Dickies Arena Plaza Deck Extends the Experience

The Dickies Arena plaza deck hosts a variety of outdoor events and protects visitors and livestock in the exhibit space below. Photos: Trail Drive Management Corp.

Commemorative events to celebrate the grand opening of Dickies Arena in fall 2019 ranged from a ribbon cutting party to Monster Truck competitions, and performances by Twenty One Pilots, the Black Keys and the Harlem Globetrotters. The arena is home to the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo and other sporting events.

Not all the action takes place under the domed roof, however. The Dickies Arena plaza deck provides not only breathtaking views of the Fort Worth skyline, but offers a high level of functionality, strength and performance to protect visitors and livestock.

According to Bill Shaw, operations manager at Dickies Arena, the plaza is designed to serve as an extension of the rodeo, enabling visitors to watch the livestock from above. Ten-to-12-foot windows built into the plaza deck provide a view of the 100,000 square foot warm-up area where animals work with their handlers before barrel racing and other rodeo events. A roadhouse tent hosts musicians for plaza deck performances held following the rodeo. And instead of a conventional courtyard, Dickies Arena boasts a “cork yard” wine and food space.

Functionality Fuses With Performance

From lush green spaces that provide a scenic vantage point for taking in the iconic Fort Worth skyline and views of nearby barns and stables to fire lanes for emergency vehicles and concert equipment deliveries, Dickies Arena requires a plaza deck that can deliver outstanding strength. And in Fort Worth’s unpredictable weather, it must also successfully manage storm water runoff. The insulation used in the roof — Owens Corning Foamular extruded polystyrene (XPS) — is key to delivering compressive strength and storm water management performance. But the team specifying insulation for this unique landmark encountered some unusual challenges.

Exhibit areas underneath the plaza deck can be configured to house livestock. During rodeos, a warm-up area for horses is set up underneath the pavilion.

With a plaza deck encircling the main arena of about 140,000 feet, the size, scale and slope of the Dickies Arena plaza deck all presented challenges for the insulation team, beginning with the estimating process. The plaza’s design required a blend of tapered, flat filler, and reverse tapered installation.

Each phase was broken into three layers. The reverse taper layer brings the slope of the roof back to a flat slope. The flat fill section raises the height of the roof without adding the weight that concrete would have contributed to the plaza. A traditionally sloped area above the slab and pavers directs water back to the drainage assemblies located in the top layer of the roof. These layers had to be carefully calculated for many sections around the jobsite that changed in priority as construction surged ahead of schedule.

All the calculations required an experienced team who could coordinate and collaborate in real time. Sunbelt Building Services LLC was the insulation distributor on-site and team members’ experience in the roofing industry proved to be an invaluable asset. As Sunbelt prepared the drawings, Owens Corning calculated the insulation estimates by computer and by hand to ensure accuracy, piece by piece, and then Sunbelt reviewed them again. “You’ll never get the correct material count if you don’t know how the roof is sloping, where the drains are located and how to interpret the structural architectural drawings,” says Darrell Evans, project manager at Sunbelt Services. The result of the estimating process showed the collaboration and teamwork were successful. The estimated insulation for one of the first phases was within two pieces of the material used on the jobsite.

Managing Storm Water

Based on the “sandwich” of the roof design, Dickies Arena required two sets of drains sloping in different directions, according to Eric Nelson, AIA, RID, CCCA, and vice president at HKS, the architect of record for Dickies Arena.

The plaza deck had to be designed to withstand heavy stresses including emergency vehicles and equipment deliveries. Owens Corning Foamular extruded polystyrene insulation was specified for its compressive strength and storm water management performance.

The structure has one set of drains at the lowest level, where TREMproof 6100, a waterproofing membrane from Tremco, was hot-mopped into place over the concrete slab. On top of the waterproofing layer is the insulation and filter fabric, as well as the sand bed, Hanover pavers, and planters with trees. Slot drains at the top level collect surface water, and the drains at the lower level collect any water that works its way through that system. Extensive modeling was helpful in determining not only the placement of drains but precisely how much insulation should be used — and its depth and location — in various parts of the plaza deck.

Given all the activity taking place on the plaza roof, material weight was a huge consideration when selecting the roofing insulation. Emergency vehicles must be able to navigate the fire lanes that encircle the deck. Semi-truck trailers need to unload concert equipment and staging. From a building material perspective, the plaza deck supports 5 inches of concrete in addition to the weight of the insulation, with reverse tapering depths varying from 3 to 5 inches. In some areas, the plaza deck’s insulation is 12 to 13 inches deep.

While the project was originally specified to require 100-psi insulation, the team evaluated the Dickies Arena design structure and determined its design would allow weight to be distributed in a way that could be effectively managed by a 60-psi insulation. This exercise in value engineering revealed the lighter compressive strength XPS could deliver required strength and offer better economics. The plaza can support weight loads of 25,000 pounds.

Logistics Require a Team Effort

With the estimating complete and materials specified, supply chain management became an area of focus. Owens Corning worked with its manufacturing plants across the nation to coordinate logistics involved with production of XPS product and delivery to the jobsite.

A best practice on any construction project is to ensure products are not left unprotected and exposed to the elements, so communication and jobsite staging were coordinated between Owens Corning, Sunbelt and various contractors on the job. As XPS continues to expand slightly after manufacturing, the insulation was “aged” for 30 days after it came off the line. Owens Corning production plant teams, product managers and sales managers worked with a dedicated purchase order processor and a team of 20 to manage the plaza deck insulation project through to completion.

This detail from architect of record HKS Inc. shows the “sandwich” design of the plaza roof, which required slot drains at the surface and drains in the underlying slab. Image: HKS Inc.

On the jobsite, tapered pieces were sent up the slope and cut into specific rectangular sizes. Easily cut with a knife, structurally sound XPS isn’t prone to breaking into messy pieces and avoids random materials blowing away from the construction site. Given the sunny and windy climate in Fort Worth, the contractor kept exposed materials protected from sunlight and glued loose pieces together with a product that would not harm the insulation. Ordering the right amount of the right products at the right time was essential when considering up to 700 people were working on the project during peak construction periods.

The effect of the plaza deck gracing Dickies Arena can be summarized by modifying a common statement about Texas: “Everything is bigger and better in Texas.”

About the author: Tiffany Coppock, AIA, NCARB, CSI, CDT, LEED AP, ASTM, RCI, EDAC is the Commercial Building Systems Specialist at Owens Corning where she provides leadership in building science, system development, testing, and documentation.  

TEAM

Architect of Record: HKS Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

Plaza Deck Installer: Sunbelt Building Services LLC, Dallas, Texas, www.sunbeltllc.com

MATERIALS

Waterproofing Membrane: TREMproof 6100, Tremco, www.tremcosealants.com

Insulation: Foamular 600, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

Brick Pavers: Hanover, www.hanoverpavers.com

Talented Team Designs and Installs Multiple Roof Systems for Dickies Arena

Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, hosts the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as concerts and sporting events. Photos: Trail Drive Management Corp.

The new Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, was designed to echo the iconic Will Rogers Memorial Center, a historic landmark built in 1934. The site of the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as other concerts and sporting events, Dickies Arena was designed to provide a modern entertainment experience and configurable event spaces that would stand the test of time. The multiple roof systems on the project — including the plaza deck surrounding the arena — were essential in delivering on these goals.

Dickies Arena features a domed main roof with a cupola at the top that pays homage to its historic neighbor. “One of the major themes, especially of the dome roof structure itself, was to have a kind of throwback to the original Will Rogers Center, which is still there,” says Eric Nelson, AIA, RID, CCCA, vice president at HKS, the architect of record for Dickies Arena. “The Will Rogers Center was one of the first buildings of its type to have a long-span steel truss roof system. We used that existing structure as the inspiration for the roof structure inside the arena. We have these very thin, elegant looking trusses that are very art deco.”

The new structure’s domed roof is surrounded by low-slope roofs and complemented by two towers topped with metal roofs. Dickies Arena also features a pavilion with a standing seam metal roof, which sits on a plaza deck that serves as an outdoor event space as well as a giant roof system covering exhibit space and areas for housing rodeo livestock. The venue is also designed to provide excellent acoustics for concerts and features luxurious millwork and finishes throughout to provide a touch of elegance. “I like to say that it’s a rodeo arena, but it’s designed like an opera house,” Nelson says.

It took an experienced team of design and construction professionals to envision and execute the project, including HKS, the architect of record; David M. Schwartz Architects, the design architect; The Beck Group, the general contractor; Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., the roof system installer; and Sunbelt Building Services LLC, the insulation distributor and installer of the plaza deck.

The Dome

The roof system specified for the dome featured an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil. “The roof system is one that we use pretty regularly on our large sports projects, the Feltback PVC,” notes Nelson. “It’s a lot more durable than other single-ply roof membranes, so we really like it a lot. Dickies Arena is an arena that wasn’t just built for the next 20 years; it’s meant to be there for the next 100 years, so we wanted to make sure we used nothing but the highest-quality materials, especially with all of the hailstorms that we can get out there in Fort Worth.”

The pavilion has a Fabral double-lock standing seam roof system.

The roof system installer, Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas, tackled the dome roof first, followed by the low-slope sections and the metal roofs. Work on the dome roof began in July of 2018. “The project progressed pretty quickly,” says Jeff Eubank, vice president of Jeff Eubank Roofing Co. “The dome in and of itself was like two different projects. The top half of the dome is pretty workable and walkable, and the bottom 40 percent of the dome is almost vertical.”

The Sarnafil Decor system was installed over an Epic acoustical deck, which posed some logistical and safety challenges. “We had to engineer special anchors because a typical tie-off anchor could not be used,” Eubank explains. “Before we could set foot on the job, we had to engineer special tie-off anchors which nested into the acoustical deck.”

Eubank and a structural engineer worked with Epic Deck to construct anchor points that would meet requirements for fall arrest. The half-inch aluminum, F-shaped anchors were designed to rest in the flutes of the acoustical deck and featured a ring provide a tie-off point. They were set in place using a crane.

Safety concerns included the Texas weather. “Our biggest challenge came with the heat,” says Eubank. “Summers in North Texas are brutal enough, but at the end of last summer, a high pressure system just stalled over Fort Worth. We were in the middle of a drought, with temperatures up to 110 degrees. You’re up on a deck with nowhere to hide, and with it was pushing 200 degrees up there. From a life safety standpoint, we ended up pushing the dome installation to night work.”

The main roof on the arena’s dome was topped with an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil.

Crews applied approximately 250,000 square feet of material on a near vertical application at night, with lighting provided by six tower cranes. The project required 100 percent tie-off of men and equipment.

The original plan for the dome was to work top to bottom, but as work began, the cupola was incomplete, so the safety and logistical plans had to be radically changed. “We ended up basically making two rings around the dome, doing the near-vertical portion — the bottom 30 or 40 percent — first,” Eubank says. “We moved up and did another 360-degree loop around the top half of the dome once the cupola was done.”

The roof system was installed over the acoustical deck and loose-laid filler. After a 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime substrate board was installed, crews mechanically fastened two layers of Sarnatherm polyiso and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime. They adhered the Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback membrane, which was produced in a custom color called Agreeable Gray.

After the membrane was installed, the PVC ribs were heat welded into place to give it the look of a standing seam roof. “We installed over 16 miles of custom-color Decor ribbing,” notes Eubank.

The Logo on the Roof

The dome roof also prominently features the Dickies Arena logo, which took some advance planning. “We left an area of the ribs out on the east side anticipating the logo up there,” Eubank says. “That’s in another custom color. Sarnafil ran the custom color and templated the letters. The logo is roughly 130 feet by 10 feet, so we received a giant D, a giant I, a giant C, and so forth. Once these things are installed, there is no pulling them up — your only option is to tear the roof off. So, imagine working with a 10-foot letter, 200 feet up in the air, on a slope, and making sure it’s level.”

Eubank Roofing came up with a plan to use a section of 60-mil PVC membrane as a backer sheet. “We laid out this big backer sheet in Agreeable Gray and stenciled all of the letters across it,” Eubank explains. “We took the backer sheet up, got it lasered and leveled, and installed the solid backer sheet on the dome. It already had the stencils on it, so we were able fall back and install the individual letters. We didn’t need to line them up — we just had to fill in the blanks.”

The last steps in the dome installation included installing ribs in a second custom color to go through the letters. Helicopters also brought in three large Dickies signs, which were placed atop concrete pedestals treated with a Sarnafil liquid membrane.

Flat Roofs and Metal Roofs

On the low-slope sections that surround the dome, the Sarnafil G-410 Feltback was installed over structural concrete and fully tapered polyiso. “There is a tremendous amount of masonry work on this project, and it is gorgeous,” Eubank notes. “It was important, though, on the low-slope portions to let the brick work and stone work wrap up before any roofing membranes were installed.”

The design of the arena echoes the iconic Will Rogers Center, which was the inspiration for the thin, elegant steel trusses.

A vapor barrier was installed over the structural concrete deck. After masonry work was completed, crews installed a fully tapered polyiso system in ribbons of OM Board adhesive, then adhered 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime and the 80-mil PVC membrane.

The complex also features two different metal roof systems from Fabral. On the north side of the building, the two towers were capped with a flat-seam panel. Down at the plaza level, the pavilion was topped with a double-lock standing seam roof system featuring Fabral 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam panels.

According to Nelson, an area underneath the pavilion serves as a warm-up arena for horses during the rodeo, so the design was meant to evoke a rustic effect. “The cladding on that building is all quarter-inch steel with rivets on it,” Nelson points out. “Galvalume is finished to look like galvanized sheet steel, but it won’t tarnish or turn white or black like galvanized steel would — which is why they selected it — but it still has that kind of throwback look of a barn.”

Out of the Gate

Dickies Arena is now open to the public and is gearing up to host its first rodeo. The experienced team that built it has moved on to other projects, but they look back on their work on the new landmark venue with pride.

“I’m very proud of the people that I work with and the thought and care that they put into the project and the time that we take,” Eubank says. “A lot of our work is negotiated re-roofing, and I think that’s in large part because we take the time to think through a problem and come up with the best solution. I think that’s really highlighted here. You’ve got to take your time and do it right — and do it efficiently.”

Eubank commends the general contractor, H.C. Beck, for a smoothly operating jobsite. “The job was very well managed from a safety standpoint,” Eubank says. “The general contractor did a fabulous job of manipulating trade work and making sure no one was working overtop of anyone else.”

Nelson agrees, crediting the teamwork at every phase of the project for the successful outcome. “The partnership with David M. Schwartz as the design architect really worked very smoothly from our side,” Nelson says. “We worked very well with a talented team of consultants and who specialize in sports design. It’s a one-of-a-kind type of project.”

“My family has been in Fort Worth for five generations, and this is a project I’m just tickled to death about for the city,” says Eubank. “To be part of its install means a lot.”

TEAM

Architect of Record: HKS Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

Design Architect: David M. Schwartz Architects, Washington, D.C., www.dmsas.com

General Contractor: The Beck Group, Dallas, Texas, www.beckgroup.com

Roofing Contractor: Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, www.eubankroofing.com

MATERIALS

Dome Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC with Sarnafil Decor ribs, Sika Sarnafil, https://usa.sika.com/sarnafil

Acoustical Deck: Epic Metals, www.epicmetals.com

Cover Boards: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Low-Slope Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC, Sika Sarnafil

Cover Board: 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific

Metal Roof

Standing Seam Panel: 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam, Fabral, www.fabral.com

Underlayment: Fabral HT, Fabral

Plaza Deck

Waterproofing Membrane: TREMproof 6100, Tremco, www.tremcosealants.com

Insulation: Foamular 600, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

Brick Pavers: Hanover, www.hanoverpavers.com

Innovative Design Comes to Life at Innovation Amphitheater

Innovation Amphitheater features a curved standing seam roof above the outdoor stage and a roof with hips and ridges over the office and concession stand in a matching charcoal color. Photos: hortonphotoinc.com

Innovation Amphitheater is a 1,500-seat arena in Barrow County, Georgia. The striking curved, clamshell-style roof above the outdoor stage looks across the complex at the building that houses the ticket office and concession stand. Both are clad in matching charcoal-colored standing seam metal roof systems.

SACO Systems installed approximately 12,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD 24-gauge Tite-Loc Plus panels on the amphitheater roof and 10,000 square feet of the company’s Snap-Clad panels on the amenities building.

“The roof on the concession and restroom building was a 6:12 slope with hips and ridges,” notes John Salo, vice president of SACO Systems. “The stage roof was literally curved with the panels sloping from the front to the back and draining to the rear of the stage.”

Approximately 12,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD mechanically seamed Tite-Loc Plus panels were installed on the amphitheater roof

Founded in 1976, SACO Systems focuses on architectural metal cladding components for roofs and walls, as well as custom canopies and awnings. The company was called in on the Innovation Amphitheater project by Carroll Daniel Construction, the construction manager, and asked to provide pricing for the project.

Both roof systems were installed over metal decks and featured Atlas AC Foam II polyiso insulation and TAMKO TW Metal and Tile self-adhered, waterproofing underlayment. “Given the compounding slope of the stage roof, the mechanically seamed panels were an ideal choice for the project,” Salo states.

The Installation Process

After the metal decking was installed and inspected, crews from SACO Systems mobilized at the site. “We field measured for the PAC-CLAD panels and coil stock to fabricate the trims and flashings required for the project,” notes Salo. “We installed the insulation and underlayment to dry in the structure prior to panel delivery. We returned to the site a few days prior to panel delivery and began installing perimeter flashings that were fabricated in our facility in preparation for the panel installation.”

Executing the curved design of the amphitheater roof in the field would be the biggest challenge on the project. Salo contacted Dave Landis, Petersen’s sales and technical services manager for the Southeast. He’s often called in to consult on complex jobs and approves warranty applications.

The building housing the office and concession stand was topped with 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels.

Constructing a perfectly symmetrical curved roof is a difficult task, and in this case, the task was made even more difficult by the way the panels were oriented on the roof. “In this case, the panels ran parallel to the curve,” notes Landis. “Typically, they run perpendicular to the curve. Any time we deal with curved roofs on a building, there are always some imperfections in the structural decking and the structure of the building, and the roofer and the general contractor must give their best efforts to try and get it within reasonable plumbness so that we can get a roof cladding to lay down and look good.”

After walking the roof with the superintendent, Landis and the SACO Systems team developed an ingenious method of achieving the nice, smooth curve that was desired. “What we ended up doing was using two different types of clips to account for the imperfections in the deck,” Landis says. “We used flat clips that pull the panel flush to the deck, and we interspersed those with 3/8 space clips, which lift the panel up 3/8 of an inch off the deck. We used the clips to account for the more challenging areas where the curve wasn’t perfect. The clips made it work.”

Compared to the amphitheater roof, the other roof sections, including the small shed roofs off to the side of the theater, were pretty straightforward. “The roof on the amenities building was pretty cut and dried,” says Landis.

A detailed safety plan was essential, and crews used retractable roof anchors and personal fall arrest systems with double lanyards. “Fall protection is routinely our greatest concern on these projects,” says Salo.

Salo credits teamwork for the project’s successful execution. “This project was able to showcase what we consider one of our greatest assets: the relationships we have built with other companies like the construction manager and PAC-CLAD,” concludes Salo. “We were able to install a first-class roofing system that will perform for the owner for many years to come and at the same time find a solution to match the original design intent despite challenges along the way.”

TEAM

Architect: Lindsay Pope Brayfield & Associates, Lawrenceville, Georgia, www.lpbatlanta.com

Construction Manager: Carroll Daniel Construction, Gainesville, Georgia, www.carrolldaniel.com

Roofing Contractor: SACO Systems, Suwanee, Georgia, http://sacosystems.com

MATERIALS

Metal Panels: PAC-CLAD 24-gauge Tite-Loc Plus and Snap-Clad, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Underlayment: TW Metal and Tile, TAMKO, www.tamko.com

Insulation: Atlas AC Foam II, Atlas Roofing Corporation, www.atlasrwi.com

Renovated Seaview Resort Boasts Composite Slate Roof

Seaview, a Dolce Hotel, replaced its roof with a composite slate roofing system as part an extensive $18 million renovation project. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Following an extensive $18 million renovation, the award-winning Seaview, a Dolce Hotel, is once again open for business. Located on 670 scenic acres along Reed’s Bay in picturesque Galloway, New Jersey, the luxury resort and golf club now boasts a composite slate roof overhead.

“You don’t get many chances to renovate a hotel, so we wanted to do it right,” says Mike Tidwell, director of sales and marketing for Seaview, a Dolce Hotel. “We selected a DaVinci Roofscapes Single-Width Slate roof to provide us with the same aesthetic appeal as the original slate roof.”

Founded in 1914, the historic resort had its natural slate roof for more than 100 years. “The slate was cracked and brittle after all this time,” says Tidwell. “The decision on a new roof was important because we face the bay and have constant exposure to salt air and strong winds. We needed to preserve the historic look of the roof while finding a product that weighed less than real slate and could give us decades of hassle-free maintenance.”

The composite roof material is made of pure virgin resins, UV and thermal stabilizers. There’s also a highly-specialized fire retardant. And, the composite slate roofing tiles from DaVinci are designed to resist fading, rotting, cracking and pests. The 12-inch composite tiles are 1/2-inch thick and are modeled after actual slate for natural, non-repeating beauty.

“One of the aspects we liked best about selecting the DaVinci product was our ability to choose a custom color mix that replicated the original roof,” says Tidwell. “We chose a blend of Dark Violet, Medium Tan and Dark Terracotta that helps preserve the historic look of the structure.”

First Impressions Count

The celebrated resort has 298 guest rooms, public spaces and meeting areas. It has hosted many famous guests over the years. Grace Kelly’s sweet 16 party was held at the resort in 1946. Former President Dwight D. Eisenhower played golf at the resort in the 1950s. And, the Rolling Stones stayed for 10 days in 1989 during their Steel Wheels Tour.

The luxury resort and golf club features a composite slate roof from DaVinci Roofscapes.

“The ‘sense of arrival’ is really important at Seaview,” says Tidwell. “I drive by the front of this hotel every day and the renovated structure looks terrific. We’re ready to welcome an entirely new era of guests to the hotel … and we know the new composite slate roof will make a strong first impression on them.”

Located just eight miles from Atlantic City, Seaview boasts 34,500 square feet of space for indoor and outdoor events. The resort has two championship golf courses. In addition, it has a world-class Elizabeth Arden Red Door spa, tennis courts and a pool.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: ACG Roofing & Sheet Metal, Warminster, Pennsylvania

MATERIALS

Composite Slate Roof: Single-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

At The Star, Durable Roof Systems Safeguard Buildings at Multi-Use Facility

Photos: KPost Roofing & Waterproofing

About 13 years ago, the original Dallas Cowboys Stadium in Irving, Texas, needed a new roof coating. KPost Roofing & Waterproofing of Dallas won the job; not too much later a partnership was born, and multiple roofing projects were the result, include The Star in Frisco, Texas.

Founded in 2004 by Keith Post, Steve Little, and Jayne Williams, with a core group of 11 roofing professionals, KPost now employs more than 400 people, including more than 60 specialized crews. Primarily a commercial roofing company, a residential division was opened four years ago to increase reach and service area. With a dedicated focus on safety, quality, and value, the company has amassed a portfolio of 1,240-plus projects and 60,000 work orders valued at more than $541 million, including multiple highly visible projects in the last several years like the headquarter buildings for Liberty Mutual, Toyota, and Charles Schwab; the Irving Music Factory; the Omni Dallas; the Statler Hotel; Texas Rangers Globe Life Field; and many more.

A longtime partnership with the Dallas Cowboys meant that when the team’s new indoor practice facility/mixed-use development was going under construction, KPost stepped in.

The Star

The mixed-use facility known as The Star is located on 91 acres in Frisco, Texas, and includes the Dallas Cowboys World Headquarters and domed practice facility, the Baylor Scott and White Health Sports Performance and Healthcare Center, The Star District shopping area, the Ford Center (a state-of-the-art 510,000 square foot indoor athletic facility shared by the Dallas Cowboys, the City of Frisco, and area high schools), and the beautiful Omni Frisco, which is nestled in the southeast corner of the complex.

The Star in Frisco is a mixed-use complex that includes the Dallas Cowboys World Headquarters, a domed practice facility, the Ford Center, and the Omni Frisco Hotel.

With a wide variety of building conditions throughout the complex, project architects selected roof assemblies that would meet the individual criteria of a high-rise hotel roof, a mid-level mixed-use space roof, and the domed roof of the Cowboys indoor practice facility. Various manufacturers and system assemblies were considered, and the use of a premium coverboard was always front of mind.

“The Omni Frisco roof levels 16 and 17 included a large amount of rooftop mechanical and lighting systems that require regular maintenance and a durable surface from which to work,” explains Chris Evans, chief estimator with KPost. “Additional details included the sheathing on the parapet walls and, of course the dome over the indoor practice facility.”

Evans’s job with KPost is that of leading the team with technical brainstorming and quality control in accomplishing project pricing and proposals.

“The use of a cover board was always part of the design,” continues Evans. “The architect opted for a single-ply roof at all roof areas. Single-ply roof membranes typically perform better when placed over a solid substrate. If not, there is an increased risk for premature wear, tear, and puncture. We needed to choose an option that would help the roof membrane perform to its full potential.”

Additionally, Frisco is located in the midst of the hail belt, which upped the ante for additional durability and protection against puncture.

Why Use a Cover Board?

Using a cover board is important for multiple reasons:

  • To preserve membrane integrity: Cover boards provide a smooth substrate to support the waterproofing membrane with the right balance of strength and flex.
  • To protect the insulation: Insulation compression causes material degradation, which lowers R-values. The polyiso insulation boards are typically the most expensive component in a commercial roof assembly, and critical in achieving target R-value. Cover boards are well-equipped for heavy loads and will protect the insulation and membrane beneath from being smashed by heavy equipment.
  • To increase durability: Puncture and impact resistance ensures product longevity. Impact resistance to foot traffic equals less maintenance, fewer repairs over time, and an extension of the life of the roofing assembly.
  • To provide weather protection: Wind and hail can wreak havoc on roofing assemblies, but a cover board helps maintain structural integrity during both the storm and the post-storm inspection.

The cover board is a team player; it not only protects the assembly and building from damage — it supports the performance of other assembly materials and the mechanical assets that call the roof home.

The Right Materials for the Project

Carlisle’s single-ply roofing membranes were chosen for the project, with Sure-Weld TPO specified for lower roof areas and Sure-Flex PVC for the dome roof. DensDeck Prime roof boards were incorporated in the submittals, with products provided by CSL Materials of Frisco. Evans and his team chose Georgia-Pacific’s DensDeck Prime Roof Board with EONIC Technology as the cover board for The Star — and offered multiple reasons why.

“It is clear that DensDeck and GP, along with their trade partners, are committed to testing a large amount of assembly types and material configurations. This commitment by GP has resulted in an ample amount of approved and tested assemblies, which allows us to find the right answer for pretty much any roof area,” says Evans.

“Fact is, DensDeck has become one of our key components used on most roof systems,” says Aileen Struble, senior estimator with KPost. “Between the testing, the ease of use, and the durability, DensDeck consistently offers the best protection.”

The most senior estimator on the KPost team, Struble has been with the company since the doors opened. She works on multi-system projects, including both new construction, remedial work and large historical renovations. She is KPost’s go-to estimator when faced with technically challenging and complicated projects, and she has received four ABC National Eagle Awards on her projects. An estimated 300,000 square feet of DensDeck Prime Roof Board was used on The Star.

When it came to the challenging logistics of the domed roof covering the indoor practice facility, the DensDeck Prime Roof Board passed with flying colors — literally, as the roof board was integral to the overall system, which was flown into place via helicopter.

“It’s all about consistency,” concludes Evans. “One of the greatest benefits with DensDeck is the fact that we receive the exact same product every single time we order it. This incredible level of consistency affords us the ability to deal with other challenges of construction because we know how DensDeck will behave under multiple conditions, and at the end of the day this consistency minimizes our overall risk. Partnering with consistency is necessary for success.”

“We like to call DensDeck the Goldilocks of the roof board industry: some options are too dense, and with some the dimensional stability just isn’t there,” says Struble. “GP and DensDeck has figured it out, because their roof board is just right.”

TEAM

General Contractor: Manhattan Construction Company, Dallas, Texas, www.manhattanconstructiongroup.com

Roofing Contractor: KPost Roofing & Waterproofing, Dallas, Texas, www.kpostcompany.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membranes: Sure-Weld TPO and Sure-Flex PVC, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Re-Roofing a Planetarium Under the Stars

Photos: Versico

The James S. McDonnell Planetarium is a St. Louis icon. Located in Forest Park, a 1,300-acre public park, the planetarium is the main attraction at the Saint Louis Science Center, one of the few free nonprofit science museums in the country. It serves more than one million people each year. Opened in 1963, the planetarium features one of the world’s best opto-mechanical start projectors, which projects a 360-degree view of the constellations in the night sky onto its domed ceiling.

The giant, white structure is hard to miss, but its roof is hidden from view for those on the ground. The low-slope roof system and penthouse are nearly invisible behind a large, bowl-shaped parapet. The existing roof was saturated with moisture and was starting to develop leaks, and the planetarium’s dome-shaped screen and multimillion-dollar projection system could not get wet.

The Problems

Bade Roofing was just finishing up a re-roofing project at a Science Center warehouse when the company was called in to take a look at the planetarium roof. According to Dave Bade, president of Bade Roofing, and Drew Bade, the project manager, the company determined a total roof replacement was required. They also identified some key challenges.

A crane was used to lift material to the roof and remove debris.

The 4,000-square-foot roof is unusual; it’s perfectly round, yet slightly bowl-shaped, with round penthouse in the center. The unique shape would make it difficult to design a tapered insulation system, flashings, and terminations for the 30-year project. Another difficulty was posed by the concrete step-offs located under the existing roof. There were no dimensions on the original plans, so creating the tapered insulation layout would be especially tricky.

The schedule was also complicated, as the planetarium would remain open throughout the construction process, hosting daily educational presentations for schoolchildren, as well as special events and exhibits. Work couldn’t take place during business hours.

“We had to work at night, craning stuff up there with big lights,” says Dave Bade. “The good thing was the guys couldn’t fall because they couldn’t go anywhere; the roof had an eight-foot wall around it. The safety plan was easy, but the tapered design was tough.”

The Proposal

Bade Roofing decided to go with a SureMB 120TG Base Ply as a temporary roof to ensure the equipment inside the building would be protected throughout the tear-off and installation process. “It was a secondary line of defense that allowed us to remove the entire roof all at once and not have to rely on tie-ins from the old roof to the new one when the crew started and stopped each night,” Drew Bade says.

The existing roof of the James S. McDonnell Planetarium was removed and replaced with a fully adhered 90-mil EPDM system from Versico.

The temporary roof allowed the company to accurately measure the existing roof for the tapered insulation design. “This is another reason we decided to use the SureMB 120TG; it allowed us to really see what was going on with the tapered and make adjustments prior to ordering,” notes Drew Bade.

The roof specified for the final phase of the project was a 90-mil VersiGard EPDM fully adhered system manufactured by Versico. “The Science Center and the architect both have a history of using EPDM on their projects because they’ve had a lot of success with it,” says Drew Bade. “And with the uncommon design and shape of this roof, EPDM was perfect to mold into all the unique angles and it did a good job conforming to the many curves of the building. We used a 90-mil EPDM to get the 30-year warranty the Science Center wanted and for the overall longevity of the roof.”

The Process

Once the crane and light towers were in place, crews began the loading and tear-off process. Crews accessed the roof through a window of the penthouse, but material had to be lifted in place with the crane. The typical workday began at about 5 p.m., and crews worked until 2 or 3 o’clock the next morning.

“We started by priming the concrete deck with CAV-GRIP 3V,” says Drew. “Then we installed the SureMB 120 TG Base Ply.”

The insulation was adhered in Flexible DASH low-rise adhesive. Crews installed a base layer of 2-inch SecurShield polyiso, which has a special facer, followed by a layer of tapered SecurShield polyiso. The drainage areas needed exacting care. “The drains were down in a concrete sump,” says Dave Bade. “We put the drawing right on the roof and cut out each of those sections. It was like cutting a pie into 50 pieces.”

Crews then installed Securock cover board, followed by the 90-mil VersiGard EPDM. “The EPDM did a great job conforming to the building’s angles and curves,” says Drew Bade. “We adhered the EPDM with Versico’s standard Bonding Adhesive because it’s got a long track record and it works.”

Once the tapered insulation was in place, the membrane installation was pretty straightforward, although the circular roof area posed some challenges with the details. “The counter flashings and terminations were kind of tough because everything had to be pre-bent to that radius,” Dave Bade notes. “It wasn’t a tight radius, but everything had to be pre-formed to that exact radius so you could keep constant compression on that membrane.”

The Professionals

The new system qualified for a 30-year warranty. “One of the main benefits of a Versico system, from a contractor perspective, is the support from Versico’s tech reps,” says Drew Bade. “It’s second to none; they make sure the job’s done right and they’re there every step of the way.”

The work was meticulous, and Bade Roofing’s experienced crews took great care to get it right. “The artistic part of it is the roof itself. It’s a shame that no one will ever see it,” says Dave Bade. “We did the work at night, so no one even saw our trucks.”

It’s a satisfying accomplishment to re-roof an iconic structure, even if no one sees you do it. “We really wanted to do this job,” says Dave Bade. “It meant a lot to us because we try to do things that are out of the ordinary. After being in business for more than 60 years, you like project like this because you get to show off your talents. And the men like stuff like this; the ones who got to work on this project, it really meant a lot to them. They are true professionals.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Bade Roofing Co., Inc., St. Louis, Missouri, www.baderoofing.com

Architect: T.R.,i Architects, St. Louis, Missouri, http://www.triarchitects.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 90-mil VersiGard EPDM, Versico, www.versico.com

Insulation: SecurShield Polyiso, Versico

Base Ply: SureMB 120TG, Versico

Primer: CAV-GRIP 3V Low-VOC Adhesive/Primer, Versico

Cover Board: 1/2-inch Securock, USG, www.usg.com

Roof of Hong Kong’s Premier Yacht Club Gets a Major Facelift

Photos: Green Tech Insulation Systems (GTIS)

Set within a premier marina and home to some of the region’s largest luxury yachts, the Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club is an opulent leisure retreat for the who’s who of Hong Kong. Nestled along the South China Sea, the club offers stunning oceanfront views and an enviable set of amenities and attractions for its members and visitors.

But even the most picturesque and well-located of properties is subject to the elements. A subtropical region, Hong Kong’s weather pattern includes an annual typhoon season spanning May to November when periodic downpours, tropical storms, and heavy winds are more commonplace. In fact, this weather is directly responsible for the necessary, recently completed retrofit of the yacht and country club’s roof.

Prior to retrofit, the existing 38,000-square-foot roof was comprised of terracotta tile, including grout lines throughout. With both a flat deck and a pitched deck, none of the tile work was actually waterproof — far from ideal in moisture-laden Hong Kong. In 2018, after several years in operation, the lack of waterproofing had led to significant leaking throughout various portions of the roof. The club ownership recognized the necessity of restoring the roof to prevent additional costly structural damage. That’s when Green Tech Insulation Systems (GTIS) was called in.

Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club in Hong Kong underwent a complete roof restoration and then added solar panels as part of a complete energy overhaul.

A Hong Kong-based roofing and insulation contractor specializing in innovative sustainable solutions, GTIS was faced with some serious challenges. The new roof system obviously had to seal and waterproof the facility and GTIS recommended spray polyurethane foam (SPF) roofing to the club for its abilities to do both. Additionally, SPF is a lighter weight solution that may be applied directly overtop an existing roof, eliminating the costly and time-consuming removal of the older tile roof.

But the regional weather and rains complicated the installation itself. Either rain or extreme humidity was present during at least half of the installation timeline, making it difficult to dry out the substrate prior to application of the SPF roof. To ensure proper adhesion to the substrate, GTIS utilized Lapolla Thermo-Prime. The single-component, water-based acrylic primer promotes adhesion of spray foam roofing to a variety of substrates.

The roof also included interior gutters, many of which were experiencing moisture intrusion through cracks. For this issue, the four-person GTIS crew used a roof torch to dry out the concrete. The GTIS team also utilized silicone for the repair and refurbishment of these gutters.

The spray-applied Lapolla spray foam system was installed over the existing tile roof, and a custom color topcoat was applied to match the previous color.

GTIS spray-applied Lapolla FOAM-LOK 2800-4G, a spray foam system notable for integrating the earth-friendly Honeywell Solstice blowing agent, which eliminates ozone depletion impacts and dramatically decreases global warming potential over older spray foam roofing systems.

“Spray foam roofing is the right product to be deployed in Hong Kong because of its superb performance in the face of our regular and somewhat harsh weather patterns,” says Chris Brazendale, managing director of GTIS Asia Limited. “The combined ability to seal, waterproof, resist high winds and reduce energy demands are major selling points here.”

Robert Grant, Icynene-Lapolla’s field service representative based in Arizona, attended a portion of the installation to provide educational training to some of the newer GTIS crew installers.

“We pride ourselves on the resources we provide to our contractors and the training I provided onsite is a good example of this,” says Grant. “When weather caused delays on the project, I also got into full gear and laid down a good portion of the roof to help GTIS meet the project timeline.” Grant himself is also a trained installer.

Club management shared its appreciation of the installation timeline being met. “From start to finish we have been impressed with the GTIS team,” says Robert Kawai, general manager of the Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club. “The project completed quickly and work was done with minimal impact to the Club’s operations.”

Energy-Saving Strategy

The owners of Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club were looking for a complete energy solution for their upscale destination. In addition to the spray foam, which guarantees significant long-term energy bill savings, they also sought a renewable energy system. Once the roof retrofit and coatings were successfully applied and in place, the owners also engaged a solar contractor to install a robust photovoltaic system. Installation of the photovoltaics took place over a one-month timeframe.

“The Hong Kong government recently introduced an initiative to provide power directly back to the grid, which the owners of the club are participating in,” notes Brazendale. “Additionally, the longer-term plan will be to install batteries to capture the solar power and to offset energy demand at the facility. An added benefit of the batteries is assurance to the owners and managers of the facility that power will be accessible to the club, even if a storm or another event affects the grid.”

A key requirement of the client was to maintain and enhance the attractive appearance of this upscale facility. To that end, the GTIS and Lapolla teams worked with the club ownership to develop custom color coatings designed to match the original tile roof, and these were applied to the completed SPF roof. GTIS recommended Lapolla THERMO-FLEX 1000 elastomeric coating for the roof and GE Enduris 3500 silicone coating for the roof perimeter.

“The custom color topcoat really helped us retain the overall original appearance of the roofs, which was important to us” says Kawai.

In addition to providing a protective layer over the spray foam material which protects it from UV rays, debris and the elements, the coatings also stand up to the humidity present at the ocean-adjacent site. The coatings also protect against biological growth, which is key as roof surfaces under solar panels typically do not dry as quickly.

“The owners are extremely proud of the retrofit,” notes James Cooper, operations director of GTIS. “With regular care and maintenance, the new roof is expected to last for decades. This combined SPF and solar roofing system is a sustainable investment in the Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club that will provide valuable ROI for a significant number of years to come.”

“We are really looking forward to the benefits of a watertight roof and lower cooling costs and are so happy with the team and SPF and coatings products we selected for the club,” adds Kawai.

About the author: Doug Kramer is President & CEO of Icynene-Lapolla, a global manufacturer and supplier of spray polyurethane foam. The company’s products are recognized for optimizing energy efficiency and performance in the envelope. Doug Kramer may be reached at dkramer@icynene-lapolla.com.

TEAM

Installer: Green Tech Insulation Systems (GTIS), Hong Kong

MATERIALS

Spray Polyurethane Foam: Lapolla FOAM-LOK 2800-4G, Icynene-Lapolla, http://icynene-lapolla.com

Primer: Lapolla Thermo-Prime, Icynene-Lapolla

Roof Coating: Lapolla THERMO-FLEX 1000 elastomeric coating, Icynene-Lapolla

Roof Coating: GE Enduris 3500 silicone coating, GE Silicones, www.siliconeforbuilding.com

Sports Facility Highlights the Versatility of Insulated Metal Panels

Boston Sports Institute is a 130,000-square-foot multi-use recreation facility. The structure features three different colors of insulated metal panels on the walls. Photos: Metl-Span

Sports facilities are unique environments that face varying environmental conditions from both within and outside the structure. In evaluating building materials, client and builder seek proven solutions for meeting environmental requirements, codes and long-term durability without forsaking the art of design.

Enter the new Boston Sports Institute (BSI), a 130,000-square-foot multi-use recreation facility in Wellesley, Massachusetts, a suburb of Metro West Boston. A collegiate town and activities hub for surrounding residential communities, Wellesley lacked a professional-grade sports facility. Featuring two NHL ice arenas, a synthetic turf field, indoor track, repurposed 2012 Olympic trial pool, warm-up pool, sports rehabilitation area and strength training facility, this $23.3 million complex was completed in July 2019. Centered on a public-private partnership model between the town and the management company Edge Sports Group, BSI prioritizes ice and pool time for local schools who previously traveled to professional facilities. It is also rentable for private organizations and sports groups.

Barnes Buildings & Management Group installed approximately 58,000 square feet of insulated metal panels from Metl-Span.

“We were committed to using insulated metal panels from the earliest design stages, both for its performance and design flexibility,” states Kevin Provencher, AIA, LEED AP, Director of Architecture at the design builder, Dacon Corporation. “We have a lot of history with this type of product on a variety of building types. It is an effective solution for multi-use facilities with variable environmental requirements. Both ice rinks and natatoriums have high moisture loads, but the ice rink’s temperature will be maintained at 55 degrees Fahrenheit while the pools are at 82 degrees. It’s an ideal wall system for a facility with demanding environmental needs.”

Provencher notes insulated metal panels (IMPs) provide a total wall system that incorporates a continuous insulating layer with control layers for weather, air and vapor barriers. “It helps that we partnered with a quality metal building builder,” Provencher says. “Collaboration was key to this project’s success. Selecting the right details and sharing responsibility eases the burden on the designer.”

Barnes Buildings & Management Group Inc. of Weymouth, Massachusetts, a Metallic Building Company dealer, installed the insulated metal panels from Metl-Span as well as the engineered metal framing system. Tony Barnes oversaw the erection of the metal framing and challenging installation of 58,000 square feet of insulated metal panels. Tim Allison, the Vice President of Project Management at Barnes, oversaw project administration.

Barnes Buildings & Management Group installed approximately 58,000 square feet of insulated metal panels from Metl-Span.

“We have a mixture of panel types in multiple colors that run in two orientations,” Allison says. “When we have just one type of panel and one color, we simply unwrap the bundle and install continuously. With multiple colors, you must spread out bundles so we can access the panels in the order needed. With this site, we didn’t have much room, so it was tricky. We paid close attention to the drawings and details to ensure correct installation.”

Allison says Barnes Buildings erects a lot of structures using engineered metal framing systems and IMPs. He’s noticed an architectural trend is using mixed colors and panel orientation.

Metl-Span’s Smoke Gray, Polar White and Sandstone were installed to create an eye-catching aesthetic. “Our client wanted a strong visual impact on the north façade facing the state highway,” Provencher says. “When passing other commercial buildings commuters notice this vibrant design featuring vertical and horizontal panels. Tim Allison and Marty Barnes provided valuable input, influencing the final outcome.”

There are several unique details to BSI, including a parapet on the gable end of the building above the pool. It starts low at the eaves and grows to 3 feet at the peak to hide rooftop equipment. Barnes Buildings also installed an accent band near the top of the building, a single-skin metal panel that continues horizontally from the windows. The 7.2 Rib panel from Metl-Span is 36 inches wide with ribs that are 1-1/2 inches deep.

The roofing for more than 75 percent of the building is a double lock standing seam from Metallic in bare Galvalume. The roofing above the pool is a bare Galvalume insulated metal panel, Metl-Span’s CFR system. It starts approximately 35 feet from the roof peak, so the top section of roofing is standing seam. At the transition to where the IMPs are above the pool, the roofline drops 1 foot. The interior skin on the roofing and wall IMPs in the pool area are coated with Valspar’s Flurothane IV, a finish formulated to protect in exceptionally harsh environments where chemical corrosion protection is needed.

“It’s all things we’ve dealt with on other projects, but there’s a little bit of everything on this one,” Allison says. “It’s a special job and a visually appealing project. The IMPs are ideally suited for our New England climate. When used as walls and roofing, they provide excellent continuous insulation on any building.”

TEAM

Architect: PDA Inc., Natick, Massachusetts,

Design Builder: Dacon Corporation, Natick, Massachusetts, www.dacon1.com

IMP Installer: Barnes Buildings & Management Group, Weymouth, Massachusetts, www.barnesbuildings.com

MATERIALS

Wall Panels: Insulated Metal Panels, Metl-Span, www.metlspan.com

Roof Panels: CFR Insulated Metal Panels, Metl-Span

Metal Roof System: Double Lock Standing Seam, Metallic Building Company, www.metallic.com

Roofing a Resort in Paradise Took Great Design and Better Planning

Photos: Timbers Kauai

The Hawaiian Islands epitomize paradise with sandy beaches, crystal clear waters, warm days and balmy nights. Some are blessed to call the islands home, while others are lucky visitors. Both groups come together at Timbers Kauai — Ocean Club & Residences at Hokuala, an oceanfront destination nothing short of spectacular.

Opened in June 2018, Timbers Kauai exudes luxury island living. Located on Kauai’s picturesque southeast coast, the destination offers short- and long-term residents breathtaking unobstructed views of the Pacific Ocean and Hau’pu mountain range as well as immediate access to an unparalleled shoreline.

The design aesthetic of Timbers Kauai is inspired by the naturally distinct Hawaiian paradise surrounding it. All materials and finishes were deliberately selected for the richness and longevity they provide, from the cladding and windows, to roofing, luxe interior finishes and lush landscaping. Elements combine naturally, providing seamless easy connections between indoor and outdoor spaces.

“Key Hawaiian-inspired design elements were incorporated into the public indoor and outdoor spaces and main lobby,” says Gary Ross, director of architecture for Timbers Resorts. “Examples include the wave patterned fascia panels, nautical inspired backlit entry panels and the lobby’s Kappa inspired floor tile patterns.”

The Timbers Kauai features Hawaiian-inspired design elements throughout. Materials and finishes were selected for the richness and longevity they provide.

When considering roofing options for the resort, architects aimed for a durable, resilient material that complemented the sophisticated island design theme. They ultimately turned to Irvine, California-based Boral Roofing, specifying Saxony 900 Slate Appalachian Blend, a high-performance concrete roofing system with earthy stone hues replicating the natural look of real slate.

Since concrete tile is a high-quality, durable roofing solution that lasts much longer than some other competing roofing options, it is an ideal solution for the resort. The low maintenance tile also allows for localized repair areas should damage ever occur.

Sustainability is a major selling point of the concrete roof tile. Manufactured using naturally occurring and abundant geologic materials, the tile incorporates no chemical preservatives and is 100 percent recyclable at the end of its life on the roof. Concrete tile also provides the resort with substantial energy efficiency benefits, rendering significant reductions in the ongoing energy costs associated with heating and cooling the property as the seasons shift.

Fighting Unpredictable Weather

Another core consideration in the selection of the roof was storm resistance. The subtropical weather on Kauai can be trying for a roof. Hot, humid weather is common and torrential rainfall, fierce wind and hail occur as well. To protect the resort from these harsh weather variables, the architects sought a roofing material able to withstand the elements. Boral Roofing’s tile not only provided a complementary aesthetic, but also the weather resistance attributes required on Kauai.

Architects chose a high-performance concrete roofing system from Boral Roofing that replicates the look of natural slate.

 “We were able to specify a product that not only met the stringent wind and rain conditions of building in Hawaii, but also provided the style and elegance required of this project,” says Chris Ridings, partner at Poss Architecture + Planning of Aspen, the design firm retained by Timbers Resorts for the project.

Concrete roof tile also notably scores high in fire resistance. The Timbers Kauai roof is non-combustible, helping prevent ignition from occurring. The tile offers a Class A fire rating, the highest fire resistance rating for roofing.

Challenging Installation

Those involved in construction in Hawaii understand shipping can be a challenge. Many building materials must be delivered from the mainland. With most projects on strict timelines, delays in shipping can be troublesome and even costly. Thus, it is important that logistics, lead times, packaging, and fulfillment of orders are correct. With the roof installation, these factors came in to play.

Installation of the roof was led by Honolulu Roofing & Waterproofing, one of Hawaii’s first-established roofing companies. A project comprising three large buildings and 600 squares, the installation occurred over a three-month period. “We had to deal with adverse weather, primarily rain, but also hurricane warnings,” says Dan Jaeger, vice president. “Kauai didn’t end up getting hit with a hurricane, but because of the warnings, the materials already in transit had to return to their shipping origin and then be re-shipped. It took a bit longer than we would have liked.”

Despite weather delays, the Honolulu Roofing team completed the installation seamlessly once it got started. Jaeger points out that Boral Roofing was onsite during installation and contributed to the project’s success. “It’s really great to see a manufacturer present putting that level of effort into providing guidance during an installation,” Jaeger says.

The roof included all Boral components, but the attachment used for this project was the Polyfoam instant set adhesive, which is compatible with Boral Tile Seal underlayment.

Honolulu Roofing was able to install more than 580 squares of roof tile using one crew of eight men, with each member assigned a specific task on the roof, all overseen by Jaegar. He flew in daily from Honolulu before sunrise to make sure the job ran smoothly, even getting in a morning walk to the job site for exercise.

Honolulu Roofing also provided waterproofing for the low-slope portion of the project as it was critical that the roof tile installation tied into the low slope system properly. All told, the installation of the roof tile was completed ahead of schedule despite weather-related shipping delays.

Built to Entice and Endure

Timbers Kauai – Ocean Club & Residences at Hokuala is designed to offer an unparalleled experience for those who visit. Built from rich materials that last, the resort encourages luxury island living along a breathtaking stretch of coast. The island retreat offers residents and visitors alike a thoughtfully curated collection of services including access to a full-service restaurant with progressive approach to farm-fresh Hawaiian food, an oceanfront infinity-edge swimming pool, a separate ohana pool with a beach entry, and water features that form the heart of the resort. These are just a few of the onsite amenities set within the quality-crafted resort built of exceptional materials. No doubt, Timbers Kauai is designed to endure.

About the author: Ann Iten is the director of marketing for Boral Roofing, a manufacturer of durable and energy-efficient new and retrofit roofing systems. Visit Boral Roofing online at www.boralroof.com, and contact Ann at Ann.Iten@boral.com

TEAM

Architect: Poss Architecture + Planning, Aspen, Colorado, www.billposs.com, and Gary Ross, Director of Architecture, Timbers Resorts

Roofing Contractor: Honolulu Roofing & Waterproofing, Honolulu, Hawaii, www.honroof.com

MATERIALS

Concrete Roof Tile: Saxony 900 Slate Appalachian Blend, Boral Roofing, www.boralroof.com

Underlayment: Boral Tile Seal, Boral Roofing

Picturesque Mountain Clubhouse Gets a Metal Roof Upgrade

The Clubhouse at Lake Sconti was recently re-roofed with CertainTeed’s Matterhorn Shake metal roofing. Photo: CertainTeed

Just 60 miles north of Atlanta in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, the 7,000-acre Big Canoe community is an ideal location where residents enjoy mountains, lakes and a 27-hole championship golf course. The Clubhouse at Lake Sconti serves as Big Canoe’s central hub, with 25,000 square feet of gathering space that is host to weddings, corporate events, writers’ groups, poker clubs, trivia nights and more. Adding another 10,000 square feet to the overall facility is Duffer’s Bar and Grille and an adjoining golf cart storage facility.

Big Canoe’s original clubhouse — established in the early 1970s along with the community — burned to the ground 13 years ago after being struck by lightning. The entire structure was rebuilt, which included the installation of a classic cedar shake roof. After severe wind and hail damage from a more recent storm, the Big Canoe community found itself in the position of needing a complete roof replacement.

“It was a beautiful roof, but we weren’t getting the longevity out of the cedar shake as originally intended,” says Katie Wercholuk, marketing and communications director of the Big Canoe Property Owners Association. “We want our residents to be proud of their clubhouse and to not bear the cost of a new clubhouse roof every 10 years. We needed something with durability that would be able to stand up to mountain weather, which can sometimes be unpredictable.”

After six months of researching the best solution, the Big Canoe Property Owners Association found Colony Roofers, a veteran-owned roofing company based in Marietta, Georgia. Company president Mark Seymour suggested CertainTeed’s Matterhorn Shake in the color Cedar to keep the look of classic cedar shake while adding the benefits of metal.

“You should get about 30-40 years out of a cedar shingle roof, but it was 11 years and the original roof was deteriorating much quicker than it should have,” notes Seymour. “As we started ripping it off, we noticed that it wasn’t vented very well. A lot of the cedar shake shingles were curling up and breaking apart. It also sits inside of a valley and gets a lot of wind, so many of the hip and ridge shingles were coming up.”

Between the clubhouse, restaurant and golf cart barn, the job required 40,000 square feet of metal roof panels. In addition to be being the largest metal roofing job undertaken by Colony Roofing, the job’s secluded location and status as an active business presented additional challenges to the installing team.

“This was a big, six-to-eight-week job,” Seymour says. “Putting a roof on an operating business is difficult, so it required a lot of coordination with the property owners association. Big Canoe is also up in the mountains, so some of the bridges and roads you have to navigate aren’t meant for tractor-trailers and big machinery. If we were doing a standing seam roof where you have to stage long runs of metal and cut them to size, we would have definitely had some issues transporting it.”

Seymour said the way the product is designed and palletized allowed his team to “minimize the footprint” his team had on the property, and that the interlocking panel system allowed his crew to install the product quickly, helping Big Canoe get back to business as usual.

“Weather is unpredictable in the mountains and storms will come and go in the evenings,” says Seymour. “The main thing that helped us move quicker was the Matterhorn system. It goes on well and interlocks in a way our guys can understand. It’s a well-designed, user-friendly product.”

According to Wercholuk, the installation is a “win-win” for the Big Canoe community. “It’s not just low-maintenance, it’s no-maintenance and it looks beautiful,” says Wercholuk. “Anytime you have guests or visitors, the clubhouse is something you want to show off. We have intentionally tight architectural controls here and everything just blends into nature. You would never be able to tell it’s metal from far away.”

Wercholuk said that the product has left a great impression on Big Canoe’s roughly 6,000 residents.

“Everything we’ve heard from residents has been extremely positive,” Wercholuk adds. “Metal provided the look we were after as a mountain community, but with more efficiency.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Colony Roofers, Marietta, Georgia, www.colonyroofers.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: Matterhorn Shake metal roofing in Cedar, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com