School Board’s Kite-Shaped Building Reflects Location’s History

The roof design for the Homewood Board of Education Central

The roof design for the Homewood Board of Education Central Office was inspired by the site, which is known as Kite Hill. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The new home for the Homewood Board of Education Central Office in Alabama is a 14,500-square-foot modern structure that marks the first phase of a long-term development plan on a 24-acre site in Homewood, Ala., a suburb of Birmingham.

The contemporary structure was designed by Williams Blackstock Architects in Birmingham. “The roof design was inspired by the site, which is known as Kite Hill,” says architect Kyle Kirkwood. “It’s a spot where kids and parents come to fly kites. The roof, which slopes in two different directions and is kite-like in its appearance, is representative of the popular site.”

The building was conceived as a “garden pavilion” integrated within the site, intended to mediate between public and private property, and man-made and natural materials. The structure is nestled into a line of pine trees with a cantilevered roof extending just beyond the pines.

The design incorporates approximately 24,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD material in four different profiles. The main roof includes 16,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad panels up to 60 feet long. The design also incorporates an interior application of the Flush panels by integrating them into the lobby area. In addition, 7,000 square feet of Flush panels were used in soffit applications. The panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Acworth, Ga., plant.

The roof design was complex, Kirkwood notes. “Since the roof slopes in two directions, we had an interesting valley situation where we had to coordinate the orientation of the seams,” Kirkwood said.

Challenging Installation

The roof also features two rectangular low-slope sections that were covered with a TPO system manufactured by Firestone Building Products. The roof systems were installed by Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing in Birmingham, which specializes in commercial roofing, primarily architectural metal and single-ply projects.

The building is nestled into a line of pine tree

The building is nestled into a line of pine trees near the edge of the site, adjacent to a residential area. The cantilevered roof was designed to help the structure blend in with the location and mediate between public and private property. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Eddie Still, Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing’s vice president, helped prepare the budget for Brasfield and Gorrie, the construction manager on the project, so Still was prepared to go when his bid was accepted. “It was a job that consisted of a large portion of metal and a smaller portion of TPO,” he says. “Since we do both things, we were a good fit.”

The installation was made event tougher by the logistics of the site, according to Still. “The design of the metal roof was unusual, to say the least,” he says. “It had a valley that cut through it, and the panels were sloped in two directions. That’s not normally the case.”

The biggest obstacle was posed by the building’s location on a hill near the edge of the property line, immediately adjacent to a residential neighborhood. “The Snap-Clad panels were approximately 60 feet long, which isn’t a problem if you have the equipment to handle them,” Still notes. “It does pose a problem logistically when it comes to getting them into a tight area, and we definitely had that.”

Panels were trailered in and hoisted to the roof by a crane. “Once the panels were up there, the installation was fairly easy,” Still says. “The roof didn’t have a lot of changes in elevation or different plateaus built into it. The only quirky thing was that valley, and once you had that squared away, you were good to go.”

Coordinating penetrations with members of plumbing and HVAC trades is critical, according to Still. “On the metal roofs, we always stress that you’re trying to present an aesthetic picture for the building, so you want to minimize the penetrations so it looks cleaner,” he says. “You have to coordinate on site so if you have a plumbing exhaust stack, it comes up in the center of the pan and not on the seam.”

The metal roof incorporates approximately 24,000

The metal roof incorporates approximately 24,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD material in four different profiles. In addition, 7,000 square feet of Flush panels were used in soffit applications. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

A small section of metal roof near the entryway was made up of mechanically seamed panels. “The reason we used Tite-Loc panels on that portion of the roof was because of the low slope,” Still says. “We used the same width panel, so it looks identical, but the seams are different. They are designed to work on systems with slopes as low as ½:12.”

Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing also installed the Firestone self-adhered TPO roof system on two low-slope sections of the roof, totaling approximately 3,000 square feet.

Still looks back on the completed project with pride. “Our niche would be a building like this one, which has TPO or some other membrane roofing and metal,” he says. “We’ve been in business 33 years. We have a well-deserved reputation for the type of work we do. In the bid market things are price driven, so more often than not, price is the determining factor. But in larger projects and work that’s negotiated, the G.C. is going to opt to choose people to solicit pricing from who have a history of doing successful projects with them.”

TEAM

Architect: Williams Blackstock Architects, Birmingham, Ala., Wba-architects.com
Construction Manager: Brasfield and Gorrie, Birmingham, Brasfieldgorrie.com
General Contractor: WAR Construction Inc., Tuscaloosa, Ala., Warconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing Inc., Birmingham, Qualityarch.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Pac-Clad.com
Low-Slope Roof Manufacturer: Firestone Building Products, FirestoneBPCO.com

Elastomeric Coatings Reduce Surface Temperatures on Metal Roofs

Firestone Building Products offers Industrial Elastomeric Roof Coatings for metal roofs.Firestone Building Products offers Industrial Elastomeric Roof Coatings for metal roofs. The coatings are formulated with 100 percent acrylic polymer and are designed to offer superior adhesion, water protection and durability. The ENERGY STAR-approved coatings may help significantly reduce a roof’s surface temperature by up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, thus reducing peak cooling demands. According to the manufacturer, the white coating ensures a high level of reflective properties that keeps the roof near ambient air temperature, while minimizing stress to fasteners and seams. Firestone’s Industrial Elastomeric Roof Coatings are backed by a 10-year warranty and are available in colors including gray, tan and black.

Firestone Showcases New Polyiso Insulation at AIA

Firestone Building Products Company LLC is featuring its newest formulation of polyiso insulation at the American Institute of Architects Conference on Architecture (AIA) April 27-29, 2017 in Orlando, Fla.

According to the company, the new formulation is equipped with the highest R-value per-inch in cold temperatures. The Firestone polyiso offering includes ISO 95+ GL Insulation, RESISTA Insulation and ISOGARD HD Cover Board.
 
“As a company, we’ve always been committed to manufacturing products that help ensure a healthy environment for current and future generations, and our newest polyiso formulation contributes to that vision,” says Ed Klonowski, ISO product manager at Firestone Building Products. “Architects can depend on our polyiso to provide their clients with a high-performing product that works to minimize energy use and reduce waste.”

Show attendees can learn about the new insulation at Firestone Building Products booth 1613, and can also see the company’s self-adhered offering, Secure Bond Technology. 

Secure Bond Technology is a factory-applied, pressure-sensitive adhesive that ensures coverage across the membrane and establishes one of the strongest bonds possible. According to the company, it significantly outperforms liquid LVOC adhesives and has no Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), making it safer for building occupants and the environment. The Secure Bond Technology liner is also non-hazardous and 100 percent recyclable. Firestone Building Products currently offers UltraPly TPO SA and RubberGard EPDM SA with Secure Bond Technology.

AIA attendees will also have a chance to take home a Bose SoundLink Mini Bluetooth Speaker II at the Firestone Building Products booth. 

2017 Master Contractor Award Winners Honored by Firestone Building Products

Firestone Building Products Company, LLC, announced the company’s top firms that earned the 2017 Master Contractor award. This highly regarded award program recognizes the most outstanding contractors in the commercial roofing industry. These top-tier companies are among the top 5 percent of Firestone Building Products Red Shield Licensed Roofing Contractors and were selected for their exemplary installation, quality of work, and customer service.
 
This year holds a special distinction, as 2017 commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Master Contractor Program. For its 30th year, Firestone Building Products announced new specifications for achieving Master Contractor status and qualifying for the various levels within the Master Contractor program.
 
The Master Contractor Program recognizes three levels of achievement: Silver Master Contractor, Gold Master Contractor, and Platinum Master Contractor. Firestone Building Products offers these three categories to recognize increasingly-difficult levels of accomplishment. In addition to these three levels, Firestone Building Products also recognizes Master Contractors with the highest level of quality installations with the Inner Circle of Quality award.
 
“For 30 years, our contractors continue to prove they’re among the best in the industry. The Master Contractor award reflects their hard work and attention to detail,” said Tim Dunn, president of Firestone Building Products. “This esteemed Master Contractor distinction is among the longest running and most desirable recognition in the commercial roofing industry, and we’re honored to be partnered with these reputable firms.”
 
All Master Contractor award recipients were selected based on total square footage installed and quality points accumulated for outstanding inspection ratings on systems covered by the Firestone Building Products Red Shield Warranty. Those include: RubberGard EPDM, UltraPly TPO, asphalt and metal roofing systems. In the sustainability category, the program recognizes Firestone Building Products SkyScape Vegetative Roof Systems and SunWave Daylighting System.
 
Requirements include completing a minimum of eight Red Shield warranted jobs during the 2016 calendar year, being in good financial standing with Firestone Building Products, and having a Preferred Quality Incidence Rating (QIR) that does not exceed 2.5 times the average QIR for Red Shield Licensed Roofing Contractors. QIR is determined by the annual number of quality incidents per million square feet of roofing under warranty.
 
The Master Contractor 2017 award categories and qualifications include:
 
Silver Master Contractor
This highly regarded award represents the top 5 percent of Firestone Building Products contractors who have mastered quality commercial roofing solutions and who exemplify the hard work, determination and entrepreneurial leadership that defines Firestone Building Products.
 
Gold Master Contractor
In order to earn Gold Master Contractor status, the contractor must be in the top 2 percent of Firestone Building Products Master Contractors who accrued the highest number of quality points for superior inspection ratings and total square footage of Firestone Building Products Red Shield warranted roofing system installations.
 
Platinum Master Contractor
Platinum Master Contractor award winners include the top 1 percent of members who accrued the highest number of quality points for superior inspection ratings and total square footage of Firestone Building Products Red Shield warranted roofing system installations completed during the past year.
 
Inner Circle of Quality
Master Contractors were eligible for the Inner Circle of Quality award by maintaining at least 2 million square feet of Firestone Building Products roofs under warranty and achieve an annual Quality Incidence Rating (QIR) of 1.0 or less.
 
This year’s Master Contractor award presentation was held Feb. 19-22 at the Grand Wailea Resort in Maui, Hawaii.

Please visit the Firestone Building Products website for a complete listing of Master Contractors.

 

Polyiso Insulation Is Environmentally Friendly

Polyiso insulation is environmentally-friendly and requires 85 percent less embodied energy to manufacture.

Polyiso insulation is environmentally-friendly and requires 85 percent less embodied energy to manufacture.

Firestone Building Products Company LLC has introduced its new formulation of polyiso insulation.
 
The formulation is equipped with a high R-value per-inch in cold temperatures. Firestone polyiso outperforms mineral wool and competing polyiso boards when it comes to both R-value and cost savings. Benefits include:

  • Outperforms the industry standard by up to 18 percent
  • Competing polyiso boards require an additional .25 inches to meet an R25 value at 40F
  • Fewer inches of polyiso translates to cost savings for building owners. A 500,000 square-foot roof can equate up to $40,000 in savings.
  • Polyiso is environmentally-friendly and requires 85 percent less embodied energy to manufacture. Polyiso can also be recycled and reused, while mineral wool cannot.

 
 
The Firestone polyiso offering includes ISO 95+ GL Insulation, RESISTA Insulation and ISOGARD HD Cover Board.
 
Secure Bond Technology is a pressure-sensitive adhesive that ensures coverage across the membrane and establishes a strong bond.
 
This technology installs up to five times faster than traditional fully adhered applications and allows installation in temperatures as low as 20 and as high as 120F. Secure Bond Technology’s self-bonding membrane eliminates the need to apply adhesives and wait for flash off.
 
Additionally, Secure Bond Technology has no Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), making it safe for the contractor, building occupants and the environment. The Secure Bond Technology liner is also non-hazardous and recyclable. Firestone Building Products currently offers UltraPly TPO SA and RubberGard EPDM SA with Secure Bond Technology.
 

 

Project Profiles: Education Facilities

Maury Hall, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Wagner Roofing, Hyattsville, Md.
General Contractor: C.E.R. Inc., Baltimore, (410) 247-9096

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

ROOF MATERIALS

Wagner Roofing was awarded the complete replacement of all roof systems. These included an upper double-lock standing-seam copper roof system, a bullnose copper cornice transition, slate mansard, 34 dormers with double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal, eight copper hip metal caps and a continuous built-in gutter with decorative copper fascia. Each of the dormers also had a copper window well.

The upper standing-seam roof was removed and replaced with 24-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil rollformed into 1-inch-high by 21-inch-wide continuous standing-seam panels that matched the original profile. The eave bullnose, which also served as the mansard flashing, was removed and returned to Wagner Roofing’s shop where it was replicated to match the exact size and profile.

The 34 dormer roofs were replaced with 20-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil formed into 1-inch-high by 17-inch- wide continuous standing-seam panels. The decorative ornate fascia of the dormers was carefully removed and Wagner’s skilled craftsmen used it as a template to develop the new two-piece copper cornice to which the roof panels locked. The cheeks and face of the dormers were also re-clad with custom-fabricated 20-ounce copper.

The oversized built-in-gutter at the base of the slate mansard was removed and replaced with a new 20-ounce copper liner custom-formed and soldered onsite. The replacement included a specialty “bull-nosed” drip edge at the base of the slate and an ornate, custom-formed fascia on the exterior of the built-in gutter. The decorative copper fascia included 85 “hubcaps”, 152 “half wheels” and 14 decorative pressed-copper miters. The original hubcap and half-wheel ornaments were broken down and patterns were replicated. Each ornamental piece was hand assembled from a pattern of 14 individual pieces of 20-ounce copper before being installed at their precise original location on the new fascia. The miters were made by six different molds, taken from the original worn pieces, to stamp the design into 20-ounce sheet copper.

In all, more than 43,000 pounds of 20-ounce copper was used on the project.

Copper Manufacturer: Revere Copper Products

ROOF REPORT

Maury Hall was built in 1907 and was designed by Ernest Flagg. Flagg designed many of the buildings at the U.S. Naval Academy, including the Chapel, Bancroft Hall, Mahan Hall, the superintendent’s residence and Sampson Hall. His career was largely influenced by his studies at École des Beaux-Arts, Paris. Examples of Flagg’s Beaux-Arts influence can be found in the decorative copper adorning the built-in gutter on building designs.

Maury Hall currently houses the departments of Weapons and Systems Engineering and Electrical Engineering. The building sits in a courtyard connected to Mahan Hall and across from its design twin, Sampson Hall.

PHOTO: Joe Guido

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Denver International Airport Is Reroofed with EPDM after a Hailstorm

The millions of passengers who pass through Denver International Airport each year no doubt have the usual list of things to review as they prepare for a flight: Checked baggage or carry-on? Buy some extra reading material or hope that the Wi-Fi on the plane is working? Grab
a quick bite before takeoff or take your chances with airline snacks?

The storm created concentric cracks at the point of hail impacts and, in most cases, the cracks ran completely through the original membrane.

The storm created concentric cracks at the point of hail impacts and, in most cases, the cracks ran completely through the original membrane.

Nick Lovato, a Denver-based roofing consultant, most likely runs through a similar checklist before each flight. But there’s one other important thing he does every time he walks through DIA. As he crosses the passenger bridge that connects the Jeppeson Terminal to Gate A, he always looks out at the terminal’s roof and notices with some pride that it is holding up well. Fifteen years ago, after a hailstorm shredded the original roof on Denver’s terminal building, his firm, CyberCon, Centennial, Colo., was brought in as part of the design team to assess the damage, assist in developing the specifications and oversee the installation of a new roof that would stand up to Denver’s sometimes unforgiving climate.

HAIL ALLEY

DIA, which opened in 1995, is located 23 miles northeast of the metropolitan Denver area, on the high mountain desert prairie of Colorado. Its location showcases its spectacular design incorporating peaked tent-like elements on its roof, meant to evoke the nearby Rocky Mountains or Native American dwellings or both. Unfortunately, this location also places the airport smack in the middle of what is known as “Hail Alley”, the area east of the Rockies centered in Colorado, Nebraska and Wyoming. According to the Silver Spring, Md.- based National Weather Service, this area experiences an average of nine “hail days” a year. The reason this area gets so much hail is that the freezing point—the area of the atmosphere at 32 F or less—in the high plains is much closer to the ground. In other words, the hail doesn’t have time to thaw and melt before it hits the ground.

Not only are hail storms in this area relatively frequent, they also produce the largest hail in North America. The Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association, Greenwood Village, Colo., says the area experiences three to four hailstorms a year categorized as “catastrophic”, causing at least $25 million in damage. Crops, commercial buildings, housing, automobiles and even livestock are at risk.

Statistically, more hail falls in June in Colorado than during any other month, and the storm that damaged DIA’s roof followed this pattern. In June 2001, the hailstorm swept over the airport. The storm was classified as “moderate” but still caused extensive damage to the flat roofs over Jeppesen Terminal and the passenger bridge. (It’s important to note that the storm did not damage the renowned tent roofs.) The airport’s original roof, non-reinforced PVC single-ply membrane, was “shredded” by the storm and needed extensive repair. Lovato and his team at CyberCon assessed the damage and recommended changes in the roofing materials that would stand up to Colorado’s climate. Lovato also oversaw the short-term emergency re- pairs to the roof and the installation of the new roof.

The initial examination of the roof also revealed that the existing polystyrene rigid insulation, ranging in thickness from 4 to 14 inches, was salvageable, representing significant savings.

The initial examination of the roof also revealed that the existing polystyrene rigid insulation, ranging in thickness from 4 to 14 inches, was salvageable, representing significant savings.

Under any circumstances, this would have been a challenging task. The fact that the work was being done at one of the busiest airports in the world made the challenge even more complex. The airport was the site of round-the-clock operations with ongoing public activity, meaning that noise and odor issues needed to be addressed. Hundreds of airplanes would be landing and taking off while the work was ongoing. And three months after the storm damaged the roof in Denver, terrorists attacked the World Trade Center, making security concerns paramount.

INSPECTION AND REROOFING

Lovato’s inspection of the hail damage revealed the extent of the problems with the airport roof. The original PVC membrane, installed in 1991, was showing signs of degradation and premature plasticizer loss prior to being pummeled by the June 2001 storm. The storm itself created concentric cracks at the point of hail impacts and, in most cases, the cracks ran completely through the membrane. In some instances, new cracks developed in the membranes that were not initially visible following the storm. The visible cracks were repaired immediately with EPDM primer and EPDM flashing tape until more extensive repairs could begin. Lovato notes that while nature caused the damage to DIA, nature was on the roofing team’s side when the repairs were being made: The reroofing project was performed during a drought, the driest in 50 years, minimizing worries about leaks into the terminal below and giving the construction teams almost endless sunny days to finish their job.

The initial examination of the roof also revealed that the existing polystyrene rigid insulation, ranging in thickness from 4 to 14 inches, was salvageable, representing significant savings. Although a single-ply, ballasted roof was considered and would have been an excellent choice in other locations, it was ruled out at the airport given that the original structure was not designed for the additional weight and substantial remediation at the roof edge perimeter possibly would have been required.

Lovato chose 90-mil black EPDM membrane for the new roof. “It’s the perfect roof for that facility. We wanted a roof that’s going to perform. EPDM survives the best out here, given our hailstorms,” he says. A single layer of 5/8-inch glass-faced gypsum board with a primed surface was installed over the existing polystyrene rigid insulation (secured with mechanical fasteners and metal plates) to provide a dense, hail-resistant substrate for the new membrane.

In some areas adjacent to the airport’s clerestory windows, the membrane received much more solar radiation than other areas of the roof.

In some areas adjacent to the airport’s clerestory windows, the membrane received much more solar radiation than other areas of the roof.

In some areas adjacent to the airport’s clerestory windows, the membrane received much more solar radiation than other areas of the roof. When ambient temperatures exceeded 100 F, some melting of the polystyrene rigid insulation occurred. “That section of the roof was getting double reflection,” Lovato points out. To reduce the impact of this reflection, the roof was covered with a high-albedo white coating, which prevented any further damage to the top layer of the polystyrene rigid insulation board and also met the aesthetic requirements of the building.

LONG-TERM SOLUTION

Lovato’s observations about the durability of EPDM are backed up by field experience and controlled scientific testing. In 2005, the EPDM Roofing Association, Washington, D.C., commissioned a study of the impact of hail on various roofing membranes. The study, conducted by Jim D. Koontz & Associates Inc., Hobbs, N.M., showed EPDM outperforms all other available membranes in terms of hail resistance. As would be expected, 90-mil membrane offers the highest resistance against punctures. But even thinner 45-mil membranes were affected only when impacted by a 3-inch diameter ice ball at 133.2 feet per second, more than 90 mph—extreme conditions that would rarely be experienced even in the harshest climates.

Lovato travels frequently, meaning he can informally inspect the DIA roof at regular intervals as he walks through the airport. He’s confident the EPDM roof is holding up well against the Denver weather extremes, and he’s optimistic about the future. With justified pride, Lovato says, “I would expect that roof to last 30-plus years.”

PHOTOS: CyberCon

Roof Materials

90-mil Non-reinforced EPDM: Firestone Building Products
Gypsum Board: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime from Georgia-Pacific
Plates and Concrete Fasteners: Firestone Building Products
White Elastomeric Coating: AcryliTop from Firestone Building Products
Existing Polystyrene: Dow

Firestone Building Products Celebrates 35 Years of Its EPDM Roofing System

Firestone Building Products Co. LLC, a manufacturer and supplier of a comprehensive “Roots to Rooftops” product portfolio, is celebrating the 35th anniversary of its trademark ethylene propylene diene monomer, RubberGard EPDM roofing system, which has helped cement its commercial roofing reputation for trust and confidence.

Firestone Building Products began its journey to become a global leader in the commercial roofing industry in 1980 with the installation of its first warranted EPDM roof in the small town of West Bend, Wis.

“At the beginning, none of us really knew the life expectancy of the EPDM roof,” says Clay Van Gomple, president of Spec Products, a sales representative for Firestone Building Products. “The Firestone Building Products professionals were very positive they had the formulation.”

Today, Firestone Building Products is internationally known to set the standard for quality rubber products, innovation and leadership. Its manufacturing plant opened in Prescott, Ark., in 1983 and has increased capacity to become the largest EPDM manufacturing facility in the world. Since 1980, approximately 6.5 billion square feet of Firestone Building Products RubberGard EPDM have been installed globally.

Throughout the years, Firestone Building Products has grown from one to 15 plants and expanded into multiple product lines, including EPDM rubber membranes, thermoplastic membranes, modified bitumen and polyisocyanurate insulation.

“Innovating new commercial building performance solutions is top of mind at Firestone Building Products because we understand and always consider the unique challenges of our contractors, architects and building owners,” says Tim Dunn, president of Firestone Building Products. “This 35th anniversary milestone demonstrates our commitment to those key stakeholders. Their trust is the reason we can confidently promise that, ‘Nobody Covers You Better.'”

The original EPDM formulation has held strong for more than three decades and still holds strong today. Firestone Building Products has built on that foundation of reliability, evolving its application to meet the needs of building owners, contractors and architects.

In 2015, Firestone Building Products introduced its revolutionary Secure Bond Technology, the next generation in fully adhered roof system application. Secure Bond Technology ensures adhesion coverage across the entire roofing membrane, establishing one of the most powerful bonds possible. RubberGard EPDM SA with Secure Bond Technology is the only EPDM SA available on the market today.

Firestone Building Products Announces Master Contractor Award Winners

Firestone Building Products Co. LLC, a manufacturer and supplier of a comprehensive “Roots to Rooftops” product portfolio, announced the 263 firms that earned the 2016 Master Contractor Award. The top-tier companies were selected from a network of more than 3,000 Firestone Building Products Red Shield Licensed Roofing Contractors for delivering exemplary installation, quality of work and customer service.

The Master Contractor Program presents three distinct industry honors annually: The Master Contractor Award, Inner Circle of Quality Award and President’s Club Award. The program’s 2016 winners collectively installed more than 309 million square feet of warranted Firestone Building Products roofing systems on new and reroof projects during 2015.

“Our annual Firestone Building Products Master Contractor Program recognizes top-tier firms for their commitment to excellence and superior workmanship,” says Tim Dunn, president of Firestone Building Products. “Ultimately, the winners’ attention to detail during all installation phases helps ensure long-term roofing system performance. Master Contractor, Inner Circle of Quality and President’s Club award winners represent our best partners in the industry. We are proud of all they have accomplished and look forward to continuing to see them achieve.”

The program’s 2016 award categories and parameters include:

  • Master Contractor
    Master Contractor Award recipients were selected based on the total square footage installed and quality points accumulated for outstanding inspection ratings on systems covered by the Firestone Building Products Red Shield Warranty. Those include: RubberGard EPDM, UltraPly TPO, asphalt and metal roofing systems.

    Master Contractors were also eligible to earn points in the sustainability category. The program recognizes Firestone Building Products’ SkyScape Vegetative Roof System and SunWave Daylighting System.

    To meet the 2016 award requirements, a contractor had to complete a minimum of eight Red Shield warranted jobs during the 2015 calendar year, be in good financial standing with Firestone Building Products, and have a Preferred Quality Incidence Rating (QIR) that did not exceed three times the average QIR for Red Shield Licensed Roofing Contractors. QIR is determined by the annual number of quality incidents per million square feet of roofing under warranty.

  • Inner Circle of Quality
    Master Contractors were eligible for the Inner Circle of Quality Award by installing a minimum of eight warranted Firestone Building Products roofing systems each in 2014 and 2015; and four roofs per year for each of the prior three years. They were also required to maintain at least 2 million square feet of Firestone Building Products roofs under warranty and achieve an annual Quality Incidence Rating (QIR) of 1.0 or less.

  • President’s Club
    Master Contractors who have accrued the highest number of quality points for superior inspection ratings and total square footage of Firestone Building Products Red Shield warranted roofing system installations completed during the past year earned the distinguished President’s Club Award.

SOPREMA Joins the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association

The Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association announced that SOPREMA has joined the group as a manufacturing member.

“The addition of SOPREMA to the polyiso industry and the PIMA family reflects the continuing growth of polyiso as North America’s insulation product of choice,” says Jared Blum, president PIMA. “SOPREMA’s construction industry leadership role is well acknowledged, and the PIMA Board of Directors looks forward to the active involvement of the company.”

SOPREMA joins PIMA’s six manufacturing members: Atlas Roofing, Firestone Building Products, GAF, Hunter Panels, Johns Manville and Rmax.

SOPREMA is an international manufacturer specializing in the development and production of innovative products for waterproofing, insulation, soundproofing and vegetated solutions for the roofing, building envelope and civil engineering sectors. Founded in 1908 in Strasbourg, France, SOPREMA now operates in more than 90 countries.

With its first polyisocyanurate insulation plant in North America, SOPREMA will expand its presence in the construction market by offering complete roofing solutions to its clients, while managing all production phases.

“SOPREMA is proud to join PIMA and contribute to the energy performance of buildings and the reduction of greenhouse gases as a manufacturer of high-performance insulation boards,” says Richard Voyer, executive vice president and CEO of SOPREMA North America.