SPF Roof System Solves Problems for Renovated Office Complex

Historic Pier 70 in San Francisco was a steel mill and a shipyard before it was converted into a modern mixed-use office complex. Central Coating Company applied an SPF roof system from Carlisle Roof Foam and Coatings on 88,000 square feet of the original corrugated metal roof. Photos: Central Coating Company

For more than 100 years, Pier 70 in San Francisco had a storied history, serving as a steel mill and a shipyard that produced destroyers during World War II. The site is a historic landmark, but it sat idle for some two decades before an ambitious restoration project brought it back to life as a mixed-use office complex. The facility now is home to companies including Uber Advanced Technology Group, which set up new offices in 82,000 square feet of the project’s first phase.

When the new tenants found interior temperatures became uncomfortably warm in the summer, Luke Nolan, president of Central Coating Company, was called in to consult on the roof system. With locations in San Jose and Madera, California, Central Coating specializes in spray polyurethane foam (SPF) roofing. The vast majority of its work consists of commercial and industrial re-roofing.

Two inches of SPF added a layer of R-13 continuous insulation, eliminated existing leaks and minimized heat gain from the uninsulated metal roof.

“California’s Title 24 doesn’t apply to historic buildings, so modern energy codes did not apply, and the renovation was completed without thermal insulation,” notes Nolan. “Modern office space was set up in a building where they used to forge steel and used natural ventilation. There was no air conditioning. With the uninsulated roof system, even in moderate San Francisco, radiant heat could cause interior temps to rise to 85 degrees on summer days.”

Nolan used infrared imaging to document the radiant heat entering the building from the roof. Temperatures on the underside of the metal roof topped 135 degrees. He recommended applying an SPF system as the only viable solution to minimize radiant heat, prevent recurring leaks, and preserve the building’s historic status.

Central Coating put together some budgets and commissioned a study by a roofing consultant to quantify the possible reduction in radiant heat. Roger Morrison of Deer Ridge consulting calculated the reduction in radiant heat from various thicknesses of spray foam. The recommendation was for at least 2 inches of SPF, which would add a layer of R-13 continuous insulation.

The next hurdle was making sure the system would meet the standards for the historic building. “The historic architect wanted to make sure that we were able to maintain the look of the corrugated metal on the existing roof,” Nolan says. “That helped us make the decision to go with a 2-inch system instead of going up to 3 inches, because at 3 inches the foam would self-level, and you’d lose the print-through of the corrugations.”

Central Coating was required to do a prototype installation on the building before the project was approved. “We basically did two 200-square-foot areas,” Nolan notes. “Talk about pressure. We knew we had to get it right.’”

After the test areas were finished and approved, the project got the green light.

Completing the Installation

The existing corrugated metal roof was comprised of multiple peaks, many featuring monitors — raised structures that housed rows of clerestory windows for daylighting.

The building was occupied and in use at the time, adding to the complexities of the safety planning. Central Coating had to erect scaffolding and pedestrian canopies to protect passers-by on sidewalks and at building entrances. Safety equipment for Central Coating’s crew members included horizontal lifeline systems on all of the ridges and temporary guardrails along all exposed edges.

The next step was substrate preparation. Crews power-washed the surface, capturing the water, which had to be filtered before it could be returned to the sewer system. The team then installed custom-designed metal flashings at the perimeter and masked the windows before the spraying began.

Working in sections, crews applied a spray foam system manufactured by Carlisle Roof Foam and Coatings. Crews covered approximately 5,000 square feet a day. The total project consisted of more than 88,000 square feet.

Carlisle GP Primer was applied with a sprayer to help increase adhesion of the spray foam. According to Nolan, it dries very quickly, usually within an hour, and the Carlisle PremiSEAL 70 SPF was then sprayed in place.

As part of the goal of maintaining the look of the corrugated metal, the SPF was applied in one application. “You can spray 2 inches in two lifts, but you are more prone to leveling out the surface,” Nolan explains. “We also sprayed the foam a little bit colder than you normally would, which somewhat negatively affected our yield, but we needed to maintain that corrugated look. It’s funny — usually we’re trying to get the foam as flat as possible, but that wasn’t the case here. However, it really worked out well. The sprayers did an excellent job. It was like an art project.”

The Carlisle SeamlessSEAL FR acrylic coating was applied in multiple passes. “The first base coat goes on the same day as the foam is sprayed,” Nolan notes. “Once we covered a certain area, we fell back to apply the mid coat and top coat.”

The top coat was produced in a custom color, Battleship Gray, to match the existing building. Granules were broadcast into the top coat.

Well-Executed Plan

The new SPF system qualified for a 20-year system warranty and achieved its goals, including minimizing heat gain. “The benefit to building comfort was absolutely huge,” Nolan says. “We reduced the temperature of the underside of the metal roof by almost 40 degrees on warm days.”

It was a challenging project, but everything went smoothly, notes Nolan. He credits detailed planning for the project’s success. “This took a tremendous amount of work just to get through the proposal and submittal process — and get the approval of the tenant, the owner, the Port of San Francisco, and the State Historic Preservation Office. And then we just had a really good plan in place for safety and logistics,” he says. “Everyone was very pleased with our process as well as the final result.”

Since the building was occupied, communicating with the tenant was crucial. “There was a lot of coordination with the people working downstairs,” notes Nolan. “The noisier steps, such as installing our metal or installing our safety equipment, we began very early — starting at 5:30 and finishing at 8:30 — so we were not bothering people in the offices during the workday. It’s one of those things that goes to show the importance of having a good plan, communicating that plan, and then executing it.”

The experience stands out for Nolan for many reasons. The project received a 2020 SPFA Annual Excellence Award from the Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance. The Historic Pier 70 project was named the winner in the in the category of “SPF roof over 40,000 square feet.”

It was also a bit unusual. “For us as a foam roofing contractor, we typically do roofing projects that have the benefit of adding insulation to the building,” Nolan says. “What I mean by that is someone is usually calling us up because their existing roof is at the end of its useful life, and foam will have the added benefits of cutting down their energy bill and making their building more comfortable — but we’re doing it primarily because they need a new roof. This one was different in that we were doing a foam roofing project that was really an insulation job.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Central Coating Company, San Jose and Madera, California, www.centralcoatingcompany.com

MATERIALS

SPF System: PremiSEAL 70, Carlisle Roof Foam and Coatings, www.carlislerfc.com

Acrylic Coating: SeamlessSEAL FR, Carlisle Roof Foam and Coatings

Outfitter’s New Roof Is Designed to Look Great, Withstand the Elements

When the owners of the Bass Pro location in Pearl, Mississippi, looked for a new roof, they initially considered the spruce green color shared by many of the company’s other outlets, but the existing fascia boards inspired them to choose Colonial Red from Petersen’s palette of stock colors. Photos: hortonphotoinc.com

Bass Pro Shops brands itself as a supplier of performance products designed to endure the great outdoors, but at its Pearl, Mississippi, store, the roof was falling short of that standard. The roof’s mix of membrane and metal roof systems was damaged during a severe weather event, which prompted a re-roofing initiative.

“They had a hailstorm come through and they wanted to upgrade,” says Roman Malone, president of the installing firm, E. Cornell Malone Corp., based in nearby Jackson, Mississippi. In addition to installing a new membrane roof, the project including replacing the existing bare Galvalume steel panels with 59,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roofing panels Kynar-finished in PAC-CLAD Colonial Red. The panels form the highly visible sloped portions of the roof, along with a canopy overhang over the building’s storefront walkway and entrance.

After the metal roof system was installed, crews completed Firestone TPO roof on the low-slope section.

The 100,000-square-foot store was a founding anchor retailer in the 150-acre-plus Bloomfield Development. It shares the title with Trustmark Park, home of the Atlanta Braves’ minor-league baseball team, the Mississippi Braves. People visit the retailer for more than just shopping — the facility includes a large aquarium, shooting gallery and 3-D archery range along with a bar and restaurant. Since its 2005 opening, the surrounding development has grown to include The Outlets of Mississippi, the state’s largest outlet center, which welcomes almost 4.5 million visitors every year.

The metal portion of the re-roofing effort included removing the existing panels along with the ice and water shield below, while the existing plywood decking and insulation remained in good shape. For the roofing pros from E. Cornell Malone, the heavily trafficked surroundings proved a greater challenge than the roof itself. “We had to keep the front door open,” Malone recalls. “The flagpole and the tallest part of the standing seam roof are right over the main entrance. There was a period of time when we had to work there, and we had to use the exit door as an entrance and block off that area for safety reasons. We had to move as fast as we could to minimize the disruption. We also had to use cranes to get the material up to the roof and the demolished material off the roof.”

Eye-Catching Color

While the profile of the standing-seam roof remained similar to its original appearance, the Colonial Red finish certainly creates a major pop for the building. Malone says store managers initially were considering the spruce green color shared by many of the company’s other outlets, when they happened upon Colonial Red in Petersen’s palette of stock colors. “The fascia boards just happened to be the same color as the roof — so, when they saw the Colonial Red, it was an obvious color choice for them,” Malone says. “We didn’t paint that fascia, and it just matched perfectly. I believe this is the first Bass Pro Shop in the country to use this color on their roof. It looks really good.”

E. Cornell Malone Corp. installed approximately 59,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roofing panels on the project.

Crews installed the metal roof system first, and then completed the installation of the single-ply roof on the low-slope section. “We had to use the flat roof as a work platform to reach the high part of the metal roof. We protected what was there, and then came back and put the TPO roof on. That way, we wouldn’t damage it during the installation of the metal roof.”

Crews mechanically attached a Firestone 60-mil TPO system over 1/4-inch DensDeck cover board. “The TPO portion of the project was pretty straightforward,” Malone says. “The highlight of this project is really the metal roof. You can’t see the TPO roof from the ground, but it complemented everything else, brought everything under warranty and got them up to date.”

An interesting detail on the project involved the large flagpole on the metal roof over the entrance. The safety system incorporates shock absorbing anchors, S-5! clamps, and a 100 feet of stainless steel line with hands-fee Unigrab Travelers and dedicated lanyards. “We worked with a safety company, Rooftop Anchor, to engineer a safety system so people could manage the flag and be safe,” Malone says. “Before that, the owners used to hire us to come out and raise and lower their flag. Now that they have a safety system in place, they can manage the flag themselves.”

Feedback on the new roof has been very positive, notes Malone. “The customers are ecstatic about the roof. It has totally transformed the building — it’s definitely an upgrade.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: E. Cornell Malone Corp., Jackson, Mississippi, www.ecmalone.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: Snap-Clad roofing panels Kynar-finished in PAC-CLAD Colonial Red, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Low-Slope Roof: 60-mil TPO, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com

Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Flagpole Safety System: Rooftop Anchor, Heber City, Utah, www.rooftopanchor.com

Standing Seam Clamps: S-5!, www.s-5.com

New Roof Systems Make Shopping Center a Showplace Once Again

Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

LK Construction tackles many composite shingle roofing projects each year. On an average, they’ve been known to knock out 20 or more commercial and residential composite roofs annually. And, while each project is special, nothing compares to their 2018 mega-project: the re-roofing of South Lake Village Shopping Center in Reston, Virginia.

With almost two dozen retailers and businesses, the shopping center has 109,527 square feet of space. And every building in the connected community center had a failing cedar roof.

Built in 1984, South Lake Village had a natural cedar roof complementing a low-slope membrane roof system. Fast forward to 2018. Functionally, the roof was failing badly. Stores complained of water leaks. Shingles were cracked and had moss growth, degrading the look of the entire shopping center. That’s when the management company decided to invest in a new roof system featuring Bellaforté Shake from DaVinci Roofscapes.

“We knew this project was a winner the moment we started the installation,” says Scott Kim, vice president at LK Construction in Annandale, Virginia. “Both store residents and shoppers were astonished by the transformation. Everyone expressed their excitement at the look of the new synthetic shakes. We immediately got calls from people wanting the Bellaforté Shake on their homes. Within several months, 10 houses in the area had composite shake roofing. And now there are many other homeowners inquiring about the DaVinci product on a regular basis.”

Safety First

The process of re-roofing South Lake Village came with a unique set of challenges for the team at LK Construction. While shoppers were going in and out of Safeway, Starbucks, CVS Pharmacy and other stores, the team had to take great care.

The roof replacement project at South Lake Village Shopping included a new TPO roof system on the low-slope section and synthetic shake on the steep-slope sections.

“This is the largest DaVinci project we’ve ever done,” says Kim. “There were a lot of moving pieces. From ordering, receiving and storing the composite shakes to staging onsite. In addition, when it came to assuring pedestrian safety during the roofing process, the challenges were enormous. We focused a great deal on safety measures throughout the entire two-week project.”

LK Construction brought in traffic controllers and road guards to help control the active environment. “Our goal was to safely install the composite roofing without disturbing the businesses,” says Kim. “Safety was our top priority. And, we were able to achieve that goal.”

The shops at South Lake Village now feature Bellaforté Shake composite shingles from DaVinci Roofscapes.

As shoppers moved smoothly in and out of stores, the LK Construction team replaced the flat roofing with a new thermoplastic membrane. Approximately 52,000 square feet of Sure-Weld TPO from Carlisle SynTec was installed on this project.

Crews then installed the Bellaforté Shake tiles. Made to withstand fire, impact and severe weather, the synthetic shakes are ideal for the shopping center location.

“There’s no other synthetic product in the market that can mimic natural hand-split cedar as perfectly as Bellaforté Shake,” says Kim. “These tiles are designed to simulate a multi-width look. They’re extremely realistic and cost-effective.”

Mission Accomplished

With their beautiful new roofs overhead, the shops at South Lake Village now stand out again as a showplace in the Reston community. From banks to restaurants to retailers, each structure can count on their DaVinci roofs to provide long-term beauty and durability.

“The high visibility of this project opened the door for us even more in this marketplace,” says Kim. “We’re now busy replacing old cedar roofs throughout the area with synthetic shake.”

“People are embracing the look of Bellaforté,” he continues. “They love the many advantages of the product. At this point, we’re forecasting a great number of homeowners throughout Reston will switch to DaVinci products in the near future.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: LK Construction, Annandale, Virginia, www.lkconstructionusa.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Bellaforté Shake, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Low-Slope Roof: Sure-Weld TPO, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

Soft, Diffused Natural Light Transforms Eagles Nest Outfitters’ Office

VMS Northlights bathe the design and sales work areas in diffused natural light. Photos: VELUX

For years the staff of Eagles Nest Outfitters (ENO) worked in cramped, dark offices in downtown Asheville, North Carolina. Their second office didn’t even have any windows, which isn’t ideal for an outdoor equipment company specializing in portable hammocks and camp chairs.

So, when it came time to move from downtown to a location that could accommodate both the office and a warehouse, the company’s leaders challenged architects to connect the new space to the outside.

“We’re an outdoor company, and we’d all rather be outdoors each and every day,” says Lane Nakaji, general manager with ENO. “No one wants to work in darkness.”

Challenge: Opening Up a 1970s Building

The new building was at first not very promising. Located in a business park with views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, it dated back to the 1970s with a red brick exterior and a cedar shake mansard roof.

“It was a rabbit warren of an office,” says Charles Krekelberg, the project manager on the ENO project for Samsel Architects. “They had perimeter windows behind arbor vitae trees, so it was oppressively dark.”

“They wanted to radically transform the space,” Krekelberg adds. “They wanted open spaces for people to collaborate, planters and natural light.”

The building was gutted down to the exterior walls and a new roof constructed. Inside, the maze of hallways and offices became open space. And to solve the lighting problem, architects turned to two VELUX products: VELUX Modular Skylights (VMS) – Northlight Configuration and Fixed Curb Mounted skylights.

The VELUX Modular Skylight system eliminates the need for on-site glazing and can be installed quickly in varying weather conditions, which for this project included freezing rain and snow.

Ridgelights 25-40° have the classic A-frame look: two rows of self-supporting skylights mounted on standard steel profiles. The skylight installer, JP Ross & Co., installed 320 Ridgelight modules on the Burkert building configured into four rows over the center of the manufacturing space.

“We only turn the lights on when it’s raining or very cloudy,” says Allison Ettinger, ENO’s credit manager. “Natural light is generally more relaxing. It’s definitely softer than turning on the electric lights.”

The skylight units are all fixed with dimensions of 39.4 inches in width by 47.2 inches in height and high-efficiency glazing. The LowE3, argon-filled dual paned glazing assembly consists of a high-strength outer tempered pane and an inner laminated pane. The system is equipped with electrically controlled shades, which employees say are only drawn on weekends to optimize the building’s energy efficiency.

The office also has nine VELUX Fixed Curb Mount skylights (FCM 2246) with LowE3, laminated glazing and solar-powered remote controlled shades installed over offices, hallways and conference rooms. The building is topped by a 24-gauge standing seam metal roof system manufactured by Englert Inc., which was installed by DLV Roofing.

Quick Installation

Like other VMS configurations, the Northlight system arrives on the jobsite palletized for easy staging. Its plug-and-play installation method takes less time than custom, site-glazed skylights. It took the crew from JP Ross & Co. one week to complete the installation.

“We focus only on skylight design, sales and installation and have over 20 years of experience,” notes Jason Peterson, project manager with JP Ross &Co. “The only difference with the Northlight was that the panels were installed vertically.”

A vapor barrier wraps around the skylight modules and lines the interior roof rough opening for an airtight seal between the skylight modules and the building, creating a very energy-efficient building envelope.

Natural light bathes the sales department and product development area throughout the day, and employees are happy to have it. “When we don’t have that glare from artificial lights, it creates a calm,” says Julia Schell, manager of e-commerce at ENO. “Things get hectic round here. Sometimes when we come in after the weekend and the blinds have been closed, we forget and turn the lights on and it’s like ‘What’s wrong?’”

The Northlights also give the building’s exterior a unique look. “The owner wanted the skylights to be as much of an exterior expression of the design as an interior lighting device,” Krekelberg says. “They truly liked the look of the skylights and wanted them on the roof.”

TEAM

Architecture/Design: Samsel Architects, Asheville, North Carolina, https://samselarchitects.com

General Contractor: Heritage Restoration & Construction, Asheville, North Carolina, www.heritage-restoration.com

Roofing Contractor: DLV Roofing, Asheville, North Carolina, www.dlvroofing.com

Skylight Installer: JP Ross & Co., Charlotte, North Carolina, www.jprossskylights.com

MATERIALS

Skylights: VELUX Modular Skylight system – Northlight Configuration and Fixed Curb Mounted skylights, VELUX, www.veluxusa.com

Metal Roof: 24-gauge mechanically fastened standing seam roof system in Charcoal Gray, Englert Inc., www.englertinc.com

Roof of Texas Business Gets New Life After Hailstorm

After the damaged roof system was removed, CIMA installed a self-adhering SBS modified bitumen roofing system manufactured by CertainTeed. Photo: CertainTeed

Large hailstorms are a common occurrence in Northern Texas, so when the roof of CMS Magnetics Corporation in Garland, Texas, started to leak, the company suspected hail had something to do with it.

When CMS purchased its building in 2012, the company applied to its existing roof system a roof coating designed to strengthen the system and protect it from water intrusion. In 2018, however, the roof started leaking to the point that expert guidance was needed to address the situation.

To help CMS consider its options, Plano, Texas-based CIMA Contractors, LLC, was called in to find the source of the leaks and recommend an efficient, affordable solution. CIMA Contractors is a CertainTeed-credentialed roofing contractor with more than 20 years of experience in commercial roofing and storm damage restoration. After analyzing the roof’s existing PVC membrane, CIMA determined that the roof leaks were indeed the result of hail damage from a 2014 storm.

CMS leadership worried it would have to fix or replace the entire roof system at great expense to the company. Trusting in its expertise, CIMA stood by its findings and went the extra step of presenting additional findings to the insurance company so their hail damage claim could be covered.

CIMA met with adjusters, roofing contractors and engineers from the insurance company and conducted a joint assessment. During the assessment, the team conducted forensic work to determine that recent hail had compromised the roof system and was the cause of recurring leaks. This inspired the insurance company to agree to restore the roof to its pre-storm condition.

The existing roof assembly was comprised of a 22-inch intermediate-rib steel deck supporting a 60-mil PVC roof system along with a spray-on coating. CIMA decided to take a different approach — one that would offer a solution with greater energy efficiency, better tolerance for the foot traffic required for facility maintenance, and superior impact and weather resistance.

This photo shows the damaged roof before it was replaced. Photo: CertainTeed

After removing the old roof system, CIMA mechanically attached CertainTeed’s FlintBoard ISO insulation to the building’s steel deck. In addition to helping the structure meet city building code requirements, the insulation provided year-round indoor comfort. CIMA also installed tapered FlintBoard ISO-T insulation to reconfigure the cricket geometry and sumps in the roof’s corners and redirect water runoff to a new drainage system, eliminating standing water on the roof’s surface.

CIMA then applied CertainTeed’s Black Diamond Base Sheet, a self-adhering SBS modified bitumen roofing membrane designed to provide durability, strength, ease of handling and resistance to moisture and wind-driven rain. A torch-applied layer of CertainTeed’s Flintlastic GTA cap sheet topped off the system, providing additional puncture and tear resistance. The new, more resilient system delivered a combined 220 mils of protection.

Thanks to CIMA’s professional expertise and high-quality roofing products from CertainTeed, the CMS facility is dry, safe and comfortable for its employees. For additional peace of mind, the new roof is backed by a 15-year NDL (no-dollar limit) warranty from CIMA and CertainTeed. With their roof problems addressed and their storage areas dry, CMS has expanded its capacity and inventory, paving the way for greater operational bandwidth and profit.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: CIMA Contractors, LLC, Plano, Texas, www.cimacontractors.com

MATERIALS

Base Sheet: Black Diamond, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

Cap Sheet: Flintlastic GTA, CertainTeed

Insulation: FlintBoard ISO and FlintBoard ISO-T, CertainTeed

A Durable Solution

Photo: IKO

Located the heart of Halifax’s Spring Garden Road district, City Centre Atlantic features a mix of urban retail, office and residential space totaling 31,600 square feet. The site has 194 underground parking spaces servicing the office and retail components of the property.

Multiple challenges came with the City Centre Atlantic project for installing roofing contractor IC Roofing and Sheet Metal of Bedford, Nova Scotia. I.C. Roofing and Sheet Metal Limited is a Maritime-based company servicing Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Southwestern Ontario. The site offered limited street access and rooftop storage space was limited, necessitating extra movement of materials up on the roof.

The building owner was looking for a durable system with a proven track record, so a heat-welded modified bitumen system manufactured by IKO was selected. After the concrete deck on the 2,936-square-foot City Centre Atlantic roof was covered with Modiflex MP-95-FS vapor barrier, IKOTherm and IKOTherm Tapered insulation were installed using Millennium adhesive. After the cover board was installed. I.C. Roofing crews then heat welded the Torchflex TP-180-FF base sheet and light gray Torchflex TP-250 cap sheet. They also fabricated and installed the edge metal on the project.

Everything on the job went smoothly, according to Mike Croft, Atlantic Regional Manager, I.C. Roofing. The key to success on projects like this? “It’s experience,” Croft says. “I.C. Roofing ensures a quality installation through project management and employing journeyman roofers that are great tradesmen. The guys we have undertake these jobs are great journeyman roofers who do two things: they understand the tasks they are doing, and they take a lot of pride in what they are doing. You can have journeyman roofers that can install most things, but it takes a special journeyman roofer to make it look worthy. That’s stuff you can’t teach. A guy has to have that. Our guys take personal pride in their work.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: I.C. Roofing and Sheet Metal Limited, Bedford, Nova Scotia, www.icroofing.ca

MATERIALS

Vapor Barrier: Modiflex MP-95-FS, IKO, www.iko.com

Insulation: IKOTherm and IKOTherm Tapered, IKO

Cover Board: Protectoboard, IKO

Base Sheet: Torchflex TP-180-FF-Base

Cap Sheet: Torchflex TP-250-Cap

Metal Tiles Help Modernize Texas Bank’s Building and Brand

The design for the bank’s exterior incorporates metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wraps around the building, intersecting with the metal tile. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

When Southside Bank in Texas began a campaign to modernize its brand, management understood that the buildings it occupies play a significant role in branding. The existing flagship branch in Tyler, Texas, was re-imagined and renovated inside and out to reflect the contemporary way the bank now interacts with its customers.

Architect Chad Humphries AIA, RID, project architect and partner, Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, extracted the vision for the renovation from the Southside team and created the bank’s signature design element using metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wrapped around the building, and intersected with the metal tile at the entrances.

Humphries specified 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color. Also specified was 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze. Additionally, 500 square feet of Petersen’s composite rain screen in Classic Bronze finish was installed.

The building was topped with 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

“The tiles were the main design element we wanted on the entryways, to function as both wall and roof material, to blur the line between roof and wall,” Humphries says. “Metal tiles have been around in Europe for centuries, and we employed the PAC-CLAD Precision Series TS Tile as a modern option. Metal has a timelessness that is appealing, and in this project it achieved the aesthetic vision and performance needs we established.”

The tile concept on the entryways was such a success on this project that it will be duplicated on many other Southside Bank buildings. Humphries likes the metal tile’s low profile and the way it also adds texture to the wall. “I especially like the way the light interacts on the tile’s surface, which allows for a wall that changes its appearance as the sun progresses across the sky throughout the day,” he says.

When selecting products for any project, Humphries values how long a product has been on the market. “Even though the Precision Series TS Tile hasn’t been around a long time, it was Petersen’s version of a product with proven history and that was good enough for us,” he notes.

Design Challenges

Where the tile on the entryways met the standing seam roof, a junction not often encountered was created. The tile-to-panel junction was easy to deal with because ultimately it was a simple metal-to-metal joint, according to Humphries. “Additionally, the tile allowed for a 45-degree turn without requiring edge band,” he says.

A metal roof was chosen because of metal’s longevity, and the need to blend in to the building’s design, notes Humphries, who typically specifies some kind of metal element on every project. Design challenges included peeling back and sorting through the multiple phases of additions and renovations inside and outside of the building, ultimately to be truer to the original design of the building. “For example, in the 1970s they added a concrete superstructure. But in the 90s, rather than removing it, they built a giant green mansard roof over it. Over time the building’s design became a mixture of ideas with no clear vision in mind. Our job was to simplify and unify everything,” he explains.

Approximately 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze were installed. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

This project was the first one for installing contractor Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal in Longview, Texas, on which metal tile was involved, says Anthony McKinley, vice president, estimator and project manager. “The tiles tied into a valley with the existing roof, so we made sure they were cut properly and flanged,” he says. “Installation of the tile and standing seam roof was straightforward for our experienced crew. It was a slower process working with the tiles because we wanted to make sure the lines were straight, level and square. The details were custom so we took a little longer to make sure we measured correctly and got it looking right.”

All metal work on the building was performed by McKinley’s team. “This job was large in scope mainly because of the removal and replacement of the mansard roofing,” McKinley says. “After taking off the roof panels, we removed fake dormers to create a straight, plain look. We tore everything down to the wood deck. Ultimately, we were at least six months on the jobsite. Most of our time was spent removing the existing metal, which required a man lift, which is a slow process.”

“We felt it was important to make sure the owner and architect liked what we were doing by not making design decisions on our own,” McKinley says. “Some jobs you know what to do, but on this one we wanted to make sure the architect liked it. We figured out details to make it work for integrity and water intrusion, but also to give the architect the look he wanted. We figured out the details on our own because those typically aren’t specified.” Edge metal was fabricated by McKinley’s crew. “We love working with PAC-CLAD,” McKinley says. “They have superior products, and the technical help Petersen provides is very valuable.”

TEAM

Architect: Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, https://fitzpatrickarchitects.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: Snap-Clad 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Metal Tiles: Precision Series TS Tile, .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze, Petersen

Award-Winning Re-Roofing Project Showcases Quality Workmanship

Photo: Duro-Last

Replacing the roof on an occupied building with multiple tenants means not only meeting the needs of the building owner but several other businesses as well. When the roof is high above a busy metro area, the job can be even more demanding, but when the failing roof on a CBRE Group high-rise in Cambridge, Massachusetts, needed to be replaced, Commonwealth Building Systems was up to the challenge.

Located near the Longfellow bridge across the Charles River from downtown Boston, the building houses a variety of business and retail tenants. RMX Northeast Inc., the consultant on the project, specified the use of a PVC roofing system from Duro-Last to replace the existing stone-ballasted system and invited local contractors to bid on the project. Commonwealth Building Systems of Rockland, Massachusetts was awarded the job.

Photo: Duro-Last

Commonwealth is a commercial roofing and sheet metal contractor that focuses on the Boston and Cambridge area. Daniel Hulverson, principal at Commonwealth Building Systems, knew the logistics on the project would be a challenge. Due to construction taking place on the Longfellow Bridge at the time of the project, traffic in the area was diverted around the building, and use of a crane was limited to Saturdays. The Commonwealth team commissioned the use of a 300-ton crane on two consecutive weekends to remove the stone ballast, pavers, and existing EPDM membrane from the 180-foot-tall, multi-level roof.

“The ballast removal was probably the hardest part of the project,” Hulverson recalls. “We couldn’t do any work doing the week because of the tenants for one, because of the noise, and the Longfellow Bridge was under construction at the time. It was actually closed, so traffic was pretty much a nightmare.”

R.K. Hydrovac was called in to remove the stone ballast. The crane was used to hoist the vacuum hoses to the roof. “It was quite an undertaking on their end,” Hulverson says. “We got the stone ballast off and got all of the stock up there on two consecutive weekends. Actually, after the first weekend we were able to get started roofing. We stockpiled all of the trash and got most of the trash off on the second weekend. We had a couple more crane days to get trash out at the end, so we had maybe four of five crane setups in all.”

A Custom Solution

The new roofing system was designed to stand up to the area’s high winds. Leaving the existing insulation in place, the Commonwealth crew covered each roof area with 2 additional inches of Duro-Guard ISO II insulation, which was mechanically attached. The upper roof was above a steel deck, and the lower roof covered a concrete deck, so different fasters were used, but the fastening patterns were identical.

After the existing ballasted EPDM system was removed, crews installed a thermoplastic roof system manufactured by Duro-Last. Photo: Duro-Last

After the insulation was in place, the Duro-Last PVC membrane was attached using the Duro-Bond induction welding system. The membrane is delivered custom fabricated to fit the site. “Duro-Last comes out and pre-measures the job with our assistance, and then the sheets are made,” Hulverson says. “They give you a map and tell you where the sheets go. They measure around all of the penetrations, and everything is pre-cut. It’s pretty cool how it comes out. The rolls are listed A, B, C, D, and so on, and you just kick out the rolls and weld them in place. The sheets are pre-welded at any laps, so it reduces the amount of welding you are doing on the job and saves time.”

The Duro-Bond system uses specially coated plates that are screwed down to the deck before the membrane is put in place. The membrane is adhered to the plates using an induction welder.

Work began on the upper level and moved down to the lower level. “We went from side to side, working our way toward where the crane setup was going to be,” Hulverson explains

The upper roof was constructed over a mechanical room, so crews could work any time without fear of disrupting the tenants. Work hours were restricted on the lower level because it covered occupied business space. “We had to switch to very early hours in the morning because of the noise,” Hulverson notes. “We were starting at three in the morning so we didn’t disrupt the tenants.”

Commonwealth’s dedication to quality workmanship on the project earned the company Duro-Last’s Edge-to-Edge & Deck-to-Sky Award. Photo: Duro-Last

Staging areas were moved as the project progressed to limit the possibility of damage to the completed sections of the roof. On the last day, the roof membrane was protected by tarps and plywood as the final loads of debris were removed.

The safety concerns were straightforward. “There was a parapet wall that was above 42 inches high around the whole perimeter of the building, so safety-wise, this job was fairly easy for us,” Hulverson says.

Custom-fabricated curbs and stacks were utilized to help reduce rooftop labor. “All of Duro-Last’s curbs and pipe seals come pre-made, and they are all listed on that diagram,” Hulverson says. “You just unfold them and weld them. The corners are already pre-done. It’s a very nice system.”

Commonwealth’s sheet metal division installed all of the edge metal, which was custom fabricated by EXCEPTIONAL Metals. “Again, Duro-Last measures everything along with our superintendent, and it’s all sent out prefabrication,” Hulverson says. “The pre-assembled wall cap was installed on top of the walls.”

During the last phase of the project, Walkway pads were welded down in high-traffic areas.

Luckily, weather wasn’t a key factor. “There were some challenging windy days, as there always are in Boston, but nothing I can really remember that slowed us down to the point we couldn’t work,” says Hulverson. “The weekend crane setups and the size of the crane were unusual, but other than that it was a pretty smooth job. And the views are beautiful — you’re looking across the Charles River into Boston, so it was pretty nice.”

Commonwealth’s dedication attention to detail on this project earned the company Duro-Last’s 2018 Edge-to-Edge & Deck-to-Sky Award, which was presented in 2019. “Duro-Last was impressed by the neatness of the job, especially the wall flashing,” Hulverson says. “They were impressed with our workmanship. If there were any challenges or changes, we just met them head on and moved forward, like we typically do. The customer is always first.”

Hulverson believes the key to ensuring quality workmanship is dedicated employees, from top to bottom. “Our foremen are well trained, as are our superintendents, and I actually look over the jobs in the field as one of four owners,” he says. “We make sure the quality and craftsmanship are done the right way.”

TEAM

Roof Consultant: RMX Northeast Inc., Milford, Massachusetts, www.rmxne.com

Roofing Contractor: Commonwealth Building Systems, Rockland, Massachusetts, www.commonwealthbuildingsystems.com

MATERIALS

PVC Membrane: Duro-Last, www.duro-last.com

Insulation: Duro-Guard ISO II, Duro-Last

Edge Metal: EXCEPTIONAL Metals, www.exceptionalmetals.com

Silicone Coating Restores the Roof, Reduces Utility Costs at Mixed-Use Complex

At the Shoppes of Johnson’s Landing in Angier, North Carolina, ACC applied a high-solids silicone roof coating on the 20-year-old metal roof to seal penetrations, restore the roof, and provide a white reflective coating. Photos: All-County Contracting (ACC)

Glenn Wujcik, the owner of All-County Contracting (ACC), headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina, has been fascinated with spray rigs since he and his brother first used one in 1979 to insulate a van with spray polyurethane foam (SPF). His company specializes in applying SPF and roof coatings on existing buildings. Lately, he’s found silicone roof coatings are making up an increasing share of his company’s workload.

“The coatings industry in general is booming right now,” Wujcik says. “A lot of the TPO and EPDM roofs are nearing the end of their service life, and instead of tearing them off, if you catch them in time, you can go over it with the silicone coating and get a new 10-year warranty. Silicones have a proven track record. When you put it on properly, it weathers really well. It has excellent elongation.”

Wujcik characterizes himself as a hands-on owner who strives to be on the site for every job. He believes there is an art as well as a science to operating a spray rig properly, and experience is crucial. “I love doing this,” he says. “I’ve been doing it for more than 30 years, my business partner’s been doing it more than 30 years, and our best sprayer has sprayed more than both of us combined. We know what we have to do, we know how long it’s going to take, and we have the right equipment. We are really good about the preparation and the application.”

Coatings and spray foam are excellent products, but only in the right situations, notes Wujcik. They should only be used on the proper substrates and applied in the right conditions. “In spraying, the most important thing is knowing when not to spray,” he says. “Right now, I’m working on a job, and for the last two days, there have been 10-20 mph winds, and I haven’t finished it yet. I told the owner, ‘I haven’t oversprayed anything yet, and I don’t want to.’ I’d rather do it right and not have any problems.”

Wujcik points to a recent project on a mixed-use building in Angier, North Carolina, to illustrate some of the benefits of a silicone roof coating. “It’s a U-shaped building with about 14,000 square feet of roof space,” Wujcik notes. “There’s a bakery, a restaurant, a pharmacy, and a doctor’s office, and there are a lot of penetrations on the roof.”

The penetrations were the site of multiple leaks. Wujcik decided to use a high-solids silicone coating, GE Enduris 3502, to prevent leaks and extend the life of the roof. The monolithic coating will seal the penetrations, and the white reflective surface will provide an additional benefit: reduced cooling bills in the summer. “Putting a white coating on it is going to reduce their energy load in the summer pretty substantially,” he says.

Applying the Coating

On this project, the first step was to pressure wash the existing roof. “That’s where most coating jobs fail — surface preparation,” Wujcik states. “Washing the roof properly is one of the most important steps.”

The high-solids silicone coating was applied to the existing standing seam metal roof. Care had to be taken to ensure all sides of the metal ribs were properly covered with the material. Photos: All-County Contracting (ACC)

The company uses 4,000 psi belt-drive power washers, so care has to be taken not to damage the roof or skylights, which are covered and marked for safety reasons. The company follows all OSHA regulations, which in most cases means setting up safety lines 6 feet from the edge, with stanchions 10 feet apart, to establish a safety perimeter.

“Safety is my number one thing,” Wujcik says, “I’ve been doing this a long time and I’ve never had a lost-time accident. I preach safety. That is absolutely the most important — and accidents are expensive.”

The next step is to apply the GE Seam Sealer at the penetrations. “When this roof was originally installed 20 years ago, they did it textbook perfect,” Wujcik notes. “Each 4-inch pipe coming though had at least 20 fasteners holding it down.”

However, over time, the rubber grommets on the fasteners can degrade, and expansion and contraction can take their toll. “We have really hot summers here, we’ve seen roofs where literally thousands of fasteners have backed out,” he says.

The seam sealer is typically applied with a brush. “Any horizontal seams, any termination bars, any penetration that goes through the roof that has a screw, we apply the seam sealer,” he says. “It goes on quite thick — at about 80 linear feet per gallon.”

After the seam sealer cures for one day, the coating is applied. Spraying flat roofs with EPDM, TPO, and PVC membranes is a fairly straightforward process, according to Wujcik. “You basically spray it just like you would spray paint a wall,” he says. “You overlap your spray pattern 50 percent. I’ve been doing it for so many years, and you get a feeling for how fast you can go.”

After the roof was power washed, the seam sealer as applied to the seams and penetrations. After it cured, two coats of the high-solids silicone product were sprayed on the roof. Photos: All-County Contracting (ACC)

A wet mil gauge is used to ensure the proper thickness. Wujcik notes the high-solids silicone formulation has very little shrinkage as it dries.  “As we’re spraying, we insert the gauge into the wet coating and it tells you how many mils you have sprayed down. In this case, we were applying to achieve 21 dry mils.”

The spray rig is set up on the ground and operated by one man, while the sprayer and the hose man are working on the roof. “It’s a minimum of a three-man crew per coating rig,” he notes. “You’re dealing with about 6,000-7,000 psi of pressure, so you need special hoses rated for at least 7,000 psi. You never want to kink them. If you busted a hose, by the time someone came down from the roof to the machine, you could pump out 20 gallons on the ground. That’s why you need a ground man.”

Flat roofs are sprayed perpendicular to the roof, but the standing seam metal roof on this project called for a different technique. “On metal roofs with high ridges, if you don’t angle your gun you’ll miss the sides of the ribs,” Wujcik points out. “You have to do it from one direction, working one way, and then turn around and do it from the other direction, working the other way. If you try to spray straight down on the roof, you’re going to miss the nooks and crannies in all of those ribs.”

The surface area of the ribs also has to be taken into account when calculating the amount of liquid that will be applied, notes Wujcik.

The final step in the process is to touch up the applications at the penetrations to ensure a clean look. On vertical surfaces including parapet walls, crews ensure the coating is applied to a uniform height. “On the last day, we take up brushes and rollers and cut in straight lines,” he says. “That really finishes the job. The detailing gives it that final touch.”

Open for Business

The active and open jobsite posed some challenges. “There were a lot of cars around the building, so we had to be very careful not to hit them with overspray,” Wujcik notes. “When you’re working on a plant, you might be able to move all of the cars to a different location, but at doctor’s offices and restaurants, you have traffic in and out of the parking lot all of the time. We can use car covers if there are a few cars there, but when they are in and out like that, it’s not practical, so you have to be very careful when you do the job.”

The job was completed in the winter, and bad weather resulted in some delays. “A job like this in the summertime would have been a weeklong project at most,” Wujcik notes. “This project took almost a month because we had an exceptionally cold winter with a lot of high winds. It took extra time, but that’s my philosophy: If it’s not the right conditions, I just won’t do it.”

The project qualified for a 10-year warranty, and when it expires ACC plans to be there to pressure wash and recoat the roof for another 10-year warranty.

“We inspect our jobs every year,” Wujcik says. He notes that annual roof inspections and routine maintenance are the simplest and most cost-effective ways to ensure the roof’s life span. Yet these steps are often neglected.

“It’s amazing that some of these multi-million-dollar companies don’t send their maintenance guys up on the roof for 10 minutes to check the drains,” he says. “If a roof has 2 inches of pine needles around the drain, the whole roof has to have 2 inches of water on it before it begins to drain. That puts tremendous, tremendous stress on a roof. Keeping your drains clear is really important.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: All-County Contracting (ACC), Raleigh, North Carolina

MATERIALS

Roof Coating: Enduris by GE 3502, GE Performance Coatings, www.GE.com/silicones
Seam Sealer: GE Seam Sealer, GE Performance Coatings

Standing Seam Metal Roof Crowns Jaindl Farms Office Addition

The Jaindl Farms office complex sits on an a 12,000-acre turkey farm complete with its own feed mill. Photo: Steve Wolfe Photography.

Jaindl Farms is a multigenerational family business that encompasses a land development company and a fully integrated turkey farm. Its headquarters sits on 12,000 acres of farmland in Orefield, Pennsylvania, where the company grows the crops to make the feed for its turkeys. When the owners contacted MKSD Architects in Allentown, Pennsylvania, about adding space to their offices, the goals were to provide room to expand and to honor the Jaindl family’s history and legacy.

“The owner has a deep appreciation for all things agrarian and for old barns,” recalls Todd Chambers, partner, MKSD Architects. “One day we were meeting about the project, and he said, ‘What do you think about reusing the timber frame of an old barn?’ A light bulb went off.”

A large barn in Northampton County was located and dismantled, and the frame was repurposed for the office addition. The new two-story stone structure connects to the existing one-story office building, which was roofed with natural cedar shakes. A standing seam metal roof was specified for the new structure in

The new two-story addition was constructed with wood repurposed from a barn built around 1900. It was topped with a new standing seam metal roof. Photo: Steve Wolfe Photography.

keeping with the traditional architecture of the area. “We were concerned about the aesthetics, so standing seam was an obvious choice,” Chambers says. “We tried to keep the penetrations to a minimum and keep them out of the view of the main facade.”

The roofing contractor on the project was The Gehringer Company, headquartered in Whitehall, Pennsylvania. The company was called in to handle the project by the general contractor, Allentown-based Bracy Contracting Inc. The Gehringer Company’s president, Tom Gehringer, recommended a Dutch Seam roof system manufactured by ATAS International because it had the durability and aesthetics the project required, but was also easy to install. “It’s less labor-intensive than other systems because it doesn’t require a mechanical seamer,” he notes.

A Turkey Shoot

The roofing installation went very smoothly, according to Gehringer and Chambers. The Gehringer Company crews installed 6,400 square feet of ATAS MRD-110 Dutch Seam panels on the roof. They also installed approximately 500 square feet of metal panels as siding on the dormers. “It’s a 12-inch-wide piece with a raised section at the lock,” notes Gehringer. “When it’s installed looks like board and batten siding.”

The roof features dormers to bring in natural light. The dormers are sided with metal panels to minimize roof maintenance. Photo: The Gehringer Corporation.

Installation began in January 2017, so the weather posed the biggest challenge. “We did it when the temperatures were pretty low. The highs were in the 20s,” Gehringer recalls. “The nice thing is you can install the system in almost any temperature.”

After ATA-Shield high temperature synthetic underlayment was applied to the entire surface of the plywood deck, the roof panels were installed. “We worked from our aerial lifts,” Gehringer explains. “We purchased two aerial lifts several years ago and now use them for almost all of our steep roofing installations.”

Details included SL-2 Snow Meister snow guards from Berger Brothers. “In this climate, one of the tricky pieces with standing seam is sliding snow, so we specified snow guards that clamp to the standing seams,” Chambers says. “The ones we used emulate the turkey tail feathers.”

Roofing crews also tied in a small section of new cedar shakes to extend the hallway of the existing structure and connect it to the new addition. “We installed the original cedar shakes on the adjacent section for Bracy Contracting almost 20 years ago,” notes Gehringer.

The project went off without a hitch. Gehringer credits his company’s experienced crews and field supervisors for its

The snow guards installed on the project were chosen in part because they reminded the business owners of a turkey’s tail feathers. Photo: The Gehringer Corporation.

excellent track record. “I believe we’re one of the larger architectural metal roofing installers in our area and have virtually no callbacks on roofs we install,” he says. “What it boils down to is having people that know how to do it right — and having people that are committed to doing it right. And with architectural metal work, you have to take your time and do it right. This metal roof is going to look exactly like it looks now for at least 30 years.”

Looking back, what strikes Chambers is how different this project was from his typical assignments. “We’re commercial architects. We do a lot of health care work,” he says. “The ability to design something that’s not done every day, and is different than your typical approach, is refreshing and fun.”

TEAM

Architect: MKSD Architects, Allentown, Pennsylvania, www.MKSDarchitects.com
General Contractor: Bracy Construction Inc., Allentown, Pennsylvania, www.BracyConstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: The Gehringer Corporation, Whitehall, Pennsylvania, www.GehringerRoofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: ATAS Dutch Seam MRD110, .032 aluminum, Medium Bronze, ATAS International Inc., www.ATAS.com
Metal Siding Panels: ATAS Multi-Purpose Panels MPW120, .032 aluminum, Sierra Tan, ATAS International Inc.
Synthetic Underlayment: ATA-Shield, ATAS International Inc.
Snow Guards: SL-2 Snow Meister Snow Guards, Berger Building Products, www.bergerbp.com