ARMA Honors Top Asphalt Projects With QARC Awards

The QARC Gold award was presented at the International Roofing Expo in New Orleans, where Imbus Roofing received a $2,000. Pictured are Bob Gardiner, CertainTeed; Steve Sutton, Imbus Roofing; Andrew Imbus, Imbus Roofing; Tom Smith, CertainTeed and Ron Gumucio, ARMA.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recognized a historic music hall, a home with a roof built to withstand high-wind events, and a museum dedicated to the United States’ fight for independence as 2017’s top asphalt roofing installations. ARMA’s annual Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Awards Program awarded the projects that exemplify the most beautiful, affordable and reliable asphalt roofing systems in North America.

Imbus Roofing Co. Inc. received the Gold QARC Award for its new roof installation on the 225,000 square-foot, 139-year-old Cincinnati Music Hall. The Kentucky-based contractor installed designer asphalt shingles to replicate the Music Hall’s slate tile roof, while also providing crucial durability against Cincinnati’s tough climate.

Reliant Roofing Inc. was honored with the Silver QARC Award for its completion of Topsail Residence, a 10,600-square-foot asphalt shingle roofing system designed to endure high-wind events in Ponte Vedra, Florida. This high-performance roofing system not only provided the homeowners with a durable option, but also a visually stunning roof for years to come.

The Bronze QARC Award was given to Thomas Company Inc. of Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, for its low-

slope installation on Philadelphia’s Museum of the American Revolution. Designed to achieve LEED Gold certification, the project featured a high-quality modified bitumen roof membrane to prevent water penetration and create a more stable surface for the facility’s vegetative roof.

According to ARMA, the 2018 QARC Award program received some of the most impressive and innovative submissions of asphalt roofing installments to date. “This year’s submissions demonstrated asphalt’s ability to provide a durable and reliable roofing system against harsh weather while simultaneously offering an array of beautiful colors, designs and installation options,” said Ralph Vasami, ARMA’s acting executive vice president. “These projects are true examples of what asphalt roofing can offer commercial businesses and private homeowners alike.”

The 2018 QARC Award recipients are:

Project Name: The Cincinnati Music Hall
Company: Imbus Roofing Co. Inc.
Project Description: This steep-slope roof was installed with CertainTeed’s Grand Manor luxury asphalt shingles in the colors Stonegate Gray and Brownstone, as well as DiamondDeck and WinterGuard underlayments. The size, complexity and steepness of the project presented a great challenge to the contractor, who managed to install a durable asphalt roofing system that was also visually stunning.

Imbus Roofing received top honors for its work on 139-year-old Cincinnati Music Hall. Photo: CertainTeed

Project Name: Topsail Residence
Company: Reliant Roofing Inc.
Project Description: GAF Grand Canyon Lifetime Designer Shingles in the color Stone Wood was selected not only for its beauty, but its superior high-wind protection. Hand sealed Timbertex Premium Ridge Cap Shingles and GAF self-adhering Leak Barrier were also installed for added leak prevention.

Reliant Roofing received the Silver QARC Award for its completion of Topsail Residence in Ponte Vedra, Florida. Photo: Justin Alley and Kyle Brumbley

Project Name: Museum of the American Revolution
Company: The Thomas Company Inc.
Project Description: The historic project required a high-quality roofing membrane that offered an aesthetic appeal to the building. Thomas Company chose SOPREMA’s SBS Modified Base Ply – ELASTOPHENE Flam with the SBS Modified Bitumen Flashing Base Ply – SOPRALENE Flam 180 to keep the roof water-resistant year-round, protect the roof membrane from foot traffic and add a beautiful appearance to the museum.

The Bronze QARC Award was given to Thomas Company Inc. of Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, for its work on Philadelphia’s Museum of the American Revolution. Photo: Soprema

Honorable Mentions:
Big House Castle Rock
Jireh 7 Enterprises
Castle Rock, Colorado
Malarkey Roofing Products

Closson Chase Winery Church Roof
AI Anthony Roofing LTD
Hillier, Ontario
IKO Production Inc.

Tiny House & Top Shop
M & J Construction
Erhard, Minnesota
CertainTeed Corporation

West Loch Village Senior Apartments
M & R Roofing
Ewa Beach, Hawaii
PABCO Roofing Products

For more information about this year’s winners or to submit an asphalt roofing project, visit

ARMA Launches New Website

Homeowners and professionals seeking asphalt roofing help can find guidance and technical information easier now that the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has launched its revamped website. has many new design features, including improved functionality and enhanced content that boosts usability and user-friendliness. ARMA’s sleek, new modern website provides:

  • Improvements to navigation and ease of searching
  • A simplified front page to better direct visitors to relevant information
  • Two main entry points for homeowners and professionals
  • A redesigned contractor awards submissions page that saves when visitors exit out
  • A more streamlined bookstore, which is categorized by eBook, Print-On-Demand and Print
  • Enhanced ease of mobile viewing
  • An updated photo gallery that provides entry point into ARMA member company websites
  • The consolidation of informational roofing resources, videos and materials

“The ARMA website is popular with both homeowners and roofing professionals because we are able to provide them with guidance and education on asphalt roofing systems in one easy-to-use place,” said Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Whether it’s homeowner tips for choosing the right type of asphalt shingle for their home or providing resource materials to commercial building owners or professionals on installing and maintaining their commercial roofing system, ARMA is the industry authority.”

The website’s main page will primarily feature three main points of entry, the Guide for ProfessionalsGuide for Homeownersand the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Studies (QARC) awards, making navigation to points of interest and relevant information easier and faster.

Visitors to the ARMA website can also find educational resources and publications for installation, application and other technical matters. In addition, links to ARMA’s LinkedInYouTube and Facebook pages provide visitors additional resources to stay up-to-date on news regarding asphalt roofing.

For more information visit


ARMA Releases Roofing Design Guide in Digital Form

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has converted its Modified Bitumen Design Guide for Building Owners into an eBook, making it easier for roofing professionals to view it on their smartphones or tablets.

The Modified Bitumen Design Guide, which ARMA recently updated to reflect current roofing standards and building codes, serves as a general instructional aid for the installation of modified bitumen roofing systems. The guide addresses these roofing systems and their associated components, construction techniques and innovative uses.

It also provides options for overburdens, such as solar, garden and recreational installations, that push the roofing system and the membrane beyond their primary function of providing water resistance.

“Today more than ever, roofing professionals are being called to the jobsite for their expertise and knowledge regarding low slope roofing systems,” said Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “By making the Modified Bitumen Design Guide available as an eBook, ARMA is providing them the information they need in a form that is easy and convenient to access on the go.”

The Modified Bitumen Design Guide is available for $24.99 as a print-on-demand copy or $19.99 as an eBook from ARMA’s Bookstore, as well as from prominent digital platforms such as Amazon’s Kindle Store, Barnes and Nobles’ Nook, Apple’s iBookstore and more. To purchase the Modified Bitumen Design Guide, visit the ARMA bookstore.

Miami-Dade County and ARMA Team Up to Update High-Wind Codes

ARMA awarded the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department the 2017 ARMA Public Partnership Award.

ARMA awarded the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department the 2017 ARMA Public Partnership Award. Aaron R. Phillips, Corporate Director of Technical Services at TAMKO Building Products and chair of the ARMA Codes Steering Group, presented the award to Michael Goolsby and Miami-Dade team members who worked on the project. Pictured at the ceremony are (from left) Eduardo Fernandez, Gaspar Rodriguez, Michael Goolsby, Aaron Phillips, Alex Tigera and Jorge Acebo.

In the aftermath of 1992’s Hurricane Andrew, the entire building code for South Florida was rebuilt from the ground up. When it was launched in 1994, the South Florida Building Code was a groundbreaking document that set new roofing application standards and testing protocols for every component and system in the building envelope. More than two decades later, it was clear the building code for Miami-Dade County’s high-velocity hurricane zone (HVHZ) needed to be updated. Beginning in 2014, Miami-Dade County officials worked with the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) and others in the roofing industry to ensure the current code language was clear and up to date.

Two-and-a-half years later, their work is complete. The 2017 Florida Building Code is scheduled for implementation on Jan. 1, 2018, and it will include every one of the proposals and public comments jointly submitted by ARMA and Miami-Dade. As a result of this successful collaboration, ARMA presented the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department with the inaugural ARMA Public Partnership Award in 2017 for their work together in updating the building codes for the HVHZ.

Members of the joint task force on the project shared their thoughts on the experience with Roofing, including Mike Fischer, ARMA’s Vice President of Codes & Regulatory Compliance; Michael Goolsby, Miami-Dade Board and Code Administration Division Director; Jorge Acebo, Roofing Product Control Examiner; Alex Tigera, Roofing Product Control Examiner; and Gaspar Rodriguez, Code Compliance and Training Officer, Roofing.

They all believe this collaboration between industry and government could serve as a successful model for other industry trade associations and other code bodies to follow. “This kind of cooperation between a public regulator and a private trade association is rare enough,” says Fischer. “The overwhelmingly positive results are unprecedented.”

The Problems

Miami-Dade staff and ARMA representatives both saw shortcomings in the roofing requirements for HVHZ. There were outdated references that needed to be removed, including test standards that were out of date. This often resulted in questions that slowed down the product approval review process. Members of the roofing industry also wanted to explore coordinating the Miami-Dade HVHZ protocols with other national testing requirements to further streamline testing procedures.

Fischer summed up ARMA’s goals this way: “ARMA is a responsible advocate for the asphalt roofing industry. We take that role seriously. We are an advocate. Our job is to represent the collective interests of the producers, but we try to be responsible about it. And it’s that drive to be responsible which led us to this partnership with the Miami-Dade staff.”

At the first meeting between ARMA and Miami-Dade, Fischer tried to break the ice. “The first thing we said when we came into that meeting was, ‘Hi, we’re from industry and we’re here to help,’” Fischer recalls. “I will tell you that when we started that meeting in the morning, the Miami-Dade staff was probably skeptical of what we were there for. By the end of the day, we had laid out a project plan of how we were going to work together, and that set the tone for the rest of the project.”

Fischer knew it would take the two entities working together to get things done. “In the Florida process, we knew we had to work with Miami-Dade, as they are a key stakeholder. We brought in other roof covering manufacturers for some of the discussions, and we also talked to the FRSA, the Florida Roofing and Sheet Metal Association—the contractors—so they were at the table for quite a bit of this as well.”
ARMA set up a special task group to focus on the Miami-Dade protocols. The task force went through documents one by one with members of Miami-Dade group, identifying problems and sections that were out of date. They hashed out compromises when they didn’t agree.

Protecting the Public

Goolsby worked on the project on behalf of Miami-Dade along with members of his team including Acebo, Tigera and Rodriguez. “We cover a lot of territory,” notes Goolsby. “We maintain the building code and write the building code, but we also oversee all of the contractor licensing in Miami-Dade County. We have about 15,000 local licensed contractors. Of course, we handle product approvals, and we also service all of the boards here. We have a board of rules and appeals. We also oversee 35 building departments throughout Miami-Dade County. We try to make sure the code is uniformly enforced in all of those jurisdictions. So, we cover a lot of bases.”

The top priority is protecting the public. “In a general sense, we provide for the health, safety and welfare of the public,” Goolsby says, “But it’s these issues of life safety that are the most critical.”
Evacuating South Florida is difficult, so the residential portions of the code were written under the assumption that many people might have to ride out a storm in their homes. “We wanted their home to be just as strong as any commercial structure,” says Goolsby.

Acebo notes that ensuring the code is properly followed is as crucial as the code itself. He believes the inspectors’ role includes reassuring homeowners that systems are being installed correctly. “It’s important to us to fulfill our role to provide independent corroboration that the work is being done and installed properly,” he says. “The great thing about this particular effort is that it was truly collaborative. It was great to work with them and establish the language that was common with other jurisdictions or other certification agencies.”

Promising Results

Members of the joint task force agree that the changes make the code easier to understand. They also should streamline product approvals process.

“These updates definitely help the manufacturers get through the product approval process, specifically for Miami-Dade HVHZ requirements,” Fischer states. “It also helps the roofing contractor because we made sure the documents have the installation language updated, so it gives better direction to the installers of the products. And that trickles up to the general contractors in new construction, as it speeds up their processes and takes out some burdens.”

“At the end of the day, as a responsible advocate, one of ARMA’s main motivators was to make sure their industry’s products get installed the way they are intended to be installed,” Fischer continues. “That benefits the end user—the building owner and building occupant.”

Acebo agrees that the approvals process helps everyone—homeowners, contractors, manufacturers and inspectors. “If questions come out of the field from homeowners, manufacturers or contractors as to whether something is being applied or used properly, we can serve as that independent third party that doesn’t really have a stake in it other than to serve as an arbitrator who can clearly indicate whether something is right or not according to what has been provided and tested.”

The collaboration was so successful that the task force is already looking at other changes in the future. The Miami-Dade code is used as a model for other code bodies, and the joint task force could serve in that role as well, according to Fischer. “This is a model of collaboration between a governmental agency and private industry groups that will serve us well,” he says. “We are going to continue to do this with other groups, and frankly we’re going to continue doing it with Miami-Dade because this process isn’t ever done. Things will always be changing and we always have to keep up to date.”

Key Priorities for Fire Station Project Include Visual Appeal, Resistance to Algae and Wind

When the Burlington Fire Department decided to replace its aging steep-slope system, the goals included finding a system that would look good, stand up to high winds and resist algae growth.

When the Burlington Fire Department decided to replace its aging steep-slope system, the goals included finding a system that would look good, stand up to high winds and resist algae growth.

The firemen and firewomen of the Burlington Fire Department, located in Burlington, Wash., reportedly respond to about 1,800 service calls a year. The members of the department are on call 24/7, handling a variety of emergencies, both big and small.

Whether it is fighting a fire, performing a search and rescue, or something as simple as retrieving a driver’s keys from the car, the city’s bravest are too busy to have roof issues make their days more difficult. When the fire station began to experience leaks that required countless repairs and patchwork solutions, the City of Burlington knew it was time to replace the entire roofing system and ensure that the firefighters were safe from the elements.

Over the last few years, leaks began to appear more frequently in the fire station’s roof, with the worst leaks occurring in the paramedic’s quarters and in the firehouse’s workout room. The water would drip down on the firefighters and ceiling tiles became discolored, creating an unpleasant appearance throughout the firehouse. The intense winds in the area would also cause the shingles of the roof to become loose and fly off.

“The roof was patched several times over the years. We filled the voids as we went,” says Brandon Bond, a lieutenant on the Burlington Fire Department for the last 10 years. “After a while, the patches and replacements weren’t working and the leaks were getting harder to fix. At that point, we knew it was time to replace the whole roof.”

For their new roof, the city wanted a material that was visually appealing and performed against algae and wind. Also, because this was a city project, they wanted to find a contractor who was nearby and a roofing material that was manufactured locally—all of which showed pride in their community. When they considered the criteria, along with the size of the roof—24,000 square feet—the city chose to go with asphalt shingles because they provided a high level of longevity and durability while keeping it affordable.

Asphalt shingles offered a heavyweight, wind-resistant roofing material with a number of color options, making it the optimal choice among the design team. Wind resistance was an important factor because the old roofing system sustained considerable wind damage. The winds in the area can reach 65-70 miles per hour.

Selecting the Right System

Cascade Roofing Company from Burlington was hired to install the new roof on the fire station. The company has been in business for nearly 30 years and works on both commercial and residential roofing projects. The owner of Cascade, Rick Steiner, explains that asphalt shingles were used on the fire station for a number of reasons.

“Shingles were used because of the different pitch heights of the roof, their affordability and their great look,” Steiner says. “The algae-resistance was also a must. Algae grows like weeds in Washington, due to the moisture in the air and fluctuating temperatures.”

Algae flourishes in humid climates and its spores can be carried by the wind. The temperate but rainy weather found in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. produces an environment for algae to thrive in. While algae is not known to cause damage to roofs, the dark streaks are unsightly.

“Burlington is very wet, whether it’s raining or if we’re dealing with the humidity,” says Lauren Wilkins, a firefighter at the Burlington Fire Department since 2012. “We wanted the new roof to provide some resistance to algae so that it looked good as compared to the other surrounding roofs in the area.”

Cascade used shingle manufacturer PABCO Roofing Products, located in nearby Tacoma, Wash. PABCO’s algae-resistant Paramount Signature Cut Shingle in Oakwood color was selected for the project because it provided exceptional curb appeal. An aggressive modified sealant was used as well as high-wind shingle application—6 nails—to add resistance to wind uplift. PABCO Paramount starter shingles were applied over PABCO Universal Starter to provide a double-layer base. A synthetic underlayment along with an ice and water shield on the leading edges were also used. Shasta HD Ridge was applied to the ridge and hips of the roof to complement the roofline.

The roof system was installed by Cascade Roofing Company using shingles manufactured by PABCO Roofing Products.

The roof system was installed by Cascade Roofing Company using shingles manufactured by PABCO Roofing Products.

Keeping it Local

The City of Burlington was thrilled to choose local companies for the project. The manufacturer, contractor and even the supplier were all located nearby. This provided Cascade an avenue for necessary materials to be delivered quickly, allowing them to stay under budget and ahead of schedule. The project took about two weeks and 230 squares of shingles to complete, which is equivalent to the number of shingles necessary for the company to roof six or seven regular-sized homes.

“It’s easily the biggest shingle job I’ve ever done,” Steiner says. “But the design of the building along with the high-profile look of the shingles made the project look incredible. The city has a roof that’s going to last a very long time.”

Steiner also points out how smooth operations were due to the local theme of the project. “Everything was on-time. The supplier was right across the street and very easy to work with,” Steiner notes. “Even the weather cooperated – it made a potentially difficult project that much easier.”

The firefighters felt the same way. “We thought the hardest thing about the renovation would be continuing our daily operations, but we didn’t run into any problems,” Wilkins says. “They were very friendly and easy to coordinate with when moving equipment. There were no horror stories here.”

Since the renovation was completed, the firefighters are very happy with the new roof. The firemen and firewomen of the Burlington Fire Department can now focus on keeping the residents of Burlington safe.

The unique installation of the roof also earned Cascade Roofing and the fire station project the 2017 Bronze Award in the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Awards Program. Each year, ARMA seeks out the most beautiful, affordable and reliable asphalt roofing systems in North America.

Award-winning projects are selected based on innovation, performance and beauty, and recognize projects that lead the way in areas like weather protection, green roofing or unique utilization of asphalt shingles in a roofing system. ARMA is currently accepting submissions for both low- and steep-slope roofing project installations completed in 2017 for its 2018 awards program. Roofing contractors can submit multiple projects through Dec. 31, and there is no fee to enter.

For more information about asphalt roofing systems, the QARC awards program and more, visit the website.


ARMA Completes EPDs for Five Types of Asphalt Roofing

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has completed a multi-year effort to develop Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for asphalt roofing systems. These five new documents provide information that building and construction professionals can use both to support environmental aspects of roof systems as part of sustainable building projects and to better understand their impact over time. EPDs are now available for asphalt shingle roofing systems, SBS and APP modified bitumen systems, and built-up roofing systems. 

When architects and specifiers embark on new green building initiatives, they need to validate the environmental aspects of the building materials they use. EPDs are used to provide this information and to support the credibility of environmental claims.  ARMA worked with thinkstep, a sustainability consulting company, and with UL Environment to validate the EPDs.  These comprehensive documents outline the environmental attributes associated with the manufacturing of various asphalt-related roofing materials. 
ARMA’s development of these five EPDs reflects the continued use and advancement of asphalt roofing materials. In some cases, these documents are needed to fulfill requirements for green building rating systems and initiatives such as Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), Green Globes, and the International Green Construction Code (IgCC).

“As the worldwide building and construction community continues to expand the focus on creating environmentally responsible and resource-efficient building projects, asphalt roofing has a critical role to play,” said Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s executive vice president. “ARMA is committed to supporting sustainable building initiatives, and we are proud to provide the industry with this important environmental information.”

“These EPDs will help architects and engineers make sustainable choices in roof design,” said Amy Ferryman, chair of ARMA’s Sustainability Task Force. “Our work to develop these resources helps ensure that the asphalt roofing industry can fully participate in increasingly important green building practices.”
The five EPDs from ARMA are now publically available and can be accessed on ARMA’s website.

ARMA Hires New Director of Technical Services

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has named Tim McQuillen as director of technical services. McQuillen now serves as the staff liaison for ARMA’s Technical Resource Group as well as ARMA’s Codes Steering Group in a staff support role. He has been a member of the building products industry for 25 years.

In his new role, McQuillen will function as the technical voice of ARMA, leading the efforts on ARMA’s technical publications and communications while also responding to technical inquiries on asphalt roofing products and applications.

“ARMA is an association committed to educating and informing consumers and professionals through technical research and publications,” said McQuillen. “I look forward to contributing to these initiatives and more as we establish ARMA as the leading resource for asphalt roofing product applications.”

Prior to joining ARMA, McQuillen served as the technical manager of codes for Firestone Building Products Company, where he coordinated and executed product testing programs to obtain and document building code compliance.

McQuillen graduated from the University of Toledo with a bachelor’s degree in business administration. McQuillen is also a member of ASTM International and serves on the Technical Committee for the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC). He resides with his family in Westfield, Ind. 

“Tim’s wealth of technical knowledge in the field of building products will make him an invaluable asset to ARMA,” said Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s executive vice president. “We’re excited to add another strong member to the ARMA team who provides a new level of expertise to our association and the roofing industry as a whole.”

Tim McQuillen

Tim McQuillen

ARMA Presents Public Partnership Award

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has announced that the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department is the recipient of the 2017 ARMA Public Partnership Award. 

The award, given only for the recognition of partnerships formed with ARMA, recognizes the collaboration between Miami-Dade and ARMA to update the Florida Building Code requirements in high wind zones. Aaron R. Phillips, corporate director of Technical Services at TAMKO Building Products Inc. and chair of the ARMA Codes Steering Group, presented the award to Michael Goolsby, Miami-Dade Board and Code Administration Division director. In addition, ARMA presented the staff members who worked on the project with individual certificates.

Over the past two years, Miami-Dade staff and ARMA representatives worked on updates to the roofing requirements for the High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ), during numerous meetings and conference calls to review the current provisions, develop code proposals and manage the Florida Building Commission process.

The collaboration spanned hundreds of hours to remove outdated references and coordinate the HVHZ protocols with national testing requirements. Revisions approved as a result of this effort will streamline the certification process for roofing manufacturers when launching new products or renewing existing approvals and help Miami-Dade staff manage their product approval review process.

“Miami-Dade staff members are grateful for ARMA’s recognition of our joint effort,” says Goolsby. “It was only through our shared goal that we were able to get it done.”

ARMA and Miami-Dade representatives attended the Florida Building Commission’s Rule Development Workshop in Ocala as the Commission approved the final changes. The 2017 Florida Building Code, scheduled for launch on January 1, 2018, will include every one of the dozens of proposals and public comments jointly submitted by ARMA and Miami-Dade.

“This kind of cooperation between a public regulator and a private trade association is rare enough,” says ARMA’s vice president of Code and Regulatory Compliance, Michael Fischer. “The positive results are unprecedented.”   
Phillips noted that the efforts aren’t necessarily over. “We hope to build on this partnership and continue to improve the product approval process during future Florida code updates,” he says.
ARMA’s efforts in the codes, standards, and technical arenas translate to effective minimum code requirements, useful material standards, and educational resources for the industry.  Technical manuals, installation guides, Fast Facts, and technical bulletins are available on ARMA’s website and provide best practices for a variety of roofing topics.  Visit the website for access to all of these materials and more.

ARMA Names Winners of 2017 QARC Awards Program

The Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has named three winners of its annual Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Awards Program. The program seeks contractors who choose asphalt roofing and install beautiful and high-performing systems. This year, a stunning home in North Carolina, a commercial building in Florida and a firehouse in Washington state have been chosen as winners.

Chapel Hill Roofing Co. received the Gold QARC Award for its residential project titled The Triangle Home. The North Carolina-based contractor installed a full asphalt roofing system to fit the home’s complex architecture and the homeowner’s desire for a range of color options, protection from the elements and algae resistance at an affordable price.

The Silver Award was given to Advanced Roofing Inc., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., for the second year in a row. Its completion of a 49,955-square-foot roof on the Broward County Addiction Recovery Center’s Stephen R. Booher Building impressed judges with its intricacy. The new high-performance roof system provides weatherproof protection for the building’s residents.

Cascade Roofing Co., Burlington, Wash., was honored with the Bronze QARC Award for its steep-slope installation on the Burlington Fire Department firehouse. The building needed a new roof and required a product that had visual appeal, wind resistance and algae resistance. Cascade Roofing installed a full asphalt roofing system, including a synthetic underlayment and an ice and water shield on the leading edges.

ARMA received a record 40 submissions this year. These projects demonstrated the range of colors and designs that asphalt roofing can achieve, its ability to meet challenging project requirements and to provide reliability in tough climates. Each year, these projects are judged by a panel of roofing industry experts from trade associations, architecture firms and the media. Judges score projects based on their use of asphalt roofing technology to provide curb appeal, durability and value.

“As the QARC Awards Program has expanded over the last seven years, it has grown increasingly challenging for our judges to choose from the numerous excellent projects we receive,” notes Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s executive vice president. “This year, it came down to identifying which projects demonstrated how contractors use asphalt roofing to solve key challenges for building owners and to provide peace of mind with a protective roof system.”

For more information about the QARC awards projects, visit the web page.

RICOWI to Host Underlayment Seminar on March 17

The underlayment systems play a vital role in today’s roof designs for long-term performance. The challenges of selecting the right materials, application techniques and performance criteria can be challenging to the roofing professional. RICOWI‘s Spring Seminar, which will be held March 17, 2017, in Anaheim, Calif., will provide an in-depth look at the two styles of underlayments—organic and synthetic—that might be used in low- and steep-slope roof designs. This seminar will touch upon the product designs, product approvals and code language that address how to select and properly use these various underlayment products in roof system applications.

Underlayment Speakers
Organic Underlayment: Doug Thagard, Fontana Paper Mills
Synthetic Underlayment: Mark Strait, Synthetic Roof Underlayment Institute

When underlayments are installed as part of a roof system, they may have special requirements for how they are designed, selected and installed to meet the anticipated roof performance. To better understand the relationship of the components, the speakers will cover the various styles of roof applications that will help inform the audience of best practices from the various industry associations.

Association Speakers
Low-slope Underlayment Applications: Mike Ennis, SPRI
Steep-slope Underlayment Applications:

For more information, visit RICOWI’s website or contact Joan Cook, executive director, at (330) 671-4569.