EDCO Products Celebrates 70th Anniversary, Partners with ICA Food Shelf

EDCO Partners with ICA Food Shelf

EDCO Products announced a partnership with ICA Food Shelf to commemorate EDCO’s 70th anniversary. Pictured are Chris Doucet, EDCO’s director of sales, and Peg Keenan of ICA Food Shelf.

In conjunction with the company’s 70th anniversary, EDCO Products Inc. announced a long-term partnership with ICA Food Shelf that will provide financial support, as well as additional employee involvement with future ICA initiatives. EDCO Products, a manufacturer of residential and commercial exterior building products, is located in Hopkins, Minn. The company’s current commitment with Minnetonka, Minn.-based ICA Food Shelf runs through 2020, with the potential to expand and/or extend the partnership into the future.

“Philanthropy and community involvement have been hallmarks at EDCO since the company was founded back in 1946,” said Eric Lindquist, EDCO president and CEO.  “Having been located in Hopkins since our company began, we wanted to find a meaningful way to give back to the community that has been so good to us.  We are honored to be partnering with the ICA Food Shelf and to support the vital services they provide within Hopkins and the surrounding communities.”

“EDCO’s commitment to our food shelf will provide significant resources that will allow us to better serve the more than 2400 individuals who currently depend on ICA on a monthly basis,” said Peg Keenan, ICA Food Shelf Executive Director.  “We are delighted to have EDCO join our team and look forward to their support for many years to come.”

According to the company, EDCO officially incorporated in 1946 and began a 70-year journey with a laser-focused commitment to innovation, quality and service. The entrepreneurial spirit of Arthur Edwards Sr. and his son, Arthur Edwards Jr., led to the creation of an award-winning residential and commercial building products manufacturer which established its headquarters in Hopkins, where the company’s main offices and manufacturing still exist today.  Arthur Edwards, Jr. continued to work at EDCO each day until his passing in 2012 at the age of 92.  His inspirational legacy lives on today through his two daughters, Jan Edwards and Danae Kasbi, as well as his grandson Kavon Kasbi, who are now the third- and fourth-generation owners of the company, respectively.

In 2015, the company appointed a new President and CEO, Eric Lindquist, to lead EDCO into the future.  “I am honored to have been chosen to lead this incredible company and look forward to expanding on the rich tradition of innovation, quality, and service we are renowned for while at the same time capitalizing on the significant growth opportunities we see before us,” said Lindquist.  “We are confident that the next 70 years will be just as impressive as the first 70.”

Local Branding Can Trump National Competitors

The marketing game can certainly be complex. With hundreds of tools, thousands of options and one big learning curve in between, it’s easy to be inundated.

Throw in some big conglomerate-sized competitors and it’s downright daunting.

Nevertheless, local contractors actually have an advantage. They are in an incredible position to build the very best of brands. All they need to do is start!

SEE THE OPPORTUNITY: A BIG BRAND

Why do people choose big-name brands over competitors? Because they know what to expect.

The bar is set pretty low for blowing customers out of the water with service, quality and efficiency. However, when you can create a truly great customer experience, people will remember it. Customers tend to expect greatness to come from those companies that put forth an appealing and professional image. Their branding gets remembered. And the brands that get remembered are usually the ones that succeed.

A major flaw that many small businesses and contractors fail to recognize is that their brand is not memorable. Maybe they use initials for their company name or have bland truck-wrap designs. Maybe their website looks like it was made in 1995 or their brochure is full of grammatical errors. Whatever the case may be, there is always room for improvement.

A big brand excites and reassures. It doesn’t lead to skepticism or distrust. You can beat out the bigger companies when it comes to delivering personable, reliable and memorable service in your community. You just need to get your visual presence to reflect that.

So how do you make that happen?

PROFESSIONAL LOOK, PERSONAL FEEL

Customers want a service that’s human and personalized. But they also want an outfit that looks the part. The challenge is how to blend the two.

If you think aspects of your service, like tidy uniforms, clean service equipment and a slick-looking company truck, don’t matter, you’re severely missing out. Thoughtful service can help get your company’s reputation in good standing. Yet it’s only when you’ve got a brand that matches your high-quality service that you can expect to crush the competition.

Put customer woes to bed by taking hold of your brand and getting a professionally designed logo. The degree of aesthetic quality and industry-appropriate imagery will position your name as an immediate authority.

UPDATED AND INTEGRATED

Does your website and digital presence reflect your most current services and information? In 2014, this is a must!

You lose customers when you default on your brand promise by providing misleading information or not living up to expectations. Ignorance of an error is no excuse; customers will be disappointed and frustrated when certain expectations are not met. This is business.

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CentiMark Corp. Has a Culture of Giving

Although roofing is Canonsburg, Pa.-based CentiMark Corp.’s business, giving back to the community is the company’s commitment. Dedicated to helping people in need, CentiMark offers volunteer or financial support to hundreds of charities across North America that serve the hungry, homeless, at-risk children and families, domestic-violence victims, veterans and senior citizens.

CentiMark corporate associates deliver Back-to-School, Christmas, and Easter food and gifts to families in need and non-profit organizations.

CentiMark corporate associates deliver Back-to-School, Christmas, and Easter food and gifts to families in need and non-profit organizations.

Edward B. Dunlap, founder, chairman and CEO of the 46-year-old roofing company, leads by example in business and philanthropy. Since the early days of the company, Dunlap supported those in need in his community and encouraged volunteerism from his associates. “Giving back to the community has not shaped the CentiMark culture; it is the CentiMark culture,” says Timothy M. Dunlap, CentiMark’s president and chief operating officer. “The culture of giving back and volunteering has been ingrained in us for years. Now, as our company grows, we have more resources to help people.”

For example, in July 2014, 60 of CentiMark’s 80 offices throughout North America held food drives and made financial donations to food banks in their respective communities as part of National Roofing Week, sponsored by NRCA. They did the same thing last Thanksgiving, and they will do it again this Thanksgiving.

As part of their regular Friday routine, CentiMark corporate associates take turns delivering Meals on Wheels, a program near and dear to the heart of Edward Dunlap. “We are committed to the senior citizens in our community who need our help,” he states. Last summer, in the middle of a heat wave in western Pennsylvania, Dunlap instructed his associates to purchase and install air conditioners and fans in the homes of the seniors on the Meals on Wheels route who did not have the cooling appliances.

The company especially is committed to children and families. CentiMark associates teach Junior Achievement and host field trips at their corporate offices to show students how a business works. CentiMark Foundation Executive Director John Rudzik continues to teach Junior Achievement after 35 years. He remembers, “Even when I was a busy CFO and thought I didn’t have time to teach, Ed Dunlap told me I did have the time.” In addition, CentiMark associates regularly stuff backpacks for Blessings in a Backpack programs to provide meals for children on the weekends.

CentiMark participates in "Take Our Kids to Work Day".

CentiMark participates in “Take Our Kids to Work Day” to teach kids about how a business works.

Each year, CentiMark corporate associates deliver Back-to-School, Christmas, and Easter food and gifts to families in need and non-profit organizations. “When you give a child a book bag, school supplies, school clothes and shoes, you not only make their
day, but you reinforce the importance of education,” Edward Dunlap notes. “Plus the peer pressure is so great for children who do not have the latest book bag or school shoes. We try to help the parents who cannot afford all the back-to-school or holiday items.”

“Our non-profit partners tell us: ‘This was the first Easter basket that this child has received’, ” Rudzik adds. “Parents tell us: ‘There would not have been Christmas at our house without your help’. ”

“At CentiMark, we walk, run, bike and golf for charity; we teach school students; we deliver meals; we shop for winter coats; we place Christmas wreaths on veterans’ graves; we support people in need; and we give of our time,” Tim Dunlap says. “We take great pride in our success as a roofing company because our success enables us to increase our charitable and volunteer endeavors.”