Acoustical Smoke Vents Are Key Priority for School’s Theater Renovation

The renovation included the construction of a new visual arts wing that integrates a rich cross-section of artistic disciplines with a gallery, studio and classroom spaces. Photos: Sarah Hamlin/Everchangingphoto

Roofing experts are well aware smoke vents can save lives and reduce the amount of property loss. While life and property safety are their primary function, acoustical smoke vents also play an important part in noise mitigation. When Middlesex School in Massachusetts renovated the 55,000-square-foot Bass Pavilion for the Arts and Danoff Visual Arts Center, the architectural team from CBT Architects selected four acoustical smoke vents manufactured by The BILCO Company.

“The features that were included in the smoke vents were geared to student safety,” says Michelle Oishi, the lead architect on the project for CBT. “That was of paramount importance. They were also space considerations, and the automated aspect of the vents was important due to the fact that we wanted very few things interfering with the rigging sets.”

Broad Scope

The primary objective of the project aimed at improving the existing theater and creating a space where the school’s entire 400-plus students and nearly 100 faculty members could assemble. The previous structure was built in the 1960s. The school opened in 1901.

“There’s a commitment to theater and the arts,” says Steve McKeown, the school’s project manager. “It’s not any different than our commitment to clubs, sciences or athletics. We provide spaces for students who are interested in a variety of things. There’s a lot of cool opportunities for students to find their promise.”

Middlesex School recently completed an extensive renovation project of the school theater. The project included six double-leaf acoustical smoke vents manufactured by The BILCO Company.

Architects, engineers and contractors needed a large dose of creativity to execute the project. The theater’s original roof structure and perimeter walls needed to remain standing. In essence, the renovation was a major do-over of the existing space without adding additional square footage. “We had to work within the confines of the existing roof structure and the surrounding walls,” Oishi said. “A certain amount of the existing building was out of character with the rest of the school.”

The acoustical smoke vents used in the Middlesex School renovation are 6-foot-by-6-foot double-leaf smoke vents with motorized operation that allows them to be opened and closed from a remote location. They also include limit switches, which allow for monitoring if the vents are in the open or closed position.

Automatic smoke vents protect property and aid firefighters in bringing a fire under control by removing smoke, heat and gases from a burning building. This ensures better visibility, evacuation time, and protection against fire spread, as well as reduced risk of smoke inhalation and structural damage. They are activated upon the melting of a fusible link, and are ideally suited for large expanses of unobstructed space such as factories, warehouses, auditoriums and retail facilities.

Acoustical smoke vents, however, take on the added quality of controlling noise. They are used in theaters, concert halls and other projects where it is important to limit noise intrusion.

Know Your Ratings

Acoustical smoke vents and their ability to block out noise are determined by ratings in Sound Transmission Class and Outdoor-Indoor Transmission Class. For acoustical smoke vents, the OITC rating is the more important figure for architects to consider.

OITC rates the transmission sound between outdoor spaces and indoor spaces in a structure. Like the STC rating, OITC measures sound intensity loss in decibels. The OITC rating was developed in 1990 and is typically used to measure sound transmission loss over a frequency range from 80 to 4000 hertz. It is most applicable for measuring the prevention of low frequency exterior sounds such as automotive traffic, construction, and low-flying airplanes through exterior building surfaces.

STC measures the extent to which sound is prevented from being transferred from one area to another. The higher the STC value, the less that sound can be transferred through a building product. STC is typically used to measure sound transmission loss over a frequency range from 125 to 4,000 hertz and is most applicable for interior areas that experience mid to high frequency noises, such as conversation, television, telephones, and office equipment.

“OITC is the preferred rating when addressing sound insulation from exterior noise — especially when transportation noise sources are impacting a building facade with significant low-frequency (bass) sound,” says Harold Merck, principal and acoustician for Merck & Hill Consultants of Atlanta. “While STC ratings may be fine for typical interior noise sources such as voices, STC doesn’t adequately address the extended low-frequency noise contribution of aircraft, traffic or even large roof-top equipment. The OITC better addresses low-frequency noise impacts and is the more applicable sound rating for roof mounted automatic smoke vents.”

The BILCO Company recently unveiled a new acoustical smoke vent, with an STC rating of 50 and an OITC rating of 46, that provides the highest level of protection against exterior noise intrusion. In addition, the product has also received an ISO-140-18 sound rating when tested against rainfall sound. The rating measures the impact of sound insulation on building materials — such as roofs, skylights and roof/ceiling systems — incur when exposed to artificial rainfall.

Checking All the Boxes

From the roof on down, the completed project at Middlesex checks all of the boxes that were the target of the two-year renovation.

The main stage now includes balcony seating that allows the entire student body and faculty to fit comfortably as an audience for performances, guest speakers and all-school assemblies. It features a motorized orchestra pit that can be raised up to the stage level.

There are gallery space and pin-up areas as new arenas to celebrate and encourage the artistic pursuits of students. There is also a new “mindfulness” space that will provide “emotional and intellectual space to reflect and recharge,” according to the architect. Workers also improved a courtyard to provide accessible entry to adjacent buildings which includes a terrace that serves as an exterior performance venue.

Thanks to the acoustical smoke vents, it also includes important life and property safety features that also limit exterior noise.

“It’s an awesome space,” McKeown said. “The entire community gathers there on a weekly basis, and it’s very comfortable. It provides a space where our community can gather, and that’s something that is very important to our school.”

About the author: Thomas Renner writes on building, construction, and other trade industry topics for publications in the United States.

TEAM

Architect: CBT Architects, Boston, Massachusetts, www.cbtarchitects.com

Contractor: J.S. Mortimer Inc., Auburn, Massachusetts, www.jsmortimer.com

MATERIALS

Smoke Vents: Acoustical Smoke Vents, The BILCO Company, www.bilco.com

Shingles: Landmark, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

Omaha Re-Roofing Project in Historic District Wins Top Honors From ARMA

When the Molly Jenkins Carriage House was damaged by hail, a new roof system featuring CertainTeed Carriage House shingles was installed to protect the home and recapture its classic look. Photos: Everlast Exteriors

The Molly Jenkins Carriage House is located in the historic Country Club District of Omaha, Nebraska. The home, originally built in the 1920s, needed a new roof after it sustained hail damage and multiple leaks were discovered. The homeowners wanted an aesthetically pleasing, durable roof system that would be true to the style of the neighborhood and capture the look of the house as it was originally designed.

Omaha-based Everlast Exteriors was called in to consult on the project after the storm. “Their insurance agent recommended us to the homeowner,” says Brent Hall, co-owner of Everlast Exteriors. “The Country Club historic district is an early 20th century Omaha neighborhood that was marketed to attract homebuyers who expected an exceptionally high level of quality. The community was added to the National Register Of Historic Places in 2004. On this home, the existing asphalt shingle roof had to be replaced, as did the inlaid gutters, which were also damaged.”

Hall recommended asphalt shingles due to their beauty and performance. After consulting with the homeowner, the company installed CertainTeed Carriage House shingles, which are a Class 4 impact resistant shingle.

The first step was to replace the gutter system. “We had to remove the first 3 feet of the roofing and put down a high-temp ice and water shield,” explains Hall. “We installed it within the inlaid gutters, and then ran it 3 feet up the roof. Then we fabricated and installed the inlaid gutter, before we went back and roofed it. We had to do it that way because the gutter system extends under the shingles and underlayment.”

The gutters were custom fabricated out of 24-gauge pre-finished galvanized steel and installed in the existing wood frame. “We also re-flashed the chimneys using the 24 gauge pre finished steel color to match shingles.” Hall says.

The new shingles were installed over a synthetic underlayment and ice and water shield. New accessories included lead boots for the plumbing vents, a new gutter apron, drip edge and exhaust vents.

Standout features included a custom-fabricated turret cap and a new weather vane. “We fabricated a copper turret cap that might be the biggest one we’ve ever made,” says Hall. “She also purchased a copper weather vane, and we installed that for her, too.”

The copper turret cap was the final touch on the project. According to Hall, the homeowner really wasn’t sure what she wanted, so the project was put in the hands of Todd Sterba, a top metal fabricator at Everlast Exteriors. “Executing something like this takes the right tools and the right fabricator,” notes Hall. “He worked on it in our shop and even took it home to his own workshop to put some finishing touches on it. We never even saw the final product until he brought it out to the job. The homeowner really loved it.”

The style of shingle was chosen because it fit in with the character of the area. “It’s an old house in a historic neighborhood, and that asphalt shingle really has a timeless look,” says Hall. “It’s made to emulate a slate roof, and it looks like something they might have installed in the era when the home was built.”

Everlast Exteriors submitted the project to the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association for the ARMA Excellence In Asphalt Roofing Awards program, which recognizes industry professionals for their high-performing steep-slope and low-slope asphalt roofing projects across North America. The Molly Jenkins Carriage House received the Gold Award in 2020. The company received a check for $2,000 at the 2020 International Roofing Expo.

“We were really happy to learn that we won,” Hall recalls. “We try and just knock out the coolest, best roofs around. We use the best products out there and provide the best workmanship. That’s our goal. Our top priority is to put out the best product not get the biggest profit — so it’s nice to get recognition.”

According to Hall, the award-wining project showcases the company’s strengths. “We match high-end material with high-end labor,” he says. “We try to bring together the best shingles and accessories, with the best labor practices to install the best product we can while meeting every customer’s budget. We provide a transferable lifetime labor warranty so we make sure every roof we do is aesthetically pleasing and maintenance free.”

Submissions are being accepted for ARMA’s 2021 Excellence in Asphalt Roofing Awards. For more information or to apply, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Everlast Exteriors, Omaha, Nebraska, www.everlastexteriorconstruction.com

MATERIALS

Shingles: Carriage House Gatehouse Slate, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

Rutter Roofing Awards New Roof to Local Army Veteran

Rutter Roofing, a full-service, family-owned-and-operated exterior remodeling company located in Malvern, Pennsyslvania, awarded Lower Pottsgrove resident retired Army Sgt. Joe Oberholtzer with a brand-new roof as part of its annual Memorial Day Giveaway. As the winner of the veteran-aimed promotion, Oberholtzer received a free CertainTeed roof system, which was installed the first week of July courtesy of Rutter Roofing.

Oberholtzer, who served in the U.S. Army from 2001-2009 where he received several honors for bravery and humanitarian work, was unknowingly entered into the giveaway by his father-in-law.

“My father-in-law called me at the same time I got the email saying I’d won,” said Oberholtzer. “I thought, ‘Is it a scam?’ … You know, the normal reaction when somebody tells you they’re going to remodel your roof for free.”

During Oberholtzer’s service, he earned the Army Commendation Medal, the Army Achievement Medal, and the Army Humanitarian Medal — awarded to him for his off-duty community service while serving in the Kosovo Tactical Operations Center. Following his time in Kosovo, Oberholtzer’s unit was among the first to supply humanitarian aid during hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

The Oberholtzer family inlcudes (from left) Gianna Lacy, Shannon Oberholtzer, Sgt. Joe Oberholtzer II, Benjamin Oberholtzer, Sam Lacy and Joey Oberholtzer III. 

As a retired sergeant, Oberholtzer continues to give back to the community as a lifelong member of the Sanatoga Fire Company, where he is a former deputy chief. Today, he and his wife, Shannon Oberholtzer, both serve as first-responders in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.

Jackie Daller, director of business development at Rutter Roofing, said the company created the giveaway as part of their Community/Service/Leadership (C.S.L.) pledge, which focuses on charitable giving efforts each fiscal quarter. According to Daller, it was difficult to pick a winner this year with so many impressive and heartfelt nominations, so Rutter Roofing enlisted the help of last year’s winner, retired Army sergeant and Vietnam War veteran Dave Gardner.

 “[Gardner] and his wife, Joan, agreed that here was an individual who not only served his country through military enlistment, but continues to face the challenges and dangers of protecting others in his community, all the while being an amazing husband and father,” said Daller.

With a roof that was more than 30 years old, the Rutter Roofing announcement couldn’t have come at a better time, according to Oberholtzer.

“I knew when we purchased our home in 2010 that I’d be replacing the roof in less than 10 years,” said Oberholtzer. “But life happened and I did not get around to it. In 2018, I noticed a water leak in the dining room ceiling. I attempted to repair it myself and during the repair found that the shingles were all laid incorrectly and knew I’d have to replace the entire roof sooner than later.” 

Daller said Rutter Roofing was excited to work on the project and give a beautiful and durable roof to a deserving family. The new Integrity Roof System features CertainTeed Landmark shingles. “The extended warranty that comes with it, which covers the installing workmanship and the roofing materials, will give them additional peace of mind,” said Daller. 

Newlyweds Joe and Shannon Oberholtzer had to cancel their honeymoon due to the pandemic and were going to use their vacation time to fix up their old roof. Oberholtzer said he’s touched by Rutter Roofing’s generosity and was excited to spend time with his wife and four children instead of hammering shingles.“For us to be helped and be recognized is like all the pieces of our lives falling perfectly into place,” said Oberholtzer.

For more information about Rutter Roofing, visit www.rutterroofing.com

Won Over by Metal Roofing

A finished Matterhorn Tile application on an Oklahoma City-area home.
Photos: CertainTeed

Scott McCollum, owner of McRoof Residential and Commercial Roofing, has been in the contracting business for half a century. Since 2007, his Edmond, Oklahoma-based roofing business has concentrated on wind and impact-resistant asphalt products — the kind needed for homes often in the path of tornados, hailstorms and other wind events common to Oklahoma and Northern Texas.

“We’re right in the middle of the hail belt and tornado alley, so people are extremely concerned about hail and wind,” says McCollum. “Those are really big drivers that make people willing to spend more on a roof that is going to give them better performance.”

In 2019, McCollum introduced CertainTeed’s Matterhorn Metal Roofing into his product offering. The lightweight, steel panel roofing system offers top-tier wind and impact resistance, with bold colors and designs that emulate popular styles like shake, slate, and clay tile.

McCollum said most of his customers are homeowners and business owners making insurance claims due to severe hail and storm-related roof damage. He often recommends higher-end and SBS-modified asphalt products, but began offering metal roofing due to a surge of consumer interest. After experimenting with a few metal systems, McCollum settled on Matterhorn from CertainTeed for its looks, solar-reflective color options and ease of installation.

“We really believe it’s the most beautiful metal roofing product on the market,” says McCollum. “We’ve always been a value-added contractor, so this is a good fit for us.”

Overcoming Contractor Concerns

According to McCollum, customers typically come to McRoof because they are frustrated with typical products after several roof repairs or replacements following storms. “Some have had to replace their asphalt roof every five to seven years, so we’ve always recommended higher-end products,” notes McCollum. “I’ve always understood the benefits of metal roofing when it is installed correctly, but I was concerned about introducing it into our product line with our available labor resources. What was the learning curve, and what does it take to get the job done … those were the questions I had.”

Since its inception, McRoof has relied exclusively on CertainTeed for its asphalt products. After a chance meeting with a CertainTeed Matterhorn metal roofing field representative, McCollum decided to give the product a try.

“Most of the concerns I had went away after the first one or two installations,” McCollum says. “Matterhorn is a well-thought-out product and the way it fastens and goes together is seamless. It takes a little more time to get drip edge and hips and ridges done, but once the deck is prepared, the installation of the field tile goes very quickly.”

McCollum said that on the first couple of Matterhorn roofing installations, CertainTeed sent field representatives to the project site who worked alongside McRoof installers to help them avoid any costly or time-consuming installation errors.

“Some contractors are worried about getting into metal roofing, but the monetary investment for the hand tools you need is next to nothing, and the learning curve is very low,” says McCollum. “With a metal nibbler, some snips, a crimper and a handbrake, you’re good to go. The additional revenue basically doubles the size of my company.”

Making the Sale

McCollum says that in storm-prone Oklahoma and Texas, most of his customers are open to the idea of metal roofing, which is known for its durability and longevity. Most metal roofs have a useful lifespan of more than 50 years, which is music to the ears of many homeowners living in the hail belt. He says it’s important to establish the benefits with customers and to explain the advantages of going with a longer-lasting product on their “forever home.”

“People know that metal roofing is a little more expensive than asphalt,” said McCollum. “However, customers are looking for impact, fire and wind resistance, as well as solar reflectivity. I’ve had people tell me they’ve wanted a metal roof for years, but they don’t want it to look like a barn. When you’re able to actually show customers the samples, their eyes light up.

“Clay tile is very popular in the Southwest and the Matterhorn is especially spot on,” McCollum continued. “I grew up in New Mexico surrounded by stucco homes with tile roofs and you could put a Matterhorn Tile roof in the middle of 10 clay tile roofs and you would not be able to tell the difference. It’s that good, so we think there’s a huge potential market for it with architects and specifiers.”

McCollum says contractors should consider metal roofing specialization a long-term investment. He suggested becoming a credentialed installer in order to demonstrate expertise and be able to offer better installation warranties.

“When I was looking at metal roofing, I wasn’t looking at it to make a lot of money right away,” says McCollum. “We were concerned about learning how to do it correctly as opposed to squeezing money out of the first couple of jobs. My best advice would be to find a mentor and do some training. It’s money well spent.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: McRoof Residential and Commercial Roofing, Edmond, Oklahoma, https://www.mcroofrx.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: Matterhorn Tile, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com/metal-roofing

Missouri Home Gets a Fresh Appearance With Impact-Resistant Roof Upgrade

Photos: CertainTeed

Of the $723 million in property damage caused by hail in the United States annually, many of those losses take place in the “hail belt,” a center strip of the country that regularly receives more hail damage than most parts of the country.

Sibley, Missouri, a suburb of Kansas City, sits squarely in the buckle of the hail belt. An impressive five-bedroom home built in Sibley had weathered several damaging storms, but unfortunately, the home’s wood shake roof could not stand the test of time.

When Chase Roscher, vice president of Zucca & Daughters & Sons Roofing Company, Inc., was approached by the homeowner, the home’s roof was failing and in need of total replacement.

“This particular roof was a wood shake roof and had bad hail damage,” says Roscher. He explained that while popular for its natural aesthetic, wood shake roofing can be difficult and expensive to maintain properly.

“Unlike asphalt roofing, wood shake roofing requires yearly maintenance and upkeep to avoid becoming a hazard,” said Roscher. Without diligent upkeep, he added, prolonged sun and water exposure can cause wood shake to break down, making it more vulnerable to mold, algae, fires and impact damage from hail and wind-blown debris.

When this Missouri home’s roof needed to be replaced, Zucca & Daughters & Sons Roofing installed Belmont IR shingles from CertainTeed.

In addition to needing an impact-resistant roof solution, the slope of the roof was an extremely steep 12/12 pitch. The roof would need a sturdy, reinforced shingle that would resist the forces of gravity. According to Roscher, the homeowner considered swapping out their aging wood roof with a slate roof. While slate can provide a long-lasting, sophisticated appearance, the weight and cost of the product are often prohibitive.

“Slate roofing will last longer, but it is so heavy that if your house isn’t built for it, you have to go in and do a lot of additional structural work to support it,” Roscher says. “It’s also extremely expensive compared to asphalt. For people looking for a higher-end appearance, the value proposition of an impact-resistant asphalt shingle really fits that need.”

Roscher suggested CertainTeed Belmont IR (Impact Resistant) shingles in the color Black Granite for the project. Emulating the appearance of slate, the product offered a natural-looking solution with the strength and durability of a reinforced, impact-resistant asphalt shingle. Eighty-five squares of the product were required for the project.

“We try to present Belmont to customers as an option,” says Roscher. “With this product, you’re spending less to get the same great look as slate with more functionality.”

Installing the product came with benefits for both the homeowner and the roofing contractor. The product offers Class 4 impact-resistance — the highest impact rating in the industry — allowing the homeowner to qualify for a premium discount on their home insurance and decreasing the chances of having to file a hail damage claim in the future.

For the roofing contractor, working with a familiar, lighter-weight asphalt product — as opposed to a heavier slate product — saved his crew time and improved the safety of the installation. That was especially important, given the steep pitch of the roof and three stories separating the eaves from the ground below.

“The homeowner was extremely happy, and the product gave the homeowner insurance savings and more value,” Roscher says. “That’s better for us and the homeowner.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Zucca & Daughters & Sons Roofing Company Inc., Blue Springs, Missouri, www.zuccaroofing.com

MATERIALS

Shingles: Belmont IR in Black Granite, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

CertainTeed Becomes Gold Sponsor for National Women in Roofing

CertainTeed announced its commitment as a Gold-level sponsor of National Women in Roofing (NWIR), a volunteer-based organization that supports the careers of women roofing professionals and focuses on connecting and empowering women so they can promote change and improve best practices within the roofing industry.

“Through recruiting, networking, educating and mentoring women in roofing, NWIR is making valuable strides to further strengthen our industry,” said Barb McDonough, general manager of CertainTeed’s commercial roofing division. “Not only does the organization shine visibility on new opportunities for women, it also champions the accomplishments and dedication of those already established in the industry. This is why CertainTeed is proud to support NWIR as a Gold-level sponsor.”

Sponsorships serve a critical role for NWIR, as they support the organization as a whole and fund critical program initiatives. In addition to its Gold-level sponsorship, CertainTeed also collaborated with NWIR to establish the Philadelphia chapter, which serves as a vehicle for members to connect regularly to exchange ideas, attend educational events and develop relationships to advance women within the roofing profession.

“We at NWIR are proud to be sponsored by CertainTeed,” said NWIR Immediate Past Chair Shari Carlozzi. “This sponsorship is so important for us because it allows women to network with others in the roofing profession while forming bonds that can lead to greater opportunities for women and the industry as a whole.”

For more information, visit https://nationalwomeninroofing.org/ or www.certainteed.com.

Hispanic Contractors Association of the Carolinas Names CertainTeed as Partner of the Year

CertainTeed was recognized as the HCAC “Partner of the Year.” Pictured at the award ceremony are Lissette Velez (left) of the HCAC and Manaya Robertson of CertainTeed Roofing. 

CertainTeed has been recognized by Hispanic Contractors Association of the Carolinas (HCAC) as its “Partner of the Year.” The acknowledgement took place earlier this year during the association’s annual Gala & Brilliance Awards. 

In conjunction with the Gala, the HCAC Brilliance Awards have existed since 2012 to recognize the success of Hispanic and minority contractors and organizations supporting them. The Partner of the Year Award is given to a company or individual that has gone above and beyond to provide opportunities and resources that contribute to the growth and success of Hispanic construction firms and works closely as an active partner with the HCAC to make it happen. 

“CertainTeed has done an incredible job working to meet the needs of Hispanic contractors in the Carolinas and implementing bilingual resources and certifications in Spanish for them,” said HCAC Executive Director Lissette Velez. “Over the five years they have been an HCAC partner, CertainTeed has partnered with us on several initiatives to enable growth and success of Hispanic firms. This includes providing initiatives and training for small businesses, free training to roofing contractors, bilingual business resources for its customers, informational newsletters and free marketing tools. 

“The fact that CertainTeed is committed educating contractors on best practices and providing free certifications, even in Spanish, allows Hispanic contractors to better compete and stand out in the marketplace,” Velez added. “We thank CertainTeed and its team for their support over the years.” 

“It’s an honor and privilege to work with and support our colleagues within the Hispanic community,” said Alex Pecora, director of residential roofing product management for CertainTeed. “We support HCAC’s efforts to celebrate and honor diversity in the construction industry, and we are proud to accept the Partner of the Year Award.” 

To learn more about the HCAC or to become a member, visit www.hcacarolinas.org. For more information about CertainTeed’s community outreach initiatives, visit www.certainteed.com.

On hand for the award presentation were (from left) Jose Benitez and Nelson Benitez, co-owners of NJR Construction, LLC; James Mitchel, Business Development Manager, JE Dunn Construction; Chiquitha Lloyd, Director of Diversity & Inclusion Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools; Chad Smith, Senior Project Manager, Holder, Edison Foard, RJ Leeper Construction, Joint Venture; Manaya Robertson, Territory Field Sales & Marketing Specialist, CertainTeed Roofing; Juan Carlos Hernandez, owner of Matrix Renovations Corp.; and Celia Cruz and Jose Luis Montoya, owners of NC1 Construction, Inc.

Picturesque Mountain Clubhouse Gets a Metal Roof Upgrade

The Clubhouse at Lake Sconti was recently re-roofed with CertainTeed’s Matterhorn Shake metal roofing. Photo: CertainTeed

Just 60 miles north of Atlanta in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, the 7,000-acre Big Canoe community is an ideal location where residents enjoy mountains, lakes and a 27-hole championship golf course. The Clubhouse at Lake Sconti serves as Big Canoe’s central hub, with 25,000 square feet of gathering space that is host to weddings, corporate events, writers’ groups, poker clubs, trivia nights and more. Adding another 10,000 square feet to the overall facility is Duffer’s Bar and Grille and an adjoining golf cart storage facility.

Big Canoe’s original clubhouse — established in the early 1970s along with the community — burned to the ground 13 years ago after being struck by lightning. The entire structure was rebuilt, which included the installation of a classic cedar shake roof. After severe wind and hail damage from a more recent storm, the Big Canoe community found itself in the position of needing a complete roof replacement.

“It was a beautiful roof, but we weren’t getting the longevity out of the cedar shake as originally intended,” says Katie Wercholuk, marketing and communications director of the Big Canoe Property Owners Association. “We want our residents to be proud of their clubhouse and to not bear the cost of a new clubhouse roof every 10 years. We needed something with durability that would be able to stand up to mountain weather, which can sometimes be unpredictable.”

After six months of researching the best solution, the Big Canoe Property Owners Association found Colony Roofers, a veteran-owned roofing company based in Marietta, Georgia. Company president Mark Seymour suggested CertainTeed’s Matterhorn Shake in the color Cedar to keep the look of classic cedar shake while adding the benefits of metal.

“You should get about 30-40 years out of a cedar shingle roof, but it was 11 years and the original roof was deteriorating much quicker than it should have,” notes Seymour. “As we started ripping it off, we noticed that it wasn’t vented very well. A lot of the cedar shake shingles were curling up and breaking apart. It also sits inside of a valley and gets a lot of wind, so many of the hip and ridge shingles were coming up.”

Between the clubhouse, restaurant and golf cart barn, the job required 40,000 square feet of metal roof panels. In addition to be being the largest metal roofing job undertaken by Colony Roofing, the job’s secluded location and status as an active business presented additional challenges to the installing team.

“This was a big, six-to-eight-week job,” Seymour says. “Putting a roof on an operating business is difficult, so it required a lot of coordination with the property owners association. Big Canoe is also up in the mountains, so some of the bridges and roads you have to navigate aren’t meant for tractor-trailers and big machinery. If we were doing a standing seam roof where you have to stage long runs of metal and cut them to size, we would have definitely had some issues transporting it.”

Seymour said the way the product is designed and palletized allowed his team to “minimize the footprint” his team had on the property, and that the interlocking panel system allowed his crew to install the product quickly, helping Big Canoe get back to business as usual.

“Weather is unpredictable in the mountains and storms will come and go in the evenings,” says Seymour. “The main thing that helped us move quicker was the Matterhorn system. It goes on well and interlocks in a way our guys can understand. It’s a well-designed, user-friendly product.”

According to Wercholuk, the installation is a “win-win” for the Big Canoe community. “It’s not just low-maintenance, it’s no-maintenance and it looks beautiful,” says Wercholuk. “Anytime you have guests or visitors, the clubhouse is something you want to show off. We have intentionally tight architectural controls here and everything just blends into nature. You would never be able to tell it’s metal from far away.”

Wercholuk said that the product has left a great impression on Big Canoe’s roughly 6,000 residents.

“Everything we’ve heard from residents has been extremely positive,” Wercholuk adds. “Metal provided the look we were after as a mountain community, but with more efficiency.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Colony Roofers, Marietta, Georgia, www.colonyroofers.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: Matterhorn Shake metal roofing in Cedar, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

Roof of Texas Business Gets New Life After Hailstorm

After the damaged roof system was removed, CIMA installed a self-adhering SBS modified bitumen roofing system manufactured by CertainTeed. Photo: CertainTeed

Large hailstorms are a common occurrence in Northern Texas, so when the roof of CMS Magnetics Corporation in Garland, Texas, started to leak, the company suspected hail had something to do with it.

When CMS purchased its building in 2012, the company applied to its existing roof system a roof coating designed to strengthen the system and protect it from water intrusion. In 2018, however, the roof started leaking to the point that expert guidance was needed to address the situation.

To help CMS consider its options, Plano, Texas-based CIMA Contractors, LLC, was called in to find the source of the leaks and recommend an efficient, affordable solution. CIMA Contractors is a CertainTeed-credentialed roofing contractor with more than 20 years of experience in commercial roofing and storm damage restoration. After analyzing the roof’s existing PVC membrane, CIMA determined that the roof leaks were indeed the result of hail damage from a 2014 storm.

CMS leadership worried it would have to fix or replace the entire roof system at great expense to the company. Trusting in its expertise, CIMA stood by its findings and went the extra step of presenting additional findings to the insurance company so their hail damage claim could be covered.

CIMA met with adjusters, roofing contractors and engineers from the insurance company and conducted a joint assessment. During the assessment, the team conducted forensic work to determine that recent hail had compromised the roof system and was the cause of recurring leaks. This inspired the insurance company to agree to restore the roof to its pre-storm condition.

The existing roof assembly was comprised of a 22-inch intermediate-rib steel deck supporting a 60-mil PVC roof system along with a spray-on coating. CIMA decided to take a different approach — one that would offer a solution with greater energy efficiency, better tolerance for the foot traffic required for facility maintenance, and superior impact and weather resistance.

This photo shows the damaged roof before it was replaced. Photo: CertainTeed

After removing the old roof system, CIMA mechanically attached CertainTeed’s FlintBoard ISO insulation to the building’s steel deck. In addition to helping the structure meet city building code requirements, the insulation provided year-round indoor comfort. CIMA also installed tapered FlintBoard ISO-T insulation to reconfigure the cricket geometry and sumps in the roof’s corners and redirect water runoff to a new drainage system, eliminating standing water on the roof’s surface.

CIMA then applied CertainTeed’s Black Diamond Base Sheet, a self-adhering SBS modified bitumen roofing membrane designed to provide durability, strength, ease of handling and resistance to moisture and wind-driven rain. A torch-applied layer of CertainTeed’s Flintlastic GTA cap sheet topped off the system, providing additional puncture and tear resistance. The new, more resilient system delivered a combined 220 mils of protection.

Thanks to CIMA’s professional expertise and high-quality roofing products from CertainTeed, the CMS facility is dry, safe and comfortable for its employees. For additional peace of mind, the new roof is backed by a 15-year NDL (no-dollar limit) warranty from CIMA and CertainTeed. With their roof problems addressed and their storage areas dry, CMS has expanded its capacity and inventory, paving the way for greater operational bandwidth and profit.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: CIMA Contractors, LLC, Plano, Texas, www.cimacontractors.com

MATERIALS

Base Sheet: Black Diamond, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

Cap Sheet: Flintlastic GTA, CertainTeed

Insulation: FlintBoard ISO and FlintBoard ISO-T, CertainTeed

One-Component Liquid-Applied Flashing Requires No Primer or Mixing

CertainTeed introduces SmartFlashONE, a one-component, UV-stable, fluid-applied resin for steep and low-sloped roof flashing details and repairs. SmartFlash ONE offers roofing contractors an economical and convenient waterproofing solution in a ready-to-use, re-sealable can that requires no measuring or mixing to activate.

According to Abby Feinstein, commercial roofing product manager for CertainTeed, the ability for SmartFlash ONE to be applied without a primer and resealed for future use gives contractors an edge in terms of time, cost and ease of installation. “SmartFlash ONE delivers one-part labor efficiency with two-part performance,” said Feinstein. “With no primer or component mixing, contractors can work quickly without fear of the product setting up too fast or going to waste. And CertainTeed is so confident in the stress resilience and UV stability of the formula that we’re supporting the product with up to 20 years of warranty coverage, which is in line with the coverage afforded to two-part solutions.”

SmartFlash ONE resin is available in a 5-gallon pail (125-square-foot coverage) or a 1-gallon pail (25-square-foot coverage). The 1-gallon pail is available à la carte or as part of a Flash Pack which includes resin, fleece and application accessories. 

For more information, visit www.certainteed.com/commercial-roofing.