Metal Retrofit Project Protects Air Force Base

On this 7,800-square-foot building at Hurlburt Field, a new metal roof was installed over the existing roof using Roof Hugger sub-purlins. Photos: Roof Hugger

Over the past 15 years, Royster Contracting, LLC of Fort Walton Beach, Florida, has completed several metal-over-metal retrofit projects. Skip Royster, the company’s owner, started his general contracting firm in 1977, and it has a strong reputation for quality construction, with a focus on metal buildings, metal roofing and walls, and retrofit roof systems.

Royster’s newest retrofit roofing project was for the U.S. Air Force on a 7,800-square-foot building located at Hurlburt Field in Okaloosa County, Florida. This Air Force base is very familiar with retrofit roofing projects, with some stretching back more than 25 years. The existing building needed a new metal roof, but in lieu of removing the existing roof and replacing it, the Base Facility Construction department elected a metal-over-metal retrofit. In this case, a new metal roof was installed over new structural sub-framing from Roof Hugger that attaches directly to the existing roof’s support system, without removing the existing metal roof.

Officials at the base knew that it was possible to engineer the new retrofit system to meet current wind uplift design criteria for the area. In this case, the system was designed to meet a Category V hurricane with wind speeds of 157 mph. With the recent catastrophic Hurricane Michael damage at nearby Tyndall Air Force Base and elsewhere on the Florida Panhandle, this project just 82 miles away suffered no damage, even with Michael’s documented peak wind speed of 155 mph.

Roof Hugger provided 2,700 linear feet of the standard Model C sub-purlins, manufactured to fit over 12-inch on center PBR rib panel roofs. Central States Manufacturing of Lowell, Arkansas, furnished their 24-inch-wide Central Seam Plus trapezoidal standing seam roof in 24-gauge Brite white. The general contractor for the project was CCI Mechanical, LLC of Shalimar, Florida.

In addition to hardening the building with the increase in wind uplift resistance, the Base chose to include 3 inches of fiberglass insulation between the existing roof and bottom of the new metal roof. Hardening of building roofs is very common on metal-over-metal retrofit roofs in the coastal states. Many older buildings that were engineered for a 90 to 100 mph windspeeds must be upgraded to minimum code requirements that are currently at 120 mph inland and 130 mph for coastal areas; some parts of Florida and Texas have requirements of 155 mph or greater. U.S. Government facilities typically specify criteria that exceed locally adopted codes.

TEAM

General Contractor: CCI Mechanical, LLC, Shalimar, Florida, www.cci-alliance.com

Roofing Contractor: Royster Contracting, LLC, Fort Walton Beach, Florida, www.roysterconst.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: Central Seam Plus Trapezoidal Standing Seam Roof, Central States Manufacturing, www.centralstatesmfg.com

Sub-Purlins: Roof Hugger, www.roofhugger.com

Composite Slate Roof Tops New Train Station

The 2,800-square-foot Wyandanch Station is topped with 5,000 square feet of DaVinci composite slate roofing. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

These days, when trains stop at the Wyandanch Station in Wyandanch, New York, they’re traveling through a completely renovated, eye-stopping facility. Atop that train station can be found a new composite slate roof.

The state-of-the-art location is the most recent new train station constructed by the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR). The 2,800-square-foot structure is topped with 5,000 square feet of DaVinci Single-Width Slate roofing in a Castle Gray color.

As part of the Double Track Project, the LIRR built two new 12-car-long platforms that include a snow melt system, a pedestrian overpass with elevators, new stairs, new canopies and new platform shelters. The interior of the station features Terrazzo tile floors, a wood-paneled ceiling and chandeliers. Some 4,200 people use the train station each day.

The new Wyandanch Station is part of a revitalization effort called Wyandanch Rising. A highlight was the construction of the new train station and adding a second Long Island Rail Road track running through the Wyandanch area. The LIRR partnered with the Town of Babylon and Suffolk County in the site location and design of the new Wyandanch Station.

As construction progressed on the train station, Ashlar Contracting was brought in to work on the project and install the roof. “The roof is a key architectural element on the design of this station,” says Christopher Monahan, owner of Ashlar Contracting in Bohemia, New York. “The DaVinci composite slate was very easy to install and makes a large visual impact on this structure. The product looks like real slate and complements the entire look of this train station.”

Opened in September of 2018, the Wyandanch Train Station is receiving positive reviews from daily users and the general public. “We get compliments all the time on the train station,” says Peter Casserly, project manager with Bay Village Consultants Inc. out of Amityville, New York, developer of the site. “The entire facility has been well received by the immediate community and all those who utilize it. The roof plays a vital visual role in the train station. I’m pleased to say we’ve had no issues with it and look forward to it providing both shelter and beauty for the structure for decades into the future.”

TEAM

Roof System Installer: Ashlar Contracting, Bohemia, New York, www.ashlarcontracting.com

MATERIALS

Roof System: DaVinci Single-Width Slate roofing, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Putting a Lid on Gainesville’s New Airport Fire Station

The fire station’s standing seam metal roof was constructed with 22-gauge MegaLoc panels from Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing. Photos: Scherer Construction

When Gainesville Regional Airport leaders decided to retire the airport’s aging fire station, they knew the replacement facility had to be safe, secure and attractive from above.

After all, most of the passengers who flew to Gainesville in north-central Florida would only see the fire station’s roof from the sky, as their planes took off and touched down. What Gainesville Fire Rescue Station 6 needed was a roof that was tough as nails but also matched the city’s image as a healthcare and education hub.

The choice was clear: A standing-seam metal roofing system that was engineered to withstand hurricane-force winds and designed to look beautiful.

Clayton Crosier, owner of Crosier & Son Roofing in Gainesville, said during the four-week job the crew transformed what could have been a dull municipal building into a shining star at the two-runway airport.

“The roof turned out great,” Crosier says. “It’s one tough roof. It’s not blowing off, I can tell you that.”

Not only does the new fire station roof meet stringent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) guidelines, it protects against anything Mother Nature can throw at it.

Making Way for a New Fire Station

The move to the new fire station, officially called an aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) facility, began in late 2016. With two major airlines — American and Delta — flying out of Gainesville Regional and steady growth in passenger loads, a new ARFF facility had to be ready for new challenges.

When the original 5,600-square-foot ARFF station was constructed in 1979, 180,550 passengers boarded aircraft at Gainesville Regional. By 2018 (the most recent data available), the number of passengers had increased to 236,019. 

The new 9,589-square-foot facility allows for wider firetrucks and also adds training space.

At the same time, the building needed significant renovations, including a new roof and repairs to the crew quarters, electrical systems and plumbing. Storage space was also tight, in large part because firefighting equipment had been getting bigger over the years. The new structure allows for wider fire trucks and also adds training space.

After studying the possibility of a renovation, the airport authority decided to build anew in a different location on airport property. The chosen site is near the control tower and has a direct view and access to the runways, which is critical to emergency operations. The construction, funded by a $3.8 million FAA grant, was completed in fall 2017.

In planning for the new 9,589-square-foot facility, Crosier knew the roof was required to meet local, state and federal specifications. Per FAA rules, the new building needed to be constructed with fire-resistant materials and have systems in place to control noise. In addition, the building had to be low maintenance and designed with energy conservation in mind, among other factors. Finally, local and state building codes specified that the structure be built to withstand hurricane-force winds.

Fire Station 6 Cleared for Take Off

To meet the standards, Crosier knew the roof had to be heavy duty. He chose Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing’s mechanically seamed roof system MegaLoc in the color Nevada Silver, which complemented the building’s white concrete-block construction. The roof’s specifications called for 2-inch standing seams and 22-gauge steel, which was coated with a premium metallic paint.

To start the 114-square project, the Crosier & Son crew installed plywood sheeting over the existing steel joist system. On top, 5-inch rigid insulation with an R-value of 35 and Grace Ice & Water Shield HT high-temperature waterproof underlayment were installed. From there, the crew took meticulous care to custom fit the materials on site to prevent panel laps.

The roof was mechanically seamed at 180 degrees. Running the metal roof seamer was a two-person job, with one person at the ridge and the other at the eaves overhang to ensure accuracy. Several weeks after the roof was completed, Crosier & Son returned to install the metal soffit, fascia, gutters and downspouts.

A Job Well Done

Since the construction was completed, the roof has successfully weathered severe weather, including Hurricane Michael in 2018. Looking back on the project, Crosier said he never doubted that the standing seam roof was a perfect fit for the ARFF building.

“With the size and scope of this project,” he said, “I am incredibly happy with the result of the hard work we all put in.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Crosier & Son Roofing, Gainesville, Florida, www.crosierroofing.com

Construction Contractor: Scherer Construction, Gainesville, Florida, www.schererconstruction.com

MATERIALS

Standing Seam Metal Roof: MegaLoc, Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing, www.gulfcoastsupply.com

Underlayment: Grace Ice & Water Shield HT, GCP Applied Technologies, www.gcpat.com

New System Avoids Tear-Off, Eliminates Leaks, Meets Strict Florida Codes

The Solid Waste Authority facility’s existing roof was re-covered with a symmetrical standing seam roof system from McElroy Metal. Photos: McElroy Metal

Advanced Roofing Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, runs its operation by the belief that what the customer wants, the customer gets.

The Solid Waste Authority (SWA) in West Palm Beach, Florida, had a building with an aging and leaking R-panel metal roofing system. “It was leaking everywhere,” says Mike Scardina, the Sheet Metal Department Manager at Advanced Roofing. “The original roof looked to be over 20 years old.”

Advanced Roofing is a commercial roofing company with nine locations, specializing in re-roofing, repairs and maintenance services for occupied buildings in Florida and the Caribbean. When it comes to commercial re-roofing to meet strict building standards and wind codes, Advanced Roofing has seen it all.

The roof panels were manufactured from .040-inch aluminum in Ash Gray. The panels are 16 inches wide, with pencil ribs.

This particular SWA building was used as a dumping site for foliage collected from the community. Eventually, the leaves are moved to a compost site or a recycling facility. Roof leaks were threatening electrical components and creating many problems in a small workshop within the building. The SWA wanted a permanent solution to fix the leaks and wanted a long-lasting solution for an area where hurricane-force winds are a constant threat.

The 238T symmetrical roof system was chosen because of its extremely high uplift capacity over the open framing and ease of repair if it would ever become damaged by a future storm. This system also eliminates the need for additional edge and corner framing typically required when re-roofing an open frame metal building like this, with existing 5-foot-on-center purlin spacing. Instead of a complete tear-off of the original R-panel roof, Advanced Roofing left the roof in place and installed Roof Hugger sub-purlins every 5 feet on-center —approximately 7,600 linear feet. Leaving the existing roof in place maintained the structural diaphragm that the R-panel provides to the building. The roof re-cover was completed with the 238T symmetrical standing seam roofing system from McElroy Metal in .040 aluminum. The assembly is approved for Florida’s High Velocity Hurricane Zone.

“SWA wanted their roof system engineered to the highest standard possible and in line with their goals of durability in the most extreme conditions, and that’s what we gave them,” Scardina says. “This system will last a long time and hold up under tough conditions.”

After the roll former was lifted into place by a crane, the panels were run at the eave.

McElroy’s 238T symmetrical standing seam systems do not have male and female seams; instead they are comprised of panels with matching left and right seams. The panels are joined with a mechanically seamed cap. The panels are non-directional and can be installed left to right, right to left or even from the center out. In addition to the installation benefits, symmetrical panels offer easy individual panel removal and replacement. Individual panels can also be re-installed, requiring only the purchase and installation of a new cap.

Before working on the roof, Advanced Roofing had to replace several rusting 20-foot purlins with new purlins. The roof panels for this project were .040-inch aluminum, painted Ash Gray, They were 16 inches wide with pencil ribs to reduce the appearance of oil canning. Seventy percent of the panels were 87 feet long and the remaining 30 percent were 100 feet long. All of the panels were run at the eave as Advanced Roofing used its in-house crane division to lift their 238T roll former into place.

To obtain HVHZ and Florida building code approval, the 238T roofing panels were installed with 100 percent 24-gauge continuous clips, meaning the clips run the entire length of each panel. The C-shaped clips are pre-installed back-to-back and run down each side of the panel and attached to the top of the Roof Huggers using two or three fasteners per side. Because of the extreme corner pressures and the 5-foot purlin spacing, a small 22-gauge plate was added on top of the clip base over the Roof Hugger in the edge and corner zones. After three holes were drilled through the plate, clip and Roof Hugger, an AB #14 screw was used to fasten the plate and clip to the Roof Hugger in the edge and corner zones.

Roof Hugger sub-purlins were installed every 5 feet on-center.

“It’s a special fastener that has a point and gets real fat where it meets the hex head,” says Tom Mahon, Sheet Metal Field Superintendent for Advanced Roofing. “It meets the uplift requirements for the area.”

Scardina and Mahon say to meet High-Velocity Hurricane Zone approval, the installation is more labor intensive, mainly because of the time needed to pre-drill plates, but the level of added durability makes it worth the work. The symmetrical panel legs are capped and the caps are secured by a seamer.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Advanced Roofing Inc., Fort Lauderdale, Florida, www.advancedroofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: 238T Symmetrical Standing Seam Roofing System, McElroy Metal, www.mcelroymetal.com

Sub-Purlins: Roof Hugger, www.roofhugger.com

Roof Restoration, Cooperative Purchasing Alliance Offer Savings for Taxpayers

Building I, shown here, had its existing a TPO roof restored using PM’s 3201 high-solids silicone coating. Photos: Anthony Roofing Ltd, a Tecta America Company

After leaks appeared in their middle and elementary school buildings, the St. Joseph Central Consolidated School District in St. Joseph, Illinois, decided it was time to re-evaluate their roofs. Since it is a public agency, the school district began looking into the request for proposal (RFP) process, which can be costly and time-consuming. Thankfully, before they spent too much time or money, they were approached by Anthony Roofing and the Progressive Materials (PM) team.

Anthony Roofing, a Tecta America Company, inspected the roofs and determined they were in prime condition for a roof restoration, as opposed to two full roof replacements. Between this cost-saving measure and the use of the National Cooperative Purchasing Alliance (NCPA) contract, the Anthony Roofing/PM team was able to save the school district a substantial sum of money. The NCPA is a publicly bid contract that allows awarded vendors/contractors to streamline the RFP process for publicly funded work because it has already performed the competitive bid process.

Building II had an EPDM roof system, which was cleaned with PM’s P-120 EPDM Cleaner prior to application of the coating to ensure proper adhesion and optimal waterproofing.

Anthony Roofing is one of Tecta America’s 70-plus locations and is certified to utilize NCPA contracts. Contractors are strongly examined and scrutinized by the lead public agency to become an award-winning contract holder. Contractors must prove a demonstrated track record of quality workmanship, customer satisfaction, and competitive pricing to be an NCPA vendor. Because of this relationship, St. Joseph Central Consolidated School District knew they were getting a top-quality contractor while saving substantial taxpayer money in the process.

Anthony Roofing was able to completely waterproof both buildings’ roofs in just four weeks using just one six-person crew. If the school district had elected to replace the roofs, the teams would have been double in size, taken double the time, and the school would have been vulnerable to even more water damage during the replacement process.

Restoring the Roofs

Building I had a single-ply substrate, which was ideal for the silicone coating process. Anthony Roofing completely restored the roof in three steps. First, crew members power-washed the existing TPO roof. They then patched seams, worn areas, and flashings. Finally, they applied PM’s 3201 high-solids silicone restoration system.

Building II’s roof had an EPDM substrate, so Anthony Roofing took additional measures to ensure proper adhesion and optimal waterproofing. They cleaned the EPDM with PM’s P-120 EPDM Cleaner to prepare for power-washing process. They then power-washed the EPDM roof and patched seams, worn areas, and flashings before applying the coating.

In just four weeks, Anthony Roofing coated roughly 117,000 square feet of roof area for the school district. Both buildings qualified for a 20-year warranty. After calculating the cost savings, it was determined that a roof replacement for these buildings would have cost roughly $18 per square foot. The expert application of the silicone coating reduced the project cost to $3.55 per square foot, saving the school district an estimated $1.6 million. Combine that with the money and time saved by utilizing the NCPA cooperative purchasing contract to streamline the process, and you get two waterproof roofs, one happy school district, and thousands of satisfied taxpayers.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Anthony Roofing Ltd, a Tecta America Company, Aurora, Illinois, www.tectaamerica.com

MATERIALS

Roof Coating System: PM 3201 high-solids silicone coating, Progressive Materials, www.pmsilicone.com

Marina’s New Roof Is Its Signature Design Element

When the former Morrow’s Marina first hit the Ridley Township, Pennsylvania, real estate market, it seemed like this last piece of the town’s open space might soon become a townhome development. But the township’s board of commissioners had a different idea for the tumble-down, 14-acre property, sited on Darby Creek, less than a mile from the entrance to the Delaware River. In addition to a new public recreation amenity, some on the board also saw a possible income opportunity too good for the township to pass up.

“I think, with good management, there could be a lot of revenue in the future,” says Bob Willert, who was then the board’s president, of the financial benefits the marina could offer.

Over the years, the town has made improvements to the marina, boosting its popularity with boaters. And, with the recent opening of a new $6 million restaurant, along with marina offices, right on the waterfront, that income potential is becoming a reality. Owned by the township and leased to a local restaurateur, the new Stinger’s Waterfront has quickly become a popular destination. It’s also easy to find, even without a GPS, thanks to a standout metal roof finished in an impossible-to-miss Copper Penny hue.

Choosing the Roof System

While the color is certainly eye-catching, it was the classic PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad profile that first caught the attention of Clarice Jones, project architect with Catania Engineering Associates, the restaurant’s Milmont Park, Pennsylvania-based design firm. She knew the standing seams on the 10,500 square feet of Snap-Clad roof panels — complemented by a matching 1,500 square feet of vented PAC-750 Soffit Panels — would emphasize the crisp lines of the building’s contemporary façade.

Crews from E.P. Donnelly installed 10,500 square feet of PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad roof panels in Copper Penny and 1,500 square feet of matching vented soffit panels. Photos: © hortonphotoinc.com

“The seaming is punched out — I saw a particular style,” she says. “I liked the way the seam looked in profile; it was a nice tight look.”

E.P. Donnelly Inc., of Warrington, Pennsylvania, installed the roof, and it was a complicated project. The sloped design is interrupted on both sides with three triangular window dormers, requiring complex detailing. And a multi-gabled cupola required similar attention, though at a smaller scale. Donnelly’s project manager, Gerry Campi, suggested Petersen’s PAC-CLAD product to the general contractor — J.S. McManus Inc. of Chester Heights, Pennsylvania — as a better fit for this demanding project.

“I told the GC that Petersen was a much better product, and the GC made the switch,” Campi says. “We use the Snap-Clad profile regularly. It snaps together the best. It’s a really nice product.”

For Jones, metal was the only roofing option that would work; any other option would have looked too residential. But, interestingly, the bright metallic finish wasn’t her first choice. Initially, her plans had called for a more neutral gray, but the town’s business manager opted for the definitely-not-neutral Copper Penny shade. “They wanted something bolder,” Jones says. “It’s like a flame; I’m glad they chose it. It sparkles like a diamond.”

Building a Landmark

The roof design features a multi-gabled cupola as well as triangular window dormers.

After winning the project, J.S. McManus Inc. needed to complete the building construction on a tight schedule. Michael McManus, vice president of J.S. McManus, coordinated the work of subcontractors and worked closely with the architect, owner, restaurant owner, and the other prime contractors. “I had my superintendent, Tim O’Connell, who was on site to handle the day-to-day operations,” McManus notes. “We kept our focus on getting the steel superstructure completed as soon as possible so that we could get the roof installed. As with all projects, once the roof is installed, then you can really expedite the project since you don’t have to worry about being impacted by the weather. It took a lot of hard work from my team, and we all stayed focused and worked diligently to complete the project on time.”

As soon as they could, crews from E.P. Donnelly tackled the challenging installation. Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time to ensure safety. The architectural features called for extra care during detailing to ensure smooth lines, and crews worked carefully to make sure that all areas were fully sealed and waterproofed.

Snow Retention System

Despite Ridley Marina being located in snow country, no snow retention had been specified for the project. “We actually brought this up to the owner and architect that no snow guards were specified for the metal roof, which would create a serious safety concern,”says Campi.E.P. Donnelly recommended installing the S-5! ColorGard system, citing it as the only system the company installs.

A ColorGard engineered snow guard system was added at the recommendation of the roofing contractor on the project.

Sourcing the snow guard system was an easy decision because Campi had worked with a specific distributor since 2013. Brock and Associates Metal Resources, based in Pittsburgh, fulfilled the necessary bill of materials. Brock is a manufacturer and distributor of exterior metal cladding systems for commercial and industrial applications.

The project called for thirty 8-foot sections of unpunched ColorGard rail. To attach the rail, 290 S-5-S Clamps were employed. Then, 290 Sno-Clips II and 290 VersaClips were installed to complete the engineered snow guard system atop the marina’s new copper penny roof. Of course, ensuring aesthetics remained an important design goal, and matching the roof color was crucial. The product allows color-matched strips of the roof metal to be inserted into the ColorGard sections, providing the necessary holding strength while still maintaining a streamlined appearance.

Since its completion, the Ridley Township Marina project has become a stunning showpiece for the area, and all involved with the project point to the roof as its most stunning architectural feature. Campi notes that the roof has become a billboard, of sorts, for the marina, visible from a nearby interstate highway. “When you’re coming down I-95 through Philly, that Copper Penny roof really stands out,” he says.

TEAM

Architect: Catania Engineering Associates, Milmont Park, Pennsylvania, www.cataniaengineering.com

General Contractor: J.S. McManus Inc., Chester Heights, Pennsylvania, www.jsmcmanus.com

Roofing Contractor: E.P. Donnelly Inc., Warrington, Pennsylvania

Distributor: Brock and Associates Metal Resources, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, www.brock-assoc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad Panels, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Soffit Panels: PAC-CLAD PAC-750 Soffit Panels, Petersen

Snow Retention System: ColorGard, S-5!, www.s-5.com

Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Boasts One of World’s Largest Green Roofs

The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building in Washington, D.C., has more than 550,000 square feet of green roof space. Photos: Owens Corning

Like a 550,000-square-foot sponge, the vegetative roof assembly (VRA) atop the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building in Washington, D.C., absorbs rainfall while managing its release into the city’s sewer system. Green roofs are a storm water management “best practice” in the nation’s capital, which boasts more than 3.2 million square feet of green roof space.

Gordon Contractors installed the green roof on the 11-level, 1.2-million-square-foot headquarters, which is also home to several independent field commands including the National Pollution Fund Center and Marine Safety Center. Key performance objectives included complying with D.C.’s stringent storm water regulations, as well as federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules requiring 95 percent of storm water to be collected onsite.

Beyond complying with local and federal storm water mandates, the project team creating the vegetative roof sought to create a rooftop habitat that supports biodiversity and helps birds and other wildlife thrive. The result of a careful and collaborative approach to moisture management is a high-performing roof that ultimately received LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. Working as a system, the roof’s components help reduce rainwater runoff while helping to reduce pollutant loads and protect natural resources such as the nearby Chesapeake Bay.

Numerous Challenges

As every roofer knows, no two projects are alike. The location of the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters on hilly terrain provided plenty of natural obstacles, including nine of the eleven levels being built into a hillside. The site

Gordon Contractors installed the green roof on the 11-level headquarters. Performance objectives included complying with D.C.’s stringent storm water regulations, as well as federal EPA rules requiring 95 percent of storm water to be collected onsite. Photos: Owens Corning

features a series of stair-stepped green roof terraces that help gradually move water from higher to lower levels and eventually into a pond through elevation changes of 120 feet. According to Steve Gordon, president of Preservation & Protection Systems Inc. (PPSI), the company providing design and installation support with the Owens Corning FOAMULAR extruded polystyrene insulation and Henry 790-11 Hot Rubberized Asphalt used in the VRA, the stair-step design required a complex approach to the roof’s varied elevations. To meet this challenge a complex network of expansion joints by EMSEAL tied together multiple air barriers within the system. Another challenge was the magnitude of the project, spanning more than a half-million feet across multiple levels and 176 acres. Timing was critical, as plants and vegetation required quick delivery and transplanting into their new environment, particularly during D.C.’s sweltering summers. These living materials couldn’t simply be covered with a tarp until better conditions prevailed, but had to be quickly transported, installed and irrigated.

The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters serves 4,000 occupants, so comfort and energy efficiency were important concerns. From the outset of the project, the integrated roofing team was tasked with designing a vegetative roof assembly that would help decrease the building’s heating and cooling energy usage, lower long-term maintenance costs and extend the life of the roof.

A Solution to Achieve Performance Goals

The project team selected a Protected Roof Membrane Assembly (PRMA) to deliver the water management required to meet storm water mandates, as well as deliver energy efficiency through R-value performance and strength to support vegetation requirements. The PRMA places the insulation layer above the waterproofing membrane, a reversal of traditional roof systems. PPSI recommended Owens Corning FOAMULAR 404 and 604 extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulations for use in the PRMA. The water resistance and compressive strength of the XPS insulation provided the integrity needed for long-term roof performance and helped the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building ultimately achieve LEED Gold certification.

The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters was built on hilly terrain, and nine of the eleven levels were built into a hillside. The stair-stepped green roof terraces help gradually move water from higher to lower levels and eventually into a pond. Photos: Owens Corning

Given the sheer size of the project, it was inevitable that the roofing team would encounter several scenarios requiring strategic problem-solving throughout the installation. For example, the team adjustedthe engineered soil specification to reduce the loads within the structural tolerances for the roof structure and carefully addressed a range of pH, moisture, organic matter and nutrient levels to support the variety of plants. Not only did such careful attention deliver strength performance, it’s also achieved the objective of attracting wildlife. The terraced landscape has welcomed not only birds and butterflies, but the occasional deer wandering onto a rooftop.

Evaluating Results

Since its completion, the VRA at the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters has attracted widespread attention from landscaping groups, engineering firms and organizations interested in sustainability. These groups are interested not just in the building’s unique design but in its resilience and performance. Steve Gordon of PPSI says the resilience of the headquarters’ roof is reflected in its record of no leaks. “We’ve had no leaks,” Gordon says. “The reason we use hot fluid applied waterproofing on green roofs is because we want to avoid any leaks in the building. At the end of the day, the biggest liability in a roof is water.”

After successfully navigating a range of challenges and opportunities, the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters’ VRA epitomizes the convergence of aesthetics and performance and is recognizedas one of the largest green roofs in the world.According to the Landscape Performance Foundation, the headquarters’ vegetative roof retains up to 424,000 gallons of rainwater.

In a small way, the performance reflects the integrity of a hero an Act of Congress honored when naming the headquarters, according to Captain Will Smith, Commanding Officer U.S. Coast Guard Base NCR. Captain Smith noted, “The Coast Guard’s only Medal of Honor recipient, Douglas Munro earned the award for his selfless sacrifice as a landing craft pilot at Guadalcanal while evacuating marines from a beachhead under heavy fire from enemy forces.”

TEAM

Architect: WDG, Washington, D.C., www.wdgarch.com
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, Bethesda, Maryland, www.clarkconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: Gordon Contractors, Capitol Heights, Maryland, www.gordoncontractors.com
Independent Rep Agency: Preservation & Protection Systems Inc. (PPSI), Laurel, Maryland, www.ppsimd.com

MATERIALS

Insulation: FOAMULAR 404 and 604 extruded polystyrene, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com
Waterproofing Membrane: 790-11 Hot Rubberized Asphalt, Henry Company, https://us.henry.com
Expansion Joints: EMSEAL, www.emseal.com
Pavers: Hanover Architectural Products, www.hanoverpavers.com
Sedum Mats: Sempergreen, www.sempergreen.com

The Hatch Memorial Shell Shows Off New Roof at 4th of July Celebration

The Boston Pops perform at The Hatch Memorial Shell on July 4, 2018. Photo: Walter Mulligan Photography

The Boston Pops perform at The Hatch Memorial Shell on July 4, 2018. Photo: Walter Mulligan Photography

In an annual tradition, Boston kicks off its outdoor summer concert series with a nationally televised performance by The Boston Pops Orchestra on the 4thof July while fireworks snap and sparkle. The Pops perform from The Hatch Memorial Shell, an amphitheater shaped like the quarter of an orange that opens to the crowd on the Charles River Esplanade.

The difficulty of waterproofing this curved structure became apparent after the Massachusetts Department of Conservation & Recreation (DCR), owner and manager of the Hatch Shell put out a bid for a new roof around Labor Day in 2017. The specification called for a single-ply EPDM sheet with pre-cast concrete panels set atop pedestals as an aesthetic outer shell.

Folan Waterproofing & Construction Co. Inc. of South Easton, Massachusetts, the general contractor, handled the overall project as well as demolition of an old terrazzo roof and installation of the new pre-cast concrete panels. Executive manager Patrick Folan worked closely with roofing contractor John F. Shea Company of Mattapan, Massachusetts, which was responsible for the waterproofing installation.

Working from cloud point data, lasers marked the position of the 1,476 pedestals that would hold the 3-inch thick concrete panels in place on the curved structure. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

Shea Company project manager Michael Frank, RRC, reviewed the installation challenges with Folan. The EPDM sheet would need to be cut into multiple slices, and then require full adhesion to the curved roof deck as well as along all the lap seams. The pedestals for the 665 concrete panels also posed an issue since the anchor studs would penetrate the EPDM sheet. There would be nearly 4,500 penetrations on the job for the 1,476 stainless steel pedestals alone. No EPDM manufacturer would warrant the installation.

After the contract was awarded in October 2017, the construction team suggested an alternative inspired by a recent project for a youth center in Cambridge. There Shea Company used the Kemperol 2K-PUR liquid-applied reinforced membrane system to waterproof below a plaza deck topped with pedestals and pavers. The DCR and Boston architectural firm Bargmann Hendrie + Archetype Inc. gave the team a green light to explore further.

“The point we made was that because we are dealing with such an odd shape and with so many penetrations for the studs, it would be much easier to install the Kemperol liquid-applied system,” Frank says. “With the single-ply EPDM sheet, there would be ‘miles’ of field seams and, of course, every time you have a lap joint, you have areas that may be suspect at some point for leaking.”

The team contacted Kemperol manufacturer, Kemper System America Inc. of West Seneca, New York, and detailed specifications for the assembly along with cost estimates were presented to the owner and architect about two weeks later. “Obviously, there was a change in installed cost, but it was almost immediately accepted. So, we needed to completely shift gears, and revise our shop drawings and submittals accordingly,” Frank says. Among other things, the design of the stainless steel pedestals was modified to allow the panels to rest a couple of inches above the new reinforced membrane.

Air hammers were used to remove the aging terrazzo and concrete layer. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

The surface preparation for the waterproofing started in April 2018, with a late May project completion target. The Folan crew removed the old cast-in-place terrazzo roofing system with air hammers and then peeled back an existing neoprene membrane to expose the structural concrete deck. Before the waterproofing membrane could be applied, Folan completely tented the roof with winter enclosures around the scaffolding, and then added diesel heaters to maintain the temperature above 40 degrees F.

Shea Company worked the job across the top of the structure and down row-by-row. After applying a Kempertec EP primer, crews applied Kemperol 2K-PUR resin with high-nap rollers a section at a time while laying Kemperol reinforcement into the resin from 20-foot rolls. Each roll was pre-cut lengthwise and then rerolled so it could be smoothly laid onto the curved surface. This was closely followed by a topcoat of the resin to fully embed the reinforcement in the resin. The system fully adheres to the deck and creates a monolithic watertight surface.

Securing the Anchors

Each pedestal needed to be precisely positioned and anchored into place through the membrane, so the epoxy anchoring system for the studs was key to the project.

The team from John F. Shea Company waterproofed the concrete roof deck with a Kemperol liquid-applied reinforced membrane system. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

The team from John F. Shea Company waterproofed the concrete roof deck with a Kemperol liquid-applied reinforced membrane system. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

After the membrane fully cured, 3-D measurements were taken across the dome with point cloud software to help determine the height difference between the surface of the membrane and the desired finished elevation for the pre-cast panels. The surveying firm that made the measurements returned when it was time to set the pedestals.

“Their surveyors marked out the dome with lasers. They would set a mark, and say, ‘This is your point for four panels, and this is the cavity depth for the finished panel elevation,’” Folan explains. There was also GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) scanning performed to locate existing reinforcement in the original structural concrete. His firm carefully drilled holes for the threaded studs to avoid the existing reinforcing steel, and the studs were then set in epoxy. Shea Company then applied GreatSeal PE-150 sealant around the pedestals and the heads of the bolts.

“Kemper System provided this detail, and they wanted the epoxy to ooze out of the pre-drilled holes when the anchors were inserted,” he says. “We would then hang the pedestals on the studs, and screw nuts onto the studs to hold the pedestal in place.”

The Folan team needed to wait for an architectural review of the pre-cast concrete panels before they could be installed. They were not all the same, but designed and numbered like puzzle pieces for their location on the shell. The 3-inch thick panels averaged 3 feet by 4 feet, and needed to be lowered by crane since they ranged from about 350 to 550 pounds each.

The studs for the pedestals were epoxied in place through the Kemperol membrane and top-sealed with GreatSeal construction sealant, also from Kemper System. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

The panels were installed row-by-row starting at the bottom with 3/4-inch open joints between. “The biggest factor at that point was the depth of the cavity. Before we set a pedestal, we needed to know whether it should be shimmed 1/16th, 1/8th or 1/4 inch,” Folan says.

Though the panel fabrication process started late, the team worked six days a week with some 10-hour days to complete the job by a final June 15thdeadline. “As fast as they could get us the pre-cast panels, we were putting them in,” he recalls.

Looking back, Folan says the pedestals would have required much more time to install if the Kemperol system had not been selected, since there were nearly 1,500 of them and each would need to be covered with EPDM. “With the Kemper System detail, we could just keep moving to meet the deadline in time for the big July 4thcelebration.”

TEAM

Architect: Bargmann Hendrie + Archetype Inc., Boston, https://bhplus.com
General Contractor: Folan Waterproofing & Construction Co. Inc., South Easton, Massachusetts, www.folanwaterproofing.com
Roofing Contractor: John F. Shea Company of Mattapan, Massachusetts, www.johnfshea.com

MATERIALS

Liquid-Applied Waterproofing System: Kemperol 2K-PUR liquid-applied reinforced membrane system, Kemper System America Inc., West Seneca, New York, www.kemper-system.com

Recreation Center’s Innovative Roof and Wall Systems Provide Added Durability

Indian River County Intergenerational Recreation Center hosts recreational and competitive sporting events and other community activities. Photos: Borrelli + Partners

Indian River County Intergenerational Recreation Center was designed to be the hub of its community, a venue that hosts recreational and competitive sports and other activities, including educational, social and philanthropic events.

The new $10.4 million facility, branded by the county as the “iG Center” and often referred to as “Big Red,” consists of two adjoining main buildings: the two-story gymnasium and a long, single-story wing that houses various multi-purpose rooms, a concession area, a game room and a catering kitchen.

The site’s location near the oceanfront in Vero Beach, Florida, is susceptible to hurricanes and other extreme weather events, and making sure the complex would stand up to the elements was a key consideration for officials and residents in the county. This concern prompted a focus on the design of the building’s exterior envelope. In the end, a metal roof and metal wall panels were the key to meeting the building’s design goals.

Design Criteria

When county officials spoke with the architects at Borrelli + Partners, they had a strict set of criteria in mind for the building, including the ability to withstand high wind speeds and 100-year rainstorms. “They mandated a sloped roofing system,” notes Dan-Michael Trbovich of Borrelli + Partners. “They wanted a minimum 20-year warranty, and they said they were looking for a ‘50-year roof.’ This affected the roof design and the wall design.”

The new $10.4 million facility was designed to stand up to hurricanes, torrential rains and extreme fluctuations in temperature. Photos: Atlantic Roofing II of Vero Beach Inc.

A key goal of the team at Borrelli + Partners was to specify a watertight metal roof system that would also allow unlimited thermal movement to cope with extreme temperature fluctuations. They found what they were looking for in a standing seam metal roof and wall system manufactured by IMETCO.

The 37-acre site and open park setting also provided the opportunity to explore interesting aesthetic elements. The building would be highly visible, and goals included a dynamic exterior design that would allow the park and the building complement each other. In the end, the decision was made to go with bright red and white metal panels that would stand against the blue sky to create what Trbovich calls an “All-American design.”

In one of many daring design elements, sections of the red roof panels were folded over and brought down to the ground to serve as wall panels. A custom detail was devised to make the transition impervious to water penetration.

“Our criteria included a kneecap—a premanufactured fixture that would be put over the entire thing,” Trbovich says. “IMETCO was the only manufacturer we knew that offered that, and it was absolutely critical in the design.”

Areas in which the panels were turned over included the south-facing wall, which was no coincidence. “We wanted to make sure the south-facing wall didn’t get too much heat, so what you’re essentially doing is creating a vented roof decking system that protects the vertical surface on the south side,” notes Trbovich.

High summer temperatures and afternoon rains in Vero Beach can cause a lot of expansion and contraction, so HVAC and plumbing systems were rerouted to avoid the roof. “There is not a single roof penetration,” Trbovich says. “We wanted to make sure that roof would be able to move and slide. We wanted to make sure there were no contraction points that would hang it up, therefore we went with a design that would not allow roofing penetrations, whether it was a vent pipe, air duct or air-handling unit.”

Detailing was meticulous and consistent throughout, according to Trbovich. Flashing details were all designed to have a 6-inch overlap. “We went to extreme levels of detailing, whether it was in section cuts or in isometric cuts, to make sure that each and every one of those flashing details had that same 6-inch overlap. We required those be uniform across the facility on all corners, so that we essentially matched rake, eave jamb and corner flashing details.”

Installation Challenges

To ensure the details were correctly installed in the field, the architect and manufacturer worked closely during construction with the general contractor, KAST Construction, and the installer, Atlantic Roofing II of Vero Beach Inc.

The building’s exterior envelope features a metal roof system and metal wall panels manufactured by IMETCO. Photos: Borrelli + Partners

Atlantic Roofing IIapplied the standing seam roof system and metal wall panels, as well as a small single-ply roof on a flat section near the entryway. IMETCO Series 300 panels in Cardinal Red were installed on both the roof and walls, while white IMETCO Latitude panels were also installed on the walls.

The metal roof system was installed over the structure’s metal deck. It included 3 inches of polyiso insulation, 5/8-inch DensDeck and Aqua-Block 50 peel and stick, high-temperature underlayment.

The absence of penetrations simplified the metal roof installation, notes Steven Cottrell, project manager and chief estimator for Atlantic Roofing II. “The panels were rolled right on the site, and the longest ones up there are 168 feet long,” he says.

The roll former was stationed on the ground, and panels were lifted to the roof with a special cradle. “IMETCO brought out the metal and provided the machinery to roll them out, and the panels were placed onto giant spacer bars and loaded onto the roof,” Cottrell explains. “It was a bit of a challenge. We had 20 men up on the roof unloading them.”

The flat roof sections connecting the two buildings and the entryway were covered with a Seaman FiberTite KEE membrane, which was fully adhered over 3 inches of polyiso, tapered insulation and 5/8-inch DensDeck.

The roof system features a large internal gutter, which was lined with the same FiberTite roof system. Metal panels drop into the gutter and pick up on the other side, so it was crucial to ensure the area would be watertight and the panels would line up perfectly. “We worked closely with the architect and manufacturer on that,” notes Cottrell. “We used their eave detail and high eave detail, and it worked very well.”

Elegant Solutions

According to Cottrell, the roof and wall installations went smoothly and the roof is performing well — despite a hurricane and a 100-year rainstorm. “We’ve had no leaks, zero callbacks,” he says.

Photos: Borrelli + Partners

As the building was completed, Borrelli + Partners worked with the county to design the landscaping around the structure. “Our architects and interior designers work very closely with the landscape crew,” Trbovich notes. “We’re concerned about the physical space — external, internal, architectural and throughout. It’s a real holistic design approach, and you don’t see that with most architectural firms.”

The result is a project that Cottrell and Trbovich point to with pride. “It’s a unique structure,” says Cottrell. “It was a challenging project, but we rose to the challenge and banged it out. It’s like a little star for us on the fridge, if you know what I mean.”

For Trbovich, what stands out the most is the marriage of form and function in the many details. “While the building looks interesting with the awning and the striking form of the red standing seam roof, what’s crucially important is all the things we just talked about that are embedded in that design — the solutions themselves.”

TEAM

Architect: Borrelli + Partners, Orlando, Florida, www.borrelliarchitects.com
General Contractor: KAST Construction, West Palm Beach, Florida, www.kastbuild.com
Roof System and Wall System Installer: Atlantic Roofing II of Vero Beach Inc., Vero Beach, Florida, www.atlanticroofing2.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: Series 300 in Cardinal Red, IMETCO, www.imetco.com
Metal Wall Panels: Series 300 in Cardinal Red and Latitude in White, IMETCO
Underlayment: Aqua-Block 50, IMETCO
Cover Board: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.densdeck.com
Single-Ply Membrane: 50-mil FiberTite XT KEE, Seaman Corporation, www.fibertite.com

Curved and Tapered Zinc Panels Highlight Canadian Subway Entrance Pavilion

The Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Subway Station is one of six new subway facilities near Toronto. Photos: Rheinzink

The new Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Subway Stationis truly an artistic jewel on Toronto Transit Commission’s (TTC) Spadina Subway Extension. One of six new facilities on the route, the station offers intermodal transit services and rapid subway connection to downtown Toronto.

The curvilinear design of the main entrance pavilion creates a futuristic appearance for the structure. The design offers a column-free interior environment with high ceilings and bright open spaces that allow daylight to penetrate deeply into the station.

Highlighting the exterior design is a standing seam roof that brings the structure to life. Approximately 12,000 square feet of Rheinzink Classic bright rolledpanels clad the curved roof of the impressive building. The roof offers high solar reflectance and combines with significant sustainable initiatives throughout the project. The station exceeds Canada’s National Energy Code requirements for energy performance by 40 percent and meets sustainability standards comparable to those required for LEED Silver certification.

Approximately 12,000 square feet of zinc panels clad the curved roof of the station, which exceeds Canada’s National Energy Code requirements for energy performance by 40 percent. Photos: Rheinzink

More than 1,000 uniquely tapered panels were fabricated by Rheinzink distributor Agway Metals Inc. at its facility in Exeter, Ontario. “No two panels are alike,” says Paul MacGregor, estimator. “Each panel had an individual taper and length. We fabricated the panels using our CNC turret, which was key to achieving the exact taper for each panel right down to the millimeter.”

Providing precise panel specifications to Agway Metals was the installer, Bothwell-Accurate, of Mississauga, Ontario. It was a demanding process, according to Trevor McGrath, Bothwell’s estimating manager for cladding. “We used a 3-D scanner on the roof structure and then utilized Radius TrackCorporation to design the curved framing system that went on top of the roof structure,” McGrath notes. “The Rheinzink panels were thenapplied on that. Radius Track confirmed the skin model of the 3-D structure for us and then computer-flattened it so that we could begin doing sheet design and layout. The flattened model gave us critical dimensions regarding panel lengths and widths.”

The panels were curved on site by Bothwell-Accurate using Agway’s Schlebach machine. “We did a sheet stagger at the beginning of the installation with the two panel lengths, which then allowed us to stagger all of the joints which is recommended,” McGrath says.

Bothwell-Accurate has considerable experience in installing zinc.“We’re very familiar with how to form and work with the natural metal,” McGrath states. “The architects wanted an ‘old school’ appearance with hammered seams and the manner in which the flashings and counter-flashings were done. There was a painstaking amount of detailing done around the 46 skylights in the roof. Each one required custom attention. We had productions crews on the job getting the panels down and then finishing crews crafting the detail work.”

The curvilinear design of the main entrance is capped with a standing seam roof comprised of zinc panels from Rheinzink. Photos: Rheinzink

Design for the station was a collaboration of Grimshaw Architectsand Adamson Associates Architectsin conjunction with ARUP Canada.

Goals of the Vaughan Metropolitan Centre included encouraging greater use of public transportation, facilitating efficient transfers between modes of transportation, as well as creating an interesting aesthetic experience. The domed entrance pavilion integrates a mirrored ceiling art installation by Paul Raff Studio designed tocapture the drama of moving passengers and changing light conditions.

Juan Porral, partner at Grimshaw Architects, summed it up this way: “We are always looking for opportunity to create high-quality places with real character. By elevating a functional building to something artful and full of life that people will remember and enjoy, we can have a greater impact on urban space and user experience.”