Preserve, Protect and Defend

Our thoughts about government get intertwined with our images of the buildings that house its institutions. Architects know this, and in their designs, they often strive to evoke the key principles governments aspire to—permanence, stolidity, common-sense functionality, even grandeur. These buildings can touch our emotions. They can inspire us.

But no building lasts forever. When the time comes, talented individuals and enterprising companies have to step up and secure the integrity of these landmarks so they can survive to serve and inspire future generations.

The twin themes of this issue are government projects and historic renovation. Many of the projects you’ll see detailed on these pages would qualify in both categories, including three buildings that recently had iconic structures at their peaks meticulously restored. They include the copper pyramids on the North Carolina Legislative Building in Raleigh, North Carolina; the Saskatchewan Legislative Dome in Regina, Saskatchewan; and the Bradford County Courthouse Dome in Towanda, Pennsylvania.

The contractors involved in these projects conveyed the sense of responsibility that comes with keeping these one-of-a-kind structures functioning. But as they talked about the challenges they faced on these projects, it was the love of their jobs that kept coming through.

“We’re using natural, traditional building materials of stone, wood, copper and other noble metals,” said Philip Hoad of Empire Restoration Inc. in Scarborough, Ontario, as we talked about the Saskatchewan Dome project. “That’s what drives me to love the industry and my job—because it’s permanent, sustainable and it’s for future generations.”

Mike Tenoever of Century Slate in Durham, North Carolina, echoed that message when he talked about his company’s work on the North Carolina Legislative Building. “Our guys do this every single day, day in and day out,” he said. “It’s repetition, practice and love of restoration. Taking something so amazing and restoring it to the beauty it originally had—we all get a kick out of that.”

“You put in a hard day’s work and you’re proud to go home and know that what you’ve done is going to last not only your lifetime, but probably your kids’ lifetime, and maybe even your grandkids’ lifetime,” said Bill Burge of Charles F. Evans Roofing Company Inc. in Elmira, New York, as he detailed his company’s work on the Bradford County Courthouse.

Each of the roofing professionals I spoke with about these projects had the conscious goal of making sure the systems they installed might last another century. “We try to think of these slate and metal projects in terms of 100 years—that’s why we named our company Century Slate,” said Tenoever.

“This is the one thing that makes Charles F. Evans Company special to me: the fact that what we do from an architectural sheet metal standpoint, from a slate, copper, tile roof standpoint—these roofs will last 100, 150 years, and it is artwork,” Burge said.

“At the end of the day, why do we go to cities?” Hoad asked me. “We go to cities to look at their beautiful old buildings. We don’t generally go to look at their skyscrapers. It’s the old building that gets our minds and hearts working. When you go to a city and look at these old buildings intermingled with new buildings—that’s what gives a city life.”

National Roofing Contractors Association CEO Releases 2016 Elections Statement

William Good, CEO, National Roofing Contractors Association, has released a statement about the 2016 elections.

We are pleased a majority of candidates supported by the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) and ROOFPAC, our political action committee, prevailed in the 2016 elections. We congratulate President-elect Donald Trump and all winning candidates on their victories and look forward to working with the incoming Trump administration and new and returning lawmakers to advance NRCA’s policy agenda. This includes pro-growth tax policies, relief from some regulations, legislation that addresses the workforce needs of our industry, and replacement of the Affordable Care Act with market-based reforms to our health care system.

ROOFPAC, the voice of the roofing industry in Washington, D.C., actively supported pro-growth candidates in the elections. ROOFPAC invested more than $340,000 in support of 67 candidates during the 2015-16 election cycle and achieved a winning percentage of nearly 90 percent of candidates supported.

NRCA and ROOFPAC will continue to support members of Congress and other candidates who support government policies that enable roofing industry entrepreneurs to start and grow businesses.

Metal Roofing and Siding Enhance Waste Collection Building

The Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center celebrate the industrial chic nature of dealing with hazardous waste products with metal roofing and wall panels.

Metal roofing and siding help the Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center celebrate the industrial chic nature of dealing with hazardous waste products.

The city of Elk Grove, Calif.’s Special Waste Collection Center opened in April 2014 with a commitment to a cleaner and greener community. The center, which features AEP Span’s architectural metal panels, has earned LEED Gold Certification and, to date, has accepted nearly 300,000 pounds, or 130 tons, of recyclable materials diverted from local landfills.

“With the Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center project, we wanted to express and celebrate the industrial chic nature of dealing with hazardous waste products at the same time creating a safe, warm and comfortable environment for the center staff,” says Eric Glass, AIA, LEED AP and principal of Santa Rosa, Calif.-based firm Glass Architects. “The project is designed to take a heavily abused, neglected and contaminated site and revitalize it, turning it into a protected habitat.”

“Metal siding and roofing products were a natural choice for this project,” Glass adds. “The inherent durability and recycled content material speaks to the overall mission of this facility. The horizontal and vertical fluted siding creates a strong form and texture, enhancing the building’s character.”

The Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center project features AEP Span’s 24-gauge Reverse Box Rib in ZACtique II on the lower section of the wall application; 24-gauge HR-36 in Metallic Silver in the upper wall and canopy application; 24-gauge Prestige Series in Metallic Silver in a soffit application; 16-inch, 24-gauge SpanSeam in Hemlock Green in a roof application; and 24-gauge Curved Select Seam in Hemlock Green for the curved canopy application.

The $4.6 million center is the first, and only, facility of its kind in the nation powered by solar energy.

The $4.6 million center is the first, and only, facility of its kind in the nation powered by solar energy.

The $4.6 million center is the first, and only, facility of its kind in the nation powered by solar energy. Since its grand opening in April 2014, the center has been used by more than 8,000 customers to dispose of paint, cleaning supplies, electronics and other household recyclables. The center has also received nearly 1,000 visitors to the reuse room, which offers a wide variety of new or partially used products for free.

Project Details

Project: Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center, Elk Grove, Calif.
Architect: Glass Architects, Santa Rosa, Calif.
General Contractor: Bobo Construction Inc., Elk Grove
Installer: MCM Roofing, McClellan, Calif., (916) 333-5294
Manufacturer of Architectural Metal Panels: AEP Span