Asphalt Roofing Facilities Across North America Earn Workplace Safety Awards

More than 50 asphalt roofing manufacturing facilities have been recognized for workplace safety by the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA). ARMA’s annual Accident Prevention Contest honors individual roofing manufacturing facilities across North America for their low incident rates among workers.

The winners of the 2018 Accident Prevention Contest were selected based on their exemplary quarterly safety data reports from this past calendar year. The facilities were judged on the number of hours completed and an ARMA INDEX derived from the criteria and standards set by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

“ARMA and its member companies are committed to providing a safe work environment across the industry,” said ARMA’s Executive Vice President Reed Hitchcock. “Year after year, asphalt roofing manufacturers continue to demonstrate the high quality and safety of their work environments.”

ARMA’s Accident Prevention Contest is open to all manufacturer members. They can submit data from their entire company, a specific division, or an individual plant or mill in North America. The winners are honored in four different categories: the President’s Award, the Award of Excellence, the Perfect Employee Safety Certificate and the Certificate of Improvement.

President’s Award: Presented to the plant in each contest category that has the lowest combined ARMA INDEX over a two-year period.

  • Owens Corning, Irving, TX
  • GAF, Shafter, CA (Shingle)
  • Owens Corning, Portland, OR
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Summit, IL 

Award of Excellence: Presented to those plants that have recorded a score of 0.00 in the ARMA INDEX for three consecutive years and are not President’s Award winners.

  • Owens Corning, Irving, TX
  • GAF, Minneapolis, MN
  • GAF, Mobile, AL
  • GAF, Stockton, CA
  • Johns Manville, Plattsburgh, NY
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Atlanta, GA
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Compton, CA
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Denver, CO
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Kearny, NJ
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Medina, OH
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Memphis, TN
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Minneapolis, MN
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Oklahoma City, OK
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Portland, OR

Perfect Safety Award: Presented to those plants that have recorded a score of 0.00 in the ARMA INDEX for the reporting year and are not President’s Award winners.

  • CertainTeed Corporation, Milan, OH
  • GAF, Myerstown, PA
  • Owens Corning, Irving, TX
  • Atlas Roofing Corporation, Hampton, GA
  • CertainTeed Corporation, Fremont, CA
  • CertainTeed Corporation, Jonesburg, MO
  • GAF, Minneapolis, MN
  • GAF, Shafter, CA (Shingle)
  • GAF, Tampa, FL
  • Owens Corning, Atlanta, GA
  • CertainTeed Corporation, Peachtree City, GA
  • GAF, Mobile, AL
  • Johns Manville, Macon, GA
  • Owens Corning, Brookville, IN
  • Owens Corning, Houston, TX
  • Owens Corning, Kearny, NJ
  • Owens Corning, Portland, OR
  • GAF, Shafter, CA
  • GAF, Stockton, CA
  • Johns Manville, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Johns Manville, Plattsburgh, NY
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Atlanta, GA
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Compton, CA
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Denver, CO
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Houston, TX
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Jacksonville, FL
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Kearny, NJ
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Medina, OH
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Memphis, TN
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Minneapolis, MN
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Oklahoma City, OK
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Portland, OR
  • Owens Corning (Asphalt), Summit, IL
  • Siplast, Arkadelphia, AR
  • SOPREMA, Inc., Chilliwack, British Columbia
  • SOPREMA, Inc., Gulfport, MS
  • TAMKO Building Products, Ennis, TX

For more information visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

ARMA Releases 2019 Q1 Report on Asphalt Roofing Product Shipments

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has released its Quarterly Product Shipment Report, covering asphalt roofing product shipments in the United States and Canada in the first quarter of 2019. The report includes year-to-date shipment information and a comparison with the prior year’s data.

“The purpose of the shipment report is to provide interested parties insightful information on the asphalt roofing industry,” said ARMA’s Executive Vice President Reed Hitchcock. “Beyond receiving these quarterly summaries, those not eligible for ARMA membership may also apply for a subscription to the full, detailed report on the ARMA website.”

Asphalt Roofing Product Shipments

Shipments (squares) Q1-2019 Q1-2018 % Change YTD 2019 YTD 2018 % Change
Shingles – US (including Individual shingles) 37,414,443 39,951,603 -6.4% 37,414,443 39,951,603 -6.4%
BUR – US (not including saturated felts) 1,576,679 2,036,659 -22.6% 1,576,679 2,036,659 -22.6%
Modified Bitumen – US 7,557,680 8,359,572 -9.6% 7,557,680 8,359,572 -9.6%
Shingles – Canada (including Individual shingles) 4,143,208 4,734,237 -12.5% 4,143,208 4,734,237 -12.5%

Roofing product shipment data is collected from participating manufacturers by an independent third party, Association Research Inc., and aggregated to create this report.

For more information, visit https://asphaltroofing.org/quarterly-product-shipment-report.

ARMA Offers Subscription to Detailed Shipment Report

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) is now offering an annual subscription to its full detailed shipment report, which provides asphalt roofing product shipment data for the United States and Canada.

The quarterly report shares product shipments by geography and product type for asphalt shingles, modified bitumen, and built-up-roofing (BUR) materials. The report offers quarterly and year-to-date shipment data, as well as comparisons to the previous year’s reports.

The report is available through a 1-year (4 quarterly reports) subscription for $7,500. Subscription is only available to entities that do not qualify for ARMA membership.ARMA will continue to issue summary quarterly reports, which can be found on the ARMA News & Press page.

“The asphalt roofing shipment data is relevant and valuable to a number of industries, which is why we’ve decided to make this information available,” said ARMA Executive Vice President Reed Hitchcock. “We expect professionals from an array of industries will find the report useful.”

For more information, visit https://asphaltroofing.org/quarterly-product-shipment-report/

ARMA Elects New President

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has announced the election of Tim Kersey, vice president and general manager for Soprema Inc., as the association’s president for the 2019 term. ARMA represents North American asphalt roofing manufacturers, as well as raw material suppliers, and serves to promote the long-term sustainability of the asphalt roofing industry. An active member with the association since the late 1980s, Kersey brings to the president’s role his rich roofing industry knowledge, proven leadership capabilities and a passion for communicating the benefit of asphalt roofing products to the building industry and the public.

Kersey has served multiple terms as the chairman of ARMA’s Low-Slope Roofing Committee, a role in which he was regularly involved, helping to craft technical publications and codes standards and supporting activities for low-slope asphalt roofing applications. He joined the ARMA board of directors when he joined the SOPREMA executive team in 2012, and he has served on the board ever since. Due to his experience with the organization, Kersey was elected by his peers to the Executive Committee, ARMA’s governing body, and served as the treasurer/secretary for two years. He began his term as president on January 1, 2019.

The ARMA president is responsible for facilitating the board of directors’ activities and setting the agenda for the organization. In 2019, Kersey plans to continue the organization’s momentum in driving awareness of the benefits of asphalt roofing in the residential space while also bolstering communications around the advantages of asphalt roofing in the low-slope/commercial market. Industry members can expect to see expanding interactions between asphalt shingle and low-slope roofing manufacturers, broadening public dissemination of ARMA’s statistical industry reports, more external-facing communications from ARMA and a general emphasis on increasing asphalt roofing representation in industry conversations.

“I have had the pleasure of working with Tim since 2003 when I started with ARMA,” said Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s executive vice president. “He has a breadth of technical knowledge and executive experience, and he also brings a great combination of fresh perspective and insight into the association’s history that we look forward to engaging further as he takes the reins as president.”

For more information, visit www.asphaltroofing.org

ARMA Releases 2018 Q4 Report on Asphalt Roofing Product Shipments

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has released its Quarterly Product Shipment Report, covering asphalt roofing product shipments in the United States and Canada in the final quarter of 2018. The report includes year-to-date shipment information and a comparison with the prior year’s data.

“By issuing these reports, ARMA is providing the interested members of the public an opportunity to stay up-to-date on the asphalt roofing industry,” said ARMA’s Executive Vice President Reed Hitchcock.

Asphalt Roofing Product Shipments

Shipments (squares)Q4-2018Q4-2017% ChangeYTD 2018YTD 2017% Change
Shingles – US (including Individual shingles)29,962,04430,379,426-1.4%143,453,436151,098,256-5.1%
BUR – US (not including saturated felts)1,674,3702,170,704-22.9%7,919,1579,290,841-14.8%
Modified Bitumen – US7,800,1727,853,109-0.7%35,387,38434,361,4383.0%
Shingles – Canada(including Individualshingles)1,305,0051,969,802-33.7%14,355,45014,876,926-3.5%

Roofing product shipment data is collected from participating manufacturers by an independent third party, Association Research Inc., and aggregated to create this report.

For more information, visit https://asphaltroofing.org.

Safety Tips and Best Practices for Roofing in Frosty Temperatures

Installing a roof in cold weather is nothing to sneeze at. While roofing contractors in the deep South may not have to worry about business slowing down in the winter, the majority of contractors must contend with cold temperatures, snow, ice and sleet. And even when these extreme weather conditions allow work to be done, they can still create many product and safety issues on the job. 

No matter how well you’ve honed your craft, roofing in cold weather is a challenge for any seasoned contractor. In addition to thinking about the safety of your workers, you must also consider the usability of supplies and equipment, which may be susceptible to the elements. 

For instance, in lower temperatures, certain types of asphalt shingles can become less flexible and equipment may freeze. Also, you should ask yourself: Can I keep my workers motivated and focused on the quality I expect? When roofers are uncomfortable or can’t work safely, they begin to worry about themselves more than the work they’re doing — and justifiably so. 

Before proceeding with your next cold-weather roofing job, consider the following precautions and recommendations. 

Product Considerations

The first rule of cold-weather roofing is to follow all manufacturers’ cold-weather installation guidelines. Different manufacturers specify different minimum temperatures for their products. If the temperature is below that minimum, you will need to take extra precautions to ensure the roof shingles are handled correctly and the product seals properly. 

For example, while asphalt shingles have been successfully used in cold climates for more than a century, they become less flexible at temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. 

When asphalt shingles lose their pliability, they become prone to cracking and other problems, including failing to lie flat and not holding their shape, which can result in granule loss, humping and other damage. Lower temperatures will also keep the shingle sealant lines from achieving proper thermal activation. 

Because of the increased risk of shingle damage and the shingle not sealing correctly in cold temperatures, workers should keep the following things in mind:

  • Never throw or drop shingles. 
  • Give shingles time to warm up before installation if they have been stored in freezing temperatures. Cold shingles — especially fiberglass shingles — may crack on the back when nailed to the deck, which can cause roof leaks. Best practice: When installing shingles in low temperatures, nail them by hand to avoid the “blow through” that a high-powered nail gun can cause.

Remember that most sealants won’t thermally activate at temperatures below 40 degrees. Instead, seal strips must be hand sealed with an approved asphalt roofing cement or other manufacturer-approved adhesive. 

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recommends that shingles be pressed into the asphalt cement so that the adhesive reaches almost to the shingle edges, but is not exposed. For laminated shingles, ARMA says at least three spots of sealant may be used. If not sealed properly, eaves and rakes can be extremely susceptible to wind blow-off. 

The association also suggests the use of open metal valleys in cold weather because installing closed and woven valleys require shingles to be bent, which could result in damage. 

To prevent ice dams — the frozen water that can build up at the eaves of a roof — be sure to install proper roof and attic ventilation in addition to a premium ice and water roof underlayment, which provides a second layer of protection in cold-weather conditions. Ice and water underlayment can be used along eaves, valleys, flashings, hips, ridges, dormers, rakes, skylights and chimneys. Properly ventilating a roof will help ensure maximum protection against ice dams.

Before installing roofing underlayment, be sure that the deck is completely dry so the moisture doesn’t cause wrinkling or buckling of the underlayment. This wrinkling can telegraph through the shingles, creating cosmetic and performance concerns. In addition, trapped moisture can contribute to shingle blistering. 

Overall, when roofing during cold-weather months, check the forecast and plan for potential delays. Better yet, try to work on bright, clear days, when the sun can bear some of the burden and help warm up the roof deck. 

Safety Concerns

Near-freezing temperatures not only create issues with supplies, they can also pose safety risks to workers.

To avoid frostbite, roofers should layer up in clothing such as ClimaWarm and Hyperwarm, which provide warmth, breathability and protection from wintery weather. Even with the proper attire, workers should beware of the signs and symptoms of frostbite, which include prickling skin, numbness and — worst of all — clumsiness caused by stiff joints and muscles. 

In addition to following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA’s) safety regulations for harnesses and fall-protection systems, roofers should always wear shoes with good traction — but especially in cold weather, when surfaces can become slippery. 

Also, encourage everyone to take regular warm-up breaks throughout the day, limit work schedules during extreme weather conditions and consider investing in on-site heating equipment, such as portable foot warmers.

To best prepare yourself and your crew for winter jobs:

  • Plan work around the shorter daylight hours, as well as weather conditions that may prevent roofers from safely being able to put in the necessary hours. 
  • Expect work performance to slow down due to dexterity issues and other natural body-responsive reactions caused by cold temperatures. 
  • Anticipate the extra time that will be required to clear snow from roofs and protect the surface from the elements while work is being performed. 
  • Remember that even a thin layer of snow can camouflage skylights, other materials and debris, which could pose a tripping or falling hazard. 
  • Because working in cold weather takes just as much, if not more, physical exertion as working in warm weather, roofers should be sure to drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration. 

Ultimately, the best advice is to be prepared. Take a cold hard look at the weather forecast and plan accordingly, taking into consideration worker safety, product usability and equipment functionality. Being flexible and ready to adjust work as needed can keep winter business from freezing up altogether.

About the author: Paul Casseri is the product manager of the Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division for Atlas Roofing Corporation. For more information, visit www.atlasroofing.com.

ARMA’s Awards Program is Now Accepting Submissions for the Best Steep and Low-Slope Asphalt Roofing Systems

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has launched its ARMA Excellence in Asphalt Roofing Awards Program, which recognizes the best steep and low-slope asphalt roofing projects from across North America. Formerly known as the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study (QARC), the program has been modernized to better reflect its mission of creating awareness around the most impressive, dynamic asphalt roofing systems.

“By repositioning the QARC Awards as the ARMA Excellence in Asphalt Roofing Awards Program, we are completing an overall ARMA rebrand begun over two years ago,” said ARMA’s Executive Vice President Reed Hitchcock. “This rebrand places an emphasis on excellence, and our logo design clearly shows a focus on both steep and low-slope asphalt roofing applications.”

There is no charge to participate in the program, and it will recognize three asphalt roofing projects each year, highlighting the contractor(s), their team, and their outstanding craftsmanship. Submissions, which require a project description and high-resolution images, must relate to a project completed within the past three years. Click here to enter your project(s) or visit asphaltroofing.org/excellence/submit-your-entry/ before December 31, 2018.

ARMA Excellence in Asphalt Roofing Award winners will receive a monetary prize (Gold – $2,000; Silver – $1,000; Bronze – $500), an opportunity to network with key asphalt roofing industry leaders, portfolio-building materials and an official certificate, as well as recognition at the International Roofing Expo (IRE), in a national trade publication, in the contractor’s local media, on the ARMA website, on social media, and more.

The entries will be judged by a panel of ARMA leaders, roofing industry experts, and prominent members of the roofing media on four criteria:

• Beauty – Does the project embody the true beauty of asphalt roofing? Is it visually attractive or interesting, does it enhance the skyline, building use or design?

• Affordability – Does the project demonstrate value through life-cycle cost or creative use of components to add benefit to the construction process or overall roofing system?

• Reliability – Does the project demonstrate asphalt roofing’s reliability, durability and strength? Does the project show how proper installation of an asphalt roofing system can help provide protection and peace of mind?

• Why Asphalt? – Why did the submitter choose to use an asphalt roofing system? Were there specific circumstances (examples: weather-related challenges, customer requests, building history, overburden requirements, evolutions in the roofing industry which change the playing field, or other situations) that made asphalt roofing the clear choice? What additional aspects about the project make it a step above the rest?

For more information, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

 

Asphalt Roof System Helps Protect Home Against the Elements While Raising Curb Appeal

The Topsail Residence is a private estate in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. Its roof encompasses approximately 10,600 square feet. Photo: Reliant Roofing

With the sunshine state regularly experiencing a beautiful and warm subtropical climate, it’s no surprise that Florida ranks second in the United States for tourism, ranking only behind California. However, actually living in this paradise has challenges of its own — extreme humidity, powerful winds and torrential rains can test the limits of any roofing system. To keep pace with Florida’s erratic weather conditions, proper roof design, installation and maintenance are paramount. The Topsail Residence, a private estate in Ponte Vedra Beach, is a testament to how selecting the right roofing system makes a world of difference.

Previously, the homeowners had an extensive addition on their property, which consisted of adding a new two-story section to the home. A short time after remodel, the roof began to leak, causing widespread damage as well as unsightly water spots throughout the home.

The homeowners sought the expertise of Pillar to Post Home Inspectors, who discovered issues with the roof. They quickly recognized such frequent and substantial leaking required immediate attention before other, bigger problems occurred. So, they suggested the homeowners contact a roofing contractor for a further assessment.

“After inspection, the problem immediately became apparent,” says Sean Shapiro, CEO of Reliant Roofing, the Jacksonville, Florida-based company hired to install the new roof. “We found torn shingles, signs of extensive foot and ladder traffic, and leaks.”

The roofing system appeared to lack some of the key components required for weather resilience and durability, according to Shapiro. “In some areas, there was no flashing installed whatsoever, allowing rainwater the perfect leak point to pour into the home,” Shapiro notes. “The problem was just as bad where the second story met the roof below. The water was free to run through every nook and cranny. Every aspect of a proper installation of a roofing system is important, especially something as essential as flashing.”

The contiguous U.S. average annual rainfall is 32.1 inches, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Jacksonville received 65.91 inches of rainfall in 2017 –more than double the contiguous national average, according to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Living only 22 miles southeast of the city, the homeowners needed a roofing system that would help to protect them against Florida’s high winds and frequent rainstorms. Reliant had the solution — a new asphalt shingle roof.

A new roof system featuring GAF Grand Canyon Lifetime Designer Shingles was installed by Reliant Roofing in 2017. Photo: Reliant Roofing

“The homeowners didn’t feel comfortable just patching the leaks. They wanted protection against future leaks and the area’s common threats: high winds and stormy weather,” Shapiro says. “Therefore, we recommended installing a completely new roofing system with designer asphalt shingles.”

Reliant began by tearing off the shingles on both the older and newer sections of the roof, bringing in two full teams to tackle all 10,600 square feet. Having dealt with numerous high-wind conditions on other roofing projects, Reliant chose GAF Grand Canyon Lifetime Designer Shingles in the color Stone Wood to provide the homeowners with a durable, long-lasting shingle, a key component of a beautiful new asphalt roofing system.

“When it storms in Florida, it storms,” added Shapiro. “We wanted to install a system that could withstand torrential downpours and high winds. Additionally, it was hard to overlook the durability shingles provided at an affordable cost.”

GAF Timbertex Premium Ridge Caps were installed on the hips and ridges to provide leak protection with extra dimensions to complement the roof. Reliant hand sealed every hip and ridge cap shingle and used GAF StormGuard Self-Adhering Leak Barrier to help protect the roof deck. Crews also installed custom counterflashing to address any potential defects in the stucco. Thanks to Reliant’s craftsmanship and the shingles’ ease of installation, the homeowners received a beautiful new asphalt roofing system in just five days.

The new asphalt roof will not only help to protect the homeowners against the elements and restore their comfort of living, but also provide them incredible curb appeal for years to come.

For their work on the Topsail Residence project, Reliant Roofing received the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Silver Award from the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA).

Each year, ARMA seeks the most beautiful, affordable and reliable asphalt roofing systems in North America. The Topsail Residence showcases how asphalt roofing provides durability and reliability in the face of harsh weather, while also providing aesthetically stunning designs.

ARMA is now accepting low and steep-slope asphalt roofing projects completed in 2018 for its 2019 Awards Program. Roofing professionals may submit multiple submissions, and there is no fee to enter. The program recognizes projects that exhibit innovation, performance and beauty, and which lead the way in roofing breakthroughs, such as advanced weather protection, green roofing or unique system design. The submission deadline is December 31, 2018.

For more information about asphalt roofing systems or to learn more about ARMA’s Awards Program, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

Ponding Water Basics: Proper Drainage Design and Low-Slope Roofs

Roofing professionals install a new asphalt roof on the Broward County Stephen Booher Building in Coral Springs, Florida. Photo: Advanced Roofing Inc.

A low-slope asphalt roofing system is cost effective, durable and reliable. Multiple layers of weatherproof membranes protect a building, its residents and the property it houses. There are a few design elements that will help building owners get the most from their roofing system. Managing ponding water is essential to properly maintaining a roof.

Ponding water is defined as the water which remains on a roof 48 hours or longer. Water may accumulate on a low-slope roof due to rain, snow or runoff from rooftop equipment. Ponding water can have major negative consequences, regardless of the type of roofing system. Proper design, installation and maintenance of roofing structures can prevent this condition and its associated problems.

The adverse effects of ponding water on roofs can include:

  • Deformation of the deck structure:Ponding water can substantially increase the load on roof decks. As water accumulates, deck deflections can increase, thereby resulting in additional ponding water, which could compromise the structural integrity of the deck.
  • Damage to the roof surface:Ice formations develop and move constantly with changes in temperature. This movement can “scrub” the roof membrane to such an extent that considerable physical damage to the membrane can occur.
  • Growth of algae and vegetation:When water stands for long periods of time, algae and vegetation growth will likely occur, and may cause damage to the roof membrane. Additionally, vegetation can clog drains and cause additional ponding.
  • Accumulation of dirt and debris in the ponding area:Dirt, debris, and other contaminants can affect and damage the membrane surface. The can also lead to clogged drains.

Proper design and installation are crucial factors in roof system performance. This photo shows an Atactic Polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane being applied by torch to a low-slope roof. Photo: ARMA

Ponding water may lead to accelerated erosion and deterioration of the membrane surface that can result in failure of the roof system. Allowing even relatively small amounts of moisture beneath the roof membrane may reduce the thermal efficiency of the insulation. More importantly, moisture intrusion can cause serious damage to the deck, insulation, and membrane as well as the building’s interior.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recommends that roof designs provide adequate slope (minimum of ¼ inch per foot) to ensure that the roof drains freely throughout the life of the building and to thereby avoid the effects of ponding water. Model building codes also require a minimum ¼ inch per foot slope for new construction projects, and require positive drainage for re-roofing projects. These requirements are intended to prevent water from ponding on roof surfaces.

Managing Ponding Water

Here are a few best practices to manage ponding water:

  • Adequate sloping should be taken into account during the design process. A roof’s structural frame or deck should be sloped, and drainage components like roof drains and scuppers should be included in the design.
  • In addition, secondary (or emergency) drains may be required by local plumbing codes to help reduce the risk of a structural failure due to clogged drainage systems. Talk to your roof membrane manufacturer and/or roof system designer to determine the proper location of these components.
  • If a deck does not provide the necessary slope to drain, a tapered insulation system can be used. A combination of different approaches — single slope, two-way slope, and four-way slope — is often used to achieve the necessary slope and to allow for moisture drainage.
  • Additionally, crickets installed upslope of rooftop equipment and saddles positioned along a low-point between drains, can help prevent localized ponding in conjunction with a tapered insulation system.
  • Building designers and owners should work with contractors and roof manufacturers to determine which methods are best and appropriate for a roof assembly’s long-term performance, whether it’s a new construction or re-roof project.

The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015, states the following: “NRCA recommends that designers make provisions in their roof designs for positive slope.”

The manual spells out that slope generally is provided by:

  • Sloping the structural framing or roof deck
  • Designing a tapered insulation system
  • Proper location of roof drains, scuppers and gutters
  • A combination of the above

By following the proper drainage practices detailed above, building owners can positively impact their low-slope roofing system and help to ensure it will remain durable and reliable throughout its service life.

To obtain specific information about ponding water on particular products and systems, contact your roof material manufacturer. For more information about low-slope asphalt roofing systems, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

ARMA’s New Video Illustrates Why Homeowners Need Proper Attic Ventilation

Is your roof properly ventilated? The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association’s (ARMA) latest whiteboard video outlines the components to a properly functioning attic ventilation system and the many ways it benefits a roof, such as protection against shingle deterioration and roof system damage.

How Does Proper Attic Ventilation Protect my Roof?” highlights how a balanced system of intake and exhaust results in a continuous flow of air in an unconditioned attic, helping to reduce heat and moisture buildup year-round and prolong the life of the roofing system.

Proper attic ventilation can assist in reducing energy consumption, and preventing mold, mildew and wood rot. Additionally, it can help prevent ice dams, which can cause leaking and costly damage to shingles, gutters, insulation and the whole roof system.

“Homeowners may not be aware of just how important attic ventilation is to the longevity and performance of their asphalt shingle roofing system,” said Tim McQuillen, ARMA’s director of technical services and a 25-year industry veteran. “ARMA wants to educate homeowners on proper attic ventilation and why it’s important, as well as how to recognize the signs indicating it’s time to call a roofing contractor if there are issues.”

ARMA encourages homeowners planning to install a new asphalt shingle roof to consult with their roofing contractor or the manufacturer of their roofing system to ensure their attic is properly ventilated. To view ARMA’s latest attic ventilation video, or its library of other educational videos on asphalt roofing systems, visit ARMA’s website or YouTube Channel.