DaVinci Roofscapes Recycles 820,000 Pounds of Waste

Efficient operations, new blending systems and a dedicated focus on the environment allowed DaVinci Roofscapes to recycle 820,000 pounds of composite scrap in 2017. The excess shake and slate roofing tiles were crushed, then ground down and used to create starter tiles for the roofing company.

“The big story this past year is that our company molded 30 percent more pounds of roofing tiles than in 2016 while simultaneously reducing our scrap by 242,000 pounds over the past year,” says Bryan Ward, vice president of operations at DaVinci Roofscapes in Lenexa, Kan. “This is a terrific achievement when considering Earth Day and our companies’ dedicated commitment to the environment.

“We were able to advance production while reducing scrap by enhancing our recycling efforts. Searching for ways to reduce waste is a full-time dedicated endeavor at our company.”

Thanks in part to an investment in a new blending system, which makes manufacturing operations more efficient, the team at DaVinci Roofscapes sold zero scrap to outside firms in 2017.

“It’s very significant that we were able to recycle and reuse 100 percent of all scrap items at our facility last year,” says Ward. “In 2016 we transferred 567,000 pounds of scrap to an outside end-user who makes pallets, crates and totes. That’s a great use for the product because it doesn’t end up in landfills. However, in 2017 our company was able to keep every pound of scrap in-house and reuse it for our own products. That’s a significant achievement.”

DaVinci Roofscapes continues to meet their goal of zero scrap going into landfills. The industry’s leading composite shake and slate manufacturer produces polymer slate and shake roofing tiles in 49 standard colors, plus custom colors.

Each time the manufacturing operation changes color runs, there is a transitioning between colors.  Those transition tiles are “off spec,” cannot be used and are recycled. The tiles — which are 100 percent recyclable — are segregated by color and then ground up and molded into starter shingles, which are generally unseen on the roof.

“Every year we take stock on Earth Day to evaluate the progress of our recycling operations and share the good news about our enhanced efforts,” says Ward. “Our manufacturing operation continues to become more efficient each year.

“The fact that we increased manufacturing production of roofing tiles in 2017 while substantially decreasing the amount of scrap generated is a huge accomplishment. We’re on a path toward continually making our operations more efficient, which is great for the environment.”

For more information, visit www.davinciroofscapes.com.

300,000 Pounds of Polymer Roofing Tile Scraps Are Recycled Annually at DaVinci Roofscapes

The 45th anniversary of Earth Day in 2015 puts a shining spotlight on recycling efforts around the country—including at DaVinci Roofscapes in Kansas. That’s where more than 300,000 pounds of polymer roofing tile scraps are recycled each year.

“Most manufacturing operations have scrap materials,” says Bryan Ward, vice president of operations at DaVinci Roofscapes in Lenexa, Kan. “The difference here is that every roofing tile we create is 100 percent recyclable, so we are able to reuse every pound of scrap that comes off our production line into our roofing material’s starter shingles. This saves a significant amount of material from going to the landfill, along with making us an efficient, environmentally friendly operation.”

With more than 300,000 pounds of scrap recycled annually, DaVinci doesn’t stop there. The polymer slate and shake roofing manufacturer offers two recycling programs that provide a way for roofers to return scraps, cuttings and unused synthetic roofing material to the company’s facility for recycling.

Waste products from a job site can be returned to DaVinci’s Kansas plant for recycling (with shipping paid for by DaVinci within a 500-mile radius of the plant) and expired tiles (those older than 50 years old) can also be returned for recycling. Ward estimates that almost 5,000 pounds of product are returned from field projects each year for recycling.

Selecting polymer roofing tiles also helps save trees and energy. “Every time someone chooses a DaVinci roof instead of wood shakes, trees are saved—often young growth cedars that are difficult to harvest, produce low-quality shingles and further deplete our limited resources,” says Ward. “Natural slate roofs present other problems. The quarrying process consumes large amounts of labor and fuel and can be harmful to the local ecosystem. Up to 15 percent of natural slate tiles crack or break up during installation, so waste is significant. Because DaVinci tiles weigh one-third as much as natural slate of comparable thickness, transportation energy costs and carbon emissions are lower.

“Just as it’s important to us that all our sustainable roofing products are Made in America, it’s also vital that we keep our earth as clean and healthy as possible for future generations,” says Ward. “We’re a company that celebrates Earth Day every day of the year. By creating roofing products that meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification process standards, we’re taking a step toward saving valuable resources.”