NRCA Partners with “Inside the Blueprint” to Produce Educational Content for the Roofing Industry

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has entered into a strategic partnership with national TV show “Inside the Blueprint” to produce educational content regarding roofing industry issues, initiatives and innovative solutions. 

NRCA will create broadcast-quality video content specifically addressing roofing industry insight for industry professionals, and the content will be integrated into half-hour episodes. The TV show airs nationally on Fox Business Network and internationally to more than 35 countries on Bloomberg International. NRCA and “Inside the Blueprint” will work together to promote the TV show via digital marketing and on social media platforms leading up to the first airing in 2021.

“NRCA is pleased to partner with ‘Inside the Blueprint,’” said NRCA CEO Reid Ribble. “We appreciate the opportunity to provide content that will connect with a broader audience, promote professionalism and educate those involved in the roofing industry.”

“‘Inside the Blueprint’ shares NRCA’s view that providing educational content specific to the needs of architects, engineers and roofing professionals are keys to helping the industry address challenges related to sustainability, efficiency and resilience,” said Ron Secreto, executive vice president, partnerships, for “Inside the Blueprint.”

For more information about NRCA, visit nrca.net.

For more information about “Inside the Blueprint,” visit insidetheblueprint.com.

IKO Announces 2020 Dates for ROOFPRO Profit Power Workshop Series

IKO released the 2020 dates for its ROOFPRO Profit Power Workshops, events designed to provide critical insights that attendees can immediately put to work to elevate their company’s profitability and industry knowledge. The workshops will feature Scott Siegal, president of the Certified Contractors Network, who will share insights on how to use customer behavior and neuroscience to develop a company elevator pitch that represents its brand and engages customers.

The events will also cover IKO’s ROOFPRO Contractor Loyalty Program, tips for mastering homeowner meetings, comprehensive business knowledge, and third-party vendor tools and services.

The upcoming ROOFPRO Profit Power Workshops include:

  • February 25: Calgary, Alberta
  • March 3: Anaheim, California 
  • March 27: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
  • April 7: Dallas, Texas
  • April 21: Detroit, Michigan
  • October 6: Charlotte, North Carolina

 “IKO’s Profit Power Workshops empower construction professionals with some of the tools they need to not only provide the highest-quality roof services, but also help meet their financial growth goals in 2020,” said Nicole Gray, loyalty program manager at IKO. “For professionals in the roofing industry, it’s absolutely critical to be equipped with the highest quality products on the market and have the business know-how to boost their bottom lines. IKO is eager to continue providing this essential support through Profit Power Workshops to selected contractors in 2020.”

Available to members of IKO’s ROOFPRO Loyalty Program or contractors interested in applying, Profit Power Workshops feature a curriculum developed and presented by accomplished roofing professionals and subject-matter experts. Each workshop covers tips ranging from plugging leaks in business profitability to connecting contractors to third-party vendors for business support. 

ROOFPRO Profit Power Workshops were established as a means for roofers to glean expert knowledge from industry and business leaders. In addition to technical roofing resources, contractors learn the ins and outs of running a financially successful business. 

For more information, visit www.iko.com

CEO of S-5! Attachment Solutions to Present Metal Roofing Seminar at IRE

At the International Roofing Expo (IRE) in Dallas, S-5!’s Founder and CEO, Rob Haddock, will present the educational session titled “Understanding Metal Roofing: Part I and II,” providing the opportunity for attendees to earn continuing education credits.

On Wednesday, Feb. 5 beginning at 7:45 a.m., Haddock will present an introduction to Understanding Metal Roofing: Part I. Often billed as “Metal Roofing 101,” the course includes technical information presented in a common-sense fashion that makes the art and science of metal roofing clear, concise and understandable. Topics include the history of metal roofing, metals and metallic coatings, metallurgy, galvanic weathering and material selection criteria. Also covered: fabrication and manufacturing techniques, various seam types and panel profiles in addition to underlayments, the use and misuse of sealants, seam technologies and the principles of thermal cycling and panel anchorage.  

Then, later on Wednesday morning beginning at 9.30 a.m., Haddock will present an advanced course building on the metal roofing essentials. This extended course, Understanding Metal Roofing: Part II, will cover the coil coating process, common and popular steep slope construction and critical details of low slope installation, in addition to curved applications and wind issues. Finally, the program delves into system design, drainage principles and system selection criteria, including the principles of water-shedding and hydrostatic designs. 

Contractors, architects, specifiers, roof consultants, engineers, building owners, maintenance staff and sales professionals will benefit from these sessions.  

The course instructor, Rob Haddock, is a well-known expert in the field and has worked in various aspects of metal roofing for almost five decades ― beginning as a laborer, then contractor, then forensic consultant, technical author, educator, innovator and Founder and CEO of S-5! attachment technologies. His writings and lectures (which number in the hundreds) have been translated into at least 10 languages, and he has won awards from MCA, CSI, ASTM, MBMA. His innovations have received more than 50 patents. For 27 years he has been a featured speaker at industry tradeshows, METALCON and IRE. Rob’s practical experience, colorful background and world travel add flavor to his technical expertise resulting in a “must-attend” course that is as poignant as it is entertaining for every educational or experience level in metal roofing trades and practices.

“Rob leads you down the path to understanding with such humor and simple clarity, you not only go away understanding, but remembering,” said former course participant, Darrell T. Blair.

S-5! Will also introduce its new GripperFix technology at the International Roofing Expo. Attendees are invited to stop by S-5! Booth #2622 to see first-hand its new universal GripperFix system, which is designed to make mounting almost anything on standing seam and exposed-fastener roof profiles simple and easy.

For more information about S-5!, visit www.S-5.com.

For more information about the educational sessions at IRE, visit https://explore.theroofingexpo.com/Attendee/conference/sessions.

Inside, Outside

I was first introduced to Malinowski’s hierarchy of needs in college during an introduction to sociology class. I must admit, I wasn’t paying very close attention. I was an English literature major, and sociology was just a required elective. My hierarchy of interests was topped by the cute girls I might meet at the local tavern during quarter beer night.

I do remember that Malinowski put the need for shelter right up there with food and companionship as one of human society’s most important components. That concept made intuitive sense to me, but as I sat in the classroom, it never occurred to me how important the buildings themselves — and their roofs — were to educational facilities. Roofs not only protect students and teachers, but they also help preserve priceless works of art and literature — including those in digital formats — inside academic buildings.

The project profiles in this issue document the crucial roles roofs play in educational settings. They detail how roof design and installation, roof maintenance, and roof replacement are all critical functions that must be expertly handled. They also reveal how a school’s buildings can embody and define the institution architecturally.

At Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, crews from Charles F. Evans Company, Inc. replaced the roof systems on the first building constructed on the campus — Morrill Hall, built in 1868. The challenges on the project included bringing the building up to code while capturing its original look with modern products.

On the campus of Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas, crews from Empire Roofing faced similar challenges as they replaced the roof on historic Austin Hall, a building that has been occupied since 1851.

Educational buildings that are less than 150 years old also need to have their roofs replaced. At the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, Massachusetts, crews from Tech Roofing re-roofed the entire complex, which houses irreplaceable works of Yiddish literature in a building designed to resemble a shtetl, or traditional Jewish town common in Eastern Europe before World War II.

This issue also profiles building envelopes that help embody the design goals of new construction projects, including the Innovation Lab at the Lamplighter School in Dallas and the energy-positive Myrtle Beach Middle School in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

While we all probably remember begging our teachers to hold classes outside on a beautiful fall day, it’s reassuring to know that structures like these will live on to serve future generations, thanks in part to the work of dedicated roofing professionals.

Speaking of Education…It May Be Back to Class for Contractors

It’s no surprise that almost all states require general contractors and some subcontractors to register with regulatory boards and pass a qualifying exam in advance of bidding, contracting, and certainly physically undertaking construction work. That’s not new. However, there is an emerging trend towards requiring general contractors, and even some subcontractors, to participate in continuing education. Depending on the jurisdiction, some contractors and subcontractors are now statutorily obligated to complete a certain amount of continuing education — similar to what has been historically required only of doctors, lawyers, and accountants — to maintain licensure.

For instance, this summer, North Carolina became the most recent state to impose continuing education requirements for general contractors. Effective January 1, 2020, general contractors will be required to complete 8 hours of continuing education per year. Because roofing contractors in North Carolina performing work in excess of $30,000 are required to be licensed as general contractors, they will now be subject to the new continuing education requirements.

This recent legislation and its impact on the roofing industry raises questions about what is required for roofing contractors nationwide. Does roofing require special licensure and registration or continuing education? The answer is entirely dependent on the jurisdiction where the work is to be performed.

The following states currently require licensure for roofing: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, and Virginia.

Other states don’t require licensure per se but do require roofing contractors to register. For instance, Oklahoma requires roofing contractors to register with the Construction Industries Board. Failure to register is a misdemeanor, and registration and endorsement as a commercial roofing contractor requires 4 hours of continuing education every 36 months. Similarly, Idaho does not require a state license, but requires roofing contractors to register with the Idaho Contractors Board.

As seen in Figure 1, even among the states which require continuing education, the requirements vary greatly both in the amount and type of education required. For instance, Florida law requires contractors holding a roofing license to take 1 hour of wind mitigation methodologies as part of the 14 annually required continuing education hours. In Massachusetts, construction supervisors within the roofing industry are required to take 2 hours of continuing education in code review and four one-hour courses in topics of workplace safety, business practices, energy, and lead safe practices.

Figure 1. Licensing and continuing education requirements by state.

Finally, in those states which don’t require licensure or continuing education, some industry groups have developed self-regulation. These industry groups are aimed at consumer protection and seek to secure public confidence in the roofing industry. In Georgia, which does not require a state roofing license, the Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association of Georgia (RSMCA) provides a voluntary licensing program. Similarly, Kentucky has no license requirements for roofing contractors. However, the Kentucky Roofing Contractor Association (KRCA) is a nonprofit and professional organization which certifies roofing contractors. To obtain and maintain KRCA certification, roofing contractors must complete 10 hours of continuing education per year.

But just because a state legislature or professional association has not enacted regulations necessitating continuing education does not mean contractors are free from such requirements. While not mandated by the state itself, many cities have imposed their own directives. States such as Kansas, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Missouri, New York, Oklahoma, Wyoming, and Pennsylvania each contain at least one municipality that compels contractors to take board-accredited continuing education courses. For example, Idaho Falls, Idaho, requires 8 hours of continuing education.

Regardless of where you are engaged in the practice of roofing contracting, it is imperative that all contractors exercise due diligence and review and comply with all state and local regulations before undertaking any project.

Contractors and trades are seeing a rise in regulation through the government by way of mandated continuing education courses. Do you think contractors should be required to take continuing education classes? Is this a necessary void that needs to be filled by the government intervention or is this just another example of unnecessary government regulation? Tell us what you think.

About the author: Lindsey E. Powell is an attorney with Anderson Jones, PLLC practicing in North Carolina and Georgia. Questions about this article can be directed to her at lpowell@andersonandjones.com. Special research credit is given to Kyle Putnam, Juris Doctor candidate and summer law clerk with Anderson Jones, PLLC.

Author’s note: This article is intended only for informational purposes and should not be construed as legal advice.

OSHA Education and Training Requirements For Contractors

Many licensed contractors have been getting “on-the-job” training for years — some, since they were working on jobsites as young laborers. But what formal education and training are required for contractors? The short answer is that it differs slightly from state to state, but no one can escape OSHA.

Perhaps the best-known training requirements for contractors are those set forth in the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHA) and the regulations OSHA enables.

OSHA permits individual states to develop and enforce their own occupational safety and health plans, statutes, and enforcing agencies as long as the states meet federal requirements (29 U.S.C. § 667), so many contractors may be more familiar with their state’s occupational safety and health act than the federal. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, jurisdictions with their own federally-approved plans governing both public and private employers are Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming. (Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, New York, New Jersey, and the Virgin Islands have plans that apply only to public employees.) State laws must be “at least as effective” and stringent as OSHA.

In most of these states, and in states that simply follow the federal OSHA requirements, construction-industry employee training is required to comply with the federal requirements set forth in 29 CFR 1926. California, Michigan, Oregon, and Washington have more stringent requirements than the federal rules.

What Training Does OSHA Require?

The Department of Labor’s regulations contained in 29 CFR 1910 and 29 CFR 1926 give employers numerous “accident prevention responsibilities.” These responsibilities specifically include the duty to train each “affected employee” in the manner the standards require. The regulations specifically require training for employees on topics including scaffolding, fall protection, steel erection, stairways and ladders, and cranes. Both federal and state courts interpret OSHA training requirements; state courts interpret them in states with their own laws but look to federal decisions for guidance.

Court decisions indicate that training requirements are interpreted broadly. For example, in 2002, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit evaluated 29 CFR § 1926.21(b)(2)’s requirement for employers to instruct each employee in the “recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions.” The case, Modern Continental Const. Co., Inc. v. Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, involved vertical rigging in a tight working space during an underground project involving submerging a section of highway. The operation resulted in a fatality. The court found that the employers’ duty “is not limited to training for hazards expressly identified by OSHA regulation” and that employers are obligated to instruct their employees in the recognition and avoidance of “those hazards of which a reasonably prudent employer would have been aware.” The court recognized that while the training does not have to eliminate hazards, the training must focus on avoiding and controlling dangerous conditions.

Furthermore, merely holding or sponsoring training courses may not be enough to comply with OSHA; the regulations require employers not only to ensure training but also to ensure that each affected employee has received and understood the training. The District of Columbia Circuit emphasized this requirement in Millard Refrigerated Services, Inc. v. Secretary of Labor. The Court upheld a citation against an Alabama company operating a refrigerated storage facility after an anhydrous ammonia leak even though the employer claimed it didn’t know that its employee didn’t understand the training and therefore wasn’t wearing a respirator.

Decisions like this make it incumbent upon employers to recognize and anticipate hazards and ensure that employees have the proper education and quality training to handle them.

Penalties for Training Violations

Employers’ duty to train is worded as a duty to its individual employees: “The employer must train each affected employee in the manner required by the standard, and each failure to train an employee may be considered a separate violation” [29 CFR 1926.20(f)(2)]. The statute and regulations do not explicitly state the penalty for failure to give required training; penalties will depend on the facts of each case. OSHA violations generally fall into one of four categories: willful, serious, repeated, or other-than-serious. According to the Department of Labor, the current maximum penalty is $13,260 per serious violation and $132,598 per willful or repeated violation.

Courts have upheld steep penalties for certain training violations, particularly for repeated failure to train employees. For example, in Capeway Roofing Systems, Inc. v. Chao, a roofing contractor was fined $6,000 for failing to train an employee on fall protection. (The Secretary of Labor also assessed other fines against the contractor for failure to comply with rules on fall protection, personal protective equipment, and other regulations.) The court reasoned that the fine for failure to train was appropriate, though relatively high, because it was a third “repeat” violation. Additionally, in some states, certain OSHA violations, especially willful and repeated violations, can subject employers to criminal liability.

About the author: Caroline Trautman is an attorney with Oak City Law, LLP, based in Durham, North Carolina. Questions about this article can be directed to her at caroline@oakcitylaw.com.

Author’s note: This article does not constitute, and should not be construed as, legal advice on any particular scenario. For specific advice, consult with an attorney licensed in your state.

Owens Corning University Brings Virtual Training to Roofing Education

While August is back to school season for students and teachers, education is always a timely topic for contractors who want to stay on top of the latest in roofing technology. And just as virtual learning is transforming classroom education, digital technology is also changing the game for roofing contractors. Case in point: Owens Corning University’s (OCU’s) expanded Learning Management System (LMS) recently rolled out to all members of the Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network (OCCN). The platform features easy-to-digest learning modules of 15 minutes or less that make it easy for roofing professionals to grab information anytime and anywhere – from their truck, on the jobsite, or between appointments.

Free to all OCCN members and offering an unlimited number of users, OCU is an on-demand education platform accessible from mobile and computer devices. Featuring multiple learning modules, sub-modules and educational videos, the platform compliments Owens Corning’s in-field courses and allows contractors to efficiently access information about Owens Corning products, warranties, business services, and more. 

Because contractors enjoy “getting their game on”, future phases will include a gaming element featuring leaderboards that allow contractors to track education points, award badges for completed educational tasks, and see how they rank compared to their peers. 

From helping onboard new employees to learning the fundamentals of roofing application, unlocking the mystery of warranties and more, the Owens Corning University platform builds on a portfolio of digital resources available to OCCN members. Additional  resources on OCU include product and system content such as the Duration Series shingles, SureNail Technology information, an overview of the Total Protection Roofing System, roofing fundamentals, business service offerings and access to the entire Owens Corning video library.  

ATAS International Hosts International Melting Pot Event

On September 19th, ATAS International welcomed guests from several countries to the ATAS headquarters in Allentown, PA for the biennial International Melting Pot event. The guests, all of whom are ATAS product distributors, gathered for education sessions, plant tours, and information exchanges. ATAS continues to grow their export business and develop relationships with distributors throughout the world.

Joao DaCosta, Director of International Business Development for ATAS, stated, “We were pleased to receive our international distributors for this third biennial meeting. The four-day event was full of collaborative ideas and enthusiastic networking. Our guests shared their business experience with ATAS and each other, and all left with many new and renewed global relationships.” The event wrapped up with a trip to New York City, where guests were treated to a matinee showing of the musical, Aladdin, followed by dinner.

DaCosta, who is also a professor of international business and global supply chain at Baruch College of The City University of New York (CUNY) in New York City, sees the Greater Lehigh Valley area as a strategic location for the manufacturing industry and for continued growth in the exporting of products.

For more information, visit www.atas.com.

 

The 2018 IRE Opens in New Orleans February 6

Roofing professionals will be heading to The Big Easy for the 2018 International Roofing Expo (IRE), which runs February 6-8. Known as one of the most important trade shows of the year for the roofing industry, the show is expected to feature more than 460 exhibiting companies. More than 44 educational sessions and 30+ educational presentations on the show floor will provide information on the latest developments and trends.

On the 131,000-square-foot show floor, attendees can expect to see, touch, feel and experience the full gamut of products, value-added services and the most innovative ideas in roofing materials and technology, according to show management. From major corporations to innovative new startups, you will find every conceivable segment of the industry in one place, at one time.

Learning is a vital part of the IRE. The educational conference program offers brilliant speakers, fresh ideas and continuous inspiration through 122 education hours and 44 new sessions. The three-day event is packed with sessions led by industry experts covering hot topic areas including emerging technology, metal roofing, drones, labor, safety, roof decks, asphalt shingles, solar, low-slope roofing, profitability, codes/standards, leadership/employment, and more.

Show Floor Highlights

Stop by the Business & Technology Pavilion to find new tools and resources that will help you run your business better, faster and safer. Find the latest industry solutions to generate more revenue, including mobile, wireless and web-based programs for insurance, finance, credit, estimating, labor, weather, and more.

Get to know the Equipter, OMG and Soprema teams and their products in-depth and in-person through the Exhibitor Product Clinics held daily on the show floor. You can make better purchasing decisions after seeing a demo and having a Q&A session with product experts about the functionality and capabilities.

Stay on the cutting-edge of what’s new from leading manufacturers supplying creative and innovative metal products, designs, building concepts, tools and services. If metal is your specialty, you will find exactly what you need in the Metal Marketplace, sponsored by Metal Roofing Magazine.

To build your business and keep your company thriving into the future, stop by the Product Showcase where you will explore innovation as you see, try and compare a wealth of dynamic products. The unique layout offers a time-saving overview of what’s new on the show floor. It is sponsored by Professional Roofing Magazine.

Show Floor Educational Opportunities

Exhibitor-Presented Seminars provide outstanding opportunities to get exciting new information and in-depth analysis presented by our exhibitor community. These 45-minute sessions will provide practical, innovative ideas and solutions to invigorate your business.

Learn essential content to help you deliver profits and streamline processes by attending The Roofing Institute, sponsored by Johns Manville. You’ll refine your technical skills, learn top marketing and sales strategies to improve your bottom line, and sharpen your leadership skills to lead your team to success.

The GAF Education Center is dedicated exclusively to roofing industry education, not product pitches. Through a series of 45-minute sessions, expert trainers will help you build skills, think critically and arm you with practical solutions to work smarter.

Special Events

Known as one of the greatest NBA players of all time, Julius “Dr. J” Erving will share what he has learned through triumph and adversity. As Dr. J reveals his personal tactics for overcoming challenges and cultivating a champion’s mindset, you will walk away from this Keynote Address enlightened and with a deeper understanding of the power of grace, humility, hard work and collaboration on the drive to success. Held February 6 from 9:30 a.m.-10:50 a.m., the Keynote is sponsored by Malarkey.

Join us at historic Generations Hall for an evening of Louisiana culture, food and drink at the Welcome Party. Network with industry friends and leaders while experiencing delicious hors d’oeuvres, beer, wine and soda. New Orleans-based party band, The Bucktown All-Stars, will provide the live music. The Welcome Party is sponsored by Tremco, and all guests must be 21 years of age with valid ID and IRE name badge.

Pay it forward and help those less fortunate by participating in the 9th Annual Community Service Day, the show’s home repair and revitalization project. By volunteering for this heartwarming cause, you will help repair and rebuild the homes of New Orleans families that are elderly, disabled or financially unable to support the renovation. Tax-deductible monetary donations are needed as well as volunteers to perform a variety of construction disciplines. This incredible day is sponsored by Sika Sarnafil. Additional contributors include OMG, Carlisle, CentiMark, Roofing Solutions, ICP Adhesives & Sealants, Inc., CertainTeed and Damato Enterprises.

Endless amounts of fun and a customized tailgating RV await you outside the show floor in the parking lot of the Riverwalk Outlet Parking Lot. At the SRS Extreme Tailgate, you will network with industry friends and leaders in the sunshine while taking a break from the busy show floor to relax and enjoy a refreshing beverage in a fun and friendly atmosphere.

Join the National Women in Roofing (NWIR) for a hospitality reception and interactive networking experience. Spend some time getting to know thought leaders, executives and industry experts receive some mentoring advice from those who design, build, operate and support the roofing industry. Open to all roofing professionals.
For additional pre-show specialty educational opportunities taking place February 4 to 5 from NRCA and NWIR, please visit www.TheRoofingExpo.com.

Show Hours

The show floor hours are Tuesday and Wednesday, February 6 and 7, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Thursday, February 8, from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
All educational sessions require registration. Space in sessions is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Online registration is available 24-hours a day, seven days a week. For more information regarding registration, visit www.TheRoofingExpo.com or call (244) 563-3147 or (866) 860-1970. To register on-site, proceed to the registration counter in Lobby A at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70130.

Get Connected

The mobile app can be used to organize your time, get real-time alerts and connect with colleagues and customers using the “Friends” feature. Search “IRE” in the app stores. The IRE is also featured on various social media sites such as Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RoofingExpo, LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=1963938, Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/RoofingExpo, Instagram at http://www.instagram.com/RoofingExpo, and YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/c/TheRoofingExpo. Twitter users can follow the show using #RoofingExpo or @RoofingExpo.

2018 International Roofing Expo

When: February 6-8, 2018
Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Halls B-D, New Orleans, Louisiana
Registration: www.TheRoofingExpo.com
Questions: (800) 684-5761 or (972) 536-6415

Chem Link Opens New Training Center

Chem Link has opened a new training center at which the company will offer in-person and virtual contractor education.

Located in Schoolcraft, Mich., the new 3,200-square-foot facility with a 540-square-foot classroom can be utilized for groups of up to 20 contractors, training on both Chem Link and SOPREMA products. Training takes place in a classroom setting featuring stations set up to provide customers with hands-on experience using these products. This experience is designed to teach and engage using written, hands-on application combined with training videos through Chem Link’s interactive media classroom.

“We are pleased to be able to offer our customers the chance to receive this type of product training,” explained Rocky Stroud, National Sales Manager, Chem Link. “Our new education facility means we can give contractors the firsthand experience they need to feel confident using our products in the field, and we can also provide virtual training to contractors in remote locations. It is a great opportunity to ensure customers can learn in the manner that suits them best.”

For more information, visit www.chemlink.com.