Concrete Tile Roofing Protects Canadian Hotel from the Elements

The Moose Hotel & Suites is located in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The resort sits at an elevation of 4,600 to 5,300 feet in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, about 80 miles west of Calgary.

The Moose Hotel & Suites is located in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The resort sits at an elevation of 4,600 to 5,300 feet in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, about 80 miles west of Calgary.

Banff, Alberta, Canada, sits at an elevation of 4,600 to 5,300 feet in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, about 80 miles west of Calgary. The small community (around 8,000 permanent residents) was established as a resort town almost immediately after its hot springs were discovered by Canadian Pacific Railway workers in 1883. The town, which is built in a valley surrounded by mountains, has been a popular tourist destination for more than a century and is known for skiing and, of course, the Banff Upper Hot Springs.

Because of its history of tourism, Banff offers comfortable lodging at every price point. Among the town’s options for accommodations are nine hotels owned and operated by Banff Lodging Co.; the company also has seven restaurants, two spas, and a ski school and rental shop. The Moose Hotel & Suites is the lodging company’s newest four-star property, having opened in July 2016.

Because Banff is a national park, the Moose Hotel & Suites project is significant because it is one of the largest hotel developments (174 rooms) since the Canadian federal government’s 1998 commercial growth cap, which has prevented many hospitality developments from being built. Despite being approved, the Moose Hotel & Suites still was required to adhere to Banff’s design guidelines. The guidelines state they were enacted “to prevent any monstrosities being put there to destroy the general beauty of the park.”

In fact, the guidelines require that all developments, particularly hotels, enhance views to the mountains surrounding Banff. “They want visitors to realize they’re really in the mountains and not just anywhere in a hotel room,” explains Ted Darch, owner of Calgary-based E.J. Darch Architect Ltd., the architect on the Moose Hotel & Suites project. “We wanted to take advantage of the views, so designing the hotel to resemble a village with a courtyard in the middle allowed us to capture the drama of the mountains. You’ll see the reviews on TripAdvisor mention this.”

Darch has been working on Banff Lodging’s projects since the mid-1980s. The concept for the Moose Hotel & Suites evolved over a number of years as Banff Lodging acquired the property for the hotel and Darch worked on other projects for the company. Similarly, Banff Lodging chose the Moose Hotel & Suites’ roofing contractor because of a long-standing relationship.

“We’ve done work with Banff Lodging for about 10 years on most all its other facilities,” explains Brock Hanson, president and CEO of Banff-based Rocky Mountain Sundeck & Roof. “This was a pinnacle Banff job that doesn’t occur often due to the building guidelines. Having this project in our backyard was just fantastic to be a part of.”

Constructed to Withstand the Elements

The new hotel had to meet Banff’s strict design guidelines. It also had to withstand the subarctic climate (winters as cold as -40 F and short and cool summers, as well as 15 to 40 inches of precipitation, typically snow, per year). The Moose Hotel & Suites features spray foam at R-20 in the walls and R-40 in the roof. The spray-foam insulation not only keeps guests and staff warm during Banff ’s long winters, but also protects the building against air and moisture infiltration.

The Moose Hotel & Suites was required to adhere to Banff’s design guidelines, which were developed “to prevent any monstrosities being put there to destroy the general beauty of the park.”

The Moose Hotel & Suites was required to adhere to Banff’s design guidelines, which were developed “to prevent any monstrosities being put there to destroy the general beauty of the park.”


Darch had specified concrete tile roofing on a Banff Lodging hotel previously, but Hanson recommended a new supplier with whom he had previously worked. Darch met with a salesperson from the roofing manufacturer to discuss its concrete tile product. After he checked some samples, Darch was convinced this was the right product for the project.

The distinctive concrete tile was chosen for its energy efficiency and durability. It resembles natural slate to complement the design of the rustic mountain lodge. Because it is concrete, the tile is able to withstand the subarctic region’s extreme weather and withstands flying embers in case of forest fires. “We learned a big lesson about fire recently in Fort McMurray, north of Edmonton, Alberta,” Darch notes. “They had a terrible fire last summer that destroyed something like 2,000 houses. They’re in the forest and Banff is in the forest, so fire resistance was important.”

Concrete Tile Roofing

The tiles’ aesthetic also appealed to Darch; he especially liked that he was able to choose a bright red (Mission Red) for the roof. “From the architectural perspective, what is really nice is the color possibilities and to make the roof color part of the overall scheme of things is great,” he says. “Other roofing options were nice but they didn’t have the snap that the red tile does.”

Photos courtesy of Boral Roofing.

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Project Profiles: Hospitality & Entertainment

B.O.B., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Roof Materials

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The B.O.B.’s 900-square-foot Sky Patio was completed in August 2015 when its signature green wall was installed. The distinctive double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

“Our living wall on the Sky Patio is a vivid symbol of our commitment to sustainability and support of the local environments where our restaurants are located,” says Alice Jasper, director of sustainability, the Gilmore Collection. “It greens up the exterior and interior of the rooftop patio, contributing to the beautification of downtown, making the patio more inviting from the street below and enhancing the dining experience of our guests.”

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet. Three exterior sections (48 inches in height) are attached to the outside of the fencing that surrounds the patio. Facing out to the street, these sections frame the Sky Patio on three sides with flowering annuals and perennials. There are five interior sections (45 1/2 inches in height), three on the inside of the perimeter fence, two on the back wall of the building. In addition to flowers, the interior sections include vegetables and herbs used in the kitchen.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

“Local sourcing of ingredients is one of our main sustainable hospitality practices,” says Barbie Smith, the Gilmore Collection’s gardener. “With the green wall at the B.O.B., we grow ingredients right near the tables where our guests dine. You cannot get more local than that.”

“What chef wouldn’t want a garden with fresh herbs and produce right in their restaurant? A green wall makes it practical,” adds Mick Rickerd, chef at Bobarino’s. “We utilize the herbs in all our everyday dishes and the vegetables, like Swiss chard and rainbow carrots, in daily features. Our mixology team incorporates fresh basil, mint, lemongrass and thyme into special summer cocktails.”

Green Wall Manufacturer: LiveWall

Roof Report

The B.O.B. is the Gilmore Collection’s most ambitious project, and it exemplifies the company’s commitment to sustainability. The B.O.B. is an acronym for Big Old Building; the 70,000-square-foot, 4-story, red brick building was constructed in 1903 as a grocery warehouse. It stood vacant for decades before the Gilmore Collection saved it from demolition and began its transformation into a landmark hospitality destination in downtown Grand Rapids. The B.O.B. offers multiple venues, including bars, restaurants, comedy and nightclubs, as well as the rooftop Sky Patio, which is accessible through Bobarino’s restaurant on the second floor.

Photos: LiveWall

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A Permeable Pavement Patio Outside a Performance Space Features a Distinctive Musical Note Pattern

Since performing its first concert in 1939, the West Michigan Symphony, a professional orchestra in Muskegon, Mich., has been a vital part of the region’s cultural landscape. In spring 2013, the symphony decided it was time to expand its administrative and ticketing services. It moved into offices in the newly renovated Russell Block Building. Located in downtown Muskegon, a block away from the Frauenthal Theater where the orchestra performs its concerts, the historic Russell Block Building was constructed in 1890.

The porous-paving material had to express the musical note motif the landscape architect envisioned for the patio. It is the quintessential design element for the entire rooftop project.

The porous-paving material had to express the musical note motif the landscape architect envisioned for the patio. It is the quintessential design element for the entire rooftop project.

“With the move, the symphony also realized a long-held dream: establishing a flexible space where we could expand educational offerings and stage smaller fine-arts performances,” explains Carla Hill, the symphony’s president and CEO.

Named The Block, the 1,800-square-foot space offers seating on two levels for up to 150. In addition to providing an intimate venue for a variety of arts performances, The Block is available for meetings and special events. The west-facing windows of The Block look out toward Muskegon Lake. However, there was a problem: Outside the windows, an unimproved and unappealing tar roof marred the view.

“In conversations with the symphony and Port City Construction & Development Services, which planned and managed the building renovation, we started envisioning the transformation of the unadorned roof into a rooftop patio and garden,” says Harry Wierenga, landscape architect, Fleis & VandenBrink Inc., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Wierenga designed a 900-square-foot green roof (including 380 square feet of vegetation and a 520-square-foot patio area) as an accessible and appealing outdoor space. His design invites patrons of The Block to the outdoors onto a landscaped rooftop patio.

First Things First

“The existing roof was a tar roof over a concrete deck. Some holes had been boarded over and patched with tar,” notes Gary Post, manager, Port City Construction & Development Services LLC, Muskegon. “If the rooftop patio and garden had not been incorporated into the project, we would not have replaced it. We had to reroof to support the new rooftop outdoor space.”

The Port City Construction & Development Services roofing crew removed the existing roof down to the concrete deck, which they repaired. Two new roof drains were added to improve drainage. A single-ply membrane was selected for the new roof. The crew fully adhered the new membrane to the deck. The crewmembers then installed a geotextile fabric to protect the membrane and rolled out a geotextile drain sheet atop the protection fabric. The drain sheet facilitates drainage to the existing and two added roof drains.

A new 40-inch-high wall around the perimeter shelters the space and enhances rooftop safety. The porous paving’s gray and black custom-color mix harmonizes with the color of the wall.

A new 40-inch-high wall around the perimeter shelters the space and enhances rooftop safety. The porous paving’s gray and black custom-color mix harmonizes with the color of the wall.

A new 40-inch-high wall around the perimeter was constructed to shelter the space and enhance rooftop safety. Preparations also included widening the opening out to the rooftop from the interior of The Block. Glass double doors would be installed to establish a generous and transparent transition from indoors to outdoors.

Permeable Pavement

The project team applied a multi-faceted set of factors in evaluating options and selecting a pavement material for the patio:

  • To eliminate standing water and allow excess stormwater to flow to the drains, the paving material had to be permeable.
  • The plan called for installing the patio and green-roof elements on top of the geotextile drain sheet. The paving material would have to work with the modular green roof selected for the project.
  • The paving material had to be lightweight. By regulation, the maximum static plus live load for the roof is 100 pounds per square foot.
  • For easy access and safety, the pavement had to be low profile to minimize the threshold at the entry into The Block.
  • To create visual interest within the rectangular shape of the roof, the design emphasizes irregular shapes with angles to break up the space. The paving material would have to be flexible to adapt to the design.
  • The musical-note motif Wierenga envisioned for the patio is the quintessential design element for the entire rooftop project. The paving material had to offer the versatility to express the design.
  • Finally, a green-building product was preferred.

The project team considered composite decking and pavers. However, these linear materials were not flexible enough to adapt to the shape of the patio or sufficiently versatile to convey the musical note design.

PHOTOS: Porous Pave Inc.

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Project Profiles: Hospitality and Entertainment

Hilton Garden Inn, Cleveland

Team

General Contractor: HOBS Roofing, Canton, Ohio
Roofing Consultant: RS&M, St. Petersburg, Fla.

Because of the area’s harsh winter climate, the hotel’s reroofing project required a redundant roofing system that would be strong and durable. The SOPREMA system chosen is typically used in climates like this for that reason.

Because of the area’s harsh winter climate, the hotel’s reroofing project required a redundant roofing system that would be strong and durable. The SOPREMA system chosen is typically used in climates like this for that reason.

Roof Materials

Because of the area’s harsh winter climate, the hotel’s reroofing project required a redundant roofing system that would be strong and durable. The SOPREMA system chosen is typically used in climates like this for that reason.

Although the selection of this particular roofing system was easy, the installation presented a few challenges. The hotel’s roof includes a cell tower, containing a telecommunication terminal for all of Ohio. The installers had to be careful to avoid interference with the terminal when removing the original roof, as well as applying the new system. In addition, the mortar in some of the walls of the penthouse was deteriorating. The installation team had to flash in the ALSAN RS liquid system to keep water from penetrating and getting into the new roof system.

When the reroofing project began, installers first needed to remove the old coal-tar roof from the structural deck of the concrete building. Next, the deck was primed using Elastocol 500 and then a SOPRALENE 180 SP vapor barrier was heat-applied. This particular vapor barrier is commonly used in northern Ohio when reroofing.

Following the vapor barrier, the installation package was ready to be glued down using DUOTACK, SOPREMA’s low-rise foam adhesive. SOPRABOARD cover board was applied, followed by a layer of heat-applied SOPRALENE Flam 180 and then a heat-applied cap sheet of SOPRALENE Flam 180 FR GR. To finish the project, ALSAN RS 230, a PMMA two-part rapid-curing liquid flashing product, was applied over top in a custom color to match the roof to the aesthetic of the building.

Roof System Manufacturer: SOPREMA

Roof Report

Open since 2002, the Hilton Garden Inn stands 11-stories high and has 240 rooms. The hotel is within walking distance to Progressive Field and the CSU Wolstein Center, and is close to other downtown Cleveland entertainment and dining. The hotel features a business center, pool, fitness center and more. The reroofing project took place in summer 2014.

PHOTO: SOPREMA

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Clay Tile Roofing Protects a Subdivision’s Clubhouse from the Hot Phoenix Sun while Providing an Old World Look

Located in the Sonoran Desert southeast of Phoenix, the Encanterra Country Club subdivision offers upscale living in houses built by Walnut, Calif.-based Shea Homes and surrounding an 18-hole golf course designed by Tom Lehman. The centerpiece of this vibrant community, however, is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

The centerpiece of the Encanterra subdivision in Phoenix is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

The centerpiece of the Encanterra subdivision in Phoenix is the 60,000-square-foot country club known as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra.

Designed to keep the community’s members active and entertained, La Casa, The Club at Encanterra contains four restaurants, a full-service spa, fitness center and three swimming pools. The club features Mediterranean-style architecture to essentially be an extension of the attractive homes in the subdivision.

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings; custom-fabricated ornamental details; and a spray-foam system on the low-slope roof areas. Only a roofing contractor with the experience and capabilities to do all facets would suffice.

Phoenix-based Century Roofing Inc., which has been in business since 1991, has a long history of commercial and custom residential projects. With crews experienced in installing all types of tile, as well as its own metal fabrication shop, the contracting company was chosen to roof the club as it was being built.

Hustling for the Job

Steve Schwoerer, president of Century Roofing, knows what it takes to hustle and land large jobs, like La Casa, the Club at Encanterra. Knowing the project was going to be a landmark building in the valley attracted him to it. “We got it off the permit list, pursued it, bid on it and landed it, although not quite so cut and dry,” he says. “We have a lot of custom-home
experience and in Phoenix that means clay tile roof experience, so it fit in perfectly with our abilities.”

Originally, the club’s designer specified a different type of clay tile than what was actually installed on the roof. However, Schwoerer invited Irvine, Calif.-based Boral Roofing to come up with a color match and submit a quote for its tile to be installed on the project. “Boral had their plant manager fly into Phoenix to look at the roofing on the existing guard house that Shea Homes was trying to match,” Schwoerer recalls. “Boral then formulated a custom-blended tile and shipped the tile to Phoenix so a mock-up could be done for the architect’s approval, which they received.”

In addition to its curb appeal, the tile offered other benefits. Manufactured from naturally occurring geologic material (59 percent of which is recycled content), Boral clay tiles have received Cradle to Cradle Gold certification from the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, San Francisco. The certification program assesses products in five categories: material health, material reutilization, renewable energy and carbon management, water stewardship and social fairness. The tile product is wind, hail and fire resistant, as well as considered a cool roof, meaning it reflects heat from the sun, which reduces the need for air conditioning and provides savings on energy bills.

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings

To achieve a rustic, Old World appearance, Shea Homes specified a two-piece clay tile roof installed in mud set, accented with copper flashings

Working in Phases

The roofing work was completed in phases as La Casa, The Club at Encanterra was being built. “Anytime you do a project of this size, the general contractor has scheduling demands that add to the difficulty, especially when you’re working in stages and
they want you out there as it’s being built rather than all at once,” Schwoerer states. “Their version of what’s roof-ready versus what’s actually roof-ready is one of many things that causes a roofing contractor stress!”

Century Roofing’s five-man crew began by installing the spray-foam roof on the low-slope portions of the building, which compose 130 squares of the total roof area. Although spray-foam roofs in Arizona typically are 1-inch thick, the club’s roof is 2-inches thick to achieve additional R-value. The foam was sprayed directly onto the wood deck and two base coats were applied before the final topcoat, which features a #9 crushed marble cast into the wet topcoat by hand.

PHOTOS: US TILE BY BORAL

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Projects: Hospitality & Entertainment

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

The Lobby, Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail, Colo.

Team

Design Architect: Zehren & Associates, Avon, Colo.
Engineer: Monroe & Newell Engineers Inc., Denver
Owner: Vail Valley Foundation, Vail

Roof Materials

The Vail Valley Foundation envisioned an iconic entrance for the amphitheater that not only would accommodate guests, protect against the elements and provide facilities, but also would recognize and celebrate the Ford family and mirror the amphitheater’s atmosphere.

Under the Vail Valley Foundation, Zehren’s team of architects chose approximately 5,500 square feet of PTFE fiberglass membrane canopies to make the vision for The Lobby a reality. PTFE, or polytetrafluoroethylene, is a Teflon-coated woven fiberglass membrane that is durable and weather resistant. The PTFE fiber coating is chemically inert, capable of withstanding extreme temperatures and immune to UV radiation.

Designer, fabricator and installer of PTFE fiberglass membrane: Birdair

Building Report

The Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater is a remarkable outdoor venue nestled along a hillside with a stunning view of the Rocky Mountains. The Lobby, which is adjacent to the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens and Ford Park, serves not only as an impressive entrance to the amphitheater, but also as a shelter from inclement weather, a social gathering point prior to entering the amphitheater, and a place for ticket and bag check. The Lobby allows for a smooth transition into the venue.

Within the Lobby resides a mini-stage that can accommodate pre-show performances, along with a new stand for concessions and restrooms. Around the perimeter of the space rests informal boulder seating, and alpine landscapes border the surrounding walls. Overall, the aesthetics of the space mirror the pristine landscape and enjoyable outdoor atmosphere.

The Lobby also holds a Ford family tribute: a series of symbolic sculptures and interpretive elements intended to pay homage to President and Mrs. Ford and their family. This tribute is a new landmark in Vail celebrating the family’s commitment to their adopted hometown and the positive changes that they made to the community.

PHOTO: BIRDAIR

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Projects: Historic Preservation

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT, TOPEKA, KAN.

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT

KANSAS STATEHOUSE COPPER DOME & ROOF REPLACEMENT

TEAM

SHEET-METAL CONTRACTOR (DOME): Baker Roofing Co., Raleigh, N.C.
SHEET-METAL CONTRACTOR (ROOF): MG McGrath Inc., Maplewood, Minn.
SPECIALTY FABRICATION (DOME): Ornametals LLC, Decatur, Ala.
ARCHITECT: Treanor Architects P.A., Topeka
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: J.E. Dunn Construction Co., Topeka

ROOF MATERIALS

The $22 million copper roof and dome replacement, completed in late December 2013, occurred over previously restored, occupied spaces and utilized approximately 127,000 pounds of copper. The east and west wing roofs are covered with 24,700 square feet of 20-ounce copper batten-seam roofing. The central, north and south wing roofs are finished with a hybrid horizontal and standing-seam roof constructed of 20-ounce copper to replicate the historic roof.

ROOF REPORT

The Kansas Statehouse’s copper dome, contrasted by the limestone structure, has captured the attention of citizens and visitors alike for more than 100 years. Built in three distinct phases during a 37-year period, the Kansas Statehouse reflects the changes in construction between the 1860s and the turn of the 20th century.

Planning for the statehouse’s restoration began in 1999 with an overall evaluation of the building and schematic design. For the legislature to continuously occupy the building, the construction was broken into six major phases and 29 separate bid packages. As part of the statehouse preservation and restoration, Treanor Architects completed a study on the existing roof and dome systems between 2007-10 and concluded the entire copper cladding needed to be replaced. Because of its longevity, copper proved to be the best long-term value for the project when other cost factors, such as access, associated repairs and maintenance, were taken into consideration.

TO COMPLY with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation, the replacement copper design had to replicate the historic construction as closely as possible. However, areas identified as leak-prone or lacking in provision for thermal expansion were targeted for changes to better protect the building in the future. The design included repairs for substrate damaged by infiltration and alterations to the substrate to accommodate copper detail changes. The original copper installations lacked underlayment. To minimize changes in the manner that the roof envelope behaves, breathable underlayment was used to the greatest extent possible.

Approximately 127,000 pounds of copper were recycled and portions of the copper were salvaged for reuse in the Kansas Statehouse’s new visitor center. MG McGrath performed the fabrication and installation of 65,250 square feet of sheet metal on the roof. Low-slope areas of the central roof, which were originally clad with standing seam, were re-clad with 20-ounce soldered flat-seam copper to provide a more watertight roof. To meet the aggressive schedule, roofs were sequenced to allow for tear off and substrate repairs to occur while sheet-metal installation crews worked on another roof.

DETERIORATED SUBSTRATE required repairing structural framing and the wood and masonry decks. Work on the 21,300 square foot dome was performed by Baker Roofing with custom fabrication of the ornamental trim and windows performed by Ornametals. A 365-foot-tall, free-standing tower crane was used to deliver materials and equipment. Crews worked in a spiraling pattern from the bottom of the dome up to sequence tear-off, substrate repairs and sheet-metal installation.

Standing-seam 20-ounce copper cladding was used for radius components at the base and top of the dome. The distinctive horizontal seamed panels used in the original construction were replicated in 20-ounce copper, and templates were created for each panel to account for differences in the compound curvature and spacing of the attachment points. In total, the dome required 230 linear feet of built-in monumental gutter constructed from 32-ounce copper and 752 linear feet of 24-ounce copper rib moulding.

PHOTOS: ARCHITECTURAL FOTOGRAPHICS/TREANOR ARCHITECTS

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Projects: Hospitality & Entertainment

Refinery Hotel, Manhattan

The lean-to-enclosure features a bi-parting roof measuring 24 feet 4 inches by 40 feet 5 inches with a 40-foot 5-inch- by 12-foot 5 1/2-inch-high front wall.

The lean-to-enclosure features a bi-parting roof measuring 24 feet 4 inches by 40 feet 5 inches with a 40-foot 5-inch- by 12-foot 5 1/2-inch-high front wall.

Team

Retractable roof designer, manufacturer and installer: OpenAire, Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Architect: Stonehill & Taylor Architects and Planners, New York

Roof Materials

The lean-to-enclosure features a bi-parting roof measuring 24 feet 4 inches by 40 feet 5 inches with a 40-foot 5-inch- by 12-foot 5 1/2-inch-high front wall. Installation is along a 7.72-degree slope. The four dividing roof sections each measure 10 feet. Two sections bi-part up to 50 percent from the center, moving outward and “parking” over the fixed end bays.

Roof Report

Located in Manhattan’s Fashion District, Refinery Hotel welcomes guests to its rooftop, which opened in June 2013. The industrial aesthetic of Refinery Hotel extends onto the rooftop, where cocktails can be enjoyed within three distinct lounge spaces: indoor, outdoor and a space “in-between” that features the integrated bi-parting skylight/roof. The retractable glass roof enhances the view of New York’s city sunsets and allows guests to take in the skyline, including the Empire State Building.

“The rooftop has a warm industrial aesthetic for which the skylight was a perfect complement,” says Christina Zimmer, principal at Stonehill & Taylor Architects and Planners. “The massive skylight brings the outside in and vice versa while sheltering guests from the elements.”

The retractable glass roof enhances the view of New York’s city sunsets and allows guests to take in the skyline, including the Empire State Building.

The retractable glass roof enhances the view of New York’s city sunsets and allows guests to take in the skyline, including the Empire State Building.

Pinky Vaid, owner of Refinery Hotel, adds: “The retractable skylight has become a focal point for our guests with evening hours spent enjoying access to the Manhattan skyline. OpenAire enabled us to realize our original vision for the rooftop, from conception to execution of the finest details.”

Photos: OpenAire

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Nashville, Tenn., Begins Revitalization of Its City Center with a New Convention Space that Features a Truly Unique Roof

It isn’t often that a nightmare becomes a pleasant reality. Andy Baker, vice president of Raleigh, N.C.- based Baker Roofing, recalls the year he spent as project manager for the roofing of the new Music City Center in Nashville, Tenn., as one of his most challenging jobs. “The logistics, a tight spot downtown, the size of the project and everything that goes along with that—thousands of people trying to work and everyone needs their material in that area at the same time. Even the unique shape of the building made it hard,” Baker remembers. “We’re glad it’s done and we can look back on it now and say: ‘Wow! We did that.’”

The Music City Center was built to be the catalyst for more development in the SoBro neighborhood of Nashville, Tenn. It is intended to create a diverse economy that won’t be affected if flooding occurs, like in May 2010.

The Music City Center was built to be the catalyst for more development in the SoBro neighborhood of Nashville, Tenn. It is intended to create a diverse economy that won’t be affected if flooding occurs, like in May 2010.

Baker and his crew of up to 50 roofing workers have much to be proud of. The completed project is the largest capital construction project in Nashville’s history and was designed to bring prosperity to the area known as SoBro, or South of Broadway, which was affected by massive flooding in May 2010. The Music City Center lies outside the flood-prone areas and hopefully will be the catalyst for more development, which will create a diverse economy that won’t be affected if another flood occurs.

In addition to the Music City Center’s imaginative design that resembles various musical instruments, the building boasts a number of features that are ideal for a high-profile project. Many of these features are located in the most opportune of places—the roof. An Energy Star-qualified thermoplastic PVC membrane covers the 643,752-squarefoot roof while a 186,700-square-foot vegetated roof literally mimics the rolling hills of Tennessee’s Highland Rim. The rooftop also hosts a 211-kilowatt solar-power system on the 1-acre area that is over the Grand Ballroom, a rooftop space that resembles an acoustic guitar in shape. Lastly, the roof collects rainwater that is funneled to a 360,000-gallon tank before it is used to irrigate the site and flush hundreds of toilets inside.

Construction Challenges

Baker and his colleagues knew the Music City Center would present many challenges even before work began. “We knew it was going to be a logistical nightmare going in but then you have to live it,” he recalls. “You would think four city blocks would be a large enough area to work from but there were thousands of contractors working and receiving materials at the same time. Trying to keep truck drivers and suppliers happy was difficult. The community was great though; there were a lot of police officers around to direct traffic.”

Baker Roofing's team of up to 50 roofing workers spent one year working on the Music City Center.

Baker Roofing’s team of up to 50 roofing workers spent one year working on the Music City Center.

Installation also proved perplexing because of the roof’s undulating slopes of 1/4:12 to 12:12. Baker likens the rolls to waves and points out in some places they were almost conical in shape. In the areas in which there was no vegetated roof, the crew fastened two layers of 1.7-inch polyisocyanurate insulation followed by 1/4-inch roof board. Then a 60-mil thermoplastic PVC membrane in a light gray color was fully adhered to the assembly. The membrane features a lacquer coating to reduce dirt pickup.

Photos: Keri Baker

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Best Roofing Projects of the Carolinas

We celebrate the best roofs installed in North and South Carolina with our final issue of Carolinas Roofing. From metal to shingles to single ply and coatings, these roof coverings protect newly built and reroofed schools, homes, manufacturing facilities, city-service buildings and more.

Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse and the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse and the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse and the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Team

Roofing contractor: Baker Roofing Co., Charlotte, www.bakerroofing.com
Designers: Jenkins-Peer Architects, Charlotte, www.jenkinspeer.com, and DLR Group, www.dlrgroup.com
Construction manager: Rogers PCL Russell, a joint venture of Rodgers Builders Inc., Charlotte, www.rodgersbuilders.com; PCL Constructors Inc., Charlotte, www.pcl.com; and H.J. Russell & Co., Atlanta, www.hjrussell.com
Metal roofing manufacturer: McElroy Metal, Bossier City, La., www.mcelroymetal.com

Roof Materials

New metal roofing matches the campus scheme on many other buildings. It also offers overall longevity, durability and low-maintenance features.

The field house and press box are covered with 11,000 square feet of Maxima 216, 24-gauge Kynar in Slate Gray and 4,000 square feet of 24-gauge flat stock metal roofing and low-slope roofing trim.

Roof Report

2013-14 is the first year for Charlotte 49ers football. This new 15,000-seat stadium was built for the new team and is designed to be expanded to 40,000 seats. The main building, the Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse, located in the south end zone, has been named after the university’s longtime athletic director.

The stadium includes several other buildings, including the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, named in honor of Hugh McColl, former Bank of America CEO, and Jerry Richardson, owner of the NFL’s Carolina Panthers.

Photo courtesy of McElroy Metal, Bossier City, La.

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