One-of-a-Kind Home Gets One-of-a-Kind Composite Roof

AllPro Roofing Inc. installed a new composite shake roof featuring DaVinci Select Shake. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

What’s a dream home without a dream roof? One new homeowner got both when he recently purchased a one-of-a-kind lodge-type home in Canada. The newly-installed DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roof perfectly accents the three-story house where David and his family will work and play for years to come.

“This structure is incredibly impressive and has a roof to match,” says David. “When I initially drove up what struck me immediately was the towering size of the glass windows. They’re 32 feet high in the great room. After that, I was impressed by how the home is framed by the massive roof. The roof is critical to properly anchoring and framing a house of this size and structure. One of the first things I thought was to wonder how roofers would ever get up there. Given the pitch, this could not have been an easy job.”

Reliable Composite Shake

Jamie Bates agrees with David — it was not an easy job.

The house, located in Caledon East in Ontario, was being put on the market. The owners wanted to enhance the home’s curb appeal, therefore they decided to replace the roof. Bates and his team at AllPro Roofing Inc. were tasked with tearing off old cedar shakes and adding on composite shakes.

“The real cedar shakes were beginning to deteriorate and age,” says Bates. “The owners wanted a product that replicated the existing cedar roof. However, they also wanted a roof shingle that was maintenance free with a lifetime warranty.”

That search led the previous owners to DaVinci Select Shake in a Tahoe color. Bates recommended the DaVinci product because the impact- and fire-resistant roofing tiles require little maintenance. In addition, they come with a Lifetime Limited Materials Warranty that is transferable to the new owner.

“Our Canadian seasons change quickly,” says Bates. “We have cold and snowy weather. Then it gets warm and rainy very quickly. Composite roofing has been proven to withstand this type of weather quite well.”

“DaVinci Select Shake was specifically chosen for this estate property,” he continues. “The composite shake is the most aesthetically appealing product on the market. We install up to 10 DaVinci roofs a year. The profiles and colors available from DaVinci set this company’s product apart.”

Re-Roofing Challenges

According to Bates, there are several unique details to the massive roof. These include the rounded bell curves in the eaves, an array of skylights and copper accents.

“Most obviously, the height and pitch of the roof makes this a demanding project,” says Bates. “We used an articulated boom for most of the installation.”

“Removing the dry, deteriorated old cedar roofing was a challenge,” Bates notes. “It created more dust and debris than normal. In addition, there are many cuts and angles in this roof. We took our time to make this installation exceptional in every way.”

Unique details of the home’s roof include rounded bell curves at the eaves, skylights and copper accents.

One of the aspects that took time and talent were the skylights. Several large 5-foot-by-12-foot skylights had to be hoisted and installed on the roof. After that, the team also had to work around a side solarium with skylights.

All the roofing work took place just weeks before David saw his one-of-a-kind new home for the first time. He’d been looking for the right property for years. This home checked all the boxes.

“First of all, the out-of-city location in Caledon East is ideal,” says David, who resides in the Toronto area. “It’s not too remote, has a temperate climate, is close to amenities and has privacy.”

Then came the “wow factor.”

“Inside and out, this home is visually impressive,” says David. “The home feels like a lodge. There’s post-and-beam construction, towering fireplaces and lots of glass. Outside the grounds and pool are spectacular. There’s even a coach house on the property. That’s great for helping make it a retreat for family and friends to come visit.”

Peace-of-Mind Roofing

Because this is an investment in his future, David appreciates that the former owners didn’t “go cheap” with the roof replacement.

“With the DaVinci roof I believe it will look great for decades to come,” says David. “Knowing that the composite shake product will maintain its aesthetic appeal is a huge comfort. The DaVinci product resists mold, moss, cracking, insects and algae growth. It’s even Class 4 rated for hurricanes and up to 110 mph for high winds. This gives me great peace-of-mind. I can just enjoy the home and stay off the roof!”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: AllPro Roofing Inc., Orangeville, Ontario, allproroofinginc.ca

MATERIALS

Synthetic Shake: DaVinci Select Shake in Tahoe, DaVinci Roofscapes, davinciroofscapes.com

Addiction Treatment Center’s Roof Offers Great Aesthetics, Low Maintenance

Situated on a 96-acre campus, Wellbridge Addiction Treatment and Research Center consists of six buildings featuring composite shake roofing. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Take exit 69 off the Long Island Expressway, and that’s where you’ll immediately find the impressive new Wellbridge Addiction Treatment and Research Center. The 96-acre campus in Calverton, New York, consists of six buildings, all of which have composite shake roofing overhead.

Opened in April 2020, the 80-bed facility includes a two-story main building. This structure houses the primary treatment facility, labs, care sections and auditorium. It also has a dining room, chapel and a variety of offices.

The massive main building connects to other buildings via paved garden paths. The campus, which has 134,000 square feet of space, includes a short-term care building, wellness center, creative expression center, and maintenance building.

“We designed this complex with low maintenance in mind,” says Ron Whelan, senior project manager for Engel Burman. “The DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake product fits our needs. We want the exteriors of the buildings as easy-care as possible.”

“Our company has used DaVinci’s synthetic roofing products in the past,” Whelan notes. “The Bristal Assisted Living project in Garden City, New York, also features DaVinci’s low maintenance roofing tiles. The product looks great at both facilities. I believe it’s a beautiful composite roofing product that seems to hold up well to the environment with no fading or other problems.”

Largest Project to Date

Soon after the project started, the team at Premier Building & Renovations Corp. was brought in. Their task was to install DaVinci Bellaforté Shake roofing on the structures as they were built. Their work started in February of 2019, and completed 10 months later in October.

“This is the largest DaVinci project we’ve ever tackled,” says Robert Foreman, owner of Premier Building & Renovations Corp. “We had ten people working on this project continually. The Bellaforté Shake product is great to work with. It’s lightweight and installs easily.”

Premier Building & Renovations is proud to point to this project as an example of the company’s outstanding workmanship. “In the five years we’ve been installing DaVinci composite roofing tiles, we average about three or four major projects a year,” says Foreman. “No matter how many roofs we do in the future, this project will stand out for many years to come. The Weathered Gray shake tiles give both a unified and unique look to this complex of buildings. The composite shake tiles look great and provide the owners with the low-maintenance roof they wanted.”

TEAM

Designer: Engel Burman, Jericho, New York, https://engelburman.com

Roofing Contractor: Premier Building & Renovations Corp., Farmingdale, New York, https://premierbuildingny.com

MATERIALS

Synthetic Shake: Bellaforté Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Composite Shake Available in Three New Colors

Bellaforté, the most affordable shake product available from DaVinci Roofscapes, now comes in the three unique colors of the company’s Nature Crafted Collection: Black Oak, Aged Cedar and Mossy Cedar. 

Available previously on DaVinci Multi-Width and Single-Width Shake composite roofing tiles, the realistic Nature Crafted Collection colors have grown in popularity since their introduction just a few years ago. Homeowners have gravitated to the nature-inspired colors that replicate different progressive aging processes found on real shake shingles. 

“The Nature Crafted Collection captures the look of a moment and retains it for decades,” said Wendy Bruch, marketing manager at DaVinci Roofscapes. “The popularity of these colors is so great that we’re now extending them to our durable Bellaforté Shake tiles.”

According to the company, the proprietary process technology at DaVinci Roofscapes allows the company to recreate the natural warmth and soft patinas found in the Nature Crafted Collection.

The Black Oakcolor reminds people of natural cedar shingles that have been saturated with moisture and mold for many years. The color tells the story of dark, aged mature-looking cedar on a home. The Aged Cedar color reflects a burnt reddish cedar tone. This color is generally found when there’s a transition from a new cedar shake roof into the weathered deeper tone. Mossy Cedar features a damp, greenish character. While in real cedar this is achieved by moss and lichen that are not good for the longevity of the roof, the color is one that people desire for their natural-looking shake roofs.  

“The Nature Crafted Collection is for people who are true lovers of cedar shake shingles,” said Bruch. “They get the colors they desire from the very first day the roofing tiles are installed, without waiting years for the aging process to occur. The hues are remarkably realistic and are ‘locked in’ for a lifetime on the roof. Best of all, with composite roofing people have none of the maintenance hassles or decay worries they would normally experience with real cedar shingles.”

Designed as a reasonably-priced, top quality shake shingle that resists hail, impact, decay and fire, Bellaforté Shake has steadily grown in popularity since being introduced to the marketplace. The authentic-looking composite shake tiles resist splitting, cracking, curling and fading. Plus, they’re crafted to resist mold, algae, fungus and insects. 

“Imagine a cedar shake roofing tile that is never negatively impacted by time or weather,” said Bruch. “That’s Bellaforté Shake. There are no hassles of dealing with problems associated with real wood. Homeowners get all the benefits of the look of real shake, but with a Lifetime Limited Materials Warranty. When compared to other roofing options, the allure of a Bellaforté Shake product in Black Oak, Aged Cedar or Mossy Cedar is appealing. Available at an affordable price, with the natural cedar look and none of the ongoing maintenance hassles of real cedar, the result is impressive.”

For more information, visit www.davinciroofscapes.com.

New Synthetic Slate Roof Tops Historic Owatonna City Hall

The city offices in Owatonna, Minnesota, are housed in a historic building that underwent a complete roof replacement as part of an ambitious restoration plan. Photo: Lakeshore Drone Services

The massive brick complex in Owatonna, Minnesota, that currently serves as its city hall has an interesting past. According to Aaron Fitzloff, facility manager for the City of Owatonna, the structure was originally built in 1886 as the Minnesota Public School for Dependent and Neglected Children. The facility closed in 1945 and later became the Owatonna State School. “The state closed it in 1970, and the city of Owatonna took it over in 1974,” notes Fitzloff. “In 1975, the building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.”

The complex now houses administrative offices for the city and the Minnesota State Public School Orphanage Museum. Asphalt shingles had been installed on the roof at some point in the 1990s, but leaks developed over the years, and the city budgeted for a complete roof replacement as part of an ambitious restoration plan. “The intent was to get the building back to its original state,” says Fitzloff.

Specifying a New Roof

The city consulted with Adsit Architecture and Planning, a full service architectural and interior design firm located in Minneapolis. When the firm completed a condition assessment for another historic building in Owatonna— the Firemen’s Hall —that project led to a request from Fitzloff to look at the city’s administration building.

Crews from Schwickert’s Tecta America installed more than 29,000 square feet of DaVinci synthetic slate. Photo: Lakeshore Drone Services

“Aaron realized that all of the roof systems were in need of replacement at this point,” says Gunstad. “He wanted to make sure, first and foremost, that we mitigated any moisture problems that were occurring up in the attic space. The project was about insulation as well as roofing.”

Finding the right roof system was crucial. Evidence suggested that the original roof was comprised of slate, but that couldn’t be confirmed due to a fire that had destroyed the main building in 1904. “Even before we did our research, we knew from our first look at the building that an asphalt roof on a building of this mass and scale did not look right,” Gunstad says.

Adsit Architecture specified a synthetic slate roof system manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes. “Right off the bat we felt that given the scale of the building that slate would have been prohibitively expensive for them, and they agreed,” Gunstad recalls. “We knew with the cost, ease of installation, the warranty, the weight — all of that — the synthetic slate would be a really good fit, and DaVinci had an enormous amount of color choices for the blends we needed.”

DaVinci’s Color Visualizer Tool was used to help determine the colors. A European blend of gray shades and purple was installed. As the project got under way, the hunch that the original roof was slate was confirmed. “When we got into reconstruction and were up digging around in the attic, we did find some old slate pieces,” Gunstad recalls. “Oddly enough, they were a perfect match for the colors we had chosen.”

Installing the Roof Systems

The installer on the project was Schwickert’s Tecta America, headquartered in Mankato, Minnesota. “We ended up being the only bidder on it, which of course you don’t know at the time,” notes Scott Haefner, Schwickert’s steep slope project manager.

The scope of work on the project included 60-mil Carlisle EPDM, new gutters and custom-fabricated metal trim. Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

According to Haefner, the difficulty of the project is what made it appealing for the company, which thrives on projects others turn away from. “Those are the ones we look for — the ones that have some complexity to it,” says Haefner. “That’s where we can shine. We have our own metal shop, we can do all our own metal fabrication, and we can do the types of things that can really set us apart. It gives us an advantage because we don’t have to farm some of that work out, and we have complete control over the whole process.”

The scope of work included installing more than 29,000 square feet of the DaVinci synthetic slate. The roof also included low-slope areas, and for these a 60-mil EPDM from Carlisle was installed. Sheet metal work included new gutters and custom-fabricated metal trim.

The safety plan was crucial, as the building would be open during the construction process. “You start with the safety plan,” says Haefner. “With staff and members of the public walking in and out, it is critically important in your pre-construction meetings to address those issues with overhead protection in certain areas, and blocking off certain areas when you’re working above them for the day.”

The safety plan incorporated scaffolding and personal fall arrest systems, as well as overhead protection for pedestrians. Photo: Schwickert’s Tecta America

Coordination with the city staff was critical. “Aaron Fitzloff helped us tremendously in that area,” says Haefner. “We had a standing meeting every Tuesday morning at 9, and that was always a big part of the conversation — safety and the sequence of what we were going to do that day. Aaron and I would also see each other every day also, typically. He was a great attribute to the whole project, for sure.”

Safety equipment included scaffolding and PFAS. “The vast majority of the building was scaffolded,” Haener says. “Fall arrest was anchored to the roof in areas we didn’t have scaffolding, and even where we did, the roof pitch was steep enough that everyone was always tied off with anchors and fall arrest systems.”

Work began in the late fall and progressed in sections. “That’s part of the beauty and charm of the building — its different additions and roof sections,” notes Haefner. “That also allowed us to focus on one area at a time. That’s typically what you do — you start and do a section that’s kind of an easy one to just get your feet underneath you and get a feel for how it’s going to go. There were some big, long planes of roof that we were able to get a start on and get a feel for the whole sequence.”

Schwickert’s steep-slope division handled the composite slate roof installation, while its flat roof division tackled the EPDM roofs.

Tying in flat and steep-slope roof systems was critical. Steep slope-crews completed most of their work first, using a Grace Ice & Water Shield product that is compatible with EPDM. “Let’s say you know the EPDM is going to go let’s say two feet up the slope of the roof, from flat to transition up the steep slope,” Haefner explains. “We’d leave off the bottom two or four courses of shingles, and leave the ice and water shield exposed, but not adhered.”

Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

Low-slope crew members would just flip up the ice and water shield and install the EPDM. Steep-slope crews would then install the metal flashing, adhere the ice and water shield, and add the final courses of shingles.

A snow retention system from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards was installed in several sections of the roof.

Re-roofing the large turret was made easier by DaVinci’s turret package, which supplies pre-cut tiles. “You give them some basic information, including the circumference and the pitch,” Haefner says.

It worked well on the project, with one minor hitch that was quickly remedied. “This one was a little different because it has a sort of witch’s hat appearance to it, where the pitch changes at the bottom,” Haefner says. “It’s not a typical cone shape. When I sent in the request for the package, I didn’t take that into account, and we needed to order some more shingles to finish the turret.”

The large finial on the turret was taken down, painted and replaced.

A heat mesh system was installed in certain areas that had been subject to ice dams in the past. The Warmquest Zmesh system consists of woven copper mesh, which was installed below the tile, sandwiched between layers of ice and water shield. “That was a tricky part of the installation,” says Haefner. “We had to run big transformers, electrical panels, and run conduit to these areas from the old attic.”

The Minnesota weather brought things to a halt in the mid-winter, and work concluded this spring.

Mission Accomplished

Haefner points to this project as proof of his company’s ability to complete projects with multiple scopes of work. “With steep slope, flat roof, sheet metal work, new gutters, insulation, and the electrical portion involved with installing the heat mesh system — it shows perfectly how we can install multiple complex systems that have to go together in a certain way,” he says. “That type of complexity is where we shine.”

The city and its residents have been pleased with the result, according to Fitzloff. “Feedback has been nothing but positive,” he says. “We cleaned all of the limestone around the whole building as well, and it looks fabulous.”

Gunstad notes that the project fulfilled its design goals: making the building sound and restoring it to its former glory. “Performance and maintenance of the project were our primary concerns, but design-wise, looking at this building, which is rather grand, we knew it lacked something — and that something was a substantial roof,” says Gunstad. “We wanted to give that visual prominence back to that building, which is a hallmark of the city.”

TEAM

Architect: Adsit Architecture and Planning, Minneapolis, Minnesota, www.adsitap.com

Roofing Contractor: Schwickert’s Tecta America, Mankato, Minnesota, www.schwickerts.com

MATERIALS

Synthetic Slate: Single-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Low-Slope Roof: Carlisle 60-mil EPDM

Leak Barrier: Grace Ice & Water Shield

Underlayment: Titanium UDL

Snow Retention: Rocky Mountain Snow Guards

New Roof Systems Top University of Minnesota’s Renovated Pioneer Hall

Pioneer Hall was renovated by the University of Minnesota in 2019 at cost of $104 million. Photo: Central Roofing Company

Pioneer Hall is a central fixture on the University of Minnesota campus. Built in 1934, the five-story structure serves as a freshman dormitory and dining hall. The building was almost totally rebuilt as part of a $104 million renovation project in 2019.

A key goal of the project was to keep the distinctive, highly visible brick facades on the four outer wings in place while totally replacing the main section of the building. Work included entirely renovating the interior, replacing all mechanical systems, and installing a new roof.

Working along with McGough Construction, the St. Paul-based general contractor on the project, Minneapolis-based Central Roofing Company installed the new roof systems on the building, which included 47,000 square feet of synthetic slate, as well as built-up roofs, EPDM roofs, and a garden roof.

Central Roofing has been in business since 1929, and the company is a fixture on the University of Minnesota campus. “We do a wide variety of different types of commercial roofs, ranging anywhere from flat to steep to sheet metal roofs,” says Michael Mehring, vice president of commercial sales for Central Roofing. “We also have a metal panel division. There is no system that we cannot do in regard to flat roofs. On steep roofs, we do both tile and shingle as well as sheet metal. In addition to that, we have one of the largest service divisions in the Midwest.”

The building’s 93 dormers posed some detail challenges. The dormer roofs were topped with synthetic slate, and the sides were clad with it as well. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

The project involved multiple scopes of work, including the DaVinci Roofscapes synthetic slate on the steep-slope sections, Johns Manville built-up roofs on the main roof and green roof area, as well as sheet metal work, gutters and downspouts. Central Roofing developed a detailed plan to bid on all the scopes of work — and execute everything.

“The project was interesting in the sense that approximately 75 percent of the building was demolition,” notes Mehring. “That included all of the internal parts of the building. The four bays around the perimeter were saved because of historical ramifications. The university wanted to try and keep those four bays because of the distinctive windows and the brick. The middle portion of the structure was pretty much demoed out. So much internal work was needed on the mechanical and electrical systems that they couldn’t save it.”

Synthetic Slate Roof

Central Roofing worked closely with McGough Construction and the project architect, St. Paul-based TDKA Architects, to ensure the new synthetic slate roof system would closely replicate the structure’s original slate roof. According to Henri Germain, project manager/estimator with Central Roofing, the DaVinci Multi-Width Slate product was approved for the project because it so authentically duplicates real slate.

DaVinci Multi-Width Slate in a custom color blend was chosen for the steep-slope sections of the roof.

“We started by making presentations of product options to the project architect,” says Germain. “The architect moved forward with the DaVinci product because of the aesthetics, value, and long-term benefits to the university.”

Selection of a roofing color was also a critical factor. DaVinci created a custom color blend of dark purple, medium brown, dark stone, medium green and dark green for Pioneer Hall. “The capability of DaVinci to develop the custom color blend was amazing,” says Germain. “The roofing colors really complement the dormitory plus other structures on campus.”

Installation Begins

Work began on the steep slope sections with the installation of the synthetic slate system on the brand-new metal deck. “From a scheduling standpoint, the first thing that we did was the tile areas,” Mehring recalls. “In order to maintain the milestones that McGough had, we had to essentially get them watertight within 60 days. To do that, we did the tile work in phases utilizing 15-20 workers every day.”

The men were split into three crews. A crew of six to seven roofers began installing the substrate board and Grace Ice & Water Shield, which served as the vapor barrier. The second crew came in behind the first to install the wood blocking and insulation, which was capped with plywood and covered with Grace Ice & Water Shield and GAF FeltBuster synthetic underlayment.

Crews from Central Roofing Company installed RG 16 Snow Guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards.

A third crew of four or five technicians then installed the DaVinci synthetic slate tiles. The product was easy to install, notes Germain, but the numerous details — including some 93 dormers — posed some challenges. Crews also installed RG 16 Snow Guards from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards Inc.

“There were many details, and because of the extreme difficulty in accessing the area after the scaffolding was removed, everything was treated as if it would never be returned to in the lifetime of the roof — not for caulking, not for anything,” Germain says. “The thought was to make sure it was done once and done right.”

As the tile work progressed, the sheet metal crew started installing the gutters. The waterproofing, gutter installation and tile application had to be coordinated carefully to make sure everything was tied in perfectly. “It was a sequencing nightmare,” says Mehring.

Central Roofing crews installed the wood blocking, sheathing and waterproofing in the decorative cornices, which had been recreated out of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) by another subcontractor. Central Roofing then fabricated and installed the copper internal gutters, as well as the downspouts, which were constructed of pre-finished steel to match the window frames.

On the smaller flat roof areas abutting the steep-slope roof, a 60-mil EPDM system from Johns Manville was installed. These areas were completed as work progressed on each section.

Built-Up Roofs

On the low-slope sections of the main roof, crews applied a four-ply built-up roof system manufactured by Johns Manville. Approximately 31,500 square feet of JM’s 4GIG system was installed and topped with a gravel surface.

Central Roofing’s sheet metal crew installed custom fabricated gutters. The waterproofing, gutter installation and tile application had to be carefully coordinated.

The built-up roof areas were bordered by parapet walls, which were east to tie into, notes Mehring. “What made this project a tad bit easier is that the other scopes of the work — the flat roofs — didn’t have too many sequencing issues with the tile work and the gutters,” he says. “The built-up roofers were on their own and had their own schedule.”

On the 13,000-square-foot area for the green roof, a Johns Manville three-ply system with a modified cap sheet was installed. The green roof features a built-in leak detection system from International Leak Detection (ILD). “The leak detection system is encapsulated between the polyiso and the cover board,” notes Mehring. “We installed a JM modified cap sheet. All of the seams had to be reinforced with their PermaFlash liquid membrane to maintain the warranty because of the green roof.”

Installation Hurdles

Challenges on the project included a tight schedule and difficult weather. “Essentially we had a 40-day schedule to get all of the built-up roofing on,” Mehring says. “The challenge with not only the built-up but the tile as well is that the work started in the late fall and we had to work through the winter. You can imagine the problems with the Minnesota weather.”

Days were lost to rain, snow, cold temperatures and high winds. The green roof system couldn’t be completed until May, near the end of the project, when Central Roofing installed the growing medium and plants. After a drainage layer was installed over the cap sheet, crews applied engineered soils and sedum mats supplied by Hanging Gardens, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Access at the site was also difficult. Central Roofing used its Potain cranes to get materials on and off the roof. “Those self-erecting stick cranes can go 120 feet up in the air and they also have the ability to deliver materials 150 feet from the setup location,” Mehring explains. “That was critical because we only had two locations we could set up: on the south side, in between the opening of the two wings, and on the north side, also in the opening between the wings. We had to have the ability to get material to the middle section and the corners of all four wings, and that was the only way to do it.”

Another logistical challenge was posed by a large tree at the southeast corner of the building — the oldest tree on campus. Great care had to be taken to avoid damaging it. “The tree goes as high as the steep roof, and you had to work right by it,” notes Germain. “While working and using the crane, we couldn’t touch it. The guys were very careful and very conscious of it. Adam Fritchie, the foreman on the project, did a great job communicating with the university and the crews to make sure everyone understood the project goals.”

Safety Plan

As part of the site-specific safety plan, crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time on the steep-slope sections — even with scaffolding in place for the project. The flat roof areas were bordered by parapets, but they were only 2 feet high, so safety railing systems were installed. “We used Raptor Rails all the way around, and when we were installing the railings, we used Raptor carts,” Mehring says. “Our men were fully tied off while installing the railings — and taking them down.”

It was a complicated project, but executing complicated projects with multiple scopes of work is one of the company’s strengths. “Overall, I think we had more than 20,000 hours on this project,” Mehring says. “So, I think that a roofer having the ability to garner 20,000 hours on a project speaks for our ability to finish large and challenging projects within the milestones required — as well as keeping safe protocols and paying the bills. The tile, the copper, the sheet metal, the built-up roofing, the green roofing, the EPDM — all of those were self-performed by our guys.”

“This was such a special project,” Germain says. “Aside from the sheer size, it captures the heart. When we look at the finished structure we’re extremely proud. Our team, which also included Lloyd Carr, Matt Teuffel and Corey Degris, played a big part in re-establishing Pioneer Hall as a key building on the University of Minnesota campus.”

TEAM

Architect: TDKA Architects, St. Paul, Minnesota, www.tkda.com

General Contractor: McGough Construction, St. Paul, Minnesota, www.mcgough.com

Roofing Contractor: Central Roofing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota, https://www.centralroofing.com

MATERIALS

Synthetic Slate: DaVinci Multi-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Built-Up Roofs: Four-ply 4GIG system and, Johns Manville, www.JM.com

EPDM Roof: 60-mil EPDM, Johns Manville

Vapor Barrier: Grace Ice & Water Shield, GCP Allied Technologies, www.gcpat.com

Underlayment: FeltBuster synthetic underlayment, GAF, www.GAF.com

Leak Detection System: International Leak Detection, https://leak-detection.com

Snow Guards: Rocky Mountain RG 16 Snow Guards, Rocky Mountain Snow Guards Inc., www.rockymountainsnowguards.com

Green Roof: Sedum mats, Hanging Gardens, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, www.hanging-gardens.com

New Roof Systems Make Shopping Center a Showplace Once Again

Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

LK Construction tackles many composite shingle roofing projects each year. On an average, they’ve been known to knock out 20 or more commercial and residential composite roofs annually. And, while each project is special, nothing compares to their 2018 mega-project: the re-roofing of South Lake Village Shopping Center in Reston, Virginia.

With almost two dozen retailers and businesses, the shopping center has 109,527 square feet of space. And every building in the connected community center had a failing cedar roof.

Built in 1984, South Lake Village had a natural cedar roof complementing a low-slope membrane roof system. Fast forward to 2018. Functionally, the roof was failing badly. Stores complained of water leaks. Shingles were cracked and had moss growth, degrading the look of the entire shopping center. That’s when the management company decided to invest in a new roof system featuring Bellaforté Shake from DaVinci Roofscapes.

“We knew this project was a winner the moment we started the installation,” says Scott Kim, vice president at LK Construction in Annandale, Virginia. “Both store residents and shoppers were astonished by the transformation. Everyone expressed their excitement at the look of the new synthetic shakes. We immediately got calls from people wanting the Bellaforté Shake on their homes. Within several months, 10 houses in the area had composite shake roofing. And now there are many other homeowners inquiring about the DaVinci product on a regular basis.”

Safety First

The process of re-roofing South Lake Village came with a unique set of challenges for the team at LK Construction. While shoppers were going in and out of Safeway, Starbucks, CVS Pharmacy and other stores, the team had to take great care.

The roof replacement project at South Lake Village Shopping included a new TPO roof system on the low-slope section and synthetic shake on the steep-slope sections.

“This is the largest DaVinci project we’ve ever done,” says Kim. “There were a lot of moving pieces. From ordering, receiving and storing the composite shakes to staging onsite. In addition, when it came to assuring pedestrian safety during the roofing process, the challenges were enormous. We focused a great deal on safety measures throughout the entire two-week project.”

LK Construction brought in traffic controllers and road guards to help control the active environment. “Our goal was to safely install the composite roofing without disturbing the businesses,” says Kim. “Safety was our top priority. And, we were able to achieve that goal.”

The shops at South Lake Village now feature Bellaforté Shake composite shingles from DaVinci Roofscapes.

As shoppers moved smoothly in and out of stores, the LK Construction team replaced the flat roofing with a new thermoplastic membrane. Approximately 52,000 square feet of Sure-Weld TPO from Carlisle SynTec was installed on this project.

Crews then installed the Bellaforté Shake tiles. Made to withstand fire, impact and severe weather, the synthetic shakes are ideal for the shopping center location.

“There’s no other synthetic product in the market that can mimic natural hand-split cedar as perfectly as Bellaforté Shake,” says Kim. “These tiles are designed to simulate a multi-width look. They’re extremely realistic and cost-effective.”

Mission Accomplished

With their beautiful new roofs overhead, the shops at South Lake Village now stand out again as a showplace in the Reston community. From banks to restaurants to retailers, each structure can count on their DaVinci roofs to provide long-term beauty and durability.

“The high visibility of this project opened the door for us even more in this marketplace,” says Kim. “We’re now busy replacing old cedar roofs throughout the area with synthetic shake.”

“People are embracing the look of Bellaforté,” he continues. “They love the many advantages of the product. At this point, we’re forecasting a great number of homeowners throughout Reston will switch to DaVinci products in the near future.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: LK Construction, Annandale, Virginia, www.lkconstructionusa.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Bellaforté Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Low-Slope Roof: Sure-Weld TPO, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

DaVinci Roofscapes Names General Manager

DaVinci Roofscapes, a subsidiary of Royal Building Products, has announced that Mark Pagel has been appointed as general manager of the company. Effective immediately, Pagel, who has served as interim general manager for DaVinci Roofscapes since February of 2020, will now fill that role on a permanent basis.

In his position, Pagel will lead the DaVinci composite roofing and siding business. Pagel will also continue to manage the National Builder Program for Royal Building Products, where he has worked for the past 10 years.

Pagel, from Northfield, Minnesota, has extensive industry background in roofing and siding. He has worked for manufacturing, distribution and installation companies throughout his nearly 30-year career.

For more information, visit www.davinciroofscapes.com.

Re-Roofing a Frank Lloyd Wright Home

The Thomas P. Hardy House in Racine, Wisconsin, was designed and built in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Frank Lloyd Wright. Just the name brings to mind images of beautiful homes. So, when the team at Allrite Home & Remodeling had the opportunity to work on one of Wright’s creations, they jumped at the chance. A year later, the newly-added DaVinci Single-Width Shake roof brought the team industry recognition along with praise from Frank Lloyd Wright enthusiasts.

The home, on the shore of Lake Michigan, is located in Racine, Wisconsin. It was designed and built in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright for attorney Thomas P. Hardy. The stucco finished front, intricately detailed windows and breathtaking waterfront views make this a home like no other in the neighborhood.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Wisconsin, the Thomas P. Hardy House has changed hands seven times. In 2012, the then-homeowner began working to restore the home to its former beauty.

The exterior was repainted to the original terracotta color. The foundation was jacked up and rotting beams were replaced. And, original light fixtures and pocket doors were all restored. As the restoration progressed, Allrite Home & Remodeling was brought in by the home’s newest owner to tackle the roof.

Selecting the Right Shake Roof

“The homeowner had three very important priorities for this historic renovation project,” says Randy Miller, owner of Allrite Home & Remodeling. “First, they wanted cedar shake, just as Frank Lloyd Wright had intended for the roof. However, they wanted to take advantage of modern advances in materials. Second, they wanted to be environmentally responsible. And third, they wanted the roof selection to please Frank Lloyd Wright loyalists.”

Many years prior, previous owners had asphalt roofing installed on the home, which was not consistent with Frank Lloyd Wright’s style. After reviewing a variety of products, the current owners decided on a composite shingle that simulates a cedar shake roof.

Single-Width Shake from DaVinci Roofscapes in the natural Aged Cedar color was chosen to restore the original appearance to the home’s exterior.

“The DaVinci product has the right quality, texture, color and warranty that the owners wanted,” says Miller. “The Single-Width Shake in the natural Aged Cedar coloring brought back the original appearance to the home exterior. As an added bonus, the composite shake shingle has a longer lifespan and will require far less maintenance.”

Soon after the team started removing the old roof, they noticed significant fire damage to the rafters above the kitchen area. Apparently a fire in the early 1960s extensively damaged the inner structure of the roof.

“The current owners had no idea so much harm had occurred,” says Miller. “We proceeded to replace the damaged wood. That was important so the home will be structurally sound and able to support the new roof.”

According to Miller, safety was also a concern. The home is located on a steep bluff overlooking Lake Michigan. High winds were a challenge as the team worked to keep materials, tools and technicians secure.

Another challenge was the location of the home on a busy road. There was also a walled-in yard. This meant there was not a good staging location for materials or a dumpster. They were able to squeeze a dumpster onto the property, but neither the placement nor the access was ideal.

Finishing Touches

After the installation of the composite shake roofing came the finishing touch: copper accents. The area around the chimney had previously been plain brown flashing. It was decided to update it with copper flashing that will continue to add character to the home as it ages and patinas.

“Installing the copper without it rippling required our expert technicians to be extremely precise as they worked,” says Miller. “Then there was the added pressure of knowing that every step of this project was being scrutinized.”

Copper accents were added, including copper flashing around the chimney.

“There are Frank Lloyd Wright fans and enthusiasts both online and in our community who watched our progress closely,” Miller continues. “They wanted to make sure every step of the way that we honored the original design of the home.”

For their successful efforts, the team at Allrite Home & Remodeling won an award in the 2019 National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) Milwaukee Remodeler of the Year Awards competition. The home received a Silver Award in the category of “Residential Historical Renovation/Restoration.”

“Our company has installed many DaVinci composite roofs during the past 15 years,” says Miller. “We’re proud of all of them. However, this project was a true labor of love. We’ve now added our mark to a beloved historical home in our community. Our entire team takes great satisfaction in knowing we were able to help bring a longer life to this Frank Lloyd Wright home.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Allrite Home & Remodeling, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, https://allriteremodeling.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Single-Width Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Persistence Pays Off for Roofer

After the Muirfield Design Control Committee agreed to allow the installation of DaVinci synthetic slate and shake in their community, Great Roofing and Restoration re-roofed this home in late 2019 with shake composite. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Determined. Resilient. Stubborn. Those words could easily describe Ryan Lephart. Whether it’s a single home project or the challenge of securing roofing for a community, Lephart digs in for perfection.

One of Lephart’s longest quests was to secure approval to install composite roofing on homes in the Muirfield Village community in Dublin, Ohio. It took nine years, but his patience and diligent efforts paid off.

“Acceptance of new products comes slowly to some people,” says Lephart, director of business development for Great Roofing and Restoration. “This is a planned community. In the past it has only accepted real slate and shake roofing materials. Now we’ve finally gotten a toehold. We’ve gained approval for composite materials in Muirfield. As a result, we’ve installed our first DaVinci Multi-Width Shake roof there.”

Developing Muirfield

The Muirfield concept was started in 1968. That’s when golfer Jack Nicklaus teamed up with design and building professionals in Ohio. His goal was to convert unspoiled land into a world-renown golf club and living area.

The family-friendly community of Muirfield now boasts nearly 2,400 families. A winding complex of tree-lined streets includes condos, patio homes and single-family homes. And, two Jack Nicklaus golf courses.

Fast-forward about 40 years. That’s when Lephart started lobbying for composite roofing tiles at Muirfield.

The Wenners chose DaVinci synthetic shake for their residence in Findlay, Ohio.

Many of the original shake and slate roofs at Muirfield have deteriorated over time. The Design Control Committee for the development does not allow roof repairs — only roof replacements.

“Design standards are very high at Muirfield,” says Lephart, a licensed general contractor. “For nine years I presented the DaVinci product option because of its high aesthetic and performance values. Recently I met with their board again. New, more progressive people are now on the board. I brought in six boxes of DaVinci tiles and laid them out on the tables. I wanted people to see and feel the quality of the products.”

Thanks to Lephart’s persistence, the Muirfield Design Control Committee finally agreed to allow the installation of DaVinci Multi-Width Shake and DaVinci Multi-Width Slate in their community. Lephart re-roofed his first DaVinci home at Muirfield in late 2019.

“We had a beautiful shake composite in a Chesapeake color installed on a home on Aryshire Drive,” says Lephart. “We see this as a starting point in this community. With the DaVinci product now being an option for homeowners to choose for roof replacements, we believe residents will select the product for its beauty and durability.”

 “We’re confident that we’ll be re-roofing up to 10 houses in this community in 2020,” he continues. “That gets the ball rolling for future composite re-roofing projects in Muirfield.”

Single Home Attention

Lephart and the team at Great Roofing and Restoration put as much attention and effort into single family re-roofing projects as they do into multi-family communities. One example of this is homeowner Steve Wenner, a resident of Findlay, Ohio.

Amid constant worry that his real cedar shingles were blowing off in wind storms, Wenner decided to take action. He began investigating composite roofing options.

“My wife and I liked the DaVinci roofs we saw locally,” says Wenner. “We contacted several roofers and the DaVinci corporate headquarters. They gave us locations throughout northwest Ohio where we could see the composite roofing installed.”

So, the Wenners went on a mini-road trip. They spent an entire day driving around looking at dozens of roofs. And they liked what they saw.

The next step in replacing the 1991 cedar shake shingles on their home came in making the color decision. Wenner did what many homeowners do in the same situation. He took a ladder out and placed the samples on the roof. His wife Nancy stood back and evaluated the color options.

“When Nancy kept coming back to the Mountain blend color I knew we had our choice,” says Wenner. “The combination of the three shades of Mountain tones really complements the other elements of our home exterior.”

After receiving several bids for the project, the Wenners decided they liked the personal attention offered by Lephart and his company. “Selecting Great Roofing and Restoration was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made,” says Wenner. “That roofing crew has an exceptional work ethic. They took care of our property at all times and worked from sun up to sun down. I just can’t say enough good things about working with Great Roofing.”

According to Lephart, the Wenner home was a dream project. “Helping the Wenners gain a low-maintenance, top-quality DaVinci roof means they’ll have years of worry-free enjoyment,” says Lephart. “Demand for composite slate and shake shingles is up in all our locations. From Ohio to Colorado, people want impact- and fire-resistant roofing. They want roofing with a strong warranty and incredibly appealing looks. Basically, they want everything that DaVinci has to offer them in a roofing product.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Great Roofing and Restoration, Cleveland, Ohio, www.greatroofing.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Multi-Width Shake and Multi-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Renovated Seaview Resort Boasts Composite Slate Roof

Seaview, a Dolce Hotel, replaced its roof with a composite slate roofing system as part an extensive $18 million renovation project. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Following an extensive $18 million renovation, the award-winning Seaview, a Dolce Hotel, is once again open for business. Located on 670 scenic acres along Reed’s Bay in picturesque Galloway, New Jersey, the luxury resort and golf club now boasts a composite slate roof overhead.

“You don’t get many chances to renovate a hotel, so we wanted to do it right,” says Mike Tidwell, director of sales and marketing for Seaview, a Dolce Hotel. “We selected a DaVinci Roofscapes Single-Width Slate roof to provide us with the same aesthetic appeal as the original slate roof.”

Founded in 1914, the historic resort had its natural slate roof for more than 100 years. “The slate was cracked and brittle after all this time,” says Tidwell. “The decision on a new roof was important because we face the bay and have constant exposure to salt air and strong winds. We needed to preserve the historic look of the roof while finding a product that weighed less than real slate and could give us decades of hassle-free maintenance.”

The composite roof material is made of pure virgin resins, UV and thermal stabilizers. There’s also a highly-specialized fire retardant. And, the composite slate roofing tiles from DaVinci are designed to resist fading, rotting, cracking and pests. The 12-inch composite tiles are 1/2-inch thick and are modeled after actual slate for natural, non-repeating beauty.

“One of the aspects we liked best about selecting the DaVinci product was our ability to choose a custom color mix that replicated the original roof,” says Tidwell. “We chose a blend of Dark Violet, Medium Tan and Dark Terracotta that helps preserve the historic look of the structure.”

First Impressions Count

The celebrated resort has 298 guest rooms, public spaces and meeting areas. It has hosted many famous guests over the years. Grace Kelly’s sweet 16 party was held at the resort in 1946. Former President Dwight D. Eisenhower played golf at the resort in the 1950s. And, the Rolling Stones stayed for 10 days in 1989 during their Steel Wheels Tour.

The luxury resort and golf club features a composite slate roof from DaVinci Roofscapes.

“The ‘sense of arrival’ is really important at Seaview,” says Tidwell. “I drive by the front of this hotel every day and the renovated structure looks terrific. We’re ready to welcome an entirely new era of guests to the hotel … and we know the new composite slate roof will make a strong first impression on them.”

Located just eight miles from Atlantic City, Seaview boasts 34,500 square feet of space for indoor and outdoor events. The resort has two championship golf courses. In addition, it has a world-class Elizabeth Arden Red Door spa, tennis courts and a pool.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: ACG Roofing & Sheet Metal, Warminster, Pennsylvania

MATERIALS

Composite Slate Roof: Single-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com