Standing Up to Mother Nature

When this home’s failing roof had to be replaced, it was restored with a composite shake product from DaVinci Roofscapes. Photo: Ron Berg Studio

Decisions. Decisions. When Sheri Stamper recently purchased a home in the Village of Loch Lloyd in Missouri, she faced numerous remodeling decisions — including the search for a new roof. The one she “inherited” on her home was made of concrete foam to replicate slate or concrete tiles, but the surface was cracking and the roof was leaking.

Fortunately for Stamper the decision on a replacement roof was an easy one. She went with a composite roofing product she knew and trusted: DaVinci Roofscapes.

“I installed this company’s composite roofing tiles on a previous home,” says Stamper. “I did research prior to selecting both roofs. The DaVinci product wins out for quality, performance and style.”

For her new home, Stamper was pleased to learn that the company now offers the Black Oak color in its Nature Crafted Collection. “I like this new color offering,” says Stamper. “It has a natural look along with good texture and dimension.

“My goal was not to install a wood shake look, but rather a natural look with colors from nature. The darker tone of the Black Oak roofing appears natural, with not such a harsh appearance.”

Out With the Old

The 1995 modern/contemporary style home Stamper purchased was in distinct need of a new roof, placing it high on her list of remodeling projects. “The roof was only about seven years old, but it was a poor-quality roof,” says Stamper. “Storms had damaged it and replacing it became a top priority for me.”

To help get the new composite roof she wanted, Stamper turned to M&M Roofing out of Olathe, Kansas. “This is the second DaVinci composite roof we’ve installed for Sheri over the years,” says Craig Meyer, operations manager with M&M Roofing. “She was very correct in her assessment of the existing roof … it was in bad shape and needed replacement.”

Photo: Ron Berg Studio

According to Meyer, the Village of Loch Lloyd wants homeowners to invest in higher-performance roofing materials. If residents need a new roof, M&M Roofing’s goal is to be there to offer assistance. “We help homeowners make the connection between the investment in a composite roof and years of peace-of-mind,” Meyer says. “A roof like this may initially be more expensive than other options, but then again, there are many benefits. This composite roof resists flame spread, impact, insects and algae growth. There is the potential for yearly discounts on homeowners insurance. Easy-care roofing that requires no yearly maintenance fees is a bonus. These benefits really add up for homeowners.”

When the M&M Roofing team arrived onsite, the job of removing the existing roofing material couldn’t have been easier. “That old roof literally peeled right off,” says Meyer. “There were no nails holding it in place. It came off piece by piece, using only our hands. This may explain why some of the pieces were coming off in high wind storms.”

The ability of the roof to stand up to extreme weather is essential. “Here in the Missouri/Kansas area, our roofs have to hold up to hail, wind and snowstorms,” Meyer notes. “The only products that we’ve seen truly stand up to those conditions are impact-resistant, top-quality composite roofing.”

Proving his point, Meyer relates that his company receives calls regularly from customers praising the composite roofing they’ve had previously installed by the M&M Roofing team.

“They tell us how a hailstorm destroyed roofs in their neighborhood — except for theirs,” he says. “That’s when we really feel good about making the recommendation of an impact-resistant DaVinci roof.”

Tackling the Job

After removing the old roof on the Stamper home, the M&M Roofing team got to work on installing the new composite shake roof. First came a radiant barrier roof decking, then drip edge was installed. An ice and water shield product was added next, followed by metal in the valleys.

“This home has tons of valleys so we added the ice and water shield for extra protection,” says Meyer. “It takes more time, but it’s essential for the design of this home to help protect it from our weather conditions.”

Finally, the DaVinci Single-Width Shake tiles were installed. Arriving in pre-mixed bundles saved the installation crew time on the jobsite.

Photo: Ron Berg Studio

“Any roofing project has its challenges,” says Meyer. “For this home it was keeping our crew tied off at all times. The home goes up four stories in the back and we wanted everyone to be as safe as possible while keeping the courses straight during installation. For us, our longstanding, top-quality crews and loyal customer base are the backbone of our business. That’s why we make every effort to treat each project individually with special attention to safety.”

Introduced to the marketplace in early 2018, the Nature Crafted Collection includes realistic, nature-inspired colors including Aged Cedar, Mossy Cedar and Black Oak. “This is one of the few products on the market that looks like natural wood, but without weight or performance issues,” says Stamper. “The impact resistance, fire rating and low maintenance aspects were all features that helped me once again decide to invest in a DaVinci roof.”

With the job now complete, Meyer agrees with the homeowner. “It’s great when we can work with a repeat customer like Sheri who was so impressed with her first composite roof that she wants another one for a new home,” says Meyer. “We were really pleased that she was excited about the new Black Oak color for the composite shake shingles. The house looks spectacular with those tiles and you can easily see that they give the home a clean, natural appearance on the exterior that will last for decades to come.”

Copper Accents Complement Synthetic Shake Roof System

This home in Northfield, Illinois, features custom copper dormers, four copper gable vents and four small flat standing seam copper roofs that tie into the synthetic shake roof system. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

What makes a re-roofing project truly stand out? According to Chad Janisch, owner and President of Shake Guys, it’s the ability to aesthetically and functionally blend copper accents with synthetic shake to create a one-of-a-kind roof. The home they re-roofed last year in Northfield, Illinois, perfectly illustrates his point.

“The Mayberry home project had numerous custom copper dormers that had to be tied in with the DaVinci Roofscapes system,” says Janisch. “Most re-roof projects in this market that have this much custom copper work choose to reuse the existing copper metals. However, for this project the owners approved the use of new copper.

“We created eight custom copper roof dormers, four copper gable vents and four smaller flat standing seam copper roofs. The various roof dormers and sharp angles of the roof all added to the value of capturing the beautiful details of the Bellaforté Shake roofing system.”

Prior to hiring Shake Guys, homeowner Trent Mayberry knew his real cedar shake roof was in poor condition. Hail, wind damage and severe weather had taken its toll on the roof. When he inspected the roof, Chris Paulus, a field representative for Shake Guys, found that the cedar shakes were in the beginning stages of cupping and curling. Even worse, numerous cedar shakes were starting to fail and slide off the roof. Due to the amount of damage and overall poor condition of the roof, it was determined that a replacement roof was needed.

The various roof dormers and sharp angles of the roof accent the detials of the Bellaforté Shake roofing system by DaVinci Roofscapes. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

“Shake Guys helped me from the initial roof assessment to coordinating all aspects of the estimates,” says Mayberry. “They worked with the insurance company to get a replacement roof approved, provided references so I could see their other projects, then did a professional installation job and great follow-up. This was a responsive, knowledgeable and caring team that I would highly recommend. Overall they provided great ‘end-to-end’ service.”

Enhanced Curb Appeal

Pleased with his selection of a roofing team for his home, Mayberry next had to make a decision on a roofing material. He wanted an alternative cedar shake that enhanced the curb appeal of his home. At the same time his top desire was to find a roofing product that would not deteriorate over time and put him in a similar situation for replacement.

“We’ve installed DaVinci synthetic shake roofs for the past three years,” says Janisch. “During that time, we’ve seen a very sharp increase and demand for alternative shake roofs and have installed more than 70 DaVinci roofing systems. Real cedar shake shingles just can’t hold up long-term against our Chicago-area weather conditions.”

Janisch points to some key benefits for homeowners. “The synthetic shake tiles are Class A fire and Class 4 impact rated, they withstand high winds and severe weather, plus they resist insects, algae and decay,” he notes. “With the Lifetime Limited Warranty on the DaVinci product and low maintenance appeal, you can’t beat the return on investment.”

Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

Shake Guys, whose primary focus is to replace real cedar roofs with an alternative composite roofing system, worked with Mayberry to select the Tahoe color for the Bellaforté Shake shingles. The new color and refreshed roof has added substantially to the curb appeal of the home.

“This roofing project took about 10 days to complete due to the custom copper work, but it was well worth it,” says Janisch. “The house looks stunning. I believe this will serve as a showpiece house to other residents in the area who are considering a new roof.”

“The investment that the Mayberry family made in this new synthetic shake roof gives them instant added curb appeal and value for their home,” he concludes. “Over time, this low-maintenance roof will also save them money and headaches. They’ll no longer have to invest in preserving real cedar tiles and maintaining them.”

A Roof Coating Is the Right Answer for Florida Condo Complex

Photos: KARNAK Corporation

Educated customers make the best decisions.

That philosophy is shared by Frank Scelzi of Munyan Restoration Waterproofing and Painting Service of Tampa Bay Inc. The company was founded in 1951 as a painting and waterproofing company, and over the years it has evolved into a general contractor that handles restoration of the entire building envelope, including the roof.

Munyan Restoration often educates its customers through seminars, which sometimes have the added benefit of bringing in new business. According to Scelzi, that was how he got involved in the Sage Condo project in St. Petersburg, Florida. “We have a marketing department, and we do what’s called ‘lunch and learns,’” he says. “Our engineer also has several continuing education classes approved for facility managers and building owners who want to keep up to date on certain things. We have these several times throughout the year, and one of the property managers said he needed a roofing inspection.”

The property manager was worried that his roof needed to be replaced, and he asked Scelzi to take a look. Scelzi found the existing TPO roof was nearing the end of its service life, and it had some minor tears and punctures, but he believed the roof would be a good candidate for a restoration coating. He contacted Joe Prussel, Southeast U.S. Regional Manager for KARNAK Corp., to confirm his conclusion and determine which product would be the best fit.

“After the initial evaluation, Frank brought me back to walk the roof and look at the condition of it,” Prussel says. “Frank wanted to give them an option of coating in lieu of tearing everything off and transporting all of the trash to the dump — avoiding not only the cost but the environmental impact that would have, as well as the disruption to the residents that live there because the building has a multi-level roof.”

After adhesion tests proved a high-solids silicone coating would be an excellent fit, Scelzi submitted a written proposal and he and Prussel put on a presentation for the board and the property manager. “We told the board that we’ve been on the roof and had seen the damage that is up there, and we feel that it is a good candidate for a coating application,” Scelzi recalls. “We went through the procedure with them. We told them how we clean the roof, how we do our repairs, apply our primer, do our tie-in work, and ultimately apply the coating.”

After he detailed the safety plan and documented the experience and training of his crews, Scelzi told the residents what to expect during the coating application, stating, “There’s really going to be no disruption of your lifestyle while the coating system is going on.”

The board had been budgeting for a roof replacement, and the coating application was substantially less expensive. It would also be approved for the 20-year warranty the board sought. “They decided to go forward with it,” Scelzi says. “This was a real quick turnaround, which is unusual in the condo market. We were at a board meeting on a Thursday night and had a signed contract Friday morning.”

Following the Plan

A couple of weeks later, the Munyan Restoration crew was executing the plan laid out at the board meeting.

The building had a main roof on the 12th floor and two other roof sections on the fifth floor, totaling approximately 30,000 square feet. The main roof was sloped toward the interior, and its outer edges were approximately 6 feet above the center. “Everything slopes into the roof’s interior to make it more architecturally pleasing,” Scelzi notes. “It gave you a real weird feeling when you stepped out on that roof, but as far as setting up a safety perimeter, it made things fairly easy. The roof also had built-in tie-off points, so our guys could be harnessed, and that made the safety aspect very easy for the guys up there.”

The roof on the Sage Condo complex was restored using a high-solids silicone coating system manufactured by KARNAK. Photos: KARNAK Corporation

The first step was washing the roof with 799 Wash-N-Prep, an environmentally safe cleaner that can go right into the roof drains and the water system. “The entire roof was cleaned,” notes Scelzi. “We used a power washer and a round scrubber head that really raises the dirt from the roof. The roof was pretty dirty, but it really came out very, very clean and it was a real good surface for us to do our repairs and start doing our tie-in work.”

Repairs were made to seams and penetrations using Karna-Flex 505 WB repair mastic with fibers, using a brush application. The next steps included applying the primer and the coating.

The 180 Karna-Sil Epoxy Primer is a two-part epoxy that can be applied with spray equipment or a roller. A roller was used on this project, and it was applied at a rate of 3/4 of a gallon per square. “It really enhances the adhesion of the coating to the roofing membrane,” notes Prussel. “This is one of the products we did an adhesion test with and got very good results. It dries fairly quickly — in three to four hours — which makes it very user friendly.”

After the primer was dry, the Karna-Sil 670 high-solids silicone coating was applied. The product was chosen for several reasons, including its excellent performance in the adhesion test and the fact that the owner wanted a white coating. The product also allowed the contractor to meet the 20-year warranty with only one coat, minimizing labor costs.

The slope of the roof was another key consideration, as crews wanted to make sure the product didn’t run or migrate when they put it on. “What was really nice about this system from KARNAK was the high-solids silicone, even with the angle of the roof, the coating just stayed there, so we could really get our millage,” notes Scelzi. “On this job, we even exceeded it in some areas, which was good.”

For the 20-year specification, the coating was applied at a rate of 3 gallons per square, or 46 dry mils. As they put the coating down with rollers, crew members constantly checked the thickness with a mil gauge. After the project was completed, destructive testing confirmed the proper mil thickness was achieved, and then the test areas were repaired.

Smooth Operation

Weather was a concern, as rain, dew and fog are common in the area. “We had a couple of days we had to stand down due to the weather, but other than that, the project went very smoothly,” Scelzi says. “It really shows you what coatings are supposed to do — make it more friendly for the building owners and for the applicators who put it down.”

It also minimizes disruption for the residents. “We had some material we had to stack in certain areas, but the residents never even knew we were there unless they saw that material,” Scelzi says.

Prussel points out that coating applications also pose less liability for owners, as the roof area is never exposed to the weather, as it would be during a tear-off. “With a coating, there is never a liability of an open roof, and especially in Florida in summertime, you never know when you’re going to get some rain.”

Feedback on the job has been positive, notes Scelzi. “The owners, property manager and board members are very happy,” he says. “It’s a nice, clean-looking product and there are no seams. It’s a monolithic system. They are very pleased with the result, and it cost a lot less than a roof replacement.”

The project included a contract for an annual maintenance program. According to Prussel, proper maintenance not only safeguards the warranty, it can save owners money in the long run by ensuring the likelihood that the roof will be a good candidate for another coating application when the warranty period nears its expiration.

“Whenever we do a presentation for a building owner, a board, or a property manager, we always stress the importance of maintenance,” Prussel says. “It’s extremely vital to any roofing project, be it a coating or a new membrane, that a certified applicator of that manufacturer observe the roof a minimum of once a year, maintain it, make any repairs, and make a report for the owner.”

Scelzi and Prussel believe that teamwork between the manufacturer and the contractor is essential at every phase of the job. “As the manufacturer working with the applicator, we have a technical support team that can advise the applicator which product would be the best fit for that substrate,” says Prussel. “We are there to specifically design a system that is the best fit for the owner of that building, and we can advise the contractor on the application, and they can lay out the best option for that customer. We want to make sure our product will work, our product will last, and everybody will be happy.”

Scelzi agrees. “It gives the customer a good feeling to know they have a quality contractor and a quality manufacturer standing behind them,” he says.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Munyan Restoration Waterproofing and Painting Service of Tampa Bay Inc., Clearwater, Florida, www.munyanpainting.com

MATERIALS

Roof Coating: Karna-Sil 670 high-solids silicone, KARNAK, www.karnakcorp.com

Primer: 180 Karna-Sil Epoxy Primer, KARNAK

Repair Mastic: Karna-Flex 505 WB, KARNAK

Cleaning Agent: 799 Wash-N-Prep, KARNAK

Michigan Homeowners Embrace Composite Shake Roofing

The cedar shake roof on this Michigan home was replaced with composite shake by Butcher and Butcher Construction Co. Photos: Butcher and Butcher Construction Co. Inc.

Homeowners can be faced with difficult decisions when it’s time to replace their roof. That’s when knowledgeable, dedicated contractors can provide crucial assistance by explaining the best options for their particular circumstances. Mark Dalrymple, president of steep roofing operations for Butcher and Butcher Construction Co. Inc., headquartered in Rochester Hills,Michigan, points to one homeowner’s decision to replace their cedar shake roof as an example.

“Ten years ago, our company maintained and restored the original cedar roof on this house because the homeowners loved their real cedar shake so much,” says Dalrymple. “The goal was to get it to last another decade, which was achieved. However, now it’s 10 years later. The homeowners came back to us because they knew their old cedar shake roof had reached the end of its lifespan.”

At the client’s request, Dalrymple explained other roofing system options. “They wanted a recommendation for a roof alternative that would outperform real cedar, but still give the authentic appearance of cedar shakes,” he recalls. “We recommended composite shake roofing from DaVinci Roofscapes.”

The contractor installed Multi-Width Shakefrom DaVinci Roofscapes on the roof and turret. Photos: Butcher and Butcher Construction Co. Inc.

According to Dalrymple, the homeowners immediately approved of the DaVinci Multi-Width Shake product suggested by Butcher and Butcher.“They were impressed with the authentic look of the composite shake tiles,” he says. “The Autumn color was a great match for the weathering effect they were seeking. These homeowners were also extremely pleased with the features of the DaVinci tiles and liked the idea that long-term roof maintenance will be much easier than with real cedar shakes.”

Roofers That Care

Butcher and Butcher completed the massive re-roofing project in July of 2018. The project included installation of 85 squares of roofing material with special applications around a turret and multiple chimneys.

The roof on this Michigan home was replaced with composite shake manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes. Photos: Butcher and Butcher Construction Co. Inc.

“We’ve been installing DaVinci composite roofs for 18 years so we’re very familiar with the product,” says Dalrymple, whose company has locations in both Michigan and Florida. “For this project, we used extra caution to protect the home’s meticulously manicured landscaping, courtyard and pool area. We were careful in both removal of the old roof and installation of the new roof. Everything from flowering shrubs around the house to flowers in window boxes had to be protected.”

Located in the prestigious area near Cranbrook Schools, a National Historic Landmark site, the newly re-roofed home sits in the Bloomfield Hills community of Michigan. Butcher and Butcher has worked in this area since the company started in 1972.

“This is a neighborhood of quiet, rural residential properties,” Dalrymple notes. “For us it’s an honor to help these homeowners have composite roofing installed on their homes. We know that this roofing material will help both protect the home from severe weather and add distinct curb appeal value to a property.”

According to Dalrymple, the homeowners were very pleased with the end result. “For this project, the homeowners truly love the fact that the composite shake looks so much like natural cedar roofing,” he says. “They’re excited with the roof’s performance so far and the idea that this DaVinci roof will far outlast their old natural cedar roof.”

Metal Panels Highlight Rooftop Area of Washington Apartment Building

Reed Row apartments in Washington features a rooftop common area that provides residents with social space and great views of the city. Photos: Rheinzink

The brand-new Reed Row apartments in the Adams Morgan neighborhood of Washington, D.C., offers an eclectic, urban sophistication that is reflective of the area. Adams Morgan is well known for its broad mix of cultures and activities. The five-story apartment community includes 132 residential units in 100,000 square feet of space.

The site, located about 1.5 miles from the White House, was previously a parking garage. The developer demolished everything above grade but was able to retain portions of the below-grade structure.

The exterior expression of the architectural design, created by R2L:Architects, Washington, D.C., is influenced by the materials and scale of the traditional masonry buildings found in nearby districts. “We wanted to pay homage to the historic neighborhood with a material palette that offered the proper aesthetic fit,” says Donrico Washington, R2L project designer/manager.

Approximately 3,000 square feet of Rheinzink Flat Lock Tilesand 1,000 square feet of Rheinzink Standing Seam Panelswere used to highlight the rooftop amenity. Photos: Rheinzink

Two different Rheinzink profiles were specified for application in an “intimate, exterior amenity space,” Washington notes. The area is an inviting rooftop common area that provides residents with social space and a great view of the city. Approximately 3,000 square feet of Rheinzink prePATINA graphite-greyFlat Lock Tiles and 1,000 square feet of Rheinzink Standing Seam Panels highlight the rooftop amenity. “In the early stages of our design process, we noticed that numerous nearby buildings had mansard roofs with diamond-shaped tiles and shingles. That’s what led to our selection of the Rheinzink Flat Lock Tiles,” Washington says. 

The Rheinzink Standing Seam Panels were used to clad sloped roofs over stairways in the units below the roof deck leading up to outdoor terraces. “The reaction to the Rheinzink from the residents has been outstanding,” says Washington. “Everyone loves it because it’s a material that’s not typically seen.”

Installation of the panels was done by MSM Roofing, Hampstead, Maryland. David Peterson, owner of MSM, described the installation as “a piece of cake.”

Composite Shake Is the Answer for Home in British Columbia

The Siebert residence was originally built in 1991. Its original cedar shake roof was replaced with a new roof system featuring composite shakes. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Myrtle Siebert grew up in the logging industry as the granddaughter of a hand logger in British Columbia, Canada. She married a man who dreamt of having his own logging company and saw that dream come true. But when it came time to replace the cedar shake roof on her own home near Victoria, she decided to go with composite shake shingles because of their durability, fire resistance, and ease of maintenance.

Siebert and her son did their homework. They visited local builder supply businesses and then struck gold when they hiredVictoria-based Custom Roofing Inc.to do the job. Siebert worked closely with Caleb Friesen, owner of Custom Roofing, to make sure she got the roof system she wanted.

“Caleb and his team confirmed what we already knew … that composite shake from DaVinci was the product for my home,” says Siebert. “I chose the style and color of the composite shakes carefully so that the new fake cedar shakes would look like the real cedar roof we had previously. Mission accomplished.”

“She definitely wanted to maintain the look and feel of the thick wood shakes that the house had on it previously,” Friesen notes. “The idea of longevity and consistent appearance truly appealed to this homeowner. The selection of Bellaforté Shake in the Tahoe color blend really complements the design of this house.”

Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Made of pure virgin resin, UV and thermal stabilizers plus a highly-specialized fire retardant, Bellaforté products are created to resemble natural slate and shake products. The composite roofs are designed to resist fading, rotting, cracking and pests, plus high winds, hail and fire. The realistic-looking roofing tiles stand up to weather challenges while requiring no maintenance.

Siebert was intimately involved in the re-roofing process. “I had been directly involved in building this home back in 1991, plus several others over the years,” she says. “I love doing the planning and design work. Caleb was delightfully communicative and his team of workers was fabulous.”

Despite interruptions of pelting rain, snow obliterating the drawn lines and slippery conditions causing work stoppages, the team from Custom Roofing was careful and dedicated to the re-roofing process. “This roof gives me confidence,” Siebert says. “As much as I love wood, I no longer have to worry about maintaining a real cedar shake roof. The DaVinci composite shake is the best possible option I could find for staying as close to real wood on our roof.”

Working With Homeowners Associations Means Taking on Big Challenges

Glenwood Townhomes in San Dimas, California, includes 185 residential units, a clubhouse, standalone garage and park restroom building. The re-roofing project encompassed 250,000 square feet of shingles. Photos: La Rocque Better Roofs

A quick glance at the numbers reveals that Glenwood Townhomes in San Dimas, California, is not your everyday residential re-roofing project. Featuring 185 units plus a clubhouse, standalone garage and park restroom building, and requiring the installation of 250,000 square feet of shingles, the project is expansive in scope, to say the least. But for nearly 40 years, La Rocque Better Roofs has enjoyed taking on challenging roofing projects, and the team put a plan in place to take on a very ambitious and complex assignment.

With literally hundreds of homeowners impacted by the re-roofing project, the Glenwood Townhomes Home Owner Association (HOA) board of directors through its property management company, Personal Touch Property Management Company, actively sought a roofing company that had been in business for 20-plus years and, most importantly, was experienced in working with HOAs. Doug McCaulley, owner of Personal Touch Property Management Company, has managed Glenwood HOA for several years and knew he needed a company that was large enough and had the proper labor force to handle the size of the project — and would also be around to honor its warranty.

La Rocque Better Roofs has served customers throughout Southern California since 1981, and approximately 80 percent its business is focused on HOAs. The company has developed a process for effectively managing the multiple parties and considerations involved in HOA remodeling projects. Beyond the HOA board, other parties commonly involved in re-roofing projects include property management companies, roofing consultants, and maintenance and service organizations. From a project management perspective, challenges involved in HOA remodeling projects include dealing with any structural or code-related discoveries that arise once the project begins and minimizing inconvenience to residents.

The HOA board selected the Owens Corning TruDefinition Duration shingle in Desert Tan. Members desired both the aesthetics and the benefits of solar reflectivity. Photos: La Rocque Better Roofs

Labor availability is a key consideration for HOA projects, as such projects require a sizeable labor pool to be available for an extended period. Rory Davis, vice president of HOA Sales at La Rocque Better Roofs, says a readily available roofing team was a key factor in the selection of La Rocque Better Roofs for the project. “We do not subcontract our workers and work with a team of 75-110 people, depending upon the time of year, so that the project stays on schedule,” says Davis.

While project management skills, logistical know-how and labor are all required for HOA projects, the most important element in a re-roofing project is satisfying the homeowners living in the community. All these considerations went into La Rocque Better Roofs’ approach to the re-roofing of Glenwood Townhomes.

A Customized Approach to Roof Removal

The design of the Glenwood Townhomes community presented some structural challenges. Detached garages adjacent to each building blocked access for workers during the removal process. La Rocque Better Roofs found a way to resolve this challenge, investing in customized, extra-wide, sturdy walk boards to bridge the distance between the homes and garages. The walk boards allowed roofers to remove roofing from the home and then walk the removed materials directly into the truck. “Walking the debris right to the truck was a big plus, because materials didn’t touch the ground and didn’t come into contact with mature shrubs and landscaping,” says Guy La Rocque, president and CEO. “It was reassuring to homeowners to know that nails and debris wouldn’t be dropped in their yards and exterior living areas.” The system also supported efficiency. La Rocque estimates the walk boards reduced tear-off time by four to five hours per building.

“Safety and efficiency on all of worksites are key factors in being a successful and sought-after company,” La Rocque states. “The rules and requirements are constantly changing with OSHA, and it’s our responsibility as the management team at La Rocque Better Roofs to make sure all our employees are always up to date with the latest information. Our weekly Tailgate Safety Meetings as well as our monthly safety and education meetings help us maintain a level of awareness. It’s one thing to be educated in OSHA’s safety requirements; it’s another thing to implement and monitor these safety procedures on our jobsites.”

Surprises are not uncommon when remodeling mature properties. During the re-roofing project, some fireplaces in the community were found to be unstable. La Rocque Better Roofs worked with city permitting officials and engineers to retrofit the fireplaces so that they remained safe and functional without requiring a complete tear-down and rebuilding of the fireplaces.

Communication and the “Contractor Bubble”

Among the many steps La Rocque Better Roofs employed to simplify the process, Guy La Rocque says communication with residents was especially valuable. “We scheduled after-hours meetings with the residents to keep them informed about the project, answer their questions and let them know what to expect,” he says. “Over the years, we’ve found the best thing you can do is get homeowners involved. You can never communicate enough, so we let residents know what time our crews would be on site, where the crews would be working and what we expected to accomplish. “

Crews from La Rocque Better Roofs made sure to protect the landscaping as the project progressed. The company has made working for HOAs its primary focus. Photos: La Rocque Better Roofs

From La Rocque’s perspective, too many contractors operate in a “contractor bubble,” losing sight of other opportunities to add value to both homeowners and the contractor’s business. Listening to homeowners helps open up opportunities that may exist for additional work. “When you get homeowners involved, you get a different perception of what needs to happen,” La Rocque says. “The majority of us are homeowners, but many times we forget the most important thing we want from a contractor is communication.” He adds that the construction industry has suffered from a perception that too often contractors show up and leave whenever they want, leaving the customers in the dark. No one likes to be surprised. Keeping the homeowner informed can go a long way toward achieving more satisfied customers and generating more referrals.

Davis says that communication has never been more important than today, in the era of social media. “Yelp has become the new Better Business Bureau,” he says. “Social media provides more opportunities than ever before for consumers to either pat us on the back or criticize us.”

 Changing it Up

The Glenwood Townhomes community was built in 1973, and the roof replacement provided an opportunity to introduce trending colors and technology improvements to residents’ roofs. The HOA board wanted to select a color that would lighten up the overall look of the community and also take advantage of solar reflectivity. The HOA selected the Owens Corning TruDefinition Duration shingle in Desert Tan.

Asked about the shingle manufacturer’s involvement in the project, Davis says manufacturers’ reps can make a big difference. “Availability is key, and a willingness to bring samples onsite or address any problems that come up is critical. You learn a lot by how a manufacturer deals with any problems that arise. We may go years without a problem, but when something happens, we want someone who will step up,” he says. He also likes the Owens Corning Sure Nail technology and says the strip that ensures optimal placement of each nail is a plus.

HOA projects are not for every contractor. But through planning, establishing strong relationships with engineers, permitting organizations and other partners, thoughtful approaches to on-site challenges and most importantly, listening to customers, HOAs present an opportunity for contractors to take on projects of size and style.

Asphalt Roof System Helps Protect Home Against the Elements While Raising Curb Appeal

The Topsail Residence is a private estate in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. Its roof encompasses approximately 10,600 square feet. Photo: Reliant Roofing

With the sunshine state regularly experiencing a beautiful and warm subtropical climate, it’s no surprise that Florida ranks second in the United States for tourism, ranking only behind California. However, actually living in this paradise has challenges of its own — extreme humidity, powerful winds and torrential rains can test the limits of any roofing system. To keep pace with Florida’s erratic weather conditions, proper roof design, installation and maintenance are paramount. The Topsail Residence, a private estate in Ponte Vedra Beach, is a testament to how selecting the right roofing system makes a world of difference.

Previously, the homeowners had an extensive addition on their property, which consisted of adding a new two-story section to the home. A short time after remodel, the roof began to leak, causing widespread damage as well as unsightly water spots throughout the home.

The homeowners sought the expertise of Pillar to Post Home Inspectors, who discovered issues with the roof. They quickly recognized such frequent and substantial leaking required immediate attention before other, bigger problems occurred. So, they suggested the homeowners contact a roofing contractor for a further assessment.

“After inspection, the problem immediately became apparent,” says Sean Shapiro, CEO of Reliant Roofing, the Jacksonville, Florida-based company hired to install the new roof. “We found torn shingles, signs of extensive foot and ladder traffic, and leaks.”

The roofing system appeared to lack some of the key components required for weather resilience and durability, according to Shapiro. “In some areas, there was no flashing installed whatsoever, allowing rainwater the perfect leak point to pour into the home,” Shapiro notes. “The problem was just as bad where the second story met the roof below. The water was free to run through every nook and cranny. Every aspect of a proper installation of a roofing system is important, especially something as essential as flashing.”

The contiguous U.S. average annual rainfall is 32.1 inches, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Jacksonville received 65.91 inches of rainfall in 2017 –more than double the contiguous national average, according to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Living only 22 miles southeast of the city, the homeowners needed a roofing system that would help to protect them against Florida’s high winds and frequent rainstorms. Reliant had the solution — a new asphalt shingle roof.

A new roof system featuring GAF Grand Canyon Lifetime Designer Shingles was installed by Reliant Roofing in 2017. Photo: Reliant Roofing

“The homeowners didn’t feel comfortable just patching the leaks. They wanted protection against future leaks and the area’s common threats: high winds and stormy weather,” Shapiro says. “Therefore, we recommended installing a completely new roofing system with designer asphalt shingles.”

Reliant began by tearing off the shingles on both the older and newer sections of the roof, bringing in two full teams to tackle all 10,600 square feet. Having dealt with numerous high-wind conditions on other roofing projects, Reliant chose GAF Grand Canyon Lifetime Designer Shingles in the color Stone Wood to provide the homeowners with a durable, long-lasting shingle, a key component of a beautiful new asphalt roofing system.

“When it storms in Florida, it storms,” added Shapiro. “We wanted to install a system that could withstand torrential downpours and high winds. Additionally, it was hard to overlook the durability shingles provided at an affordable cost.”

GAF Timbertex Premium Ridge Caps were installed on the hips and ridges to provide leak protection with extra dimensions to complement the roof. Reliant hand sealed every hip and ridge cap shingle and used GAF StormGuard Self-Adhering Leak Barrier to help protect the roof deck. Crews also installed custom counterflashing to address any potential defects in the stucco. Thanks to Reliant’s craftsmanship and the shingles’ ease of installation, the homeowners received a beautiful new asphalt roofing system in just five days.

The new asphalt roof will not only help to protect the homeowners against the elements and restore their comfort of living, but also provide them incredible curb appeal for years to come.

For their work on the Topsail Residence project, Reliant Roofing received the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Silver Award from the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA).

Each year, ARMA seeks the most beautiful, affordable and reliable asphalt roofing systems in North America. The Topsail Residence showcases how asphalt roofing provides durability and reliability in the face of harsh weather, while also providing aesthetically stunning designs.

ARMA is now accepting low and steep-slope asphalt roofing projects completed in 2018 for its 2019 Awards Program. Roofing professionals may submit multiple submissions, and there is no fee to enter. The program recognizes projects that exhibit innovation, performance and beauty, and which lead the way in roofing breakthroughs, such as advanced weather protection, green roofing or unique system design. The submission deadline is December 31, 2018.

For more information about asphalt roofing systems or to learn more about ARMA’s Awards Program, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

Rooftop Decks Add Outdoor Living Space to Sacramento Town Homes

The three-story homes are built on narrow lots without a backyard, so the decision was made to offer a roof deck package to provide an area to enjoy the outdoors. Photo: The Grupe Company

More and more, builders, architects and designers are looking to the rooftop as an area for usable living space — especially in urban areas, where lots are narrow. For a new town home development in Sacramento, the idea to add rooftop decks emerged late in the design process, but it’s proved so popular the builders are not only glad they made the change — they are considering making it a standard feature in future projects.

Designed by Ellis Architects and built by The Grupe Company, the neighborhood is known as 20 PQR. “The project fronts on 20th street in mid-town Sacramento and runs from P Street down to R Street,” notes Ron Rugani, vice president and purchasing manager for Grupe. “Q Street runs down the middle of the project, so that’s how we came up with the name 20 PQR.”

The 32 town homes are arranged in four groups of eight. The three-story residences have two different floor plans, one with 1,750 square feet and the other 1,850 square feet. “It’s an interesting concept,” Rugani says. “They are really considered single-family homes. They have their own lot, and they are detached from the next unit. There is a 6-inch space between the units, and they don’t share a common wall. However, the way we trim out that space, on the top and sides, you would view the eight units as one building, but they are actually eight individual single-family detached town homes.”

The narrow lots left no room for a yard, so that’s what inspired the idea to create usable outdoor space on the roof. “If you can imagine the urban setting — the fronts of these units are right on the city sidewalk. All of the units have two-car garages in the back and are accessible through a common alley. But there is no outdoor living space, and so that’s essentially what’s driving these roof decks,” Rugani says. “The backyard is where people are going to have outdoor living in a typical single-family home, and the rooftop deck is where they are going to have outdoor living in a town-home setting.”

The low-slope roofs were designed with internal drains and parapet walls. A GAF TPO roof system was specified. When the decision was made to add the rooftop living area, Ellis Architects recommended installing rubber roof deck tiles from sofSURFACES on top of the TPO roof. “The architect steered us in this direction because they liked the product,” notes Rugani. “After the roofer installs his regular TPO roof, it gets inspected to make sure there are no leaks before the roof deck tiles are installed. It’s a really unique product. It allows water to go through to the TPO roof for drainage. It has an excellent warranty, and so we have a long-term warranty for the entire roof system.”

Applying the Roof System

The TPO roof system was installed by PetersenDean Roofing and Solar, Fremont, California. “We are a roofing subcontractor for Grupe on several projects in the Northern California area,” says Mark Vogel, president of PetersenDean’s Builder Division. “We have built a great relationship with them over the years.”

Photo: sofSURFACES

There was approximately 900 square feet of roof area on each structure. PetersenDean crews mechanically attached the 60-mil GAF EverGuard TPO membrane over quarter-inch Georgia-Pacific DensDeck roof board and rigid insulation. “It is a flat roof with low slope conditions,” Vogel says. “This is absolutely a great system for this type of work.”

The parapet walls greatly simplified the safety plan, but safety is never taken for granted, according to Vogel. “We have 22 safety engineers nationwide, with 14 in California,” he says. “Safety is our biggest concern, and we invest to ensure we send everyone home at night. Our workers are considered our most valuable asset and we strive to maintain a world-class safety culture. Having a skilled and talented workforce that truly cares about safety drives everything that we do.”

Everything on the project went smoothly, notes Vogel. “It was not tough to coordinate the work with the other trades,” he says “It is what we do, and there is no one better. We are a full-service roofing contractor and solar power installer. We handle estimating, design, permitting, and installation for roofing and solar roofing systems for all our clients and this project is a great example of this.”

Installing the Roof Tiles

The deck area on each roof encompassed approximately 700 square feet. The interlocking duraSTRONG tiles are made from recycled rubber and are ideal for outdoor rooftops, walkways and patio projects, notes Chris Chartrand, director of marketing for sofSURFACES. “This space was ideal for our product as the rooftops are flat and have proper slope with a contained edge,” Chartrand says. “The design allows for efficient drainage of surface water.”

The low-slope roofs were covered with a TPO roof system manufactured by GAF, and the deck areas were topped with interlocking rubber paving tiles from sofSURFACES. Photo: sofSURFACES

The tiles were applied by a manufacturer-certified installer, Leonard’s Construction of Fontana, California. “Coordinating delivery and installation of our product within Grupe’s required timelines was a fairly easy task, as we were the last phase of the project,” notes Chartrand.

Paulo Carrillo, installation supervisor, typically installs the product in gyms and playground areas, but recently he’s found himself doing a lot of work on terraces and rooftops. After the roof system was completed on the homes at 20 PQR, a second sheet of TPO membrane was installed as a protective barrier. “We chalked our lines on that,” Carrillo notes. “We measure out the whole rooftop and chalk it off into a 2-foot-by-2-foot grid. Every other square is a keystone — those are the tiles that we put in first that hold everything in line.”

After the keystones are glued in place, the crews cut pieces to fit along the perimeter and then begin to add tiles in strategic lines. After those tiles cure, tiles are laid in opposite directions, both horizontally and diagonally. “We do it step by step,” Carrillo notes. “When we put the final squares in at the end, they are all interlocked together. After we do the final step, we glue each seam, so everything is 100 percent glued.”

The tiles all interlock, and compression allows for expansion and contraction. “Every tile is 24-1/8 inches, but they go into a 24-inch space,” Carrillo explains. “They are all compressed. With any perimeter cuts, we add another 1/8 of an inch to get our compression.”

Stacking the Deck

According to Rugani, Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the 20 PQR have been completed and are sold out, while Phase 3 and Phase 4 are currently under construction.

The interlocking duraSTRONG tiles are made from recycled rubber. They are designed for use on rooftops, walkways and patio projects, as well as gyms and playground areas. Photo: sofSURFACES

Originally the roof deck area was offered as an option, but it’s proved so desirable all of the units in the last phase are being built with decks. “It’s been an interesting dynamic,” says Rugani. “When we started, we weren’t sure how many people would want this option. For the first phase, we had to spec those, so, we said, let’s build six of the eight with the roof deck. It started to gain in popularity, and the price didn’t seem to be an issue, so in the last phase, we said, let’s build them all. It’s become very popular.”

Based on the success of the roof decks at 20 PQR, Grupe is exploring roof deck options for other projects in development. “We are building a mid-rise apartment complex just a few blocks away, and we said from the get-go in that project that we are going to have some type of roof deck for outdoor living space for the tenants,” Rugani says. “For that project we did develop a rooftop deck, and I believe that is going to be the M.O. moving forward in any project we do. Otherwise there might be no place for tenants to gather on site and have some outdoor living space. It makes perfect sense to go to the roof. So, yes, I see this as a trend, especially in urban settings.”

In the 20 PQR project, the homes were not originally designed with roof decks, and the decision made to add them later meant a lot of extra time and work for engineers and architects. “A lot of people might walk away from that and say it is too much work,” Rugani says. “We said, this is something we need to do, and it’s going to benefit the people who buy it. We were happy in the end that we spent the time and effort to do it.”

TEAM

Architect: Ellis Architects, Sacramento, California, www.ellis-architects.com
General Contractor: The Grupe Company, Stockton, California, www.grupe.com
Roof System Installer: PetersenDean Inc., Fremont, California, www.petersendean.com
Rubber Paving Tile Installer: Leonard’s Construction, Fontana, California

MATERIALS

Rubber Paving Tiles: duraSTRONG, sofSURFACES, Petrolia, Ontario, Canada, www.sofsurfaces.com
Roof Membrane: 60-mil TPO, GAF, www.GAF.com
Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.densdeck.com

Green and Sustainable Roof Systems Highlight Durham Custom Home

The custom home in Durham, North Carolina features a standing seam metal roof, a balcony, a roof deck and a garden roof. The carport roof is made from solar panels. Photo: David Solow.

When Alison Trott purchased a vacant corner lot in the historic Cleveland-Holloway neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina, she wanted to use the space to construct her dream home. She wasn’t sure exactly what she wanted, but she had several priorities in mind. “When I built the house, I wanted to try and focus on sustainability as much as possible,” says Trott. “I wanted to try to focus on green building, and I wanted to try to utilize local resources as much as possible — local materials, local builders, local companies, and local craftsmen.”

She worked with a talented team of design and construction professionals to bring her vision to life, and the sustainable roof systems on the home became a crowning focus of the project.

At some point in the design process, the architect mentioned the possibility of incorporating a garden roof, and Trott jumped at the idea. “I said, ‘I want that!’” Trott recalls. “I was very excited about the idea, but I’d only seen green roofs on large commercial projects.”

The Lead Architect

Tina Govan, now principal of Somos Design, located in Raleigh, North Carolina, hit it off with Alison Trott right away. The two worked together on the design for several years, inviting CUBE design + research, an architecture firm in nearby Chapel Hill, to collaborate on the project.

The goals included constructing a modern home that would blend in with the historic neighborhood. The house was also designed to be part of the natural landscape. A key priority was saving two large oak trees on the property. “We wrapped the house around the trees,” notes Govan. “That way the house bends to nature.”

The key themes of the overall design are exemplified by the roof systems. The house features a metal gable roof with a balcony at one end, echoing historic homes in the area. The 950-square-foot garden roof was installed over the master wing of the house, and the roof of the carport was constructed from solar panels.

“It’s a very green house,” Govan notes. “Solar panels over the carport take care of most of the energy needs of the home. The green roof replaces what was disturbed — the ground below — and brings it up. The green roof blends well with the landscape, and with it the house doesn’t seem as big.”

The green roof is visible from many parts of the house, including the roof deck, which is separated from it by a glass railing. “I love green roofs,” says Govan. “They replace habitat and make building softer. It’s alive. It’s so much more dynamic and rich than any other type of hardscape.”

The Builder

Bob Wuopio is the owner of Form Design/Build LLC, headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina. The company specializes in one-of-a-kind, complex projects, so this custom house was right up its alley. “We love unique projects,” Wuopio says. “Our preference is to make everything — the doorknobs, the pulls, the lights, the cabinets. We try to fabricate everything. That’s our niche.”

Located on a corner lot in the historic Cleveland-Holloway neighborhood, the modern home was designed to preserve two large trees and wrap around a courtyard to provide privacy. Photo: David Solow.

Numerous custom details throughout the house put the company to the test. For its relatively small footprint — 3,400 square feet — the house has its fair share of different roofing systems. “We have almost every type of roof system on that project,” says Wuopio. “We have a standing seam metal roof on the high gable. We have standing seam metal roof that becomes a metal wall. We have a built-up roof with a floating deck and a glass railing system. There is a green roof over a whole wing of the house.”

Getting the deck and green roof areas sloped perfectly was essential, and that begins with the substructure. “Getting a roof with a slope of 1/8 inch per foot right requires a pretty good framer,” Wuopio notes.

Form Design/Build served as the general contractor on the project, and Wuopio was responsible for scheduling multiple trades at the site. One key concern was making sure that the low-slope roof system wouldn’t be damaged after it was installed. “You don’t want anyone poking holes in it,” says Wuopio. “We spray foamed underneath the deck, so if you did have a small leak, you might not notice it for years, potentially.”

Wuopio knew the roof under the garden roof assembly was crucial. “I knew we needed a bulletproof roof, so I called Jim Pickard. He knew exactly what we needed.”

The Roofing Contractor

James Pickard III is the owner and president of Pickard Roofing Company Inc. in Durham, North Carolina. He represents the third generation of his family to run the business, which is more than 90 years old.

Pickard Roofing handles all types of commercial and residential projects, including historical restoration work. Most of the company’s projects are within 25 miles of the office, including this one, which was just two miles down the road.

The red metal roof is complemented with matching half-round gutters, which incorporate “rain chains” as downspouts. Photo: David Solow.

Crews at the company don’t do as much hot-mop BUR work as they used to, but they still have that club in their bag for below-grade waterproofing projects and garden roof assemblies. For this green roof project, Pickard recommended a coal tar pitch roof system. “We use hot-mopped coal tar pitch in situations where the material is in constant contact with water because the pitch doesn’t degrade,” Pickard notes. “You don’t want to have to take the dirt off of a garden roof and start looking for leaks. You have to do everything you can to make sure nothing can cause problems.”

That includes making sure the deck is secured with screws and not nails, which can back out and damage the roof assembly. Gravel stops should either be copper or stainless steel so they won’t corrode. “The whole idea is permanence,” Pickard says.

The hot-mopped system manufactured by Durapax consists of four plies of tar-coated fiberglass felt, which were set in four layers of coal tar pitch. A fifth layer of pitch was added as a top coat.

Pickard Roofing also installed the metal roof system. Snap Lock panels were custom fabricated in the company’s metal shop from 24-gauge Kynar-coated steel from Firestone Building Products in a wine-red color chosen by the homeowner. A synthetic underlayment, Titanium PSU 30 from InterWrap, was applied to the wooden deck before the panels were secured in place.

“The great thing about the Snap Lock system is there is virtually no fastening through the face of the metal,” Pickard says.

The 950-square-foot green roof covers one wing of the house. Pre-vegetated sedum mats were installed in most of the green roof area, and native plants are also featured in areas with more growing media. Photo: Living Roofs Inc.

“The panels are secured with cleats and clips in the seams.”

Snow guards from Berger Brothers were attached to the seams using non-penetrating screws. Half-round gutters were fabricated from the same metal as the roof and complemented with “rain chains” that serve as downspouts.

Many of the copper details and flashings were custom fabricated on site. “One of our strengths is in our flashing design,” notes Pickard. “The company has a lot of soldering irons. We still use a lot of the old techniques.”

The roofing installations went smoothly. As Pickard Roofing completed the roofs on the home, crews from Southern Energy Management, headquartered in Morrisville, North Carolina, constructed the carport roof from partially transparent solar panels.

“Everyone’s priority was on doing the job right,” Pickard says. “In this case, the emphasis was on the quality, not just the cost. The cost is important, don’t get me wrong, but in this case the budget was increased if there was a product that could do the job better. Ultimately, you have to put the quality where it counts, and that’s why this project worked out so well.”

The Green Roof Installers

Landscape architect Kathryn Blatt Ancaya co-founded Living Roofs Inc. in Asheville, North Carolina, along with her husband, Emilio Ancaya. The company handles all aspects of green roof and living wall projects, including design, installation and long-term maintenance. “Our work ranges from small residential projects to large complex commercial and institutional projects — and of course, everything in between,” she says.

These photos show the roof right after it was installed (left) and after three months of growth. Photos: Living Roofs Inc.

Living Roofs is a certified installer with garden roof system manufacturer Xero Flor America LLC, which is headquartered in Durham. Clayton Rugh, the director of Xero Flor, contacted the Ancayas after Trott and Govan toured the company’s own garden roof. They asked for help designing a version of the company’s lightweight extensive roof system for the project. As Rugh notes, “One of the benefits of the Xero Flor green roof system is its adaptability to nearly any roof situation — load limits down to 10 pounds per square foot, dynamic slope changes between zero and 45 degrees, and compatibility with most commercial waterproofing, including TPO, PVC, modified bitumen and asphaltic BUR assemblies.”

“We collaborated with the architect, Tina Govan, and Xero Flor to design an extensive pre-vegetated green roof with areas of deeper soil to support native grasses and perennials,” Ancaya explains.

The Living Roofs crew installed the Xero Flor XF300 green roof system with growing media depths ranging from 2.5 to 5 inches. After the root barrier was installed over the coal tar pitch roof, it was covered with a drain mat and filter fleece. The growing medium was then lifted into place using a telehandler.

Most of the garden roof area was overlaid with pre-vegetated Xero Flor sedum mats. Plugs of herbaceous plants were inserted in the deeper areas. “The grasses we used were grown by Hoffman Nursery, a local grower, and we used perennials by North Creek Nursery,” Ancaya notes.

The sedum mats are an attractive option because they are fully covered when they are installed, notes Ancaya. “Incorporating the areas of deeper soil also allowed us to create a more dramatic visual effect by contrasting the low-growing Xero Flor mats with taller and more textured plants,” she says.

The green roof installation took less than eight hours over the course of two days. “Kate is the design arm of Living Roofs, and Emilio is the installation arm, and the two of them teamed up on this project to knock it out of the park,” Rugh says.

A Happy Home

Trott enjoyed watching the building process. “I learned a ton,” she says. “I just love watching craftsmen who are passionate about what they do. I had fun out there!”

The home was completed in the spring of 2017, and Trott is thrilled with the result. “It’s better than I even imagined it would be,” she says. “I love it, and my cats love it. In fact, I think they are pretty sure that I did all of this just to entertain them.”

The growth and changing color palette of the rooftop garden has been interesting to watch. “The green roof has been amazing,” she says. “It’s just been one year, but the green roof keeps getting lusher and lusher. Every feature is my favorite feature in the house, but the green roof — I love it. I really do.”

In fact, Trott has become something of a residential green roof ambassador. “I’ve been spreading the word,” she says.

TEAM

Architects: Tina Govan, Architect, Raleigh, North Carolina, www.somosdesign.us, in collaboration with CUBE design + research, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, www.cubedesignresearch.com
General Contractor: Form Design/Build LLC, Raleigh, North Carolina, www.formdesignbuild.org
Roofing Contractor: Pickard Roofing Company Inc., Durham, North Carolina, www.PickardRoofing.com
Green Roof Installer: Living Roofs Inc., Asheville, North Carolina, www.livingroofsinc.com
Solar Installer: Southern Energy Management, Morrisville, North Carolina, www.southern-energy.com

MATERIALS

Low-Slope System
Coal Tar Pitch: Coal Tar Roofing and Waterproofing Pitch, Durapax, www.Durapax.com
Fiberglass Felt: Tar Coated Fiber Felt, Durapax

Steep-Slope System
Synthetic Underlayment: Titanium PSU 30, InterWrap, www.InterWrap.com
Metal Panels: 24-gauge Kynar-coated steel, Firestone Building Products, www.FirestoneBPCO.com

Green Roof System
Extensive and Semi-Intensive Garden Roof: Xero Flor XF300, Xero Flor America LLC, Durham, North Carolina, www.xeroflornorthamerica.com