Atlas Names New Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Shingle and Underlayment Division

Atlas Roofing Corporation named Stanley Bastek as the new Vice President of Sales and Marketing for its Shingle and Underlayment Division. Bastek first began his career in the Atlas corporate headquarters 14 years ago.

The appointment comes as Kirk Villar, Vice President of Sales and Marketing, announces his retirement, after 22 years with Atlas. “One of the things I wanted to do is leave the company better than when I started, and at a time when we were doing extremely well,” Villar said. “I am excited about where Atlas is headed, and now look forward to exciting times where my wife and I get to go do some things that we’ve been wanting to do.” 

“Both Kirk and Stan have played pivotal roles in Atlas. It’s tough to lose Kirk. He lives and breathes Atlas and has invested so much into this company” said Ken Farrish, President of Atlas Roofing. “That said, there is no better time to make the transition. Our business is in a really good place and we are positioned for success with Stan as the new VP.”

According to the company, the success of Atlas has come part and parcel with the leadership displayed by both gentlemen. While Bastek is credited with establishing the Atlas Shingles & Underlayment division as a contractor-focused marketing force, Villar made several strategic decisions over the last ten years, including partnering with 3M and Scotchgard, changing to the HP42 Technology shingle format, and investing in sales team development — all of which has positioned Atlas for success in the years to come. 

Villar came to Atlas in 1998 and leaves a 20-plus year legacy of sales and marketing team development. “We’ve spent countless hours interviewing, hiring, and training because we understand the importance of making the right hire and finding people that fit our culture… A culture that I’m very proud of,” stated Villar.

“Kirk has driven us to focus on being the best through differentiation in all areas of the business. From our people to our products to our marketing. It’s been such a privilege to work under his leadership,” Bastek said.  

A graduate of University of Michigan, Bastek also earned his MBA from Shorter University in Georgia. He began his career in the Atlas Roofing corporate office as an administrative assistant, working his way through the marketing and sales management ranks to his most recent position of National Sales Director. “Probably like a lot of people, I had no intentions of getting into the construction industry, largely because I was not exposed to it growing up. I can tell you from firsthand experience that this is a great industry for people to build a career, and I will continue Atlas’ leadership with a focus on developing great people,” Bastek said. 

For more information, please visit www.atlasroofing.com.

Cover Board Meets UL Class A Fire Rating Requirements When Used Over Combustible Wood Roof Decks

Atlas Roofing Corporationannounces the introduction of ACFoam-HD CoverBoard-FR to its portfolio of ACFoam polyiso roof insulation products. This new offering provides an additional option to achieve a UL Class A fire-rated roof assembly when used over combustible wood roof decks.

“At Atlas, we take great pride in offering our roofing customers a wide range of products to meet all their project needs,” said Greg Sagorski, Director of Technical Services at Atlas Roofing Corporation. “ACFoam-HD CoverBoard-FR was developed in response to customer requests for an ACFoam cover board option to meet a UL Class A fire-rated roof assembly on combustible wood roof decks.”

ACFoam-HD CoverBoard-FR is designed as a lightweight cover board option that complements existing approved products from Atlas for UL Class A fire-rated roof assemblies, giving architects and specifiers multiple solutions for their design needs. ACFoam-HD CoverBoard-FR can meet UL Class A fire ratings using only one layer, saving labor and materials. The UL Class A fire rating is applicable to either mechanically fastened or fully adhered, UL Classified EPDM, PVC and TPO membranes.

ACFoam-HD Coverboard-FR is comprised of Atlas’ ACFoam closed-cell polyisocyanurate (polyiso) foam core integrally bonded to inorganic ACFoam-III coated glass facers. ACFoam-HD CoverBoard-FR is now available nationally. 

For more information, visit AtlasRWI.com

Atlas Roofing Corporation Names New Director of Marketing

Atlas Roofing Corporation announced Jeff Key has joined the company as the new Director of Marketing. In this position, Key will guide the marketing strategy across both the Shingles & Underlayment and Roof & Wall Insulation Divisions, as well as the company’s overall corporate marketing strategy across all divisions — Shingles & Underlayment, Roof & Wall Insulation, Molded Products and Web Technologies. Key will provide strategic guidance and insight on all marketing efforts, ensuring brand consistency across all customer touchpoints, and develop new marketing opportunities and strategic partnerships to further the company’s continued growth.

“We are very excited to welcome Jeff to the Atlas family,” said Steve Heaton, Vice President, Roof & Wall Insulation Division. “We’ve made great progress with both our internal and external marketing efforts and believe Jeff will be a strategic addition and resource to guide our team.”  

Key joins Atlas with more than 20 years of experience and expertise in marketing communications strategy, specifically within the building products industry. Prior to joining Atlas, Key spent the majority of his career rising from mid- to senior-level marketing positions at Georgia-Pacific Wood Products and Georgia-Pacific Building Products & Distribution. He was instrumental in introducing several new products and initiatives across traditional and digital marketing platforms. Jeff obtained his B.A. in public relations from the University of South Carolina and resides in metro Atlanta.

“Atlas is already a growing company and has the potential to continue expanding in this industry,” Key said. “I’m excited to be part of the continued growth at Atlas and to bring new ideas to the table so we can take better advantage of the strength of our brand.” 

According to the company, this new appointment is part of Atlas’ continued investment in its corporate sales and marketing team in Atlanta and the company’s commitment to innovation. In addition to its robust product portfolio, Atlas has several key product launches and initiatives planned for 2020.

For more insformation, visit https://www.atlasroofing.com/.

Nailing Down Talent: How To Successfully Hire Workers

Finding skilled workers is becoming more and more problematic for many roofing contractors. According to the 2019 Construction Outlook Survey released by the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC), more than three-quarters of respondents expected to hire more staff in 2019. However, 78 percent reported difficulties filling salaried and hourly craft positions and 42 percent believe that hiring personnel over the next year will continue to be hard.

The current labor shortage is drastically reducing the number of potential prospects. In the third-quarter 2019 Commercial Construction Index report from USG Corp. and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, 61 percent of contractors said they’re struggling to find skilled workers. That number is up from 54 percent in the previous quarter, indicating the problem shows no signs of improvement.

The effect of the workforce shortage impacts your day-to-day operations through higher costs, longer completion times and higher bid prices. So how can you attract, hire and keep qualified workers in the current state of the industry? Consider these tips:

Market and Recruit

A well-written job listing will help attract the best employees. Talk directly to the type of person you want to hire, list the qualifications you seek, and explain what’s important to your business.

When writing the job description, be specific about the type of work your roofing business does so you can attract people who are skilled and comfortable in those areas. And if you’re willing to teach someone the necessary skills, be sure to mention that too.

Jim Johnson, head coach for ContractorCoachPRO, advises taking your listing a step further by creating a recruiting platform and making it part of your website.

“Have multiple job postings for everything you’re hiring for,” he says. “Include some videos with employee testimonials, your company culture and what you’re all about. And then market it. Market that website. Market it on Google, market it on social media, market it, market it, market it.”

“Really, truthfully, you’re a sales organization, you’re a marketing organization, you’re a contractor — you’re all those things,” he continues. “But in the big scheme of things, you’re a recruiting company. If you change your perspective that way and recruit great talent, all the rest is going to be easy. You’ll change the whole [methodology] of what you do as a contractor.”

Johnson says you should always be looking for talent as you’re walking around every single day — anytime, everywhere.

Look For Specific Characteristics

A good roofing employee should be able to do more than hammer nails and carry bundles of shingles. He or she should also have characteristics that can help your company stand out from the competition, including:

· Fast learner — You can train someone to carry out specific skills, but you can’t teach that person to be a better learner. New employees — even those with experience — should be willing to learn and adapt to the way you do business.

Tip: Ask potential workers about the most recent thing they’ve learned and have them explain how they learned it. Or have them explain some of the differences in the way previous employers did things and how they adapted to those expectations.

· Tech-savvy — Many roofing businesses use construction apps on the job. Your crew members should be able to pick up these new technologies.

Tip: Ask applicants what roofing apps they like and which features they find most useful.

· Professional – Employees need to put customers at ease. If someone isn’t courteous and professional on the job, he or she could cost you referrals and reap bad reviews. Your crew represents you and your brand. Hire roofers you can trust to leave a good impression on homeowners.

Tip: Ask candidates why they left their last job. They should avoid speaking negatively about their employer or co-workers. Or ask how they would respond if a customer was rude to them.

· Safety conscious — Roofing has one of the highest fatality rates of all industries. One person’s disregard for proper safety could put your whole crew at risk. Ask potential candidates plenty of questions to see how well they know best practices and only hire those who take safety seriously.

Tip: Have interviewees explain the precautions they take while on a jobsite or what they would do if a co-worker was acting in an unsafe manner.

· Positive attitude — Roofing is already hard work, so you don’t need a negative employee adding to the everyday stress. Antagonistic people can quickly crush crew morale, which could result in sloppy work, unprofessional behavior or even high turnover. Hire someone who can go with the flow and be a positive influence on fellow workers.

Tip: Listen. Did possible hires answer previous questions to your satisfaction? Did they seem professional and eager to work and learn your way of doing things? Overall, trust your gut. You’ll know who will fit in best with the rest of your crew.

Johnson cautions that you should never hire someone during an interview.

“Resumes — I personally think they’re garbage,” he explains. “They’re usually inaccurate and embellished. They’re very time consuming for me to get through and great candidates can be missed. The best salesperson I ever hired in my entire life was a Pizza Hut delivery guy. The guy sold $6.3 million in residential sales in 2017. He’s been in it for 19 years now. So, great candidates can be missed by just relying on resumes.”

Be Competitive

Once you’ve found the right person, you want him or her to accept the job. Salary is an important factor, of course. What are your competitors paying? Find out and, if you can, match or beat it.

Money isn’t everything, though. Most people also want a sense of job security. Explain why your company has a good reputation and how it can offer stability.

Talk about other things that make your company attractive, such as taking on unique projects, participating in philanthropic opportunities, or having an excellent benefits package.

And after you hire someone, do things that will make him or her want to stay. “No one does anything without incentive,” Johnson says. “And incentive is not necessarily money. Incentive can be a lot of different things. It can be a reward — a gift card, a trophy, all kinds of stuff. Or it could be plain old recognition.”

These types of incentives will remind employees that they’re valued and respected members of your team, which in turn increases their level of commitment and builds loyalty.

Help Educate Potential Hires About the Trades

As a contractor, you know the financial, leadership, and entrepreneurial benefits of working in the roofing industry.

Volunteer for speaking opportunities at local high schools to educate students about the value of pursuing a career in the field. Or participate in a trade show, such as the CareerExpo and SkillsUSA Championships hosted by the Construction Education Foundation of Georgia (CEFGA), which allows you to meet students interested in trade careers.

Some high schools and community colleges have apprenticeship or co-op work opportunities as part of their vocational training programs. Getting involved with these institutions gives you access to people who want to work in a trade and allows you to offer them real-world experience, which could result in a position with your company.

As budget cuts continue to reduce the size of the U.S. military, veterans must transition to civilian jobs. What these motivated men and women lack in roofing experience, they make up for with other valuable qualities, including trainability, discipline, reliability, and leadership skills. Many national organizations, such as the U.S. Department of Labor, have programs that help vets get the training and experience they need for their next career.

Invest in Your People

Countless surveys show that workers leave a job because they’re unhappy and don’t feel appreciated. To help with employee retention, invest in your people by providing continuous training.

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) offers a wealth of training opportunities. Through the organization’s ProCertification program, workers who demonstrate substantial knowledge and skills can earn certifications in specific roof system installations.

“In the past, a roofing company would go to a job fair in their local community and try to present a career in the industry as one that’s truly professional,” explains Reid Ribble, CEO of the NRCA. “However, there was no way for [a trade worker] to become a master roofer. They could become a master plumber, master electrician or master carpenter, but there was really no professional certification for them to reach that same status in the roofing industry.”

By the end of 2019, the NRCA’s ProCertification program will have certifications available in six disciplines. Eventually, it will offer a total of 18.

“If roofing workers stack enough of these certifications on top of each other, they can achieve master status, as a master low-slope roofer, master steep-slope roofer, master service technician, or master solar technician,” Ribble says. “That’s a powerful tool that we didn’t have before to recruit workers. It’s a long-term, transformational shift away from making the roofing companies the primary to making the working roofer the primary. And that’s a big shift, but it’s the one that actually provides the quality assurance that customers need.”

The NRCA is taking stepsto get the ProCertification program recognized nationally. However, Ribble cautions that this push will not affect the licensing of roofing companies.

“We believe that, as a national association, it’s up to our state affiliates to make the determination locally as to whether or not they want a licensing program,” he says. “Some states do, other states do not. Some of our members do, other members do not. We don’t want to have a restrictive approach to people entering the roofing trade. But what we can do is create standards for roofing workers. Because, let’s face it, putting on an asphalt shingle roof in Georgia is no different than putting an asphalt shingle roof on in Wisconsin. You might treat the underlayment at the eaves different because of snow and ice, but for the most part, that roof goes on the same.”

The Bottom Line

Hiring workers is one challenge. Keeping them is another. So, while following one or more of these tips can help you build your business, you must also create an environment where your employees feel valued. After all, they determine the success of your jobs, which means your company’s reputation is only as good as the people you hire.

As Doug Conant, CEO of Campbell’s Soup, once put it, “To win in the marketplace, you must first win in the workplace.”

About the author: Tiara Searcy is the content and digital marketing manager for Atlas Roofing. For more information, visit www.atlasroofing.com.

Atlas Roofing Names New Vice President of Operations for Shingle & Underlayment Division

Atlas Roofing Corporation announced that Michael (Mike) McCaig is the new Vice President of Operations for its Shingle and Underlayment Division. McCaig brings more than 30 years of experience and a depth of industry knowledge, further strengthening Atlas Roofing’s position as a trailblazer in residential and commercial roofing materials.

McCaig has worked in executive leadership for prominent building materials companies. Before joining Atlas on January 20, 2020, he served as President of Alumicor Ltd., a custom door, window and curtain wall manufacturer.

“We are thrilled to welcome Mike to the Atlas family and look forward to his fresh perspective and approach,” said Ken Farrish, President of Atlas Roofing. “Mike’s breadth of experience and proven leadership skills are an asset to the company.” 

McCaig’s distinguished career underscores his commitment to advancing the building materials industry. Before joining Alumicor, he held a variety of operations and engineering positions at IKO Industries and Owens Corning. 

“I was attracted to Atlas’ commitment to developing roofing materials that address the current and future needs of the industry,” McCaig said. “I am excited to contribute to the continued growth of the Shingle and Underlayment Division.”

McCaig has also held management positions in glass, insulation and commercial foam plants in the United States and Canada. He earned a chemical engineering degree from the University of Waterloo in Ontario and an MBA from York University in Toronto. 

“Mike is the perfect person to advance our goal of innovating quality products that exceed contractor and homeowner expectations,” said Kirk Villar, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Atlas Roofing.

For more information, visit AtlasRoofing.com

Atlas Roofing Product Receives Excellent Overall Rating for Hail Resistance From IBHS

Atlas Roofing announced that its StormMaster Shake shingles received an excellent overall rating from the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS). The performance rating is based on 2019 results from a new test standard for impact resistance developed by the IBHS.

Severe weather can displace families, disrupting their lives and impacting finances. To prevent these avoidable issues, IBHS conducts top-tier scientific research, the results of which help manufacturers engineer better materials, ultimately saving both the insurance industry and homeowners significant time and money.

The IBHS impact-resistance rating factors in how well shingles hold up to specific damage caused by hail. Out of the 10 products tested, Atlas StormMaster Shake shingles received a good rating for dents/ridges and an excellent rating for tears and granule loss. In addition, StormMaster Shake is the only product to receive an excellent overall rating.

“We’re thrilled that StormMaster Shake outranked the competition,” said Paul Casseri, product manager for Atlas Roofing. “The secret is in our Core4 Enhanced Polymer Technology — the most innovative development in asphalt shingle manufacturing today.”

IBHS tests are designed to replicate real-world conditions on a variety of widely purchased shingles labeled as “impact resistant.”

“Hail causes billions of dollars in property damage every year,” said Tanya Brown-Giammanco, managing director of research for IBHS. “Consumers deserve to have confidence that shingles labeled as impact resistant live up to expectations. Our research serves to empower manufacturers to develop better products.”

For more information about IBHS, visit www.IBHS.org. For more information about Atlas Roofing, visit www.AtlasRoofing.com.

Flashing Best Practices

Tips on Installing Roll, Step and Roof-To-Wall Flashing

Photo: Atlas Roofing Corporation

Flashing plays a critical role in shielding a roof from water damage. Essential for leak-proof performance, flashing protects intersections of the roof plane and penetrations through the roof surface.

Installation methods and materials can vary based on region and weather. For example, some roofers may use aluminum instead of steel or copper. And some may use caulk on nail holes while others use tar. The most important rule of any roof installation is to follow ARMA guidelines.

Atlas Roofing partnered with professional contractor Mic Barringer, owner of Barringer Brothers Roofing in O’Fallon, Illinois, and asked him to share some of his best practices for flashing installation.

Roll Flashing

Installed along headwalls, roll flashing prevents water from penetrating a roof deck.

Roll flashing comes in a variety of metals, including steel and copper. These durable materials are typically used in Northern states, where roofs are prone to ice dams, and the Southeast, where roofs must withstand high winds and wind-blown rain.

Where Barringer lives in Illinois, the weather doesn’t get worse than an occasional downpour, so he uses aluminum roll flashing.

“Where we are, we get down-directional rain — we don’t get storms here,” he explains. “We even tape our flashing, and people will criticize if it’s not the way they do it — everybody does it differently. But here, this is 100 percent standard.”

How To Install:

  • Pull out the length of roll flashing needed for the headwall and extend it at least 4 inches past the sidewall.

Tip: Pull roll flashing from the center so it doesn’t uncoil and can easily be reused.

  • Adjust roll flashing so the center of the metal meets the bottom of the headwall, then nail it to the roof.

Tip: Push a hammer into the roll flashing as far as you can and slide it across the metal to create a 90-degree angle.

  • If necessary, nail roll flashing to the headwall to help smooth out wrinkles.

Note: Barringer acknowledges that nailing is not a preferred practice, but it gets the length of roll flashing as flush to the headwall as possible. To keep water from shedding behind flashing, he uses Zip System Tape, although he points out that others may use Tyvek. Starting the overlap from the bottom up, he adheres flashing to the oriented strand board (OSB).

  • Cut the extended section of roll flashing straight down, even with the sidewall and nail it to the roof deck, giving step flashing an area to drain off.

Tip: This method takes the place of pre-bents, which can be difficult to fit to the corner. If you end up with a pinhole, simply cover it up later with caulk.

Step Flashing

The small “steps” created by step flashing allow water to flow down the sidewall of a roof.

Like roll flashing, step flashing also comes in a variety of metals, with aluminum and copper being the most commonly used.

Barringer uses pre-milled aluminum step flashing because it already has a perfect 90-degree angle bent into it. And because each shingle is going to drain off, he installs one piece of step flashing per shingle, based on ARMA guidelines.

Figure 1a and 1b: Application of step flashing for a 5-inch exposure. See manufacturer for application instructions for other exposures. Images: Copyright © Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association.

In states such as Minnesota, Florida and the Carolinas, roofers typically use steel or copper step flashing and bend it themselves and may also solder pieces together to protect a roof from ice dams and rain, Barringer says.

Ice and water underlayment is commonly installed behind step flashing in states with heavy storms and snow. In O’Fallon, Barringer says they use ice and water on eaves and valleys, but they’re not required to use it on protrusions because they don’t get the type of weather that would warrant it.

How To Install:

  • Start at the outside corner of the sidewall and align the first piece of step flashing with the bottom of the wall, folding the excess portion around the headwall.

Tip: If using aluminum, be gentle when handling it. Because it’s a soft metal, it rips easily.

  • Working up from the bottom of the sidewall, install step flashing below each shingle, coming down at least one-half inch to three-quarter inch over the previous piece to cover nail holes.
  • For the inside corner, cut step flashing down the middle of one side (from the longest edge toward the fold), then fold one of the cut pieces behind the other to form another 90-degree angle. Trim bottom edge of step flashing so that it extends just past the exposure (to prevent it from sticking out beneath the roof-to-wall flashing — see the next section for details).
  • Use Zip System Tape (or Tyvek) to secure the step flashing to the OSB, creating a watertight seal.

Roof-To-Wall Flashing

After roll flashing and step flashing are installed, roof-to-wall flashing can be added to give a roof a beautifully finished look.

Figure 2: Application of step flashing against a sidewall.

Roof-to-wall flashing is almost always going to be steel because it’s tough, Barringer says.

“The roof-to-wall that we do, it’s got a double-bolted bead at the bottom of it, so it sticks up a little bit, but that’s what reinforces it from the wind bending and denting it.”

Barringer says roof-to-wall flashing is pretty hard to mess up. The only thing you don’t want to do is anchor it to the roof instead of the wall because that would leave holes in the roof-to-wall flashing, which defeats its purpose, he explains.

How To Install:

  • Cut roof-to-wall flashing to length and nail it to the headwall.

Tip: Barringer says you can seal nail holes if you like, but it’s not necessary. The Zip System Tape (or Tyvek) and roll flashing are behind the roof-to-wall flashing, so water should easily flow out beneath it.

Proper Installation

When flashing is installed properly,it maintains the integrity of a roof, protectingagainst water damage. But what if the flashing isn’t done right? Would a faulty install void a shingle manufacturer’s warranty?

Barringer says manufacturers can’t guarantee anything when you’re using another company’s product.

Figure 3: Application of flashing against a front wall.

“If you have bad flashing job, it’s not the shingles’ fault that it failed, it’s the bad flashing,” he says.

For more information about proper flashing installation, refer to pages 69-77 of ARMA’s Residential Asphalt Roofing Manual, 2014 Edition.

Plus, watch Mic Barringer and his brother Stevo Barringer demonstrate proper flashing installation methods in Atlas Roofing’s “Hammer Time With Paul” web series, available at https://asphaltlife.atlasroofing.com.

About the author: Paul Casseri is the product manager of the Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division for Atlas Roofing Corporation. For more information, visit www.atlasroofing.com.

Atlas Roofing Goes Pink, Raises Over $160,000 Toward Finding a Cure During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Atlas Roofing Corporation, along with their dedicated network of contractors throughout the U.S., have raised over $160,000 to support the fight against breast cancer through the Summit 60® Pink initiative. From August 15 through October 15, a portion of the proceeds of every roll of Summit 60 synthetic roof underlayment sold was donated to the Susan G. Komen breast cancer foundation.

As part of the national initiative, Atlas debuted its special-edition Summit 60 Pink premium synthetic roof underlayment embellished with pink ribbons, the international symbol of breast cancer awareness.

“The goal of our Susan G. Komen Pink campaign was to provide much-needed awareness and funding for critical research and education,” explained Kirk Villar, vice president of sales and marketing for Atlas. “We are very proud of the funds we have raised through this partnership, and we will continue to donate our time and efforts to the fight against breast cancer.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the second most common cause of death for women among all races and ethnicities in the United States.

“The special-edition rolls were a great way for Atlas and our contractors to show our dedication to the fight against breast cancer,” said Tiara Searcy, content and digital marketing manager for Atlas. “Together, we can help make a difference.”

The Susan G. Komen foundation, launched in 1982, has funded more than $988 million in research and more than $2.2 billion in education, screenings and treatment programs across the U.S.

“We are so grateful to receive this donation from Atlas Roofing Corporation,” said Julie Brock, special events and volunteer manager at Susan G. Komen Greater Atlanta. “Corporate initiatives and donations like the one from Atlas help us continue serving our local community and communities across the country through life-saving programs and research.” 

Designed To Protect

Summit 60 is designed to optimize the life of a roof system through superior water resistance and UV protection, protecting against water intrusion and mold growth. Made from a woven polymeric scrim, Summit 60 is designed for increased strength, reduced slippage between the underlayment and the roof sheathing and improved walkability during installation. The materials will not warp, buckle or crack over time like other organic felt brands. The UV coating provides 60-day protection from the sun while the roof is being installed.

For more information on Summit 60 underlayment, please visit atlasroofing.com.

Non-Halogenated Polyiso Roof and Wall Insulation

Atlas Roofing Corporation adds ACFoam NH and EnergyShield NH to the company’s current product lines. These new non-halogenated polyiso roof and wall insulation products contain no halogenated flame retardants, providing additional environmentally friendly options to their product offerings of sustainable roofing and wall insulations for architects, designers and builders.

According to the company, ACFoam NH and EnergyShield NH product offerings are an ideal building envelope solution for projects that must meet strict specific environmental specification and customers seeking non-hal options. The Atlas NH product lines offer a variety of benefits, including:

  • Living Building Challenge “Red List” Free, with Declare label and product database listing
  • Contribute toward LEED v4 credit requirements
  • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) VOC emissions compliant 

“As a leader in polyiso manufacturing, we’re excited to introduce our non-hal technology and expand our ACFoam and EnergyShield roof and wall product lines,” said Greg Sagorski, Director of Technical Services of Atlas Roofing Corporation. “These new ACFoam and EnergyShield products provide the same great quality and performance needs customers expect, but with added benefits to meet more stringent environmental and sustainable building code goals.”

The following Atlas non-hal products are available:

  • ACFoam-II NH (also available in tapered)
  • ACFoam-III NH (also available in tapered)
  • ACFoam-Supreme NH
  • ACFoam-Recover Board NH
  • ACFoam Nail Base NH
  • ACFoam CrossVent NH
  • EnergyShield NH
  • EnergyShield CGF NH
  • Stucco-Shield NH
  • EnergyShield PanelCast NH

According to the manufacturer, all literature and product packaging of Atlas NH products will be marked with a non-hal icon for easy and visible distinction.

For more information, visit https://www.atlasrwi.com/.

Atlas Roofing’s Summit 60 Underlayment Goes Pink For Breast Cancer Awareness

In honor of breast cancer awareness, Atlas Roofing’s premiere lightweight synthetic roofing underlayment Summit 60 is going pink, with a portion of the sales proceeds to support the Susan G. Komen breast cancer foundation.

For every roll of Summit 60 sold — including traditional and limited-edition pink ribbon rolls — from Aug. 15 to Oct. 15, 2019, Atlas Roofing will donate $2 to the foundation. The Summit 60 Pink special-edition rolls will be embellished with pink branding and pink ribbons, the international symbol of breast cancer awareness. The special-edition Summit 60 will be available to contractors exclusively through Atlas Roofing distributors.

Tracy Cook, director of marketing for Atlas, said the special-edition rolls are aimed at bringing more attention to breast cancer, including early detection and research for a cure. For Cook, the cause is close to her heart. Her mother had breast cancer in the early 1990s.

“Treatment has come a long way since 1991, but it has a long way to go. Indeed, early detection is key,” Cook said. “Many of my family members have had cancer — breast, lung, oral and prostate. In every case, it’s about early detection.”

Designed To Protect
Summit 60 is designed to optimize the life of a roof system through superior water resistance and UV protection, protecting against water intrusion and mold growth. Made from a woven polymeric scrim, Summit 60 is designed for increased strength, reduced slippage between the underlayment and the roof sheathing and improved walkability during installation. The materials will not warp, buckle or crack over time like other organic felt brands. The UV coating provides 60-day protection from the sun while the roof is being installed.

Supporting Cancer Research And Early Detection
The Susan G. Komen foundation launched in 1982 and has since funded more than $988 million in research and more than $2.2 billion in education, screenings and treatment programs. Due to the worldwide efforts by the foundation and others, breast cancer mortality has declined 40% from 1989 to 2016.

However, more work needs to be done. Today, about 12% of women (or 1 in 8) will develop invasive breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2019 alone, an estimated 268,600 women and 2,670 men will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. An estimated 41,760 women and 500 men will die from breast cancer in 2019.

“Cancer of all types has touched everyone in the United States in one way or another. Since breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among American women, it has impacted so many of us,” Tiara Searcy, content and digital marketing manager for Atlas Roofing, said. “We hope our efforts with Summit 60 will help make for a healthier future.”

Partners In Pink
Atlas Roofing is proud to help in the fight against breast cancer and supports the outstanding work of the Susan G. Komen foundation.

“The goal of our pink campaign is to provide much-needed funding for critical research and public education,” explained Kirk Villar, vice president of sales and marketing for Atlas. “We are honored to join forces with the community to take a stand against breast cancer.”

Summit 60 Pink will be available across the country. For more information, contractors should contact their Atlas Roofing representative.

For more information, visit AtlasRoofing.com