At The Star, Durable Roof Systems Safeguard Buildings at Multi-Use Facility

Photos: KPost Roofing & Waterproofing

About 13 years ago, the original Dallas Cowboys Stadium in Irving, Texas, needed a new roof coating. KPost Roofing & Waterproofing of Dallas won the job; not too much later a partnership was born, and multiple roofing projects were the result, include The Star in Frisco, Texas.

Founded in 2004 by Keith Post, Steve Little, and Jayne Williams, with a core group of 11 roofing professionals, KPost now employs more than 400 people, including more than 60 specialized crews. Primarily a commercial roofing company, a residential division was opened four years ago to increase reach and service area. With a dedicated focus on safety, quality, and value, the company has amassed a portfolio of 1,240-plus projects and 60,000 work orders valued at more than $541 million, including multiple highly visible projects in the last several years like the headquarter buildings for Liberty Mutual, Toyota, and Charles Schwab; the Irving Music Factory; the Omni Dallas; the Statler Hotel; Texas Rangers Globe Life Field; and many more.

A longtime partnership with the Dallas Cowboys meant that when the team’s new indoor practice facility/mixed-use development was going under construction, KPost stepped in.

The Star

The mixed-use facility known as The Star is located on 91 acres in Frisco, Texas, and includes the Dallas Cowboys World Headquarters and domed practice facility, the Baylor Scott and White Health Sports Performance and Healthcare Center, The Star District shopping area, the Ford Center (a state-of-the-art 510,000 square foot indoor athletic facility shared by the Dallas Cowboys, the City of Frisco, and area high schools), and the beautiful Omni Frisco, which is nestled in the southeast corner of the complex.

The Star in Frisco is a mixed-use complex that includes the Dallas Cowboys World Headquarters, a domed practice facility, the Ford Center, and the Omni Frisco Hotel.

With a wide variety of building conditions throughout the complex, project architects selected roof assemblies that would meet the individual criteria of a high-rise hotel roof, a mid-level mixed-use space roof, and the domed roof of the Cowboys indoor practice facility. Various manufacturers and system assemblies were considered, and the use of a premium coverboard was always front of mind.

“The Omni Frisco roof levels 16 and 17 included a large amount of rooftop mechanical and lighting systems that require regular maintenance and a durable surface from which to work,” explains Chris Evans, chief estimator with KPost. “Additional details included the sheathing on the parapet walls and, of course the dome over the indoor practice facility.”

Evans’s job with KPost is that of leading the team with technical brainstorming and quality control in accomplishing project pricing and proposals.

“The use of a cover board was always part of the design,” continues Evans. “The architect opted for a single-ply roof at all roof areas. Single-ply roof membranes typically perform better when placed over a solid substrate. If not, there is an increased risk for premature wear, tear, and puncture. We needed to choose an option that would help the roof membrane perform to its full potential.”

Additionally, Frisco is located in the midst of the hail belt, which upped the ante for additional durability and protection against puncture.

Why Use a Cover Board?

Using a cover board is important for multiple reasons:

  • To preserve membrane integrity: Cover boards provide a smooth substrate to support the waterproofing membrane with the right balance of strength and flex.
  • To protect the insulation: Insulation compression causes material degradation, which lowers R-values. The polyiso insulation boards are typically the most expensive component in a commercial roof assembly, and critical in achieving target R-value. Cover boards are well-equipped for heavy loads and will protect the insulation and membrane beneath from being smashed by heavy equipment.
  • To increase durability: Puncture and impact resistance ensures product longevity. Impact resistance to foot traffic equals less maintenance, fewer repairs over time, and an extension of the life of the roofing assembly.
  • To provide weather protection: Wind and hail can wreak havoc on roofing assemblies, but a cover board helps maintain structural integrity during both the storm and the post-storm inspection.

The cover board is a team player; it not only protects the assembly and building from damage — it supports the performance of other assembly materials and the mechanical assets that call the roof home.

The Right Materials for the Project

Carlisle’s single-ply roofing membranes were chosen for the project, with Sure-Weld TPO specified for lower roof areas and Sure-Flex PVC for the dome roof. DensDeck Prime roof boards were incorporated in the submittals, with products provided by CSL Materials of Frisco. Evans and his team chose Georgia-Pacific’s DensDeck Prime Roof Board with EONIC Technology as the cover board for The Star — and offered multiple reasons why.

“It is clear that DensDeck and GP, along with their trade partners, are committed to testing a large amount of assembly types and material configurations. This commitment by GP has resulted in an ample amount of approved and tested assemblies, which allows us to find the right answer for pretty much any roof area,” says Evans.

“Fact is, DensDeck has become one of our key components used on most roof systems,” says Aileen Struble, senior estimator with KPost. “Between the testing, the ease of use, and the durability, DensDeck consistently offers the best protection.”

The most senior estimator on the KPost team, Struble has been with the company since the doors opened. She works on multi-system projects, including both new construction, remedial work and large historical renovations. She is KPost’s go-to estimator when faced with technically challenging and complicated projects, and she has received four ABC National Eagle Awards on her projects. An estimated 300,000 square feet of DensDeck Prime Roof Board was used on The Star.

When it came to the challenging logistics of the domed roof covering the indoor practice facility, the DensDeck Prime Roof Board passed with flying colors — literally, as the roof board was integral to the overall system, which was flown into place via helicopter.

“It’s all about consistency,” concludes Evans. “One of the greatest benefits with DensDeck is the fact that we receive the exact same product every single time we order it. This incredible level of consistency affords us the ability to deal with other challenges of construction because we know how DensDeck will behave under multiple conditions, and at the end of the day this consistency minimizes our overall risk. Partnering with consistency is necessary for success.”

“We like to call DensDeck the Goldilocks of the roof board industry: some options are too dense, and with some the dimensional stability just isn’t there,” says Struble. “GP and DensDeck has figured it out, because their roof board is just right.”

TEAM

General Contractor: Manhattan Construction Company, Dallas, Texas, www.manhattanconstructiongroup.com

Roofing Contractor: KPost Roofing & Waterproofing, Dallas, Texas, www.kpostcompany.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membranes: Sure-Weld TPO and Sure-Flex PVC, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Re-Roofing a Planetarium Under the Stars

Photos: Versico

The James S. McDonnell Planetarium is a St. Louis icon. Located in Forest Park, a 1,300-acre public park, the planetarium is the main attraction at the Saint Louis Science Center, one of the few free nonprofit science museums in the country. It serves more than one million people each year. Opened in 1963, the planetarium features one of the world’s best opto-mechanical start projectors, which projects a 360-degree view of the constellations in the night sky onto its domed ceiling.

The giant, white structure is hard to miss, but its roof is hidden from view for those on the ground. The low-slope roof system and penthouse are nearly invisible behind a large, bowl-shaped parapet. The existing roof was saturated with moisture and was starting to develop leaks, and the planetarium’s dome-shaped screen and multimillion-dollar projection system could not get wet.

The Problems

Bade Roofing was just finishing up a re-roofing project at a Science Center warehouse when the company was called in to take a look at the planetarium roof. According to Dave Bade, president of Bade Roofing, and Drew Bade, the project manager, the company determined a total roof replacement was required. They also identified some key challenges.

A crane was used to lift material to the roof and remove debris.

The 4,000-square-foot roof is unusual; it’s perfectly round, yet slightly bowl-shaped, with round penthouse in the center. The unique shape would make it difficult to design a tapered insulation system, flashings, and terminations for the 30-year project. Another difficulty was posed by the concrete step-offs located under the existing roof. There were no dimensions on the original plans, so creating the tapered insulation layout would be especially tricky.

The schedule was also complicated, as the planetarium would remain open throughout the construction process, hosting daily educational presentations for schoolchildren, as well as special events and exhibits. Work couldn’t take place during business hours.

“We had to work at night, craning stuff up there with big lights,” says Dave Bade. “The good thing was the guys couldn’t fall because they couldn’t go anywhere; the roof had an eight-foot wall around it. The safety plan was easy, but the tapered design was tough.”

The Proposal

Bade Roofing decided to go with a SureMB 120TG Base Ply as a temporary roof to ensure the equipment inside the building would be protected throughout the tear-off and installation process. “It was a secondary line of defense that allowed us to remove the entire roof all at once and not have to rely on tie-ins from the old roof to the new one when the crew started and stopped each night,” Drew Bade says.

The existing roof of the James S. McDonnell Planetarium was removed and replaced with a fully adhered 90-mil EPDM system from Versico.

The temporary roof allowed the company to accurately measure the existing roof for the tapered insulation design. “This is another reason we decided to use the SureMB 120TG; it allowed us to really see what was going on with the tapered and make adjustments prior to ordering,” notes Drew Bade.

The roof specified for the final phase of the project was a 90-mil VersiGard EPDM fully adhered system manufactured by Versico. “The Science Center and the architect both have a history of using EPDM on their projects because they’ve had a lot of success with it,” says Drew Bade. “And with the uncommon design and shape of this roof, EPDM was perfect to mold into all the unique angles and it did a good job conforming to the many curves of the building. We used a 90-mil EPDM to get the 30-year warranty the Science Center wanted and for the overall longevity of the roof.”

The Process

Once the crane and light towers were in place, crews began the loading and tear-off process. Crews accessed the roof through a window of the penthouse, but material had to be lifted in place with the crane. The typical workday began at about 5 p.m., and crews worked until 2 or 3 o’clock the next morning.

“We started by priming the concrete deck with CAV-GRIP 3V,” says Drew. “Then we installed the SureMB 120 TG Base Ply.”

The insulation was adhered in Flexible DASH low-rise adhesive. Crews installed a base layer of 2-inch SecurShield polyiso, which has a special facer, followed by a layer of tapered SecurShield polyiso. The drainage areas needed exacting care. “The drains were down in a concrete sump,” says Dave Bade. “We put the drawing right on the roof and cut out each of those sections. It was like cutting a pie into 50 pieces.”

Crews then installed Securock cover board, followed by the 90-mil VersiGard EPDM. “The EPDM did a great job conforming to the building’s angles and curves,” says Drew Bade. “We adhered the EPDM with Versico’s standard Bonding Adhesive because it’s got a long track record and it works.”

Once the tapered insulation was in place, the membrane installation was pretty straightforward, although the circular roof area posed some challenges with the details. “The counter flashings and terminations were kind of tough because everything had to be pre-bent to that radius,” Dave Bade notes. “It wasn’t a tight radius, but everything had to be pre-formed to that exact radius so you could keep constant compression on that membrane.”

The Professionals

The new system qualified for a 30-year warranty. “One of the main benefits of a Versico system, from a contractor perspective, is the support from Versico’s tech reps,” says Drew Bade. “It’s second to none; they make sure the job’s done right and they’re there every step of the way.”

The work was meticulous, and Bade Roofing’s experienced crews took great care to get it right. “The artistic part of it is the roof itself. It’s a shame that no one will ever see it,” says Dave Bade. “We did the work at night, so no one even saw our trucks.”

It’s a satisfying accomplishment to re-roof an iconic structure, even if no one sees you do it. “We really wanted to do this job,” says Dave Bade. “It meant a lot to us because we try to do things that are out of the ordinary. After being in business for more than 60 years, you like project like this because you get to show off your talents. And the men like stuff like this; the ones who got to work on this project, it really meant a lot to them. They are true professionals.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Bade Roofing Co., Inc., St. Louis, Missouri, www.baderoofing.com

Architect: Thomas Roof Inc. Architects, Lake Ozark, Missouri, www.txrac.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 90-mil VersiGard EPDM, Versico, www.versico.com

Insulation: SecurShield Polyiso, Versico

Base Ply: SureMB 120TG, Versico

Primer: CAV-GRIP 3V Low-VOC Adhesive/Primer, Versico

Cover Board: 1/2-inch Securock, USG, www.usg.com

Roof of Hong Kong’s Premier Yacht Club Gets a Major Facelift

Photos: Green Tech Insulation Systems (GTIS)

Set within a premier marina and home to some of the region’s largest luxury yachts, the Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club is an opulent leisure retreat for the who’s who of Hong Kong. Nestled along the South China Sea, the club offers stunning oceanfront views and an enviable set of amenities and attractions for its members and visitors.

But even the most picturesque and well-located of properties is subject to the elements. A subtropical region, Hong Kong’s weather pattern includes an annual typhoon season spanning May to November when periodic downpours, tropical storms, and heavy winds are more commonplace. In fact, this weather is directly responsible for the necessary, recently completed retrofit of the yacht and country club’s roof.

Prior to retrofit, the existing 38,000-square-foot roof was comprised of terracotta tile, including grout lines throughout. With both a flat deck and a pitched deck, none of the tile work was actually waterproof — far from ideal in moisture-laden Hong Kong. In 2018, after several years in operation, the lack of waterproofing had led to significant leaking throughout various portions of the roof. The club ownership recognized the necessity of restoring the roof to prevent additional costly structural damage. That’s when Green Tech Insulation Systems (GTIS) was called in.

Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club in Hong Kong underwent a complete roof restoration and then added solar panels as part of a complete energy overhaul.

A Hong Kong-based roofing and insulation contractor specializing in innovative sustainable solutions, GTIS was faced with some serious challenges. The new roof system obviously had to seal and waterproof the facility and GTIS recommended spray polyurethane foam (SPF) roofing to the club for its abilities to do both. Additionally, SPF is a lighter weight solution that may be applied directly overtop an existing roof, eliminating the costly and time-consuming removal of the older tile roof.

But the regional weather and rains complicated the installation itself. Either rain or extreme humidity was present during at least half of the installation timeline, making it difficult to dry out the substrate prior to application of the SPF roof. To ensure proper adhesion to the substrate, GTIS utilized Lapolla Thermo-Prime. The single-component, water-based acrylic primer promotes adhesion of spray foam roofing to a variety of substrates.

The roof also included interior gutters, many of which were experiencing moisture intrusion through cracks. For this issue, the four-person GTIS crew used a roof torch to dry out the concrete. The GTIS team also utilized silicone for the repair and refurbishment of these gutters.

The spray-applied Lapolla spray foam system was installed over the existing tile roof, and a custom color topcoat was applied to match the previous color.

GTIS spray-applied Lapolla FOAM-LOK 2800-4G, a spray foam system notable for integrating the earth-friendly Honeywell Solstice blowing agent, which eliminates ozone depletion impacts and dramatically decreases global warming potential over older spray foam roofing systems.

“Spray foam roofing is the right product to be deployed in Hong Kong because of its superb performance in the face of our regular and somewhat harsh weather patterns,” says Chris Brazendale, managing director of GTIS Asia Limited. “The combined ability to seal, waterproof, resist high winds and reduce energy demands are major selling points here.”

Robert Grant, Icynene-Lapolla’s field service representative based in Arizona, attended a portion of the installation to provide educational training to some of the newer GTIS crew installers.

“We pride ourselves on the resources we provide to our contractors and the training I provided onsite is a good example of this,” says Grant. “When weather caused delays on the project, I also got into full gear and laid down a good portion of the roof to help GTIS meet the project timeline.” Grant himself is also a trained installer.

Club management shared its appreciation of the installation timeline being met. “From start to finish we have been impressed with the GTIS team,” says Robert Kawai, general manager of the Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club. “The project completed quickly and work was done with minimal impact to the Club’s operations.”

Energy-Saving Strategy

The owners of Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club were looking for a complete energy solution for their upscale destination. In addition to the spray foam, which guarantees significant long-term energy bill savings, they also sought a renewable energy system. Once the roof retrofit and coatings were successfully applied and in place, the owners also engaged a solar contractor to install a robust photovoltaic system. Installation of the photovoltaics took place over a one-month timeframe.

“The Hong Kong government recently introduced an initiative to provide power directly back to the grid, which the owners of the club are participating in,” notes Brazendale. “Additionally, the longer-term plan will be to install batteries to capture the solar power and to offset energy demand at the facility. An added benefit of the batteries is assurance to the owners and managers of the facility that power will be accessible to the club, even if a storm or another event affects the grid.”

A key requirement of the client was to maintain and enhance the attractive appearance of this upscale facility. To that end, the GTIS and Lapolla teams worked with the club ownership to develop custom color coatings designed to match the original tile roof, and these were applied to the completed SPF roof. GTIS recommended Lapolla THERMO-FLEX 1000 elastomeric coating for the roof and GE Enduris 3500 silicone coating for the roof perimeter.

“The custom color topcoat really helped us retain the overall original appearance of the roofs, which was important to us” says Kawai.

In addition to providing a protective layer over the spray foam material which protects it from UV rays, debris and the elements, the coatings also stand up to the humidity present at the ocean-adjacent site. The coatings also protect against biological growth, which is key as roof surfaces under solar panels typically do not dry as quickly.

“The owners are extremely proud of the retrofit,” notes James Cooper, operations director of GTIS. “With regular care and maintenance, the new roof is expected to last for decades. This combined SPF and solar roofing system is a sustainable investment in the Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club that will provide valuable ROI for a significant number of years to come.”

“We are really looking forward to the benefits of a watertight roof and lower cooling costs and are so happy with the team and SPF and coatings products we selected for the club,” adds Kawai.

About the author: Doug Kramer is President & CEO of Icynene-Lapolla, a global manufacturer and supplier of spray polyurethane foam. The company’s products are recognized for optimizing energy efficiency and performance in the envelope. Doug Kramer may be reached at dkramer@icynene-lapolla.com.

TEAM

Installer: Green Tech Insulation Systems (GTIS), Hong Kong

MATERIALS

Spray Polyurethane Foam: Lapolla FOAM-LOK 2800-4G, Icynene-Lapolla, http://icynene-lapolla.com

Primer: Lapolla Thermo-Prime, Icynene-Lapolla

Roof Coating: Lapolla THERMO-FLEX 1000 elastomeric coating, Icynene-Lapolla

Roof Coating: GE Enduris 3500 silicone coating, GE Silicones, www.siliconeforbuilding.com

Sports Facility Highlights the Versatility of Insulated Metal Panels

Boston Sports Institute is a 130,000-square-foot multi-use recreation facility. The structure features three different colors of insulated metal panels on the walls. Photos: Metl-Span

Sports facilities are unique environments that face varying environmental conditions from both within and outside the structure. In evaluating building materials, client and builder seek proven solutions for meeting environmental requirements, codes and long-term durability without forsaking the art of design.

Enter the new Boston Sports Institute (BSI), a 130,000-square-foot multi-use recreation facility in Wellesley, Massachusetts, a suburb of Metro West Boston. A collegiate town and activities hub for surrounding residential communities, Wellesley lacked a professional-grade sports facility. Featuring two NHL ice arenas, a synthetic turf field, indoor track, repurposed 2012 Olympic trial pool, warm-up pool, sports rehabilitation area and strength training facility, this $23.3 million complex was completed in July 2019. Centered on a public-private partnership model between the town and the management company Edge Sports Group, BSI prioritizes ice and pool time for local schools who previously traveled to professional facilities. It is also rentable for private organizations and sports groups.

Barnes Buildings & Management Group installed approximately 58,000 square feet of insulated metal panels from Metl-Span.

“We were committed to using insulated metal panels from the earliest design stages, both for its performance and design flexibility,” states Kevin Provencher, AIA, LEED AP, Director of Architecture at the design builder, Dacon Corporation. “We have a lot of history with this type of product on a variety of building types. It is an effective solution for multi-use facilities with variable environmental requirements. Both ice rinks and natatoriums have high moisture loads, but the ice rink’s temperature will be maintained at 55 degrees Fahrenheit while the pools are at 82 degrees. It’s an ideal wall system for a facility with demanding environmental needs.”

Provencher notes insulated metal panels (IMPs) provide a total wall system that incorporates a continuous insulating layer with control layers for weather, air and vapor barriers. “It helps that we partnered with a quality metal building builder,” Provencher says. “Collaboration was key to this project’s success. Selecting the right details and sharing responsibility eases the burden on the designer.”

Barnes Buildings & Management Group Inc. of Weymouth, Massachusetts, a Metallic Building Company dealer, installed the insulated metal panels from Metl-Span as well as the engineered metal framing system. Tony Barnes oversaw the erection of the metal framing and challenging installation of 58,000 square feet of insulated metal panels. Tim Allison, the Vice President of Project Management at Barnes, oversaw project administration.

Barnes Buildings & Management Group installed approximately 58,000 square feet of insulated metal panels from Metl-Span.

“We have a mixture of panel types in multiple colors that run in two orientations,” Allison says. “When we have just one type of panel and one color, we simply unwrap the bundle and install continuously. With multiple colors, you must spread out bundles so we can access the panels in the order needed. With this site, we didn’t have much room, so it was tricky. We paid close attention to the drawings and details to ensure correct installation.”

Allison says Barnes Buildings erects a lot of structures using engineered metal framing systems and IMPs. He’s noticed an architectural trend is using mixed colors and panel orientation.

Metl-Span’s Smoke Gray, Polar White and Sandstone were installed to create an eye-catching aesthetic. “Our client wanted a strong visual impact on the north façade facing the state highway,” Provencher says. “When passing other commercial buildings commuters notice this vibrant design featuring vertical and horizontal panels. Tim Allison and Marty Barnes provided valuable input, influencing the final outcome.”

There are several unique details to BSI, including a parapet on the gable end of the building above the pool. It starts low at the eaves and grows to 3 feet at the peak to hide rooftop equipment. Barnes Buildings also installed an accent band near the top of the building, a single-skin metal panel that continues horizontally from the windows. The 7.2 Rib panel from Metl-Span is 36 inches wide with ribs that are 1-1/2 inches deep.

The roofing for more than 75 percent of the building is a double lock standing seam from Metallic in bare Galvalume. The roofing above the pool is a bare Galvalume insulated metal panel, Metl-Span’s CFR system. It starts approximately 35 feet from the roof peak, so the top section of roofing is standing seam. At the transition to where the IMPs are above the pool, the roofline drops 1 foot. The interior skin on the roofing and wall IMPs in the pool area are coated with Valspar’s Flurothane IV, a finish formulated to protect in exceptionally harsh environments where chemical corrosion protection is needed.

“It’s all things we’ve dealt with on other projects, but there’s a little bit of everything on this one,” Allison says. “It’s a special job and a visually appealing project. The IMPs are ideally suited for our New England climate. When used as walls and roofing, they provide excellent continuous insulation on any building.”

TEAM

Architect: PDA Inc., Natick, Massachusetts,

Design Builder: Dacon Corporation, Natick, Massachusetts, www.dacon1.com

IMP Installer: Barnes Buildings & Management Group, Weymouth, Massachusetts, www.barnesbuildings.com

MATERIALS

Wall Panels: Insulated Metal Panels, Metl-Span, www.metlspan.com

Roof Panels: CFR Insulated Metal Panels, Metl-Span

Metal Roof System: Double Lock Standing Seam, Metallic Building Company, www.metallic.com

Roofing a Resort in Paradise Took Great Design and Better Planning

Photos: Timbers Kauai

The Hawaiian Islands epitomize paradise with sandy beaches, crystal clear waters, warm days and balmy nights. Some are blessed to call the islands home, while others are lucky visitors. Both groups come together at Timbers Kauai — Ocean Club & Residences at Hokuala, an oceanfront destination nothing short of spectacular.

Opened in June 2018, Timbers Kauai exudes luxury island living. Located on Kauai’s picturesque southeast coast, the destination offers short- and long-term residents breathtaking unobstructed views of the Pacific Ocean and Hau’pu mountain range as well as immediate access to an unparalleled shoreline.

The design aesthetic of Timbers Kauai is inspired by the naturally distinct Hawaiian paradise surrounding it. All materials and finishes were deliberately selected for the richness and longevity they provide, from the cladding and windows, to roofing, luxe interior finishes and lush landscaping. Elements combine naturally, providing seamless easy connections between indoor and outdoor spaces.

“Key Hawaiian-inspired design elements were incorporated into the public indoor and outdoor spaces and main lobby,” says Gary Ross, director of architecture for Timbers Resorts. “Examples include the wave patterned fascia panels, nautical inspired backlit entry panels and the lobby’s Kappa inspired floor tile patterns.”

The Timbers Kauai features Hawaiian-inspired design elements throughout. Materials and finishes were selected for the richness and longevity they provide.

When considering roofing options for the resort, architects aimed for a durable, resilient material that complemented the sophisticated island design theme. They ultimately turned to Irvine, California-based Boral Roofing, specifying Saxony 900 Slate Appalachian Blend, a high-performance concrete roofing system with earthy stone hues replicating the natural look of real slate.

Since concrete tile is a high-quality, durable roofing solution that lasts much longer than some other competing roofing options, it is an ideal solution for the resort. The low maintenance tile also allows for localized repair areas should damage ever occur.

Sustainability is a major selling point of the concrete roof tile. Manufactured using naturally occurring and abundant geologic materials, the tile incorporates no chemical preservatives and is 100 percent recyclable at the end of its life on the roof. Concrete tile also provides the resort with substantial energy efficiency benefits, rendering significant reductions in the ongoing energy costs associated with heating and cooling the property as the seasons shift.

Fighting Unpredictable Weather

Another core consideration in the selection of the roof was storm resistance. The subtropical weather on Kauai can be trying for a roof. Hot, humid weather is common and torrential rainfall, fierce wind and hail occur as well. To protect the resort from these harsh weather variables, the architects sought a roofing material able to withstand the elements. Boral Roofing’s tile not only provided a complementary aesthetic, but also the weather resistance attributes required on Kauai.

Architects chose a high-performance concrete roofing system from Boral Roofing that replicates the look of natural slate.

 “We were able to specify a product that not only met the stringent wind and rain conditions of building in Hawaii, but also provided the style and elegance required of this project,” says Chris Ridings, partner at Poss Architecture + Planning of Aspen, the design firm retained by Timbers Resorts for the project.

Concrete roof tile also notably scores high in fire resistance. The Timbers Kauai roof is non-combustible, helping prevent ignition from occurring. The tile offers a Class A fire rating, the highest fire resistance rating for roofing.

Challenging Installation

Those involved in construction in Hawaii understand shipping can be a challenge. Many building materials must be delivered from the mainland. With most projects on strict timelines, delays in shipping can be troublesome and even costly. Thus, it is important that logistics, lead times, packaging, and fulfillment of orders are correct. With the roof installation, these factors came in to play.

Installation of the roof was led by Honolulu Roofing & Waterproofing, one of Hawaii’s first-established roofing companies. A project comprising three large buildings and 600 squares, the installation occurred over a three-month period. “We had to deal with adverse weather, primarily rain, but also hurricane warnings,” says Dan Jaeger, vice president. “Kauai didn’t end up getting hit with a hurricane, but because of the warnings, the materials already in transit had to return to their shipping origin and then be re-shipped. It took a bit longer than we would have liked.”

Despite weather delays, the Honolulu Roofing team completed the installation seamlessly once it got started. Jaeger points out that Boral Roofing was onsite during installation and contributed to the project’s success. “It’s really great to see a manufacturer present putting that level of effort into providing guidance during an installation,” Jaeger says.

The roof included all Boral components, but the attachment used for this project was the Polyfoam instant set adhesive, which is compatible with Boral Tile Seal underlayment.

Honolulu Roofing was able to install more than 580 squares of roof tile using one crew of eight men, with each member assigned a specific task on the roof, all overseen by Jaegar. He flew in daily from Honolulu before sunrise to make sure the job ran smoothly, even getting in a morning walk to the job site for exercise.

Honolulu Roofing also provided waterproofing for the low-slope portion of the project as it was critical that the roof tile installation tied into the low slope system properly. All told, the installation of the roof tile was completed ahead of schedule despite weather-related shipping delays.

Built to Entice and Endure

Timbers Kauai – Ocean Club & Residences at Hokuala is designed to offer an unparalleled experience for those who visit. Built from rich materials that last, the resort encourages luxury island living along a breathtaking stretch of coast. The island retreat offers residents and visitors alike a thoughtfully curated collection of services including access to a full-service restaurant with progressive approach to farm-fresh Hawaiian food, an oceanfront infinity-edge swimming pool, a separate ohana pool with a beach entry, and water features that form the heart of the resort. These are just a few of the onsite amenities set within the quality-crafted resort built of exceptional materials. No doubt, Timbers Kauai is designed to endure.

About the author: Ann Iten is the director of marketing for Boral Roofing, a manufacturer of durable and energy-efficient new and retrofit roofing systems. Visit Boral Roofing online at www.boralroof.com, and contact Ann at Ann.Iten@boral.com

TEAM

Architect: Poss Architecture + Planning, Aspen, Colorado, www.billposs.com, and Gary Ross, Director of Architecture, Timbers Resorts

Roofing Contractor: Honolulu Roofing & Waterproofing, Honolulu, Hawaii, www.honroof.com

MATERIALS

Concrete Roof Tile: Saxony 900 Slate Appalachian Blend, Boral Roofing, www.boralroof.com

Underlayment: Boral Tile Seal, Boral Roofing

Picturesque Mountain Clubhouse Gets a Metal Roof Upgrade

The Clubhouse at Lake Sconti was recently re-roofed with CertainTeed’s Matterhorn Shake metal roofing. Photo: CertainTeed

Just 60 miles north of Atlanta in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, the 7,000-acre Big Canoe community is an ideal location where residents enjoy mountains, lakes and a 27-hole championship golf course. The Clubhouse at Lake Sconti serves as Big Canoe’s central hub, with 25,000 square feet of gathering space that is host to weddings, corporate events, writers’ groups, poker clubs, trivia nights and more. Adding another 10,000 square feet to the overall facility is Duffer’s Bar and Grille and an adjoining golf cart storage facility.

Big Canoe’s original clubhouse — established in the early 1970s along with the community — burned to the ground 13 years ago after being struck by lightning. The entire structure was rebuilt, which included the installation of a classic cedar shake roof. After severe wind and hail damage from a more recent storm, the Big Canoe community found itself in the position of needing a complete roof replacement.

“It was a beautiful roof, but we weren’t getting the longevity out of the cedar shake as originally intended,” says Katie Wercholuk, marketing and communications director of the Big Canoe Property Owners Association. “We want our residents to be proud of their clubhouse and to not bear the cost of a new clubhouse roof every 10 years. We needed something with durability that would be able to stand up to mountain weather, which can sometimes be unpredictable.”

After six months of researching the best solution, the Big Canoe Property Owners Association found Colony Roofers, a veteran-owned roofing company based in Marietta, Georgia. Company president Mark Seymour suggested CertainTeed’s Matterhorn Shake in the color Cedar to keep the look of classic cedar shake while adding the benefits of metal.

“You should get about 30-40 years out of a cedar shingle roof, but it was 11 years and the original roof was deteriorating much quicker than it should have,” notes Seymour. “As we started ripping it off, we noticed that it wasn’t vented very well. A lot of the cedar shake shingles were curling up and breaking apart. It also sits inside of a valley and gets a lot of wind, so many of the hip and ridge shingles were coming up.”

Between the clubhouse, restaurant and golf cart barn, the job required 40,000 square feet of metal roof panels. In addition to be being the largest metal roofing job undertaken by Colony Roofing, the job’s secluded location and status as an active business presented additional challenges to the installing team.

“This was a big, six-to-eight-week job,” Seymour says. “Putting a roof on an operating business is difficult, so it required a lot of coordination with the property owners association. Big Canoe is also up in the mountains, so some of the bridges and roads you have to navigate aren’t meant for tractor-trailers and big machinery. If we were doing a standing seam roof where you have to stage long runs of metal and cut them to size, we would have definitely had some issues transporting it.”

Seymour said the way the product is designed and palletized allowed his team to “minimize the footprint” his team had on the property, and that the interlocking panel system allowed his crew to install the product quickly, helping Big Canoe get back to business as usual.

“Weather is unpredictable in the mountains and storms will come and go in the evenings,” says Seymour. “The main thing that helped us move quicker was the Matterhorn system. It goes on well and interlocks in a way our guys can understand. It’s a well-designed, user-friendly product.”

According to Wercholuk, the installation is a “win-win” for the Big Canoe community. “It’s not just low-maintenance, it’s no-maintenance and it looks beautiful,” says Wercholuk. “Anytime you have guests or visitors, the clubhouse is something you want to show off. We have intentionally tight architectural controls here and everything just blends into nature. You would never be able to tell it’s metal from far away.”

Wercholuk said that the product has left a great impression on Big Canoe’s roughly 6,000 residents.

“Everything we’ve heard from residents has been extremely positive,” Wercholuk adds. “Metal provided the look we were after as a mountain community, but with more efficiency.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Colony Roofers, Marietta, Georgia, www.colonyroofers.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: Matterhorn Shake metal roofing in Cedar, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

Quick, Clean Construction of Vineyard Villas Aided by Insulated Metal Panels

Two 1,300-square-foot guest houses now provide overnight accommodations at Overmountain Vineyards. Insulated metal panels from Metl-Span were used for the walls and roofing. Photos: Metl-Span

Overmountain Vineyards, a family-operated vineyard in Polk County, North Carolina, wanted to offer its visitors comfortable overnight accommodations. Working with some talented designers, the plan was to construct two 1,300 square foot guest houses, using insulated metal panels (IMPs) from Metl-Span for the walls and roofing.

The two-bedroom, two-bath luxury villas each offer a scenic view of the Overmountain Vineyards along with a private patio. Suitable for four guests, both villas are just five minutes from the Tryon International Equestrian center and housed members of teams from Europe during the September 2018 competition. Each is stocked with a complete inventory of household items for the kitchen and bedrooms.

Each building is constructed on a concrete slab, which serves as the interior flooring as well. The concrete, which was colored while mixing in the truck, is finished with an acrylic coating.

“The vineyards’ owner, Frank Lilly, wanted the guest houses to have a modern look,” says architect Julia McIntyre of Tryon, North Carolina. “The outside is a very minimalist look, but the inside is not. Each house front features sliding glass doors that lead to an extended patio with a view of the vineyards. The insulated metal panels have a clean look and are very low maintenance, easy to care for.”

Sloping from the front of the villa to the back, the roof extends 6 feet beyond the front wall to cover the patio area, creating more “living space.” The roof extends 5 feet beyond the walls in the back and on the sides. Photos: Metl-Span

The IMPs were an integral focus of the design. “With the insulated metal panels, you’re building with a system and we were very pleased to discover the different colors and different textures we could choose from,” says McIntyre. “One couple that stayed there has already approached me about designing a mountain home for them using insulated metal panels. I don’t believe they have a lot yet, but we’ve started work on the design.”

Interior decorating features a combination of modern design as well as some antique architectural woodwork, salvaged from older buildings in the area. McIntyre says the insulated metal panels, installed on a metal framing system from Mesco Building Solutions, helped shorten erection time and therefore reduced construction costs.

“This was our first time installing insulated metal panels,” says Myron Yoder, owner of M. Yoder Construction Inc., Columbus, North Carolina. “We really liked the way they went together and it didn’t take too long. We’ve done a lot of steel buildings; we build a lot of barns and do some commercial work, but if you can do steel buildings, I believe you can build with insulated metal panels.”

The roof slopes from the front of the villa to the back and extends 6 feet beyond the front wall to cover the patio area, creating more “living space.” The roof extends 5 feet beyond the walls in the back and on the sides. To achieve an R-value of R-34 to reduce energy costs, the Metl-Span LS-36 insulated roof panels contain a 5-inch urethane core. The exterior traditional rib panels are 26-gauge Galvalume in Sandstone, while the interior panels are 26-gauge Galvalume in Mesa Almond.

The two-bedroom, two-bath guest homes were built on concrete slabs. Metl-Span’s CF-42 panels were used for the walls of the villas. Photos: Metl-Span

LS-36 insulated metal panels have an overlapping, through-fastened joint, allowing for installation that is quicker than other construction methods. This reduces labor costs and made the villas available for occupancy sooner.

Metl-Span’s CF-42 panels were used for the walls of the villas — 14 feet tall in the front and 8 feet tall in the back. The 26-gauge Galvalume exterior and interior panels contain a 2-1/2-inch urethane core, providing an R-value of R-19. Exterior panels are Sandstone, matching the roof. The interior panels are Almond.

Yoder says the panel handling and installation isn’t much different than constructing a steel building. “We used a lift to get the panels in place, but we didn’t need a crane or any other outlandish equipment,” he says. “It’s a very economical construction and it’s a pretty tight house.”

Iconic White Sands Inn Re-Roofed With Foam System After Hurricane

The White Sands Inn is an eclectic beachfront lodge in Marathon, Florida. Photo: Rachel Price. Photo: Rachel Price

For Rachel Price and her mother, Janice Stephens, the White Sands Inn represented 20 years of hard work and memories. Situated on Marathon, Florida’s Grassy Key, the eclectic beachfront lodge looked out on tranquil blue waters framed by graceful palm trees. Idyllic and serene, White Sands was a vacation home away from home for legions of loyal patrons.

But the oceanfront location that made it so popular with visitors also put it right in the path of Hurricane Irma, one of the most powerful and costly storms ever to hit the United States. After making landfall in Barbuda as a category 5 on September 6, 2017, Irma roared through the Caribbean toward the vulnerable islands at the Sunshine State’s southern tip.

The Keys bore the full brunt of Irma’s Category 4 winds and rain on September 10. The storm then traveled directly north up the entire length of Florida and into Georgia before dissipating, leaving more than $50 billion in damage in its wake, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Office for Coastal Management.

As Price watched the storm build and prepared to evacuate, she worried whether her hotel would survive. When an apprehensive Price finally returned, she found the inn practically in ruins and the roofs of both of the inn’s buildings completely gone. Determined to rebuild and re-open, she knew that a new roof was a top priority. Contractor Charles King used Lapolla roofing products manufactured by Icynene-Lapolla to shield White Sands from the elements and help Price prepare to re-open her doors to guests.

Preparing for a Direct Hit

With one eye on the weather reports, Price began bringing in all of the hotel’s outdoor equipment and battening down anything that could break or cause damage. Then she boarded up the windows, threw some essentials in the car and joined the line of Keys residents and Miamians headed north.

Hurricane Irma ripped the roof off of both of the inn’s buildings and left extensive damage to the interior and exterior of the complex. Photo: Rachel Price.

Evacuating, however, turned out to be a difficult task. With all of Florida in the storm’s path, Price and her mother had no safe place to stop. They eventually ended up near their original home of Cincinnati, Ohio.

Not everyone left. A few “old salts,” as Price calls them, weathered the storm in bars and restaurants. Photographers also traveled to the Keys expressly to document the destructive event.

In the days after the storm, photos depicted catastrophic damage: crumbled walls, demolished homes, crushed trailers, scattered debris, boats in the street and roofs damaged from the Keys to the Florida-Georgia state line. Tagged in online photos of the hotel, Price and her mother had some idea of the situation that awaited them.

Because of damaged and inaccessible roads, Price and her mother couldn’t get back to Grassy Key for two weeks. The first thing she saw when they returned was that one of her buildings, a duplex, was missing a roof, exposing the interior to heavy rains. She found the roof on top of a car she had hoped to save from Irma. The duplex also lost windows, allowing waves up to 10 feet high to cause extensive water damage inside.

Photo: Rachel Price.

The other building, the main complex of the White Sands Inn, sustained serious damage everywhere. Waves had punched enormous holes in the ocean-facing side of the building and sucked everything inside out to sea. Furniture, toilets and showers were simply gone. One room remained salvageable, but it had to be dug out of a mound of sand.

The 4,500-square-foot flat, modified bitumen roof was gone, lifted completely off by the powerful winds and deposited a quarter of a mile away. The 20-year-old roof system was built before newer building codes were enforced, and its drip edge was not properly nailed down.

“The entire roof came off down to the wood,” Price says. “The whole entire roof was just sheared off. It lifted up and split off of the building.”

Steps to a New Roof

Price immediately filled out the Small Business Administration paperwork necessary for disaster loans and began getting quotes from roofing contractors. One of them was Charles “Charlie” King of Southeast Waterproofing and Coatings, a family-owned firm based in Geneva, Florida.

A closed-cell, polyurethane foam was spray applied over a nailable vented base sheet and plywood decking. Photo: Charles King.

He didn’t get the job — at first. Price opted to hire a local contractor who promised to do the roof of the main building as well as the interior, all in a couple of months. After a while, he failed to show up and sent another roofer in his place. By then, many months later, city inspectors had shut down the renovation project and found that the contractor had installed only half of a roof — and it was crooked.

Price went back over her estimates and this time hired King.

Rain was still falling inside the White Sands Inn building the next summer when King and his small crew made the trip to Grassy Key. Having previously made a fast and sturdy repair at the Marathon Community Playhouse and Cinema, King already had a good relationship with the local building department.

King and crew arrived on July 2, 2018. After finding a place to stay in the Keys on a holiday weekend — no easy task — he and his crew restored Price’s roof in just a few days and still had time to go deep-sea fishing before heading home.

A Waterproof Roof for the White Sands Inn

One of King’s primary challenges involved the previous contractor’s botched fix, which had left a low spot in the roof over a main living area. The spot acted as a funnel, channeling rainwater into the building’s interior and causing the ceiling and floor of the building’s second floor to sink.

The roof system was topped with Therma-Flex 1000, a highly reflective acrylic roof coating. Photo: Charles King.

“First, we removed the previous contractor’s single-ply roof and started over on the 4,500-square-foot White Sands Inn roof,” King says. “The building was old and very little space was left for air conditioning ducts between the ceiling and roof.”

The White Sands Inn’s new flat roof included a three-quarter-inch plywood substrate nailed according to code. King constructed a custom gravel stop with a larger top than the previous roof’s, which he then nailed and screwed every four inches, staggered.

“We anchored the face every 16 inches to 2-by-8 fascia,” King explains. “That’s beyond code. I just like the extra protection.”

The crew worked quickly to avoid the inevitable moisture present in tropical areas, especially in the mornings and evenings, and laid down a nailable venting base sheet as the basis of the new roof. Atop this barrier they applied a Thermo-Flex polyurethane foam roof system featuring an acrylic coating.

Framed by palm trees, White Sands Inn looks out at the ocean from Marathon’s Grassy Key. Photo: Rachel Price.

King and Price agreed that the roof system would offer the hotel the best possible protection against tropical storms, rain and intense UV exposure. FOAM-LOK 2800 is a closed-cell, polyurethane foam system used on a variety of substrates for both waterproofing and insulation purposes. Therma-Flex 1000, an acrylic coating designed specifically for roofing applications, protects and preserves roofs from heat, moisture and severe weather.

The crew sprayed the polyurethane foam onto the roof substrate in a sloping shape that channels rainwater toward the building’s intended drainage pathways. Thermo-Prime and Thermo-Flex acrylics were applied on top of the polyurethane foam to completely seal the roof and ensure that everything adhered firmly to every square inch.

The roof system is designed to provide a lightweight and sustainable seamless umbrella over a wide variety of new and existing roof substrates to protect against rain and hail. It also includes a fire retardant and exhibits excellent dirt pick-up resistance.

The crew from Southeast Waterproofing and Coatings finished the roof in time to do some deep-sea fishing. Photo: Charles King.

The system does, however, require a professionally trained roofer who understands the proper application procedures. King works regularly with Lapolla products and installed Price’s roof to stand up to the heat and moisture of tropical conditions for the life of the system.

In fact, King’s customer service is such that when Price called him about a small leak near the fireplace after the roof was finished, he hopped on a plane immediately — only to discover that the issue was not related to the roof at all. He fixed it anyway.

The Return of a Florida Keys Vacation Mainstay

The new roof should help protect the White Sands Inn if another hurricane hits the Keys. King noted that after Hurricane Michael, which devastated the Florida Panhandle in October 2018, most of the few buildings that remained standing had spray-foam and coating roofing systems.

King has a lot of faith in his work, and not without reason. In response to the adage, “They don’t make ’em like they used to,” King says: “You’re right. They don’t. They make ’em much better now.”

An added bonus is that the Thermo-Flex system boosts the R-value of Price’s roof, a plus in an area prone to high heat and direct sunlight. She expects her cooling costs to come down drastically in the near future.

King, who has extensive post-storm repair experience, advises home and business owners to choose state-licensed contractors for their roofing work. The savings promised by the other guys, he says, might end up costing a fortune when the work is either not finished or not done according to code.

Though the roof is completed, interior work is still going on and Price is not sure when the White Sands will re-open for guests. But one thing’s for sure: King and Icynene-Lapolla products helped save Price’s business, and once the White Sands opens, King has a standing invitation to stay at the inn whenever he’s in town.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Southeast Waterproofing and Coatings, Geneva, Florida, www.foamittoday.com

MATERIALS

Spray Polyurethane Foam: FOAM-LOK 2800, Icynene-Lapolla, www.lapolla.com

Acrylic Roof Coating: Thermo-Prime and Thermo-Flex, Icynene-Lapolla

South Carolina Resort’s Metal Roof Complements Classic Low Country Architecture

The new Inn at Palmetto Bluff was inspired by a mansion built on the property in the early 1900s. Photos: Nurnberg Photography, www.nurnbergphotography.com

The recently expanded Palmetto Bluff Resort in Bluffton, South Carolina, now boasts a new 74-room inn designed by Dallas-based HKS Architects. The new Inn at Palmetto Bluff sits alongside an expanded lagoon waterway and was inspired by the R.T. Wilson Jr. mansion built on the property in the early 1900s. Located in the Low Country between Charleston and Savannah, Palmetto Bluff is one of the largest waterfront properties on the East Coast. The resort is set within the 20,000-acre Palmetto Bluff community and conservation preserve that features an array of Southern-style residential neighborhoods ranging from multi-million-dollar legacy family compounds to more traditionally sized single-family homes.

The inn is finished with artisan James Hardie siding on the exterior façade, and a Petersen standing seam metal roof was chosen to complement the classic Low Country architecture. The roof features PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels finished in custom color Patrician Bronze. Approximately 75,000 square feet of the 24-gauge Galvalume panels were installed on a tight deadline.

Don Harrier, principal at HKS, said one of the greatest challenges was complying with a long list of restrictions designed to keep additions within the scope of the original buildings, such as a mandated three-story height limit and rules regarding waterways.

The inn is topped with a standing seam metal roof featuring Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels. Photos: Nurnberg Photography, www.nurnbergphotography.com

“It’s easy to get into a site like this for construction, but in our world we have staging areas for materials, contractor trailers, etc., and because of the environment, we had to build another building first to house back-of-the-house areas, maintenance, administration and parking,” Harrier says. “There were a lot of logistics involved as far as taking care of the site.”

Installation of the Snap-Clad panels on the 154,000-square-foot luxury inn was done by Southern Roof & Wood Care in Hardeeville, South Carolina. “It was a complicated job with three adjoining sections of the roof and lots of different elevations and planes and dormers. The flashing details were complex,” says David Swanson, president of SRWC.

Southern Roof & Wood Care has considerable experience with Petersen’s PAC-CLAD profiles. “We like Snap-Clad because it doesn’t require mechanical seaming. We use it whenever we can and when it meets the wind uplift requirements,” Swanson notes. “Of course, we also install a lot of Tite-Loc and Tite-Loc Plus, too. We like using the PAC-CLAD products and we can be competitive in the marketplace. We’re really happy with the Petersen relationship. They stand behind their products.”

The Snap-Clad panels were manufactured at Petersen’s plant in Acworth, Georgia. The general contractor was Choate Construction in Savannah, Georgia. The Petersen distributor was Commercial Roofing Specialties in Savannah, Georgia.

TEAM

Architect: HKS Architects, Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

General Contractor: Choate Construction, Savannah, www.choateco.com

Roofing Contractor: Southern Roof & Wood Care, Hardeeville, South Carolina, www.southernroof.com

Distributor: Commercial Roofing Specialties, Savannah, Georgia, www.crssupply.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Patrician Bronze, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Contractor Overcomes Challenging Logistics to Re-Roof 16-Story Westin Savannah

The Westin Savannah site posed logistical challenges, as it is bordered by the Savannah River, a canal and the Savannah Convention Center. Photo: SOPREMA

Were you to visit Savannah, Georgia, the Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort and Spa would be tough to miss. This landmark property, known for its 18-hole PGA golf course, secluded beach access and on-site spa, is the tallest building in the city at 16 stories. The aura of luxury surrounding the building was threatened, however, when Hurricane Matthew moved through the region, inundating the city with rainwater and causing the aging Westin Savannah roof to fail. With leaks resulting in the closure of a major portion of the hotel’s upper floor, it was clear the building owners would need to move quickly to restore a waterproof seal atop their building.

The job would not be easy. The Westin Savannah is surrounded by the Savannah River on one side, a canal on another and the Savannah Convention Center on a third. The only feasible area left to stage and load the roofing material onto a crane was the front parking loop and valet area — an area that would typically be avoided with any other roofing project. “We only had one spot where we could set up, and that was the biggest challenge,” says Larry Hoffman, the superintendent who oversaw the installation of the roof at the Westin Savannah on behalf of Whitco Roofing, the Westin’s chosen contractor. “We were very limited with regard to any mobility around that hotel, not to mention the fact that we had to get materials onto a roof that was 270 feet from the ground.” 

Envisioning an Approach

The Whitco Roofing team also had to deal with challenging application conditions, given that the roof had many penetrations due to the presence of air conditioning units, towers, exhaust vents, lighting, walkways, ladders, staircases and other equipment. Special care would have to be given to the installation of the flashing to ensure no opportunities for leak formation remained after the roofing job was done. Recognizing that the use of a liquid flashing material was the best bet to keep the roofing layer monolithic despite all the penetrations, the Whitco Roofing team set about selecting the right compatible materials for the job.

SOPREMA’s SENTINEL P150 60-mil PVC-based roofing membrane was selected for the projectbecause we wanted a durable roofing product that was compatible with a liquid flashing material for difficult base flashings encountered during this project,” explains Henri Brickey, director of business development for Whitco Roofing. “We recommended the SOPREMA PVC membrane for several reasons, the first of which is the superior chemical and UV resistance PVC offers over TPO. Since we also intended to wrap the large quantity of concrete and metal support column bases with SOPREMA’s ALSAN RS 230 Flash polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) liquid resin, we made sure the PVC membrane was compatible and that we could include those areas under the roof’s warranty.” 

The Installation Commences

The complex coordination required for a successful roofing installation began on the ground. One week’s worth of material was staged at a time, then a crane was brought in to upload materials to the roof on the same day trash was being downloaded from the old roof tear-off process. All debris had to be carefully bagged and secured with tarps to avoid pollution in the nearby Savannah River, and the delivery and removal of four dumpsters at a time had to be carefully coordinated so that no dumpster was left on the premises overnight, blocking entry to the building. “You had to be out of there by five o’clock with everything, and it had to be done in a particular sequence, further complicating matters,” explains Hoffman.

On the rooftop, existing asphalt-based roofing materials were stripped down to the concrete deck. SOPREMA SOPRA-ISO3.5-inch polyisocyanurate insulation was adhered using SOPREMA DUOTACK 365 foam adhesive to provide improved R-value to the building. Next, the PVC membrane was bonded onto the insulation, providing both a reliable waterproofing layer and a reflective white finish that would help diminish heat absorption compared to the older materials. The liquid resin coating was then applied to prevent water intrusion at all exposed concrete column bases — extending up and coating metal base plates — and at vertical flashing points where air handling units tied into the building’s walls. New tapered crickets were also installed between drains, improving the overall flow of water on the roof and reducing the opportunity for ponding water.

Safety and Communications Prioritized

Throughout the project, OSHA guidelines had to be followed carefully on the rooftop and on the ground to ensure both workers and bystanders entering and exiting the hotel were safe. Flagging and ground guides were used around the staging area, and strict adherence to timelines for deliveries and mobilizations were also critical to the safe execution of the project. The Whitco Roofing team worked closely with the hotel management throughout the process to prevent interference with hotel operations and to minimize risks to guests. 

The building now benefits from a superior roofing membrane that is Energy Star-compliant, upgraded insulation, a strong foam adhesive that helps resist uplift pressure during storms and a monolithic waterproofing layer thanks to the liquid flashing installed around all penetrations. “SOPREMA’s single-ply membranes have a reputation for strength and durability,” notes Brickey, “and especially with the inclusion of the liquid flashing system to deal with difficult flashing details, we were able to provide a long-lasting, warranted waterproofing solution for the Westin.”

In all, more than 14,000 square feet of roofing material was replaced over the course of roughly a month by a large team of installers. In part because the hotel staff was so pleased with the way the job was planned, managed and executed, Whitco Roofing was brought back to install a new roof on a lower section of the building as well. That project was recently completed, positioning the Westin Savannah to resist the elements while serving as a relaxing getaway for the foreseeable future.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Whitco Roofing, Atlanta, Georgia, www.whitcoroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membrane: SENTINEL P150 PVC, SOPREMA, www.soprema.us

Insulation: SOPRA-ISO, SOPREMA

Adhesive: DUOTACK 365, SOPREMA

Liquid Flashing: ALSAN RS 230 Flash, SOPREMA