SBS System Delivers Roof Design for the Brewery District

Brewery District Building 3, New Westminster, B.C., Canada

Owner Wesgroup Properties wanted an aesthetically pleasing pattern for their roof design as well as the option to expand and add additional stories.

Owner Wesgroup Properties wanted an aesthetically pleasing pattern for their roof design as well as the option to expand and add additional stories.

The Brewery District is a dynamic, progressive area in in Metro Vancouver offering a mix of residential high-rises, shops and office buildings. The Brewery District provides quick access to the area and is connected via a SkyTrain to public
plazas, greenways, view decks, cycling paths, and a central community green gathering place. This master-planned community includes groceries, pharmacies, restaurants and other mixed-use retail outlets.

Roof Report

The project included roof areas of varying heights totaling approximately 21,320 square feet. Owner Wesgroup Properties wanted an aesthetically pleasing pattern for their roof design as well as the option to expand and add additional stories. IKO was able to meet their expectations with an SBS system using IKO TP 180 Granular Cap in a pattern of multiple colors. The IKO SBS Roofing System was recommended by GRC Columbia Roofing Inc., based on the specific client requirements to create a colorful rooftop pattern.

Team

Client/Owner: Wesgroup Properties
Architect/Designer:
Henrizquez & Partners Architects
Roofing Contractor: GRC Columbia Roofing Inc.
The Roof System:
IKO MVP Vapour Barrier
IKO MF 95 SF (Poly/Sand) Vapour
Barrier
IKO Therm III Insulation
IKO 3/16-inch Protectoboard
IKO TP 180 FF Base Sheet
IKO TP 180 SF Base Sheet
IKO TP 180 Granular Cap Sheet

Flagship Store Is Topped with Metal Roofing Panels

Made In America Store: Elma, N.Y.

Dutch Seam, continuous standing seam metal roof panels, eliminates the need for separate seam caps and field seaming.

Dutch Seam, continuous standing seam metal roof panels, eliminates the need for separate seam caps and field seaming.

Mark Andol is the owner and founder of General Welding and Fabricating, with locations in Elma and Rochester, N.Y. That business, which manufactured structural and decorative steel components for this store, has been operating since 1989. When the recession hit almost 10 years ago, Andol lost much of his business to companies located overseas, forcing him to cut his workforce to half its size. At that point, he began envisioning a store that would only carry products that are 100 percent American made, to help grow manufacturing within the United States. Andol’s vision became a reality in 2010 when he opened the doors to the first Made in America store in Elma.

Roof Report

The mission of the Made in America Store is to create and save jobs in the United States by increasing American manufacturing. By installing ATAS’ Dutch Seam metal roofing panels, which are made in America, on this new flagship store, it only further reinforced this mission. Dutch Seam, a continuous standing seam metal roof panel, features an integral lock and seam which prevents “blow-off” or “creeping” of the seam. It also eliminates the need for separate seam caps and field seaming.

When ATAS International announced the company’s 2016 Project of the Year winners at an awards banquet on May 8, the Made In America flagship store project took first place in the commercial roofs category.

Team

Architect: Lydon Architectural Services, Buffalo, N.Y.
General Contractor: Kulback’s Construction Inc., Lancaster, N.Y.
Installing Contractor: Bayford Construction, Lancaster, N.Y.
Roof System Manufacturer: ATAS International, Allentown, Pa.

Planning and Teamwork Are Essential in Tackling Retail Project

Peach State installed a mechanically attached TPO system over the existing modified bitumen roof system on two buildings totaling approximately 75,400 square feet.

Peach State installed a mechanically attached TPO system over the existing modified bitumen roof system on two buildings totaling approximately 75,400 square feet.

Headquartered in Atlanta, Peach State Roofing Inc. has 15 branches and covers clients across the nation. The company specializes in commercial and industrial roofing, and excels at large-scale single-ply jobs. The goal of every branch is to provide the same level of service for clients no matter where they are in the country, as exemplified by a recent project at a large retail mall in South Carolina.

Peach State’s Charlotte branch is located in Rock Hill, S.C. The company has re-roofed three of the five roofs at Gaffney Premium Outlets in Gaffney, S.C., including two roofs completed this year in just two weeks. Anthony Wilkerson, the branch manager, and Blake Wideman, strategic accounts, shared their insights on the project.

Peach State’s Charlotte branch focuses primarily on re-roofing, service and maintenance work for existing customers and property managers. Most of the company’s work involves TPO, EPDM and PVC, but crews have to be able to handle almost every type of system on the market. “If there is a hotel with some shingles or metal on it, we want to be able to complete every facet of the job, but most of our work revolves around single-ply roofing,” Wilkerson states. “We are certified with every major single-ply manufacturer.”

Anthony Wilkerson (left) and Blake Wideman of Peach State Roofing’s Charlotte branch inspect the completed project at Premium Outlets in Gaffney, S.C.

Anthony Wilkerson (left) and Blake Wideman of Peach State Roofing’s Charlotte branch inspect the completed project at Premium Outlets in Gaffney, S.C.

According to Wilkerson and Wideman, Peach State’s strength lies in building relationships with its clients by providing quality workmanship and excellent customer service. “We do that through our project management, our expertise and our training,” says Wilkerson. “We put a lot into training our employees so that they know how to do the technical details that the manufacturers are asking for.”

Wilkerson believes Peach State offers the best of both worlds—flexibility at each branch and the depth of knowledge from the large corporate organization. “We’re independent, but I work with the corporate office every day,” says Wilkerson. “We have local representation around the country, but at the same time we have that teamwork, so you’re still getting the same quality from each office that you’re getting from the corporate office. We try to be as close to the way Atlanta does things—the Peach State Way—all across board, all over the country.”

Landing a Big One

In the case of the recent project at Gaffney Premium Outlets, the work was an outgrowth of the company’s previous successful projects, including a re-roofing job at the same complex last year. “Our bid was what they were looking for,” Wideman says. “We gave them the price they were looking for and the quality they wanted. That’s how we were awarded this project.”

This aerial view shows the five buildings of the Gaffney Premium Outlets mall. Peach State Roofing re-roofed the two buildings on the left this year, after completing work on the building at the far right last year.

This aerial view shows the five buildings of the Gaffney Premium Outlets mall. Peach State Roofing re-roofed the two buildings on the left this year, after completing work on the building at the far right last year.

The mall is made up of five buildings, and the company re-roofed two this year totaling approximately 75,400 square feet. Peach State installed a mechanically attached TPO system from Firestone over the existing modified bitumen roof system. “We came up with a plan to cover the old roof with a half-inch high-density cover board,” Wilkerson says. “Then we mechanically attached a Firestone 60-mil white TPO system over the cover board.”

The system was chosen for its durability, according to Wilkerson. “They were looking for a long-term solution,” he says. “We went with a re-cover because it was more cost-effective for their budget, but we could still offer them the same warranty and the same guarantee that the system would be just as effective if they had torn the old system off and started from scratch.”

The company used 8-foot rolls of TPO on the project for several reasons. “We went with 8-foot rolls on this project because it was easier to apply the rolls,” notes Wilkerson. “They are not as heavy as the 10-foot rolls. It’s easier to let the rolls relax when you roll them out and easier to keep them tight when you are securing them to the deck.”

Fasteners were installed every 12 inches on center at the edge of the TPO sheets, and the next sheet was heat welded over the top of the screws and plates, and then mechanically fastened at the other end.
Extra care had to be taken with the details, especially walls and curbs. “We tore all of the old membrane off the curbs and off the walls, and we used bonding adhesive to go up the walls,” Wilkerson explains.

At the walls, the field sheets were run up the wall 12 inches and mechanically attached. “We adhere a sheet to the wall, and we heat weld that to the field sheet,” explains Wilkerson, “At the top of that, we use a water cutoff behind the sheet, and we use a termination bar. The termination bar is installed 12 inches on center, and then we use a sealant at the top of the termination bar. We came back with a surface-mount counterflashing, which basically just goes over the top of the termination bar. It has a little kick-out on it, so once that’s attached, it gives you double protection where your membrane is terminated.”

Curbs were handled in a similar fashion. “With the curbs, you run the field sheet right up to the curb, and then you mechanically attach it 12 inches on center,” Wilkerson notes. “Then we use bonding adhesive to install a piece of membrane on each side of the curb. We don’t do one piece and wrap it all the way around. We use four separate pieces, and we adhere them to the curb. Then we heat weld those pieces to the field sheet. For the curbs, we use a flashing that goes underneath the curb itself, and we attach that 12 inches on center all the way around. That lets the water shed over the HVAC unit and then down onto the membrane past the flashing, so there’s nowhere for the water to penetrate.”

Meeting the Challenges

The sheer size of the project was a challenge, but Peach State is used to handling large-scale projects. Logistics and scheduling were also demanding due to customer activity at the mall. “It was a good project for us, but I’d say one of the biggest challenges was that the mall remained open the whole time we were doing the roof,” Wilkerson says. “We had to check in with each tenant in every building to make sure everything was OK from the night before.”

Extra care had to be taken with the details at walls and curbs. Bonding adhesive was used to install a piece of membrane on each side of the curb. Then those pieces were heat welded to the field sheet.

Extra care had to be taken with the details at walls and curbs. Bonding adhesive was used to install a piece of membrane on each side of the curb. Then those pieces were heat welded to the field sheet.

The project called for roofing specific sections each day to make sure the roof stayed watertight at all times. “We sealed the roof up every night 100 percent, so if it rained in the evening, it had to be like we had never been up there,” Wilkerson recalls. “If we took three air conditioners apart in a section that we did one day, at night before those guys went home the air conditioners were wrapped back up, the flashing was put back around the air conditioner and all of the edges of the roof were sealed to the old roof so everything was watertight.”

Safety was also a concern, especially with pedestrian traffic below. “We had to make sure all of our safety procedures were in place for our crews and for the members of the public going in and out of the doors,” Wilkerson says.

The crews used safety lines at the perimeter, and anyone outside the safety lines had to be tied off at all times. “We had to make sure we had a man strictly watching out for the safety of the crews. You have to make sure any little pieces of membrane don’t blow off the roof. You have to make sure all of that is being cleaned up steadily as the job is going on. You don’t want the public to see anything except the flag stands on the roof.”

Staging was complicated, but luckily the jobsite offered ample space for trucks and cranes to be moved between the buildings. The key was to tackle high-traffic areas early in the morning and move to less busy spots as the day wore on.

Proper staging is crucial to jobsite efficiency, notes Wilkerson. “We like to stage the material as we put it on so we’re not dragging it across the roof,” he says. “It’s all right there for them, laid out as they go.”

Support and teamwork are essential up and down the line. “We work really well as a team, so if anyone has any small questions, they can ask the superintendent and call me, so we can make sure we take care of it the Peach State Way.”

Flexing Their Muscles

The project went off without a hitch, says Wilkerson. The mall traffic was never disrupted. “Not one leak, not one complaint on this project,” he says. “Our project management on this project was spot on. Our superintendents held their own out there. And our guys—it’s the attention to quality and all the time we put into training our guys that allows them to do this and make it look almost seamless. It’s one of those situations where you want it to look easy while you’re doing it, but when you’re in the mix of it and you’re trying to get it all done, it’s not as easy as it looks.”

Customer service was crucial. It wasn’t just the property management company that had to be kept informed—it was each individual retailer in the building. “There were so many people to deal with,” notes Wideman. “Every manager of each of those units had to be kept informed of the process. Roofing is not as hard as people think, but keeping up with the owners, keeping people happy, letting people know ahead of time what’s going on is a big challenge. We had to make friends with everyone ahead of time and let them know where to call with any questions.”

“The project, as far as roofing goes, was pretty straightforward,” concludes Wilkerson. “The key is to keep up with everyone on a daily basis and let them know what’s going on so if there is a small problem, it doesn’t keep brewing until it’s a big problem.”

Photos: Peach State Roofing Inc.

Re-Roofing of Shopping Center Poses Logistical Challenges

Southgate Shopping Center: Sebring, Florida

The re-roofing project of the shopping center totaled 79,556 square feet.

The re-roofing project of the shopping center totaled 79,556 square feet.

Roofing contractors often find themselves tackling re-roofs at shopping centers in piece-meal fashion, doing sections over the years as the budget allows. When property manager Southern Management and Development decided to remodel the entire Southgate Shopping Center in Sebring, Fla., in conjunction with Publix Markets’ replacement of their existing store at the location, they looked to Advanced Roofing to get the job done.

The scope of work included re-roofing three large sections of the retail plaza and a drugstore on the property. The roofing portions totaled 79,556 square feet.

Roof System

The roof specified was a two-ply modified bitumen system from Johns Manville. In the three large sections of the plaza, the existing built-up roof was completely torn off, while the drugstore was a re-cover project, notes Andrew Vik, estimator and project manager with Advanced Roofing’s Tampa branch, which operates under branch manager Michael Landolfi.

Roofing work started in November 2016 and was completed in February 2017. After the existing roof was removed, crews installed 2-inch polyiso to the steel deck. “We mechanically fastened that with a half-inch USG SecuRock cover board through the steel deck,” notes Vik. “The two plies of modified bitumen were then torch applied, a smooth base sheet and a white granulated cap sheet.”

On the drugstore, the roof was vacuumed, and the cover board and two plies were installed over the top of the old roof system.

In addition to the roofing scope, Advanced Roofing’s HVAC division installed and removed heating and air conditioning units and replaced some obstructive ductwork. “We had our own HVAC people working with our roofing crews, so it was easy to coordinate everything,” notes Vik. “We had HVAC installations on three of the buildings, and we remounted existing units on two of the buildings. There was also a lot of demolition on the south building, as there were several derelict units that
had been sitting there for quite some time. Those had to be hoisted off there and taken out.”

A Challenging Project

In addition to the roofing scope, Advanced Roofing’s HVAC division installed and removed heating and air conditioning units and replaced some obstructive ductwork.

In addition to the roofing scope, Advanced Roofing’s HVAC division installed and removed heating and air conditioning units and replaced some obstructive ductwork.


Logistics are often a challenge with a shopping center that remains open to the public, notes Vik. “You have to load and unload multiple levels of the roof at different times,” he says. “Customer relations is also a challenge; you have to keep everyone happy and ask a lot of questions. The construction manager has to do a lot of P.R. when he’s there.”

Demolition portions of the project were done at night and application during the day, so business at the mall was never disrupted. Traffic in the parking area was also a key concern.

“Setup areas had to be barricaded and marked off while we were loading and unloading,” Vik says. “There was even a drive under bridge connecting two buildings that had to be re-roofed, so we always had to be mindful of people below.”

Parapet walls did not surround all portions of the roof, so safety precautions included a safety perimeter; employees outside the perimeter had to be harnessed and tied off to a portable fall protection anchor system by Raptor.

The project went off without a hitch, according to Vik. “The mall was 100 percent open during the entire project,” he says. “Things went very smoothly— especially for everything that was involved. One of our mottoes is, ‘The harder the job, the better.’ We like a challenge. We take on a lot of projects other companies shy away from.”

The keys to his company’s success are coordination and versatility, states Vik. “We do it all,” he says. “We didn’t have to get anybody from outside the company to work on the project. We did all the roofing, all of the HVAC, and all of the hoisting was done in-house. We’ve also got lightning protection inhouse, and we have a solar division. We have a great team. Everyone does their part to get the bids out and get the jobs done. It’s the best team I’ve ever worked with.”

Team

Roofing Contractor: Advanced Roofing Inc., Tampa, Fla.
Consultant: CBA Roof Consulting LLC, Lake Worth, Fla.
Roof System Manufacturer and Technical Support: Johns Manville, Denver

Synthetic Shake Roof Helps Hotel Fit in Mixed-Use Area of Biltmore Estate

Village Hotel, Biltmore Estate: Asheville, N.C.

The four-story, 130,000-square-foot hotel was designed to ensure it fit comfortably within the Antler Hill Village and Winery area of the Biltmore Estate.

The four-story, 130,000-square-foot hotel was designed to ensure it fit comfortably within the Antler Hill Village and Winery area of the Biltmore Estate.

Nestled on 8,000 acres of pristine land in the mountains of western North Carolina, Biltmore welcomes more than a million visitors each year. Facing increased demand for additional on-site lodging, the new Village Hotel on Biltmore Estate was commissioned.

“The task of designing the four-story, 130,000 square foot hotel to ensure it fit comfortably within the Antler Hill Village and Winery area of the estate fell to PGAV Destinations. Antler Hill Village was intended to look like a series of buildings that belonged together but maintain an individual identity through the use of different roofing materials and trim treatments,” says Emily Pelcak, director of practice and innovation for PGAV Destinations. “With the Village Hotel, we wanted to continue that story. We specified DaVinci Roofscapes synthetic shake roofing to complement the general aesthetics of the area but also to create a distinctive personality for the hotel.”

The sprawling 209-room hotel is tucked next to restaurants, shops and a winery that all have real or simulated shake roofing. Each of the structures has a natural, rustic feeling, inspired by the eclectic mix of cottages and farm homes original to the estate that opened in 1895 belonging to George Vanderbilt.

“The look of the DaVinci shake roofing is convincing as a shake shingle, which is a traditional building material in western North Carolina,” says Pelcak. “Their ability to create unique blends so the hotel could have subtle color shifts across the building roof was a key reason the DaVinci shake roofing was specified.”

To ensure a distinctive look to the roof, Pelcak and her team worked with DaVinci to gain samples of multiple color blends of Bellaforté Shake tiles. The final decision was to create and install three unique color blends with the predominant colors including a range of Tahoe colors (Light, Medium Light, Medium and Dark), plus Dark Chesapeake.

“The color selection was an arduous process since we wanted a subtle variation across the roof to blend with the adjacent existing structures and complement the main exterior facade treatment,” says Pelcak. “We’re proud of this project and pleased that The Biltmore Company is happy with the look and performance of the DaVinci product. Based on their feedback, we may specify these tiles again on future projects throughout the estate.”

The sprawling 209-room hotel is in a complex with restaurants, shops and a winery. Each of the structures has a natural, rustic feeling, complemented by a real or synthetic shake roof.

The sprawling 209-room hotel is in a complex with restaurants, shops and a winery. Each of the structures has a natural, rustic feeling, complemented by a real or synthetic shake roof.

Roof Report

With the design work complete, the installation task for the massive roof system fell to Benton Roofing. From start to finish, the project took nine months to complete, with 45 days dedicated to installation of the synthetic Bellaforté Shake roof.

“The multiple roof lines on the project give the hotel an appealing look,” says Caleb Benton, president and owner of Benton Roofing. “The project went smoothly and the roofing material was easy to install.”

“These roofing tiles are the perfect fit for this hotel since they’re impact- and fire-resistant, plus they’re basically maintenance-free. This was our first time installing DaVinci products and we were impressed.”

Although the Asheville area is not known for large amounts of snowfalls, the hotel designers took extra caution to specify snow guards be installed on the roof in key public areas. Manufactured by Rocky Mountain Snow Guards, the snow guards on the Village Hotel help prevent any collected snow from sliding off the roof in large pieces onto walkways.

Now open for more than a year, the Village Hotel provides easy access for visitors to the estate’s gardens, 10 shops, 15 dining venues, winery, equestrian center and outdoor activities. The main feature of the estate, Biltmore House, has 250 rooms with tours available daily.

Photos: The Biltmore Company

Project Profiles: Retail

Sierra Nevada Brewery, Mills River, N.C.

About 58,000 pounds of copper were installed on the brewery.

About 58,000 pounds of copper were installed on the brewery.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: The Century Slate Roofing Co., Durham, N.C.
Architect: Matthew Galloway of Russell Gallaway Associates Inc., Chico, Calif.

ROOF MATERIALS

Approximately 423 squares of 1/2-inch-thick, 18-inch-tall by random width Unfading Green Slates were installed by hand on the project. This was close to 750,000 pounds of slate, or 375 tons.

About 3,000 feet of custom copper gutters and downspouts, conductor heads and 100 squares of painted standing-seam panels were fabricated, and pre-built copper clad dormers and decorative copper cornices were installed.

The project also included 35 squares of copper standing-seam roofing, 25 squares of soldered copper flat-seam roofing and 115 squares of copper wall cladding. About 58,000 pounds of copper were installed on the brewery.

Everything on the building is oversized and that meant everything had to be built to support the heavy structural loads and live loads from wind and mountain snow. The large roof faces called for 10-inch custom copper gutters. When you have gutters that large in the mountains of North Carolina you have to consider the extraordinary weight of the annual snow.

In addition to snow guards being installed on the slate roof, custom 1/4-inch-thick copper gutter brackets fastened the gutter to the fascia. It is typical on steel-framed construction, particularly on this scale, that the framing is out of square and there is widely varying fascia and rake dimensions.

Approximately 423 squares of 1/2-inch-thick, 18-inch-tall by random width Unfading Green Slates were installed by hand on the project.

Approximately 423 squares of 1/2-inch-thick, 18-inch-tall by random width Unfading Green Slates were installed by hand on the project.

However, these items should not appear out of square or have varying dimensions. Great care had to be taken to measure and custom bend onsite all the detail flashings so everything appeared perfect. This took many skilled craftsmen, a great deal of time and the absolute drive to provide the highest quality work.

Slate Manufacturer: Evergreen Slate Co. Inc.
Copper Fabricator: K&M Sheet Metal LLC
Supplier of Underlayment, Copper Sheets and Coil, Insulation and Nailbase Sheathing: ABC Supply Co. Inc.

ROOF REPORT

The new-construction project began in November 2013 and was completed in September 2015.
The team completed the slate installation so well that The Century Slate Co. was awarded the 2015 Excellence in Craftsmanship Award by Evergreen Slate for the project.

PHOTOS: The Century Slate Roofing Co.

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Project Profiles: Retail/Mixed-use

Outlet Collection at Niagara Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada

Team

DEVELOPER: Ivanhoé Cambridge, Montreal

The largest open-air outlet mall in Canada features approximately 23,000 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane walkway canopies.

The largest open-air outlet mall in Canada features approximately 23,000 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane walkway canopies. PHOTO: Birdair

Roof Materials

The largest open-air outlet mall in Canada features approximately 23,000 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane walkway canopies. The membrane canopies exhibit a flying-mast cone design that provides relief from the elements and creates a signature look for the shopping center.

PTFE, or polytetrafluoroethylene, is a Teflon-coated woven fiberglass membrane that is durable and weather-resistant. PTFE fiberglass membranes can be installed in climates ranging from the frigid arctic to the scorching desert heat with a project life in some cases exceeding 30 years.

PTFE fiberglass coating is chemically inert, and the low-surface free energy of the material results in an electrical-grade fabric membrane that is readily rinsed by rain-water. It is also immune to UV radiation. This combination makes PTFE-coated fabric membrane ideal for projects requiring weather endurance and fire resistance.

PTFE fiberglass is ENERGY STAR- and Cool Roof Rating Council-certified. During scientific tests of its solar properties, it was discovered that PTFE fiberglass membranes reflect as much as 73 percent of the sun’s energy while holding just 7 percent on its exterior surface. Certain grades of PTFE fiberglass can absorb 14 percent of the sun’s energy while allowing 13 percent of natural daylight and 7 percent of reradiated energy (solar heat) to transmit through.

PTFE FIBERGLASS MEMBRANE DESIGNER, FABRICATOR, INSTALLER: Birdair

Roof Report

Located beside the Queen Elizabeth II Highway, less than 20 kilometers from the U.S. border, the 520,000-square-foot shopping center features 102 retailers, including Canada’s first Pandora outlet, White House Black Market outlet and Bass Pro Shops Outpost. Other sought-after brands at the center include a Kate Spade Outlet, NIKE Factory Store, Calvin Klein Outlet and Michael Kors Outlet.

The Niagara Outlet Collection was developed to attract shoppers and visitors who might have otherwise crossed the U.S. border to shop in the Fashion Outlets of Niagara Falls, the Walden Galleria or the Boulevard Mall. David Baffa, Ivanhoé Cambridge senior vice president of retail development, said the developer wants the new outlet collection to be part of the Niagara experience.

Outlet Collection at Niagara is committed to corporate responsibility and environmental sustainability and has a number of design features throughout the property to raise awareness of its green initiatives. Its canopies make the open-air concept possible, reducing energy consumption because the common areas do not need to be heated or cooled. Some of the public buildings, like guest services and the eatery, have been designed so that they can be opened to the outdoors in favorable weather, thus saving energy and connecting people to the outdoors.

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Corrugated Metal Applied in Unusual Ways Brings a 1918 Building into the 21st Century, and a TPO Roof Protects Its Icon Status

Dorchester is Boston’s largest neighborhood and one of its most diverse. In July 2013, the Four Corners commuter rail station opened in the Mount Bowdoin section of the neighborhood, setting in motion plans to bring more transit-oriented buildings to Dorchester. Among the first projects to meet this goal is the AB&W Building, a mixed-use facility located about one block from the Four Corners station.

Originally built in 1918 as a car dealership that sold Model T’s, the AB&W Building has become a neighborhood icon.

Originally built in 1918 as a car dealership that sold Model T’s, the AB&W Building has become a neighborhood icon.

Originally built in 1918 as a car dealership that sold Model T’s, the building has become a neighborhood icon. Therefore, even though the goal was to create an active center that connected tenants and others with the new commuter station, Project Architect P. Nicholas Elton, AIA, a partner in Elton + Hampton Architects, Roxbury, Mass., still desired to connect the new development to its surroundings as much as possible. “The intention was to create a development that was a little denser than the rest of the neighborhood but still respected and tried to be a little like the neighborhood,” he says.

To achieve this, the decision was made to maintain the front façade of the original building and integrate it with all new construction. Elton used specific building materials to pay homage to the surrounding area. For example, a yellowish brick on the front of the new second and third stories of the AB&W Building mimics the brick used on the 1930s-era building across the street. The addition of fiber-cement and corrugated-metal siding breaks up the enlarged AB&W Building’s scale so it better fits in its location.

Elton, who is a fan of corrugated metal, decided also to have some fun with the material, flexing it in unusual ways for overhangs above windows and doors. “When you start using materials that you are using on the walls on the roof, then you get to play a little game,” he says. “The material will come down a wall and wrap into the roof; there are a lot of materials you can’t do that with but you can when you use corrugated.”

It took a team of three metal fabricators from Lancaster Enterprises Inc., a family roofing business in Dedham, Mass., to carefully curve and flex the corrugated metal to meet Elton’s specifications. Meanwhile eight to 10 of the metal fabricators’ colleagues were installing a watertight TPO membrane on the AB&W Building’s six newly constructed roofs.

The 32,096-square-foot AB&W Building features 24 affordable-housing units, primarily rentals with a few coop ownership opportunities, and 3,300 square feet of ground-floor retail space.

The 32,096-square-foot AB&W Building features 24 affordable-housing units, primarily rentals with a few coop ownership opportunities, and 3,300 square feet of ground-floor retail space.

OLD BECOMES NEW

Elton + Hampton Architects concentrates its work on what the firm’s partners—Elton and Bruce M. Hampton, AIA—refer to as socially relevant projects. The firm almost exclusively works with non-profit organizations on affordable housing and housing for special populations, as well as community-resource buildings.

The 32,096-square-foot AB&W Building features 24 affordable-housing units, primarily rentals with a few coop ownership opportunities, and 3,300 square feet of ground-floor retail space. One retail space is an art gallery and there currently are conversations to merge the other two retail locations for a restaurant specializing in Caribbean cuisine.

PHOTOS: Grieg Cranna

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Projects: Retail

KOOPMAN LUMBER & HARDWARE, SHARON, MASS.

The FM-Approved AceClamp ML was used to install a 200-kW solar-power system on the facility.

The FM-Approved AceClamp ML was used to install a 200-kW solar-power system on the facility.

TEAM

Solar Installer: Cotuit Solar, Cotuit, Mass.
Roof-clamp Manufacturer: AceClamp/PMC

ROOF MATERIALS

The AceClamp ML is a standing-seam metal roofclamp system that can accommodate almost any application or roof seam. Its two-piece design allows installation at any point on the seam with a tight vibration-tested grip. All mounting holes are top-loaded, providing easy, quick access for the contractor, completing installation in less than half the time of conventional side-mounting systems. The AceClamp ML also does not penetrate or scratch the roof’s surface, preserving manufacturers’ warranties.

The AceClamp ML also does not penetrate or scratch the roof’s surface, preserving manufacturers’ warranties.

The AceClamp ML also does not penetrate or scratch the roof’s surface, preserving manufacturers’ warranties.

ROOF REPORT

Koopman Lumber & Hardware, a Massachusetts retailer of lumber, hardware and other building materials and equipment, recently opened its newest location in Sharon. It offers equipment rental, tools, paint and decorating, a kitchen design center, building materials and more.

PHOTOS: AceClamp/PMC

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