Bi-Metal Drill Screws Feature Corrosion Resistance and Ductility

Triangle Fastener Corporation introduces a full line of 304 stainless steel bi-metal self-drilling screws.

Bi-metal screws have heads and threads made of 304 stainless steel providing corrosion resistance and ductility. A hardened carbon steel drill point welded to a stainless steel body, which allows the screw to drill and tap steel up to ½ inch thick.

The screws are used to attach aluminum, stainless steel, insulated metal panel (IMP) and when ductility is needed in the connection.

  • Available in #12 and ¼ inch diameters
  • Drill and tap up to ½ inch thick steel
  • Lengths up to 12 inches long
  • Head styles include: hex washer head, pancake head and button head
  • With and without EPDM Bond-Seal sealing washers
  • Can be painted to desired color

For more information, visit www.trianglefastener.com.

Shears Feature Curved Blade

The KD-446L Profile Shears features a curved blade configuration for maneuverability when making tight-curved cuts.

The KD-446L Profile Shears features a curved blade configuration for maneuverability when making tight-curved cuts.

Kett Tool Co. introduces the KD-446L Profile Shears, featuring a curved blade configuration for maneuverability when making tight-curved cuts in profile and flat materials.
 
Professionals working in the construction, metal building, metal fabrication, roofing and other industries will appreciate the flexibility of the KD-446L thanks to its lightweight design and ability to cut corrugated and flat metal, as well as soft non-ferrous metals at a radius as tight as three inches. At only 15 inches long and weighing five pounds, the KD-446L provides the versatility to make curved cuts while maintaining comfort and control.
 
The KD-446L features a five-amp pistol grip, variable speed motor that allows users to control speeds from 0 to 2,500 RPMs. The shears cut profile and flat materials up to 18-gauge cold-rolled (C.R.) mild steel, soft non-ferrous metals like aluminum, copper and brass (up to .090 inches thick); wire mesh and many other sheet materials – all at speeds of up to 28 feet per minute.
 
The cutting blades are made from quality steel, heat treated and precision ground for extended operation.
 
To see the KD-446L Profile Shears in action, watch the video here.  
 
KD-446L Profile Shears are available through authorized dealers. For more information or to locate a dealer, visit the website or call (513)271-0333.

An Oceanfront Elementary School Poses Tough Problems, but a Coated Aluminum Standing-seam Roof Passes the Test

Elementary school students sometimes find themselves staring out the window, but few have a view to rival that of the students at Sullivan’s Island Elementary School in Sullivan’s Island, S.C. The school is located on oceanfront property, and when it was time for the original building to be rebuilt, the site posed numerous challenges.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The original school had been built in the 1950s. It had been designed for 350 students and built on grade. The new school would have to be elevated to conform to modern building codes and service 500 students. The structure would not only have to withstand high winds, severe weather and a salt-air environment, but it also would have to fit into its surroundings. Many residents feared the larger building would look out of place in the cozy beach community. It was architect Jerry English’s job to figure out a way to make it work.

English is a principal at Cummings & McCrady Architects, Charleston, S.C., the architect of record on the project. He worked with a talented team of construction professionals, including Ricky Simmons, general manager of Keating Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. Inc. in Charleston, to refine his vision and bring it to life. English and Simmons shared their insight on the project, and they both point to the building’s metal roof as a key element in the project’s success.

CHALLENGING DESIGN

Cummings & McCrady Architects handles a broad range of commercial, institutional, religious and historic work—new construction and renovation. The firm had done a lot of work with the Charleston County School District over the years, including a small library addition for the original Sullivan’s Island Elementary School after Hurricane Hugo passed through in 1989, and it was awarded the new construction project.

The building’s foundation system had to meet strict regulations regarding resistance to storm surge. The building is elevated on concrete piers, which were topped with a 6-inch reinforced concrete slab. Metal framing was constructed above the slab. “With our building, we had to raise the underside of the structure almost 7 feet above the grade,” English recalls. “What we did is we built it a little bit higher than that so the underside could be left open and used for playground.”

For English, coming up with a design that would reflect the character of the local community was the biggest challenge. To achieve that goal, he broke up the building into four sections and spread them across the site with the tallest sections in the center. “We have four linked segments that transition down on each end to the height of the adjacent residences,” he says.

The roof was also designed to blend in with the neighboring homes, many of which feature metal roofs. “The idea of pitched roofs with overhangs became a strong unifying element,” English explains.

English checked with several major metal roofing manufacturers to determine which products could withstand the harsh oceanfront environment and wind-uplift requirements. “Virtually every one of them would only warranty aluminum roofing,” he says. “The wind requirement and the resistance to the salt air were what drove us to a coated aluminum roof.”

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but the manufacturer supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but Petersen Aluminum supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide. Metal trusses give the roof system its shape. English tapped the resources of roof consultant ADC in Charleston and the metal roofing manufacturer to iron out all the details. English wanted to avoid any cross seams in the metal roofing, so he worked with Dave Landis, the manufacturer’s architectural/technical sales manager, to arrange for the longest panels to be formed onsite.

The roof also includes two decks that serve as outdoor teaching areas. These sections were covered with a two-ply modified bitumen roof system and protected with a multi-colored elevated concrete paver system.

Another standout feature is the school’s entry tower, which is topped by a freestanding hip roof featuring curved panels. This roof was constructed with panels that were 12-inches wide. “We found other examples on the island where the base of the roof flares a little bit as a traditional element, and with the closer seamed panels they were able to get those curves,” English says. “It’s a refinement that’s a little different than the rest of the roof, but it’s the proper scale and the fine detailing pulls it together and sets if off from the main roof forms that are behind it.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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AAMA Releases Document Clarifying Weathering Requirements for Solar Reflective Finishes

The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) releases a document describing the test procedures and performance requirements for pigmented organic coatings applied to aluminum, fiber reinforced thermoset or wood and cellulosic composite profiles for windows, doors, wall panels, skylights, sloped glazing and similar products. The update is a clarification to the requirements for outdoor or accelerated weathering testing. The document Voluntary Specification, Performance Requirements and Test Procedures for Solar Reflective Finishes was originally released in 2013.

“Advances in coatings technologies for architectural products have provided the opportunity to expand the use of solar reflective coatings,” says Manny Mayer, architectural products manager at Tiger Drylac. “Selecting high-performance coatings with these solar reflective attributes can positively impact the energy efficiency associated with all exterior coated building components. The primary purpose for utilizing coatings with solar reflective properties is to keep the coated surfaces cooler than they would be with standard coatings.”

This specification is a supplement to the existing specifications (AAMA 613, 614, 615, 623, 624, 625, 653, 2603, 2604 and 2605) and does not in any way supersede the performance requirements contained in those documents, particularly the weathering requirements.

AAMA 643-16, as well as other AAMA documents, may be purchased from AAMA’s online store.

A Metal Roof Crowns a Residential New-construction Project

When Charles Callaghan purchased the two vacant lots next to his home in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., he thought they would form the perfect location for his family’s dream home. A team comprised of architects, contractors and manufacturers worked together to bring his ideas to life in the form of a new 7,500-square-foot residence. The building’s crowning feature is a metal roof system that was designed to complement the aesthetics of the home and stand up to the harsh oceanfront environment for decades to come.

The roof of the Callaghan residence in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., features 12,000 square feet of Petersen Aluminum’s Snap-Clad in Slate Gray.

The roof of the Callaghan
residence in Ponte Vedra
Beach, Fla., features 12,000 square feet of Petersen Aluminum’s Snap-Clad in Slate Gray.

“With the larger lot, we thought we could do something unique to the neighborhood,” Callaghan says. “When we first met with the architect, there were a few keys we wanted to stress. First, we didn’t want a boxy-looking house. We also wanted shingle-style siding and a metal roof. We like the look of the metal roof, we like the durability, and we thought it would be a good way of complementing the shingles on the house.”

At every phase of the project, the team of construction professionals ensured the project was executed with precision, down to the last detail of the metal roof.

THE DESIGN

The house was designed by Jaycox Architects & Associates, Jacksonville, Fla. According to William R. Jaycox, principal, the plan made the backyard pool the home’s focal point. “They wanted to do a casual, shingle-style beach house that wasn’t like everyone else’s house,” Jaycox notes. “We designed the house so it was mostly single-story and spread it out around the pool, which made for an interesting roof design. It’s all in small modules.”

The L-shaped home features a master-bedroom suite on one side while the other side contains the living room, dining room, kitchen, family room and guest bedroom. “This one also has a four-car garage under the main roof, and, because the house wraps continuously around the pool, you get a fun little foyer in the front with a little cupola up above, you get the dormers for the bedrooms in the attic, and the master suite is a little pod unto itself,” Jaycox adds. “The back has a pool pavilion separate from the house. When you put all of those elements together, you get a very interesting structure, and the metal roof was perfect because it accentuates the lines.”

The roof system specified included 12,000 square feet of aluminum panels in the cool-color Slate Gray. “This house is only a few blocks from the ocean, and in those cases we typically use aluminum,” Jaycox says. “We’ve had great success with that system. It’s absolutely bombproof from a corrosion standpoint with stainless fasteners, heavy-gauge aluminum and the Kynar finish.”

Thorne Metal Systems installed a high-temperature, self-adhered underlayment beneath the metal roof, as specified.

Thorne Metal Systems installed a high-temperature, self-adhered underlayment beneath the metal roof, as specified.

When applied by a certified installer, the system can qualify for a 20-year Oceanfront Finish Warranty from the manufacturer. In addition, the roof meets all Florida’s tough building-code requirements. The system, consisting of 0.040-gauge aluminum, 16-inch-wide panels with fastening clips spaced at 24-inches on-center, carries a Miami-Dade NOA with a -110 PSF uplift. (The UL 90 uplift is -52.5 PSF.)

THE INSTALLATION

The roofing contractor on the project was Thorne Metal Systems of Middleburg, Fla. Owner Bill Thorne has been installing metal roofs since 1989. He formed his own company 13 years ago, and it has become the go-to metal roof installer for Jaycox Architects
& Associates and the general contractor on the project, C.F. Knight Inc., Jacksonville.

Thorne has a lot of experience installing this particular aluminum roof system. “The system is a very easy system to install,” he says. “It’s very user- friendly. The panels have male and female joints that snap together and are held in place with stainless-steel clips.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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Runners’ Haven Receives New Aluminum Roof

Coxe Cage is the home of the Yale men's and women's indoor track and field teams.

Coxe Cage is the home of the Yale men’s and women’s indoor track and field teams.

Coxe Cage at Yale University, New Haven, Conn., is the home of the Yale men’s and women’s indoor track and field teams. The building is said to have one of the largest skylights in the world at roughly 26,000 square feet. The reroofing project began July 2013 and was completed in late 2013. Approximately 25,981 square feet of Tite-Loc Plus, 16-inches on-center, 0.040 aluminum was installed on the building. The 75-foot panels feature the color Zinc.

Team

The building is said to have one of the largest skylights in the world at roughly 26,000 square feet.

The building is said to have one of the largest skylights in the world at roughly 26,000 square feet.


Roofing contractor: Silktown Roofing, Manchester, Conn.

Architect: Kiss + Cathcart Architects, Brooklyn, N.Y.

Roofing distributor: ABC Supply, Beloit, Wis.

General contractor: Giordano Construction, Brandford, Conn.

Aluminum supplier: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Approximately 25,981 square feet of Tite-Loc Plus, 16-inches on-center, 0.040 aluminum was installed on the building.

Approximately 25,981 square feet of Tite-Loc Plus, 16-inches on-center, 0.040 aluminum was installed on the building.

Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Englert Releases Aluminum Composite Material Brochure

Englert Inc. has announced the availability of a print and online brochure for its line of aluminum composite material wall panels.

Englert Inc. has announced the availability of a print and online brochure for its line of aluminum composite material wall panels.

Englert Inc. has announced the availability of a print and online brochure for its line of aluminum composite material wall panels.

The six-page color brochure provides descriptions of Englert’s line of four ACM panels, including:

  • The Englert CWP 200, a sequentially installed rainscreen system that employs an integral, accent strip and adjustable attachment method.
  • The Englert CWP 400, a non-sequentially installed flush caulk joint wall panel system that employs a staggered sliding clip attachment method.
  • The Englert CWP 600, a sequentially installed, gasketed wall panel system that employs integral weather stripping and hidden fasteners.
  • The Englert CS 500, a continuous edge grab system with a 1/2-inch depth.

The new brochure features performance and testing data, line illustrations, CadCad depictions of each panel configuration and application features and benefits.

Tile Roofing System Is Made of Lightweight High-strength Steel

Roser Cleo Tile

Roser Cleo Tile

The Roser Cleo Tile will give your home a fresh and radiant appearance while leaving you in the comfort of protection that only a stone-coated steel roof can offer. The beautiful appeal of classic tile with the performance of lightweight high-strength steel, resistant to fire and hurricane-force winds, is an ideal choice for any homeowner.

The roofing system includes:

  • Clear acrylic over-glaze protective coating
  • Roofing granule coating
  • Adhesive basecoat
  • Protective surface coating
  • Aluminum/zinc coating
  • Commercial-grade steel core
  • Aluminum/zinc coating
  • Protective surface coating

The Stone Coated Steel Roofing System, manufactured by Roser, offers the advantage of high-strength steel with a look a variety of traditional and innovative architectural styles. When compared to asphalt shingles and concrete roofing products, which can weigh 350 to 1,000 pounds per square, the Roser Stone Coated Roofing System, at only 150 pounds per square, effectively reduces the overhead weight on the house structure. This provides for a much safer building during an earthquake, fire or a hurricane. While the standard shingle and shake roofs naturally deteriorate over time, the Roser Roofing System will continue to maintain its beautiful appearance and requires the least amount of maintenance in the roofing industry. An eco-friendly Roser roof will increase the resale value of your home not only with its elegance, but also with its proven durability.

About the Roser Roofing System:

  • Installs direct to deck or over battens.
  • Stone surface resists fading and provides for a quiet roof.
  • Fastener design features a confirmed and a locking profile.
  • Low-maintenance roof system with water-shedding performance.
  • Storm driven engineering design is proven throughout the world.
  • Includes the stringent Miami-Dade Approval.

Laminators Inc. Honored at SmartCEO Family Business Awards Ceremony

Laminators Inc. manufactures decorative metal wall systems for commercial construction building exteriors, and rigid panel substrates for sign makers.

Laminators Inc. manufactures decorative metal wall systems for commercial construction building exteriors, and rigid panel substrates for sign makers.

Laminators Inc. President and CEO David J. Thompson, as well as his brothers and fellow owners, Garrett and Scott Thompson, were honored at the 2015 SmartCEO Family Business Awards ceremony in Philadelphia, Pa. Each year, SmartCEO honors successful family businesses that continue to grow and move the country forward.

Located in Hatfield, Pa., Laminators Inc. is a family-owned and operated business now in its third generation. For more than 50 years, the Thompson family and the Laminators Inc. team have been building a company that is known for its ACM products and turnkey services.

According to SmartCEO: “More than two-thirds of privately held businesses in the U.S. are family-owned firms. They are driving the local and national economy and fueling job growth.” Laminators Inc. is committed to providing value through high-quality products, innovative application solutions and superior customer service.

Read SmartCEO’s full article on Laminators Inc. and CEO, David Thompson. Thompson was also featured in a video created by SmartCEO.

SmartCEO’s article on Laminators Inc./David J. Thompson:

  • The American Dream: Laminators Inc. manufactures decorative metal wall systems for commercial construction building exteriors, and rigid panel substrates for sign makers. President and CEO David J. Thompson says an entrepreneurial mindset and a willingness to reinvent the company has kept his firm thriving for more than half a century. “Each new product offering was developed because a market dried up or major customers went out of business,” he says. “We’re focused on recognizing opportunities and overcoming adversity.”
  • Passing the Torch: After leaving school with a 10th-grade education to support his family during the Great Depression, David Thompson’s grandfather started a handyman business that evolved into Laminators Inc. When David Thompson became president, he transitioned the company from an entrepreneurial leadership focus to a professional management team. David’s three brothers also joined the company, each finding a niche that fueled the firm’s growth.
  • Quick Tip: “You can’t hold others accountable unless they have clear, written, mutually set expectations with regular, consistent feedback. Too many employees think they are doing a good job because they haven’t been yelled at lately. We think that’s just wrong.”
  • Perfecting Processes: At Laminators, every potential hire, including family members, must go through the interview process. “We want our family members to be qualified and bring skills and education they learn outside our business to create ‘lift’ for the organization,” Thompson says. “It also helps each of us earn the respect of the rest of the employees.”
  • Building a Legacy: Thompson believes you build a strong reputation by doing the right things the right way. “It almost always comes back to us later in repeat business and new projects,” he says.

Aluminum Stands Up to Coastal Environments

Union Corrugating has launched a new aluminum roofing line that is geared toward high-end applications, including the coastal environment where corrosion resistance is critical.

Union Corrugating has launched a new aluminum roofing line that is geared toward high-end applications, including the coastal environment where corrosion resistance is critical.


Union Corrugating has launched a new aluminum roofing line that is geared toward high-end applications, including the coastal environment where corrosion resistance is critical. The new product was created in response to customer demand. The product line, which uses corrosion-resistant, prime-quality 0.032-inch aluminum, is available in six profiles and 29 Kynar500- or Hylar 5000-based finish colors. Weather tightness and coastal saltwater warranties are available.