs. Ford’s Dearborn, Mich., truck plant final assembly building sports one of the world’s largest living roofs at 454,000 square feet. In 2015, Facebook opened its MPK 20 office building in Menlo Park, Calif., with a 9-acre living roof featuring a 1/2-mile walking trail and more than 400 trees.

If you haven’t worked on a garden roof yet, it is likely only a matter of time until you do.

Addressing the Challenges of Garden Roofs

Weighing a fraction of soil, EPS geofoam fill creates ultra-lightweight landscaped features on Facebook’s garden roof.

Weighing a fraction of soil, EPS geofoam fill creates ultra-lightweight landscaped features on Facebook’s garden roof.


Adding plants and park-like amenities to a roof increases the complexity of the roofing assembly. Garden roofs present two primary challenges for roofing professionals to solve: minimizing the dead load and preventing moisture intrusion.

The project team for the Facebook MPK 20 building’s green roof met this two-fold need—and more—with expanded polystyrene (EPS) geofoam.

Weighing considerably less than soil, EPS geofoam is an ultra-lightweight engineered fill that can be used to create contoured landscape features, such as hills and valleys. The material weighs from 0.7 to 2.85 pounds per cubic foot, depending on the product type specified, compared to 110 to 120 pounds per cubic foot for soil.

Despite its low weight, EPS geofoam is designed for strength and has better load bearing capacity than most foundation soils. Geofoam’s compressive resistance ranges from approximately 2.2 psi to 18.6 psi (317 to 2,678 pounds per square foot) at a 1 percent deformation, depending on the product.

The garden roof on Facebook’s MPK 20 building provides ample open space and a half-mile walking trail for employees.

The garden roof on Facebook’s MPK 20 building provides ample open space and a 1/2-mile walking trail for employees.

EPS geofoam is also effective at addressing the second challenge of garden roofs: managing moisture absorption. The moisture performance of the various components in a green roof assembly is critical; retained water imposes additional loads on the roof and increases the risk of water damage to the roof assembly. EPS geofoam meeting ASTM D6817 standards works well here as it only absorbs 2 to 4 percent moisture by volume, even over long-term exposure, and it dries quickly. The moisture performance of EPS has been demonstrated in extensive in-situ applications and real-world testing, including research conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory. After burying EPS in wetted soil for nearly three years, the lab found that the material absorbed only 1.7 percent moisture by volume.

In addition to enabling lightweight, durable landscape features and helping to defend against water, EPS geofoam provides thermal insulation in garden roofs. Roofing professionals have used EPS insulation in roof assemblies for decades because it offers the highest R-value per dollar among rigid foam insulations.

Expect More Demand

Although green roofs currently account for a small portion of the billions of square feet of roofs in the U.S., expect to see more demand for them given their aesthetic and environmental benefits. High-performance materials, like EPS geofoam, can help provide a long-lasting, durable green roof assembly.

PHOTOS: Insulfoam

Manufacturers Partner to Offer Polyiso

Fabral has partnered with Atlas Roofing Corp. to provide closed-cell foam insulation, also known as polyiso, for reducing thermal conductivity between the interior and exterior of a building.

Fabral has partnered with Atlas Roofing Corp. to provide closed-cell foam insulation, also known as polyiso, for reducing thermal conductivity between the interior and exterior of a building.

Fabral has partnered with Atlas Roofing Corp. to provide closed-cell foam insulation, also known as polyiso, for reducing thermal conductivity between the interior and exterior of a building. Fabral offers three insulation products—ACFoam-III, ACFoam Nail Base and ACFoam CrossVent and fasteners—to simplify the ordering process for its customers. Suited for Fabral standing-seam metal roof systems, polyiso is manufactured using CFC-, HFC- and HCFC-free foam technology and is recognized by GREENGUARD as resistant to mold. The insulation offers high-unit R-value per inch, fire performance, no ozone depletion potential, and can be recycled or reused.

Prefabricated Edge Metal Helps Shape Unique Roofs on a Georgia Hospital

To expand its services and make it easier for patients and visitors to navigate its facility, Gordon Hospital, Calhoun, Ga., underwent a $37 million expansion. The project added 59,000 square feet of hospital space, renovated 11,500 square feet of space, and created a new patient tower entrance to separate inpatient and outpatient service entrances. The various aspects of the project included 11 different roof areas, so the project’s general contractor, the Atlanta office of Birmingham, Ala.-based Brasfield & Gorrie, brought Atlanta’s Diamond Roofing Co. into the project during concept design.

The architects designed all the curves and unique walls to make the campus beyond ordinary and give the hospital a certain appeal.

The architects designed all the curves and unique walls to make the campus beyond ordinary and give the hospital a certain appeal.

“The hospital addition and renovation was still just a sketch and a narrative, and we worked together to understand the owner’s needs and architect’s intent,” says Dave Mossige, Diamond Roofing’s president. “Roofing systems have be- come very complex over the years and it really does take a roofing specialist to navigate the numerous options and decide the best roofing systems for the project.”

Having the roofing contractor onboard from inception also helped with staging. When it became apparent that two canopies between the new and existing buildings would pose significant challenges with materials’ access, the team was able to plan ahead and stock-pile materials near the area months pri- or to needing them.

GETTING THINGS LEVEL

Because this was a fast-track project, 10 to 15 crew members worked across multiple roof areas. “All the other trades come in behind us once we have the roof ready, so getting the roof area dried-in was key to the schedule,” Mossige says. “That’s why we chose a more durable two-ply modified bitumen rather than a single-ply system for the roofing. Disturbances that happened to the base while the trades were working off the roofs could be quickly and easily repaired before we applied the cap sheet.”

The roofing areas added up to 25,400 square feet of space, including the main roof, penthouse and various other canopies. The main roof on the new addition was unique because it was divided into two portions: one with a steel deck and another with a concrete deck for future vertical expansion. The concrete deck was 5-inches higher than the steel deck.

To make the steel deck meet the thickness of the adjacent concrete deck for a level roof, Diamond Roofing’s team mechanically fastened 5 inches of polyisocyanurate insulation on the steel and then installed a 1/4-inch-per-foot-total tapered ISO system. The team then applied a cover board to increase the system’s wind rating and provide better adhesion of the base ply. The tapered system and cover board were set in ribbons of low-rise foam adhesive. The next layer was an SBS modified bitumen as a cold-process adhesive and then a fire-rated granular cap sheet, also set in a cold-process adhesive.

Although Diamond Roofing has a sheet-metal shop in which team members fabricate edge metal, it worked with a supplier to source prefabricated edge metal that had been formally tested to meet or exceed the hospital's required FM 1-105 criterion.

Although Diamond Roofing has a sheet-metal shop in which team members fabricate edge metal, it worked with a supplier to source prefabricated edge metal that had been formally tested to meet or exceed the hospital’s required FM 1-105 criterion.

PRECISE EDGE METAL

Although Diamond Roofing has a sheet-metal shop in which team members fabricate edge metal, most of the roofing firm’s product is equivalent to a wind rating of FM 1-60 and FM 1-90. FM approval ratings apply to uplift pressures in pounds per square foot. Hospitals are constructed to stricter standards, however, and officials at Gordon Hospital wanted to ensure an FM 1-105 approval rating. Diamond Roofing worked with a supplier to source prefabricated edge metal that had been formally tested to meet or exceed the FM 1-105 criterion.

The ability to order the sheer volume of edge metal needed also saved time on the project. “We had over 2,500 lineal feet of edge metal on this project. That would’ve taken us three weeks to fabricate,” Mossige explains. “In addition, the highly unique specifications of the edge metal needed for the project made it more cost-effective for us to outsource it.”

The edge metal needed to be a heavy gauge of 0.063 prefinished aluminum with a protective Kynar 500 resin-based coating. The architects also wanted welded mitered corners. In certain places on the roofs, unusual radiuses and slopes—occasionally joining with straight coping at offset angles—meant some inside and outside miters had to be exactingly produced for odd angles like 104 and 140 degrees.

For example, on one parapet, two different elevations come together at a corner, making precision critical for the manufacturer and installer. “When you are dealing with preformed metal, you have to be precise,” Mossige notes, “but when you’re doing a raised, offset miter, you have to be perfect.”

PHOTOS: OMG EDGESYSTEMS

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Air and Vapor Barrier Creates a Seal Between a Low-slope Roofing System and the Building Below

F1 Air & Vapor Barrier from Mule-Hide Products Co.

F5 Air & Vapor Barrier from Mule-Hide Products Co.

F5 Air & Vapor Barrier from Mule-Hide Products Co. allows contractors to quickly and easily create an air- and vapor-tight seal between a low-slope roofing system and the building below.

F5 Air & Vapor Barrier is compatible with a wide variety of roofing systems and can be used on primed substrates, including concrete, plywood, exterior gypsum, DensDeck Prime and SECUROCK. It also can serve as a temporary roof for up to 120 days while work on the finished roofing system is completed.

The membrane is a 40 mil-thick composite consisting of 35 mils of self-adhering rubberized asphalt laminated to a 5 mil-thick woven polypropylene film. Rolls are 39 inches wide and 75 feet long and cover approximately 244 square feet of substrate surface.

F5 Air & Vapor Barrier’s factory-controlled thickness helps ensure that the membrane has uniform barrier properties, reducing moisture movement through the roofing system and helping keep conditioned air inside the building and unconditioned air outside. The woven polypropylene film makes the membrane highly resistant to tears and punctures. The non-skid surface helps keep contractors safe on the job site and is suitable for the bonding of subsequent layers of the roofing system.

A siliconized one-piece release liner prevents the material from bonding to itself in the roll and is easily removed during installation of the barrier.

Duro-Last Achieves Gold Certification for All Membrane Product Lines

Duro-Last has achieved gold certification for all membrane product lines under the NSF American National Standard for Sustainable Roofing Membranes – NSF/ANSI 347. Certified by UL, this standard represents that Duro-Last manufactures a product that is third-party verified as sustainable, durable and high performing. The certification applies to Duro-Tuff, Duro-Fleece and Duro-Last EV membranes, in addition to Duro-Last membrane, which was certified in 2015.

With the certification of these four product lines, Duro-Last has the most roofing membrane product lines certified in the industry—furthering the company’s commitment to sustainability and transparency.

“Duro-Last believes in the importance of sustainability,” says Jason Tunney, Duro-Last’s executive vice president and general counsel. “These third-party certifications confirm what we already know about our products.”

Duro-Last has worked with UL for many years on product testing, including the UL 790 Spread of Flame Test, UL 1256 Direct to Deck (insulation) and the UL 2218 Hail Impact Test. As the sustainability business division of UL, a premier global independent safety science company that has championed progress for 120 years, UL Environment works to advance global sustainability, environmental health, and safety by supporting the growth and development of environmentally preferable products, services, and organizations.

NSF/ANSI 347 was developed by the NSF National Center for Sustainability Standards (NCSS) through a consensus-based public process with a multi-stakeholder group of participants and, according to their website, is based on life-cycle assessment principles. NSF/ANSI 347 employs an easy-to-use point system to evaluate roofing membrane products against established prerequisite requirements, performance criteria and quantifiable metrics in five key areas:

  • Product design
  • Product manufacturing
  • Membrane durability
  • Corporate governance
  • Innovation

Obtaining this certification will help Duro-Last’s membranes meet the market demand for products that comply with green building standards and codes like the Green Building Initiative’s Green Globes and the International Green Construction Code (IgCC). Product specifiers and purchasers are under pressure to find products that meet their sustainability criteria, and having the NSF/ANSI 347 certification can give them the peace of mind of specifying a third-party verified product.

Duro-Last has also published environmental product declarations (EPDs) for Duro-Tuff, Duro-Fleece and Duro-Last EV membranes. This is in addition to the previously published EPD for Duro-Last membrane—the first product-specific PVC EPD in the North American roofing industry.

Certified by NSF International, the Duro-Last EPD reports environmental impact data, which assists building contractors, architects and designers in making more informed purchasing decisions. EPDs are increasingly used across many industries to enable product manufacturers to bring transparent environmental data to customers.

“Duro-Last is proud to publish product-specific EPDs for PVC roofing,” Tunney says. “We have always known that the Duro-Last Roofing System is a durable, flexible, serviceable and recyclable product, and now these EPDs can give building owners and specifiers peace of mind.”

Increased Thermal Values Affect an Existing Roof Edge

Recent code and standard development has resulted in increased thermal insulation. This increase has required greater and greater insulation thicknesses, which are even thicker when
tapered insulation is added. This roof system thickness, especially in reroofing design, has thrown a curveball to many designers: How should they address existing rooftop conditions?

On a recent project in which the roof sustained a wind event, investigation for the design of the new roof edge and system found multiple concerns: open metal stud cavities to the parapet, open metal panel joints, wood and substrate boards attached with drywall wall screws and moisture drive concerns. This information led to the design of one of the author’s most complicated roof edges.

Photo 1: On a recent project in which the roof sustained a wind event, investigation for the design of the new roof edge and system found multiple concerns: open metal stud cavities to the parapet, open metal panel joints, wood and substrate boards attached with drywall wall screws and moisture drive concerns. This information led to the design of one of the author’s most complicated roof edges (see Figure 1).

I have successfully dealt with this for more than three decades and mostly with ease. However, based on the fight being put up by the Chicago Roofing Contractors Association (CRCA), you would think it is putting contractors out of business rather than having the potential to increase their bottom lines.

Consequently, this will be the first of several articles discussing how designers can deal with existing conditions on the roof when increased thermal values are required. This article will explain the roof edge—the first defense against wind uplift and often an aesthetic concern. Future topics will include drains, roof curbs, access doors, windows, RTUs and plumbing vents.

WHY THE NEED

Twenty-five or 30 years ago, insulation was what you placed on the roof deck to act as a separator between the roof cover and roof deck, especially with the increased use of fluted steel decks instead of monolithic-type decks, like concrete, gypsum, wood and cementitious wood fiber. Prior to that, roof covers were often placed directly on these monolithic roof decks sans insulation.

On a recent project in which the roof sustained a wind event, investigation for the design of the new roof edge and system found multiple concerns: open metal stud cavities to the parapet, open metal panel joints, wood and substrate boards attached with drywall wall screws and moisture drive concerns. This information led to the design of one of the author’s most complicated roof edges.

Figure 1: On a recent project in which the roof sustained a wind event, investigation for the design of the new roof edge and system found multiple concerns: open metal stud cavities to the parapet, open metal panel joints, wood and substrate boards attached with drywall wall screws and moisture drive concerns. This information led to the design of one of the author’s most complicated roof edges (see Photo 1).

It has only been within the last 25 to 30 years that insulation has become an integral component of the roof system, often changing how the roof cover behaved. As energy and the conservation of energy became vogue, codes and standards became more stringent in regard to thermal insulation values. With the increase in R-value came an increase in the thickness of insulation. This in turn requires roof edges be higher to accommodate the increases in insulation, ultimately changing how the roof edge on buildings without parapets are designed.

Stacking wood to raise the roof edge is old school. Here you can see the new wood blocking is the second stacking over previously installed wood on a previous reroof.

Photo 2: Stacking wood to raise the roof edge is old school. Here you can see the new wood blocking is the second stacking over previously installed wood on a previous reroof.

The use of tapered insulation with thicknesses often above 12 inches changed how the roof edge is treated, especially in reroofing situations, which has resulted in design challenges. Add to this, modern building design that forewent parapets for gravel stop; the challenge of raising the roof edge to accommodate new insulation heights has dramatically increased.

The Washington, D.C.-based American Institute of Architects has issued a challenge to the design community to make all new construction Zero Energy Buildings (buildings that produce as much energy as they use) by 2030. Intuitively, more insulation (and perhaps fewer windows) will result in a building that uses less energy and, thus, more easily achieves a balance point.

To strengthen the multiple stacks of 2xs, 3/4-inch plywood is being added on the exterior.

Photo 3: To strengthen the multiple stacks of 2xs, 3/4-inch plywood is being added on the exterior.

This altruistic, far-reaching goal is being fought. CRCA, for example, is fighting the new code increases in roof insulation. Although the organization states a variety of reasons, it appears that the fear of owners delaying work that costs more because of increased insulation thickness is the greatest concern. This is interesting because design—by state mandate—is the purvey of licensed design professionals. Is the CRCA advocating design by non-licensed designers? I believe the CRCA’s position is foolish. Why would a predominately union-based contractor organization fight a code mandate that allows their members to increase profits? Perhaps the challenge by “right to work contractors” is greater than believed.

CONCERNS: LEGITIMATE OR NOT

There are a number of concerns, or design challenges, as I like to say, to raising the roof edge. For us architects, respecting the architect’s vision and design intent is often in conflict with what may need to be accomplished. I have worked with clients in buildings of note, designed by well-known architects, and have been able to respect every detail of the roof-edge vision. It is very difficult and challenging.

When stacking, wood joints should be offset and scarfed at 45 degrees.

Photo 4: When stacking, wood joints should be offset and scarfed at 45 degrees.

Another concern can be cost. Historically, a dimensional 2x was set at the roof edge and nailed; now we often raise the roof edge with prefabricated insulated curbs. Costs are always a concern but when budgeted correctly and the client is informed during the process, the project has always been realized within a year or two.

Another concern I often hear voiced is, “It’s difficult” or “I cannot figure it out”. When one considers that the roof edge must be (let’s say should be) tied to the building structure to resist wind loads, these are true concerns. These types of conditions often call on years of experience. Therefore, I say the challenge is on!

On this detail from an older project, the roof edge is being raised with multiple layers of 2 by 12s—a bit old school but easily performed. It is recommended to not specify preservative- treated wood, coated screws and off-set joints.

Figure 2: On this detail from an older project, the roof edge is being raised with multiple layers of 2 by 12s—a bit old school but easily performed. It is recommended to not specify preservative- treated wood, coated screws and off-set joints.

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Manufacturer Donates Roofing Materials and More to Camp that Assists Veterans Suffering from Brain Trauma

Rick Briggs is in his element. The retired Air Force major has just spent the better part of the afternoon chatting with a steady stream of military veterans and their families, all of whom have come to get a closer look at Camp Liberty, a rehab facility of sorts designed to help wounded soldiers and those suffering from brain trauma.

Camp Liberty, Brooklyn, Mich., is a rehab facility designed to help wounded soldiers and those suffering from brain trauma.

Camp Liberty, Brooklyn, Mich., is a rehab facility designed to help wounded soldiers and those suffering from brain trauma.

Now, he’s enjoying a drive through the property’s northwest end in a Polaris multi-seat ATV. He is away from the crowds. Away from the rumblings of the nearby roads. Away from the jack-hammering of the nearby construction. All that can be heard now is the gurgling of the nearby Raisin River and the wind gently bending the wildflowers in a vast field within the 137-acre complex. Briggs points to a landmark in the distance and begins to tell one of his favorite stories. It’s apparent that he’s told this tale many times in the past year.

Just last year, Briggs recalls, Britani Lafferty, a 29-year-old veteran who spent time in Iraq as a combat medic, visited the Camp Liberty site. Suffering from debilitating physical and mental wounds from her tour, Lafferty tried countless medical treatments to no avail. Desperate for something that might work, Lafferty turned to the healing power of nature. Invited to spend time at Camp Liberty, Lafferty tried her hand at deer hunting. From a blind overlooking the Raisin River, Lafferty bagged her very first buck. And for Camp Liberty, it marked the first successful hunt for their program.

To Briggs, the moment symbolized that Lafferty could overcome her own afflictions, that she was still able to do things without the help of others. This is the sort of therapy Briggs and the Camp Liberty project hope to impart. “I know vets who are really dealing with severe difficulties,” Briggs says. “They don’t want to be around people. They won’t go to a mall. They won’t go to a movie. We have actually gotten them out here and back to where they can get out and start doing stuff.”

And that’s Camp Liberty’s ultimate goal. “When we get out here doing recreation with guys, it gives them the opportunity to listen and realize that PTSD is treatable,” Briggs adds. “These guys don’t want to believe it. They don’t want to think about it. They don’t want to admit they’re dealing with it. ”

The story of Lafferty is just one example of what Briggs thinks could be a new way to tackle the effects of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) to the body and mind. With the construction of a new program facility, scheduled to be completed by the end of the year, the full vision of Briggs and his childhood friend Allan Lutes is within reach.

Lutes and Briggs aim to construct a wilderness recreation facility focused on helping military veterans recover from debilitating injuries, brain trauma, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Frustrated by the lack of attention paid to veterans (just two years ago, Michigan ranked dead last in the U.S. in military spending on vets), the two vowed to make a difference. And after years of planning, preparation and fundraising, the project, which is located just a few miles from the Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, is nearly complete.

From hunting to fishing to kayaking, Camp Liberty offers veterans a quiet, tranquil location where rehabilitation can flourish.

From hunting to fishing to kayaking, Camp Liberty offers veterans a quiet, tranquil location where rehabilitation can flourish.

With the help of volunteer crews, Lutes and Briggs are overseeing one of the last steps of the project, the construction of a 2,880-square-foot, handicapped accessible lodge that has taken shape over the past five months. Upon completion, the three-bedroom, two-bathroom structure will allow injured veterans and their families to lengthen their stay and take advantage of all of the outdoor activities the massive site has to offer—and it won’t cost them a cent.

Amidst this huge habitat stand 10 state-of-the-art hunting blinds and wildlife observation towers, all fully handicapped accessible. Along with guided hunting expeditions, the veterans can fish in the nearby Raisin River, hike along numerous nature trails, and enjoy the serenity of a reflection area and outdoor chapel. From hunting to fishing to kayaking, Camp Liberty offers veterans—particularly those who have suffered injuries in combat or are challenged by traumatic brain injuries or post-traumatic stress disorder—a quiet, tranquil location where rehabilitation can flourish.

“Hunting is just a small part of what we offer here,” Lutes notes. “Every inch of this facility has been thought through as a way of something that is going to make someone feel comfortable, feel at peace, feel part of nature, and be able to reflect on their life.”

An ambitious project like this doesn’t just happen, of course. The financial barriers would be too daunting for most people, even if they were smart enough to come up with such a unique vision. Briggs, Lutes and the Camp Liberty team have raised close to $300,000 toward their building projects and have recruited volunteers to help with completing the site’s projects. The primary contributor, Lutes adds, has been the Eisenhower Center, the country’s leading brain injury facility, which has donated more than $200,000 to the project. Among a bevy of donors, Atlas Roofing Corp. has provided almost $30,000 in building products for the construction of the program facility, including the ThermalStar Radiant Comfort in-floor heat panels that will regulate heating within the complex, ThermalStar LCI-SS insulated structural sheathing, AC Foam Crossvent Insulation roofing product, WeatherMaster Ice and Water Shield, Gorilla Guard EverFelt Underlayment and Pinnacle Pristine Green Shingles.

“I think the right word [to describe his reaction to the financial support] would be overjoyed,” Lutes says. “Overjoyed that other people have bought into our vision, that other people have seen the value and need for helping our veterans and to help people who have mobility issues enjoy the outdoors. I mean, that is really heartwarming.”

Atlas Roofing Corp. has provided almost $30,000 in building products for the construction of the program facility.

Atlas Roofing Corp. has provided almost $30,000 in building products for the construction of the program facility.

To Charlene Zezawa, the project would have been stalled from the outset had it not been for Briggs’ uncanny ability to advocate for the camp’s vision. She was so taken by a presentation by Briggs at a golf fundraiser several years ago, Zezawa signed on to help out. Before she knew it, she was asked to serve on Camp Liberty’s board of directors as its secretary. Briggs’ passion is contagious, she said. “Rick is the best fundraising person I have ever met in my entire life,” Zezawa states. “He will go after it. You have to have heart and Rick has heart. That’s what drives him.”

Zezawa is among a steady stream of volunteers who have lent a hand. Throughout the summer, members of the Jackson County Habitat for Humanity jumped on board to lead the construction of the program facility’s foundation, structure and roof. The crew, ranging in age from 60 to 93, spent the better part of the summer in what crew chief David Behnke called “a wonderful experience”. “If you can’t get behind this project, you can’t get behind anything,” he says.

A.J. Mikulka is a 33-year old Army National Guard veteran who has been hunting since she was a kid, learning how to carry a shotgun from her father. She is not unlike many of the veterans that Lutes and Briggs hope to help. On Aug. 9, 2007, Mikulka, serving in Mosul, Iraq, was in the midst of helping to train Iraqi police when the station started taking enemy fire. When she stepped out from behind a barricade, insurgent forces launched a rocket-propelled grenade. “It was a direct hit. It took my leg clean off,” she recalls. Mikulka now walks with a prosthetic, which is attached to her leg just below the knee.

Her physical recovery didn’t take nearly as long as the emotional recovery, though. Mikulka believes the mental recuperation offered by Camp Liberty will have a “profound effect” on wounded veterans like herself. “There’s always going to be stuff that you deal with [emotionally],” she says. “I know a lot of [injured veterans] who are still dealing with it years later. The hard part for me was [dealing with] the loss of career.”

Lutes and Briggs hope that Camp Liberty will be a place that people like Mikulka can come to heal and feel “normal again.” Research supports their hunch. A 2013 study by the University of Michigan indicated that time spent in nature can improve cognitive abilities, particularly for those who suffer from post-deployment issues. “The research clearly shows that extended outdoor recreation helps combat-injured veterans,” Briggs notes. “And the more severe their injuries, the more significant the outcomes.”

It’s nearly impossible to not come away impressed by what has happened in this remote area in southeastern Michigan. Roger Barnett, a 66-year-old veteran, who was “in the mud” in Vietnam, spent an afternoon with his wife Dottie chatting with other visitors at a recent Camp Liberty open house. “It’s just really great to have for these guys with disabilities,” Barnett states. “It’s all set up for them. It’s all set up for recreation, for them [to have] some kind of an outlet and get together and spend time in front of the fireplace and relax. It’s great. It’s just what they need.”

Now, Briggs and Lutes are just antsy to get the construction completed. While they enjoy bringing attention to Camp Liberty, raising funds and chatting with the press, they’re eager for the property to begin hosting those who need it the most. “We hope to be able to help the veterans realize that they may have a TBI issue or a PTSD issue and that there is a treatment option that can improve it without them sacrificing their jobs, their military rating or their relationships,” Lutes says. “We’ve proven to ourselves that what we do can change lives for the better.”