Firestone Building Products Names New Vice President of Sales

Firestone Building Products Company, LLC announced Jason Flack has been named vice president of sales. In this role, Flack will oversee domestic sales and new business development, carrying out strategies that drive global objectives and reinforce that “Nobody Covers You Better.” Flack will be based in Nashville.

“Jason has an exceptional background in sales planning and leadership that will help drive our strategic objectives and accelerate growth in key markets,” said Taylor Cole, president, FSBP. “He will play a key role in supporting the broader global vision for Firestone Building Products by advancing our culture of reliability and delivering customer-centric solutions and support to the market.”

Flack has more than 20 years of experience in management, sales and operations, most recently serving as west zone vice president for GCR Tires and Service (GCR), where he managed operations and market performance for the western United States. He worked closely with his teams in the field to build, execute and optimize strategic growth plans. Before GCR, Flack spent five years with FSBP as regional business manager and director of corporate accounts. He also spent 13 years with CertainTeed Corporation holdingprogressively responsible roles in field sales, business development, national account management and sales organization leadership.

Flack holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism with an emphasis in advertising from the University of Kansas.

For more information, visit www.firestonebpco.com.

Historic Colorado School Readies for Winter With New Metal Roof System

Ouray School recently underwent a two-phase renovation project that involved improvements to the structure, which was built in 1936. Improvements include a new standing seam metal roof and snow guards designed to withstand the area’s tough winters. Photos: S-5!

Historic Ouray School in Ouray, Colorado, has undergone several renovations in the last 80 years, and the latest included a new standing seam metal roofing system with a snow guard system designed to ensure the safety of students, faculty and visitors.

The original school was built in 1883, when the school district was founded. That original structure was destroyed by fire in 1936, when a new facility was constructed adjacent to the original site. Additions were made to the school in the 1970s, in the 1990s and in 2003. After a full assessment in 2014, the existing facilities were found to be structurally safe and worthy of a thorough renovation, including the addition of a standing seam metal roof that covered the entire building, additions and all.

“We kept the slope at 2:12 because we didn’t want the roof sticking up real high,” says Joel Cox, AIA, of RTA Architects in Colorado Springs, Colorado. “After the first winter, everything is performing the way everyone expects it to be performing.”

The project was a two-phase renovation that involved improvements to the original structure, erected in 1936. The redesigned facility includes innovative 21stcentury learning spaces to support modern curriculum delivery and an emphasis on safety for all students and staff.

The New Roof and Snow Guards

Douglass Colony Group of Commerce City, Colorado, installed 18,000 square feet of standing seam metal roofing from Firestone. The snow guard system selected for the Ouray School was ColorGard from S-5!, with a Charcoal Grey insert to match the standing seam panels.

According to Anthony Sanchez, superintendent on the project, Douglass Colony crews began by installing the fascia, soffits, gutters and downspouts. One of the more unusual facets of the project were the metal details installed at the top of the walls, which were recreated to closely replicate the historic look. “We built each individual piece,” Sanchez notes. “We installed them along with the fascia, and then installed the gutter, drip edge and receiver flashing for the roof.”

Crews from Douglass Colony installed the Firestone Una-Clad UC-6 double-lock standing seam panels. Once the roof system was in place, crews installed approximately 1,600 linear feet of the S-5! ColorGard snow guard system. Photos: S-5!

The standing seam metal roof was installed on top of a nail base and Firestone CLAD GARD SA high-temperature underlayment. After the roll former was lifted into place, the Una-Clad UC-6 double-lock standing seam panels were rolled out directly onto the roof, where they were staged for installation. The installation went smoothly, Sanchez notes, despite the number of hips and ridges. “We followed all of the Firestone details,” he says.

The double-lock standing seam system was specified for its durability, as the area typically experiences tough winter weather. “We used the 180-degree seam because of the elevation,” Sanchez says.

Once the roof system was in place, approximately 1,600 linear feet of the snow guard system was installed. Depending on the length of the standing seam metal panel, some sections required two or three rows of S-5! ColorGard.

“We wanted a continuous snow guard system, instead of individual plastic pieces that are screwed down through the roof,” says Cox. “The ColorGard is attached without penetrating the roof and it performs better, that’s the main reason we installed it on the Ouray School. There is pedestrian traffic on three sides of the building, so preventing snow and ice from sliding off the roof was obviously important.”

Cox credits his S-5! rep with suggesting the best layout for the project. “We have one row about one foot up from the eave, a second row about a quarter way up the roof and another row about midway up the roof, spaced in line with S-5! suggestions,” he notes.

The snow bar system was easy to install, according to Sanchez. The non-penetrating system attaches to the standing seams with set screws. “We just followed the pattern they laid out,” Sanchez says.

Weather was not an issue on the project, and despite the remote location, the jobsite didn’t pose any real difficulties, according to Sanchez. “The days were pretty short, though, as there were mountains on both sides,” he notes.

In addition to the new sloped roof and attic addition, the renovated school features south and southeast vestibule additions, security upgrades, new entry steps, new windows, HVAC system upgrades, a fully replaced fire alarm system to meet current codes and the addition of a full, building sprinkler system.

TEAM

Architect: RTA Architects in Colorado Springs, Colorado, www.rtaarchitects.com
Roofing Contractor: Douglass Colony Group, Commerce City, Colorado, www.douglasscolony.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: Una-Clad UC-6, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com
Underlayment: CLAD GARD SA, Firestone Building Products
Snow Guards: ColorGard, S-5!, www.s-5.com

Firestone Building Products Celebrates Renaming of Waukesha Facility

Firestone Building Products Company LLC (FSBP), celebrated the renaming of its Gaco Western plant in Waukesha, Wisconsin, with a ceremony including FSBP and Waukesha elected officials on Monday, Aug. 13.

“The Gaco facility has been a part of the Waukesha community for more than 30 years, and we want to thank the more than 100 team members for their hard work and commitment to making this facility one of the best manufacturing facilities in the area,” said Taylor Cole, president, FSBP. “They will continue to play a large role in our commitment to set the standard for trusted commercial roofing and building envelope solutions.”

FSBP officially acquired Gaco in 2017, enhancing the company’s leadership in the industry by increasing its portfolio of products. The addition of Gaco silicone and acrylic liquid coatings presents contractors with new, cost-effective products allowing for easier and less labor-intensive installation.

The Gaco facility in Waukesha, Wisconsin, employs more than 100 members of the community and accommodates more than 144,000 square feet of manufacturing, warehousing and distribution operations and produced more than 42 million pounds of product in the past year. In addition to producing Gaco’s innovative silicone roofing systems, waterproofing and spray foam insulation, the facility boasts a robust research and development group that focuses on technology and formulation developments.

For more information, visit http://firestonebpco.com.

Contractor Conquers Tough Weather, Tight Schedule

The roof on the new Goodman Logistics Center (the building on the right) encompasses more than 1 million square feet. The roof system installation met an aggressive timeline that spanned the winter months. Photo: Goodman Carlisle LLC

Goodman, an international commercial and industrial property group, approached Donald B. Smith Inc. of DBS Roofing in November 2017 to support the roofing of the company’s new Logistics Center in central Pennsylvania.

Founded in 1948, DBS Roofing is a second-generation, privately held company whose principles of quality and workmanship have earned the team countless awards. Among those honors include the Firestone Master Contractor recognition, the Baltimore Builder’s Exchange “Craftsman of the Year Award” and numerous industry publication recognitions for notable projects.

The Logistics Center roof was 1,010,000 square feet and was established on a very aggressive timeline that spanned through the tough Northeast winter months. The initial specifications of the job called for a mechanically fastened TPO roof system, which was going to be challenging with the size and timeline of the project. Additionally, the condensation levels in central Pennsylvania are not ideal for mechanically fastened solutions, as it would require applying a vapor barrier and foam around all perimeters, exceeding the original budget and schedule.

To save time and keep the project moving forward during the unfavorable winter conditions, DBS Roofing elected to use one of the company’s favorite “box world” solutions — Firestone Building Products (FSBP) UltraPly TPO SA with Secure Bond Technology.

Photo: Goodman Carlisle LLC

The TPO roofing system is comprised of a self-adhering membrane with factory applied, pressure sensitive adhesive and technology designed to ensure uniform adhesion coverage across the entire membrane. According to the manufacturer, the system can be installed in weather as cold as 20 degrees Fahrenheit.

“Commercial roofing in central Pennsylvania can be very challenging during the winter season, but Firestone UltraPly TPO SA allows our business to continue working through those conditions and prosper,” says Donnie Sanders, president of construction, DBS Roofing. “Being able to apply the Firestone TPO SA at 20 degrees resulted in a successful year for us.”

The Goodman Logistics Center roofing project began on November 1, 2017 and was completed on time March 1, 2018.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Donald B. Smith Roofing Inc., Hanover, Pennsylvania, www.dbsroofing.com
General Contractor: ARCO Design/Build Northeast, King Of Prussia, Pennsylvania, http://arcodbi.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: UltraPly TPO SA with Secure Bond Technology, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com
Insulation: 2.5-inch ISO, Firestone Building Products

Hospital Pedestrian Overpass Poses Logistical and Safety Challenges

The elevated pedestrian walkway at the BJC Healthcare/Washington University Medical Center complex connects the parking garages to buildings in the medical campus. It is approximately 1,200 feet long. Photo Paric Corporation and KAI Design & Build.

“The more complicated and complex the project, the more it is up our alley,” says Drew Bade, project manager for Bade Roofing Company in St. Louis, Missouri.

The company’s recent work roofing the new 1,200-foot-long elevated pedestrian walkway at the BJC Healthcare/Washington University Medical Center complex in St. Louis certainly qualifies as complex. The fully enclosed walkway connects the parking garages to buildings in the medical campus. Constructed atop 14 concrete pillars at an elevation of approximately 40 feet over busy roadways, the 13-foot-wide structure posed obvious logistical and safety challenges.

Bade Roofing’s union-affiliated workforce focuses on commercial projects, and the lion’s share of the company’s work is in the re-roofing arena. But for this new construction project, designed and executed through a joint venture between KAI Design & Build and Paric Corporation as part of a long-term project to update the medical campus, Drew Bade knew his company was the right candidate for the roofing portion of the job. The successful roofing installation proved him right. “We teamed up with Paric and KAI and made this thing happen,” says Bade.

The Roof System

The heated and air-conditioned walkway features carpeting, LED lighting, security intercoms, windows and metal wall panels. It also features a durable roof system. “It’s a walkway, but this thing was built like a tank,” notes Bade.

The walkway was constructed atop 14 concrete piers that elevate it over busy roadways. Photo Paric Corporation and KAI Design & Build.

The roof is a Firestone TPO system that includes R-20 polyiso insulation and a half-inch DensDeck cover board from Georgia-Pacific. The 60-mil UltraPly TPO membrane was attached using Firestone’s InvisiWeld induction welding system. The base of the system is the walkway’s 18-gauge steel deck, which features interior drains, scuppers and downspouts. Tapered insulation was used to provide proper drainage.

To make the project’s logistics even more complicated, work was scheduled on the fly as different areas of the walkway were completed. “There were some areas that weren’t built yet when we started to put this roof on,” Bade recalls. “It was a fluid situation. It was a challenge just to keep up with the changes, and we had to bounce around a lot. We couldn’t just start at one end and roof our way over to the other end. We had to hop around and handle what was finished at the time, tying the sections in together as they were completed.”

The short parapet walls were capped with edge metal after the roof was installed. “In some spots, after the roof was put on, it was more like a drip edge than a parapet,” Bade says. “At the highest, it was about 8 inches. We installed edge metal that tied into the metal wall panels they used on the sides of the bridge. It was all integrated together.”

Loading components proved tricky. “Getting material to each section and moving it around was a challenge in itself,” Bade explains. “We had to coordinate certain time frames that we could get our crane into an area to drop the material off. Because of how the safety systems were set up and how narrow this bridge was, you couldn’t really transport material along it very far. The crane essentially had to put the material right where it was going to go for that day.”

Loading the roof was usually done first thing in the morning, as use of the crane could mean blocking off roads or going into gated areas. “We’d try to beat all of the other trades in there,” Bade says.

The Safety Plan

The key to executing the project was finding the right safety plan. Initially the team explored the use of a

The Beamguard lifeline system from Guardian Fall Protection was installed in the center of the roof deck by workers in a boom lift. Photo Bade Roofing Company.

temporary guardrail system, but it proved infeasible due to the short parapet walls. “We use temporary guardrails on almost 100 percent of our projects, but the engineer came back and said the parapet walls weren’t strong enough to support a guardrail system,” Bade recalls.

The company looked for other options. “We looked at a special system that is more commonly used on road bridges during construction,” he says. “It uses a cable that runs between stanchions, and crew members can clip off to the cable.”

The system chosen was the Beamguard lifeline stanchion system from Guardian Fall Protection. The posts were attached to the steel I-beams every 30 feet. “We had to cut the metal deck out and clamp the posts to the I-beams,” Bade explains.

Crew members’ personal fall arrest systems were connected to the lifeline, but only two workers could tie off to the cable in between the stanchions. “We were tied off 100 percent of the time,” Bade says. “Safety was a huge issue for everyone on this project. There were no warnings. Everyone knew that if someone wasn’t tied off, they’d immediately be thrown off the job.”

The stanchions for the lifeline system were attached to the steel I-beams under the roof deck. Photo Bade Roofing Company.

The cable system posed some limitations on crew movement, which affected the delivery of materials. “With the cable system, you could only go so far because only two people could be tied off to a 30-foot section at a time. Essentially you had two guys walking 30 feet to hand insulation boards to the next two guys. It was kind of like a chain gang, moving material down each section of the roof.”

Ensuring the safety of pedestrians and vehicles below was also crucial. “There was a sidewalk area in the parking garage that was fully functional during the project, as there was a walkway constructed of scaffolding that offered overhead protection,” Bade notes.

However, other areas of sidewalk and roads had to be closed in order to complete work on some sections. “It depended where you were working that day,” Bade says. “Some areas of sidewalk had to be closed, and sometimes we had to redirect traffic. If you were working in areas without scaffolding, you would have to have two guys on the ground with flag lines directing traffic and blocking people off.”

One crucial section over a busy road posed some additional challenges. The three-lane road could only be shut down on one weekend. All of the trades had to complete their work that weekend, so the roofing installation had to be completed in just one day. “We did a 120-foot stretch of the roof that crossed this main road, and we did it all on a Saturday. It was the only opportunity we had. Otherwise we would’ve had to pay to shut the road down lane-by-lane, as we went. We were lucky that we were able to get in there on that one day and finish the whole length.”

The roofing installation was completed in sections as they were constructed after the 18-gauge steel deck was in place. Photo Bade Roofing Company.

Communication between all of the companies involved in the project was essential, notes Bade. “The foremen for every trade met every morning before work started. All of the contractors on the project had their meeting every week to plan and go over everything,” he says. “There were multiple forms you had to fill out every morning. The paperwork on this project was flying like you wouldn’t believe.”

After the work was completed in each section, the safety system had to be disassembled and removed. The last chore completed on each portion of the roof was to fill in the patches of roofing material where the stanchions had been. Workers completed these last steps tied off to a snorkel lift.

Despite the logistical hurdles, the project went smoothly and feedback has been positive, notes Bade. “It ended up being a great project for us,” he says. “It turned out really nice.”

It’s just another tough project now in the rear-view mirror. “The coordination, the safety, and the complexity of the actual roof system itself — not that it was necessarily a difficult roof to install, but given where it was, and how difficult it was to access — it all shows how dedicated and skilled our company is,” Bade concludes. “I don’t think there are a lot of companies out there that could do this project.”

TEAM

Architect: KAI Design & Build, St. Louis, www.kai-db.com
General Contractor: Joint venture between KAI Design & Build and Paric Corporation, St. Louis, www.paric.com
Roofing Contractor: Bade Roofing Company, St. Louis, www.baderoofing.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 60-mil UltraPly TPO, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com
Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.densdeck.com

Firestone Building Products Recognizes Top Partner Contractors

Firestone Building Products announced the list of top partner firms that have earned recognition as Master Contractor, Platinum Master Contractor, Inner Circle of Quality and Partner in Quality, as well as the firms inducted into the 2018 Master Contractor Hall of Fame. These highly regarded programs recognize the most outstanding FSBP commercial roofing contractors in North America and Latin America.

“At Firestone Building Products, we strive to set the standard in commercial roofing and building solutions, but we cannot do it alone,” said Taylor Cole, president, Firestone Building Products. “These contractors share our culture of reliability and the relentless pursuit of excellence, and they deserve nothing less than some of the longest-running recognitions in the commercial roofing industry.”

The Master Contractor Program recognizes the top 5 percent of Red Shield Licensed Roofing Contractors based on the quality and square footage of installed systems covered by the Red Shield Warranty, including RubberGard EPDM, UltraPly TPO, asphalt and metal roofing systems.

The designation of Platinum Master Contractor is awarded to the top 1 percent of Red Shield Licensed Roofing Contractors who accrued the highest number of quality points for superior inspection ratings and total square footage of Red Shield warranted roofing system installations completed during the past year.

Master Contractors are also eligible for the Inner Circle of Quality award by installing at least four warranted roofs in 2013 and eight warranted roofs each year thereafter, maintaining at least 2 million square feet of FSBP roofs under warranty and achieving a preferred annual Quality Incidence Rating (QIR). Click here to view the list of Master Contractors and those who earned the Inner Circle of Quality award.

FSBP inducted the 2018 class of the Master Contractor Hall of Fame during the Master Contractor event in February, recognizing long-standing partners for their exemplary craftsmanship, superior leadership and overall distinguished presence within the commercial construction industry. The 2018 inductees are Douglass Colony Group, Herzog Roofing, Dixie Roof Decks Inc., CE Reeve Roofing a Tecta America Co. LLC, Olsson Roofing Company, Mid-South Roof Systems, York Roofing, Inc. and Holland Roofing.

“Each of the 2018 Master Contractor Hall of Fame inductees has earned this distinction as some of the best contractors in the commercial construction business through their continued exemplary work and dedication,” said Cole. “We look forward to partnering with each of these firms to drive the future of the commercial roofing and building industries.”

The designation of Partner in Quality is awarded to contractors who installed at least four warranted roofs in 2013 and eight warranted roofs each year thereafter, maintained 1 million square feet under warranty and achieved a preferred annual QIR. Click here to view a 2018 list of contractors recognized as an FSBP Partner in Quality.

For more information, visit http://firestonebpco.com.

Green and Sustainable Roof Systems Highlight Durham Custom Home

The custom home in Durham, North Carolina features a standing seam metal roof, a balcony, a roof deck and a garden roof. The carport roof is made from solar panels. Photo: David Solow.

When Alison Trott purchased a vacant corner lot in the historic Cleveland-Holloway neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina, she wanted to use the space to construct her dream home. She wasn’t sure exactly what she wanted, but she had several priorities in mind. “When I built the house, I wanted to try and focus on sustainability as much as possible,” says Trott. “I wanted to try to focus on green building, and I wanted to try to utilize local resources as much as possible — local materials, local builders, local companies, and local craftsmen.”

She worked with a talented team of design and construction professionals to bring her vision to life, and the sustainable roof systems on the home became a crowning focus of the project.

At some point in the design process, the architect mentioned the possibility of incorporating a garden roof, and Trott jumped at the idea. “I said, ‘I want that!’” Trott recalls. “I was very excited about the idea, but I’d only seen green roofs on large commercial projects.”

The Lead Architect

Tina Govan, now principal of Somos Design, located in Raleigh, North Carolina, hit it off with Alison Trott right away. The two worked together on the design for several years, inviting CUBE design + research, an architecture firm in nearby Chapel Hill, to collaborate on the project.

The goals included constructing a modern home that would blend in with the historic neighborhood. The house was also designed to be part of the natural landscape. A key priority was saving two large oak trees on the property. “We wrapped the house around the trees,” notes Govan. “That way the house bends to nature.”

The key themes of the overall design are exemplified by the roof systems. The house features a metal gable roof with a balcony at one end, echoing historic homes in the area. The 950-square-foot garden roof was installed over the master wing of the house, and the roof of the carport was constructed from solar panels.

“It’s a very green house,” Govan notes. “Solar panels over the carport take care of most of the energy needs of the home. The green roof replaces what was disturbed — the ground below — and brings it up. The green roof blends well with the landscape, and with it the house doesn’t seem as big.”

The green roof is visible from many parts of the house, including the roof deck, which is separated from it by a glass railing. “I love green roofs,” says Govan. “They replace habitat and make building softer. It’s alive. It’s so much more dynamic and rich than any other type of hardscape.”

The Builder

Bob Wuopio is the owner of Form Design/Build LLC, headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina. The company specializes in one-of-a-kind, complex projects, so this custom house was right up its alley. “We love unique projects,” Wuopio says. “Our preference is to make everything — the doorknobs, the pulls, the lights, the cabinets. We try to fabricate everything. That’s our niche.”

Located on a corner lot in the historic Cleveland-Holloway neighborhood, the modern home was designed to preserve two large trees and wrap around a courtyard to provide privacy. Photo: David Solow.

Numerous custom details throughout the house put the company to the test. For its relatively small footprint — 3,400 square feet — the house has its fair share of different roofing systems. “We have almost every type of roof system on that project,” says Wuopio. “We have a standing seam metal roof on the high gable. We have standing seam metal roof that becomes a metal wall. We have a built-up roof with a floating deck and a glass railing system. There is a green roof over a whole wing of the house.”

Getting the deck and green roof areas sloped perfectly was essential, and that begins with the substructure. “Getting a roof with a slope of 1/8 inch per foot right requires a pretty good framer,” Wuopio notes.

Form Design/Build served as the general contractor on the project, and Wuopio was responsible for scheduling multiple trades at the site. One key concern was making sure that the low-slope roof system wouldn’t be damaged after it was installed. “You don’t want anyone poking holes in it,” says Wuopio. “We spray foamed underneath the deck, so if you did have a small leak, you might not notice it for years, potentially.”

Wuopio knew the roof under the garden roof assembly was crucial. “I knew we needed a bulletproof roof, so I called Jim Pickard. He knew exactly what we needed.”

The Roofing Contractor

James Pickard III is the owner and president of Pickard Roofing Company Inc. in Durham, North Carolina. He represents the third generation of his family to run the business, which is more than 90 years old.

Pickard Roofing handles all types of commercial and residential projects, including historical restoration work. Most of the company’s projects are within 25 miles of the office, including this one, which was just two miles down the road.

The red metal roof is complemented with matching half-round gutters, which incorporate “rain chains” as downspouts. Photo: David Solow.

Crews at the company don’t do as much hot-mop BUR work as they used to, but they still have that club in their bag for below-grade waterproofing projects and garden roof assemblies. For this green roof project, Pickard recommended a coal tar pitch roof system. “We use hot-mopped coal tar pitch in situations where the material is in constant contact with water because the pitch doesn’t degrade,” Pickard notes. “You don’t want to have to take the dirt off of a garden roof and start looking for leaks. You have to do everything you can to make sure nothing can cause problems.”

That includes making sure the deck is secured with screws and not nails, which can back out and damage the roof assembly. Gravel stops should either be copper or stainless steel so they won’t corrode. “The whole idea is permanence,” Pickard says.

The hot-mopped system manufactured by Durapax consists of four plies of tar-coated fiberglass felt, which were set in four layers of coal tar pitch. A fifth layer of pitch was added as a top coat.

Pickard Roofing also installed the metal roof system. Snap Lock panels were custom fabricated in the company’s metal shop from 24-gauge Kynar-coated steel from Firestone Building Products in a wine-red color chosen by the homeowner. A synthetic underlayment, Titanium PSU 30 from InterWrap, was applied to the wooden deck before the panels were secured in place.

“The great thing about the Snap Lock system is there is virtually no fastening through the face of the metal,” Pickard says.

The 950-square-foot green roof covers one wing of the house. Pre-vegetated sedum mats were installed in most of the green roof area, and native plants are also featured in areas with more growing media. Photo: Living Roofs Inc.

“The panels are secured with cleats and clips in the seams.”

Snow guards from Berger Brothers were attached to the seams using non-penetrating screws. Half-round gutters were fabricated from the same metal as the roof and complemented with “rain chains” that serve as downspouts.

Many of the copper details and flashings were custom fabricated on site. “One of our strengths is in our flashing design,” notes Pickard. “The company has a lot of soldering irons. We still use a lot of the old techniques.”

The roofing installations went smoothly. As Pickard Roofing completed the roofs on the home, crews from Southern Energy Management, headquartered in Morrisville, North Carolina, constructed the carport roof from partially transparent solar panels.

“Everyone’s priority was on doing the job right,” Pickard says. “In this case, the emphasis was on the quality, not just the cost. The cost is important, don’t get me wrong, but in this case the budget was increased if there was a product that could do the job better. Ultimately, you have to put the quality where it counts, and that’s why this project worked out so well.”

The Green Roof Installers

Landscape architect Kathryn Blatt Ancaya co-founded Living Roofs Inc. in Asheville, North Carolina, along with her husband, Emilio Ancaya. The company handles all aspects of green roof and living wall projects, including design, installation and long-term maintenance. “Our work ranges from small residential projects to large complex commercial and institutional projects — and of course, everything in between,” she says.

These photos show the roof right after it was installed (left) and after three months of growth. Photos: Living Roofs Inc.

Living Roofs is a certified installer with garden roof system manufacturer Xero Flor America LLC, which is headquartered in Durham. Clayton Rugh, the director of Xero Flor, contacted the Ancayas after Trott and Govan toured the company’s own garden roof. They asked for help designing a version of the company’s lightweight extensive roof system for the project. As Rugh notes, “One of the benefits of the Xero Flor green roof system is its adaptability to nearly any roof situation — load limits down to 10 pounds per square foot, dynamic slope changes between zero and 45 degrees, and compatibility with most commercial waterproofing, including TPO, PVC, modified bitumen and asphaltic BUR assemblies.”

“We collaborated with the architect, Tina Govan, and Xero Flor to design an extensive pre-vegetated green roof with areas of deeper soil to support native grasses and perennials,” Ancaya explains.

The Living Roofs crew installed the Xero Flor XF300 green roof system with growing media depths ranging from 2.5 to 5 inches. After the root barrier was installed over the coal tar pitch roof, it was covered with a drain mat and filter fleece. The growing medium was then lifted into place using a telehandler.

Most of the garden roof area was overlaid with pre-vegetated Xero Flor sedum mats. Plugs of herbaceous plants were inserted in the deeper areas. “The grasses we used were grown by Hoffman Nursery, a local grower, and we used perennials by North Creek Nursery,” Ancaya notes.

The sedum mats are an attractive option because they are fully covered when they are installed, notes Ancaya. “Incorporating the areas of deeper soil also allowed us to create a more dramatic visual effect by contrasting the low-growing Xero Flor mats with taller and more textured plants,” she says.

The green roof installation took less than eight hours over the course of two days. “Kate is the design arm of Living Roofs, and Emilio is the installation arm, and the two of them teamed up on this project to knock it out of the park,” Rugh says.

A Happy Home

Trott enjoyed watching the building process. “I learned a ton,” she says. “I just love watching craftsmen who are passionate about what they do. I had fun out there!”

The home was completed in the spring of 2017, and Trott is thrilled with the result. “It’s better than I even imagined it would be,” she says. “I love it, and my cats love it. In fact, I think they are pretty sure that I did all of this just to entertain them.”

The growth and changing color palette of the rooftop garden has been interesting to watch. “The green roof has been amazing,” she says. “It’s just been one year, but the green roof keeps getting lusher and lusher. Every feature is my favorite feature in the house, but the green roof — I love it. I really do.”

In fact, Trott has become something of a residential green roof ambassador. “I’ve been spreading the word,” she says.

TEAM

Architects: Tina Govan, Architect, Raleigh, North Carolina, www.somosdesign.us, in collaboration with CUBE design + research, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, www.cubedesignresearch.com
General Contractor: Form Design/Build LLC, Raleigh, North Carolina, www.formdesignbuild.org
Roofing Contractor: Pickard Roofing Company Inc., Durham, North Carolina, www.PickardRoofing.com
Green Roof Installer: Living Roofs Inc., Asheville, North Carolina, www.livingroofsinc.com
Solar Installer: Southern Energy Management, Morrisville, North Carolina, www.southern-energy.com

MATERIALS

Low-Slope System
Coal Tar Pitch: Coal Tar Roofing and Waterproofing Pitch, Durapax, www.Durapax.com
Fiberglass Felt: Tar Coated Fiber Felt, Durapax

Steep-Slope System
Synthetic Underlayment: Titanium PSU 30, InterWrap, www.InterWrap.com
Metal Panels: 24-gauge Kynar-coated steel, Firestone Building Products, www.FirestoneBPCO.com

Green Roof System
Extensive and Semi-Intensive Garden Roof: Xero Flor XF300, Xero Flor America LLC, Durham, North Carolina, www.xeroflornorthamerica.com

School Board’s Kite-Shaped Building Reflects Location’s History

The roof design for the Homewood Board of Education Central

The roof design for the Homewood Board of Education Central Office was inspired by the site, which is known as Kite Hill. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The new home for the Homewood Board of Education Central Office in Alabama is a 14,500-square-foot modern structure that marks the first phase of a long-term development plan on a 24-acre site in Homewood, Ala., a suburb of Birmingham.

The contemporary structure was designed by Williams Blackstock Architects in Birmingham. “The roof design was inspired by the site, which is known as Kite Hill,” says architect Kyle Kirkwood. “It’s a spot where kids and parents come to fly kites. The roof, which slopes in two different directions and is kite-like in its appearance, is representative of the popular site.”

The building was conceived as a “garden pavilion” integrated within the site, intended to mediate between public and private property, and man-made and natural materials. The structure is nestled into a line of pine trees with a cantilevered roof extending just beyond the pines.

The design incorporates approximately 24,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD material in four different profiles. The main roof includes 16,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad panels up to 60 feet long. The design also incorporates an interior application of the Flush panels by integrating them into the lobby area. In addition, 7,000 square feet of Flush panels were used in soffit applications. The panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Acworth, Ga., plant.

The roof design was complex, Kirkwood notes. “Since the roof slopes in two directions, we had an interesting valley situation where we had to coordinate the orientation of the seams,” Kirkwood said.

Challenging Installation

The roof also features two rectangular low-slope sections that were covered with a TPO system manufactured by Firestone Building Products. The roof systems were installed by Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing in Birmingham, which specializes in commercial roofing, primarily architectural metal and single-ply projects.

The building is nestled into a line of pine tree

The building is nestled into a line of pine trees near the edge of the site, adjacent to a residential area. The cantilevered roof was designed to help the structure blend in with the location and mediate between public and private property. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Eddie Still, Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing’s vice president, helped prepare the budget for Brasfield and Gorrie, the construction manager on the project, so Still was prepared to go when his bid was accepted. “It was a job that consisted of a large portion of metal and a smaller portion of TPO,” he says. “Since we do both things, we were a good fit.”

The installation was made event tougher by the logistics of the site, according to Still. “The design of the metal roof was unusual, to say the least,” he says. “It had a valley that cut through it, and the panels were sloped in two directions. That’s not normally the case.”

The biggest obstacle was posed by the building’s location on a hill near the edge of the property line, immediately adjacent to a residential neighborhood. “The Snap-Clad panels were approximately 60 feet long, which isn’t a problem if you have the equipment to handle them,” Still notes. “It does pose a problem logistically when it comes to getting them into a tight area, and we definitely had that.”

Panels were trailered in and hoisted to the roof by a crane. “Once the panels were up there, the installation was fairly easy,” Still says. “The roof didn’t have a lot of changes in elevation or different plateaus built into it. The only quirky thing was that valley, and once you had that squared away, you were good to go.”

Coordinating penetrations with members of plumbing and HVAC trades is critical, according to Still. “On the metal roofs, we always stress that you’re trying to present an aesthetic picture for the building, so you want to minimize the penetrations so it looks cleaner,” he says. “You have to coordinate on site so if you have a plumbing exhaust stack, it comes up in the center of the pan and not on the seam.”

The metal roof incorporates approximately 24,000

The metal roof incorporates approximately 24,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD material in four different profiles. In addition, 7,000 square feet of Flush panels were used in soffit applications. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

A small section of metal roof near the entryway was made up of mechanically seamed panels. “The reason we used Tite-Loc panels on that portion of the roof was because of the low slope,” Still says. “We used the same width panel, so it looks identical, but the seams are different. They are designed to work on systems with slopes as low as ½:12.”

Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing also installed the Firestone self-adhered TPO roof system on two low-slope sections of the roof, totaling approximately 3,000 square feet.

Still looks back on the completed project with pride. “Our niche would be a building like this one, which has TPO or some other membrane roofing and metal,” he says. “We’ve been in business 33 years. We have a well-deserved reputation for the type of work we do. In the bid market things are price driven, so more often than not, price is the determining factor. But in larger projects and work that’s negotiated, the G.C. is going to opt to choose people to solicit pricing from who have a history of doing successful projects with them.”

TEAM

Architect: Williams Blackstock Architects, Birmingham, Ala., Wba-architects.com
Construction Manager: Brasfield and Gorrie, Birmingham, Brasfieldgorrie.com
General Contractor: WAR Construction Inc., Tuscaloosa, Ala., Warconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing Inc., Birmingham, Qualityarch.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Pac-Clad.com
Low-Slope Roof Manufacturer: Firestone Building Products, FirestoneBPCO.com

Elastomeric Coatings Reduce Surface Temperatures on Metal Roofs

Firestone Building Products offers Industrial Elastomeric Roof Coatings for metal roofs.Firestone Building Products offers Industrial Elastomeric Roof Coatings for metal roofs. The coatings are formulated with 100 percent acrylic polymer and are designed to offer superior adhesion, water protection and durability. The ENERGY STAR-approved coatings may help significantly reduce a roof’s surface temperature by up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, thus reducing peak cooling demands. According to the manufacturer, the white coating ensures a high level of reflective properties that keeps the roof near ambient air temperature, while minimizing stress to fasteners and seams. Firestone’s Industrial Elastomeric Roof Coatings are backed by a 10-year warranty and are available in colors including gray, tan and black.

Firestone Showcases New Polyiso Insulation at AIA

Firestone Building Products Company LLC is featuring its newest formulation of polyiso insulation at the American Institute of Architects Conference on Architecture (AIA) April 27-29, 2017 in Orlando, Fla.

According to the company, the new formulation is equipped with the highest R-value per-inch in cold temperatures. The Firestone polyiso offering includes ISO 95+ GL Insulation, RESISTA Insulation and ISOGARD HD Cover Board.
 
“As a company, we’ve always been committed to manufacturing products that help ensure a healthy environment for current and future generations, and our newest polyiso formulation contributes to that vision,” says Ed Klonowski, ISO product manager at Firestone Building Products. “Architects can depend on our polyiso to provide their clients with a high-performing product that works to minimize energy use and reduce waste.”

Show attendees can learn about the new insulation at Firestone Building Products booth 1613, and can also see the company’s self-adhered offering, Secure Bond Technology. 

Secure Bond Technology is a factory-applied, pressure-sensitive adhesive that ensures coverage across the membrane and establishes one of the strongest bonds possible. According to the company, it significantly outperforms liquid LVOC adhesives and has no Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), making it safer for building occupants and the environment. The Secure Bond Technology liner is also non-hazardous and 100 percent recyclable. Firestone Building Products currently offers UltraPly TPO SA and RubberGard EPDM SA with Secure Bond Technology.

AIA attendees will also have a chance to take home a Bose SoundLink Mini Bluetooth Speaker II at the Firestone Building Products booth.