Upstate Roofing and Painting and the Roofing Alliance Team Up to Help Ronald McDonald House Charities

CEO Bob Morgan challenged his team to raise enough money to have a room named after the entire Upstate team. They succeeded, and raised enough money to name a second room in memory of Bob’s parents, Robert and Deanna Morgan. Photo: Upstate Roofing and Painting

In April of 2017, the Roofing Alliance, with the focused efforts of Roofing Alliance members, NRCA members and staff, began working with Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) to create a partnership that would connect the roofing industry with the standalone Ronald McDonald Houses to provide ongoing roof maintenance. The Roofing Alliance is the foundation of the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) and at 169 members strong, it is a dedicated forum of roofing contractors, manufacturers, distributors, service providers and industry professionals. These roofing men and women promote and fund the advancement of roofing through research, education, technology and philanthropic initiatives to help shape the future of the industry.

A Roofing Alliance member since 2014, Bob Morgan, C.E.O. of Upstate Roofing and Painting, was very intrigued by the partnership with RMHC and was one of the first roofing companies in the country to adopt their local House, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Rochester, NY Inc. In fact, the roofing industry as a whole has enthusiastically embraced the efforts of RMHC to help families with critically ill or injured children stay together, near the hospitals providing them medical care. Ronald McDonald Houses provide private sleeping rooms, meals, and opportunities for families to interact as they go through difficult times. Through sponsorship funds and the adoption of the roofs of the 165 standalone Ronald McDonald Houses in the United States, the Roofing Alliance has brought together roofing professionals and companies who donate their time and talents to provide regular roof system inspections, maintenance and repairs.

After signing up in October of 2017, Morgan shared the initiative with his company’s team. Upstate’s roof inspectors went out to look at the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Rochester, NY Inc. roof and performed an assessment. The House was broken up into several sections with steep sloped roofs that featured asphalt shingles. On their initial visit they performed a thorough inspection and provided a detailed report. (All contractors who adopt Houses share their inspection reports, maintenance work and any re-roofing with the Roofing Alliance, which maintains a national database with information on all of the Houses.) After the assessment, the Upstate team performed some pro-bono maintenance to ensure that there were no leaks.

Now knowing that the roof was in good shape, Morgan and his team started looking around for other opportunities to help the House. Upstate, founded in 1974, added commercial painting services for their clients in 2006 so they offered to “freshen up” a few rooms with a new coat of paint from time to time if needed.

With the help of Sherwin-Williams material donations, the Upstate team ended up re-painting the entire interior of the House. The combination of material and labor saved their Ronald McDonald House about $15,000 while providing a fresh look for all the rooms and common areas. Upstate was so committed that not only did they offer to donate the labor, they paid their painting team for their normal 40-hour week. Upstate’s teammates saw this and really took Morgan’s gift of giving back to heart.

Meeting a Challenge

Every March, Upstate Roofing and Painting has their annual kickoff for the upcoming season of work. It is a full day of safety training, award presentations, guest speakers and is capped off with a profit-sharing celebration. Morgan always recaps which charities the company donated to in the previous year. He lets the team know that it’s not just the company writing a check. It’s a result of everyone’s hard work that allows Upstate to be able to make those donations. At the spring 2018 meeting, Morgan really wanted to share the excitement he and many of his team had for their latest philanthropic effort with their local Ronald McDonald House. He reached out to fellow Roofing Alliance member, Charles Antis of Antis Roofing and Waterproofing out of Orange County, California, to talk about what his company had been doing with their philanthropic programs. Antis made a video of his team thanking the Upstate team for all their work and donations. The video was played on the big screen for all to see during the meeting. It was the inspiration that really got the Upstate team rocking.

Upstate Roofing and Painting adopted Ronald McDonald House Charities of Rochester, NY Inc. as part of the Roofing Alliance’s effort to create partnerships between the roofing industry and standalone Ronald McDonald Houses to provide ongoing maintenance. Photo: Ronald McDonald House Charities

Upstate was already working with the United Way on an annual basis and remains very proud of the nonprofit, which was founded in Rochester by George Eastman, founder of Kodak. In 2018, when the Upstate employees found out that they could donate directly to Ronald McDonald House Charities of Rochester, NY Inc. through United Way, a challenge was initiated.

In 2019, representatives from R.M.H.C. and the United Way visited the Upstate employees and thanked them for all the work they had done and the pledges they had made to the House through United Way. After the guests departed, Morgan issued a challenge to his teammates that he and his wife Kim would personally match every dollar that they donated to the RMHC during the campaign. The goal was to raise $5,000 and have a room named after the entire Upstate team. The enthusiasm from everyone showed right away. Some even donated a second time to help increase the matched dollar amount. In total, over $13,000 was raised.

Morgan was amazed at the generosity of his team, but he was not surprised. “Our team has one of the toughest jobs on earth,” stated Morgan. “They work extremely hard, often in less than desirable conditions on a daily basis. For them to give their hard-earned dollars to a local charity speaks volumes to the character of our team.”

Because the naming rights for a room was set at $5,000, the House later named a second room in memory of Bob Morgan’s parents: Robert and Deanna Morgan. Deanna had passed away the day after Morgan challenged his team to donate.

Morgan’s dad owned a painting company at the time of his death after a battle with cancer 13 years ago (2006). Upstate hired a few key people from the painting company immediately in an effort to start offering painting services. Morgan’s brother Don was one of the hires in 2006 and serves an important role today in the business. “In construction we see the strength of family, and this is a beautiful example of how family continues to be the strength behind many companies,” said Morgan.

As a result of those hires in 2006, today Upstate is one of the most respected painting companies in the Rochester market with 35 painting teammates and growing. They offer commercial services for both interior and exterior painting, high-end office spaces, multi-family residences, hospitals and commercial roof coatings. Many of their contracts are a combination of roofing and painting working with general contractors. With all the success of their business, the true success is apparent in the culture of the company and the enthusiasm of all teammates. They know that the greatest strength of the company is the people who work there. They really care about what they do, and it shows.

To learn more about the Roofing Alliance and RHMC partnership, visit www.roofingalliance.net or contact Bennett Judson, the Roofing Alliance’s executive director, at bjudson@nrca.net.

About the Author:Heidi J. Ellsworth is partner and owner of RoofersCoffeeShop and HJE Consulting where she provides marketing and business strategies, initiatives for sales success and overall content development for companies and associations within the roofing industry. Along with Karen L Edwards, she has co-authored two books: “Sales and Marketing for Roofing Contractors” and “Building a Marketing Plan for Roofing Contractors.”

Southern California Couple Keeps Cool With New Roof System

Temperatures in Southern California soar during summer months. Homeowners in the region typically rely on traditional air conditioning units along with electric fans for air circulation to moderate indoor temperatures and keep their residences comfortable. Though these techniques help, they obviously increase energy consumption and bills.

The Vus, a professional couple in Santa Ana, California, were one household beholden to these excessive energy costs. The couple purchased their single-story California ranch style abode in 2014. After a few years of occupancy, their consistently high electricity bills prompted an investigation to determine the cause. The couple discovered the primary culprit: excessive use of air conditioning.

The roof system features Boral’s MetalSeal self-adhering underlayment and above-sheathing ventilation. Photos: Boral Roofing LLC

The couple’s research also surprised them when they found a secondary cause for their soaring energy bills. After a thorough review, the Vus realized that the energy consumption they attributed to their air conditioner was also directly linked to a poorly performing roof. The existing, aged asphalt shingle direct deck roof was susceptible to reaching extremely hot temperatures in peak summer months, and its resistance to heat transfer was extremely poor.

The decision was then made to install a new roof system to combat the heat and exorbitant energy costs accrued during Southern California’s hotter months.

“Knowing that our energy bills weren’t going to resolve themselves, as well as the fact that we were nearing the expiration date of our asphalt roof anyhow, we made the decision to completely re-roof our home with a high-performance system,” says Christopher Vu.

A Lightweight Cool Roof

After researching their roofing options, the Vus sought a lightweight durable solution that would prevent heat transfer, offer a longer lifespan than asphalt and, of course, dramatically reduce their monthly electricity bill. After rigorous research, they selected the Boral Steel Cool Roof System, selecting Boral Steel PINE-CREST Shake, a stone coated steel material. The new roof was installed by Western Roofing Systems of Anaheim, California.

The cool roof system is comprised of a series of components that work in concert to keep the home warmer in winter and cooler in summer, reducing overall energy consumption. The result is optimized energy efficiency.

The roof was topped with Boral Steel PINE-CREST Shake, a stone coated steel material.

The lightweight stone coated steel roofing panel is manufactured from Galvalume steel and is coated with stone granules applied to the steel with an acrylic polymer adhesive. The material offers a cost-effective solution whose lighter weight poses no structural load issues. With an aesthetic that mimics traditional shake, the roof complements adjacent homes in the Vus’ neighborhood, many of which feature actual shake roofing.

“The product is steel, so it’s sturdy but also looks nice and fits right into the neighborhood aesthetic,” says Vu.

The Vus utilized an alternative solution to the 30-pound felt underlayment commonly utilized in Southern California, choosing Boral’s MetalSeal high-performance water barrier. A self-adhered product that virtually eliminates the need for nails, the underlayment is resistant to puncturing, allowing roofers to stack panels on it during installation, saving numerous time-consuming trips up and down to load product.

“For many reasons, we were able to reduce the expense and safety risk of our installation with the use of this underlayment,” adds Vu. “It also provides great protection from wind and water.”

The Vus’ cool roof system takes advantage of above-sheathing ventilation. Elevated battens provide both a thermal barrier and ventilation. Hot air rises and creates a natural convection effect. This allows the heated air to be exhausted through ventilation, leading to continuous airflow across the roof deck. The result is a cooler attic and interiors.

“We are pleasantly surprised at how effective the system is in creating a cooler living space inside our home,” says Vu.

Curb appeal and energy efficiency aside, the cool roof system is also designed to offer protection from storms and severe climate events. The roof system offers Class-4 Hail Impact Resistance, a Hurricane Wind Performance Rating and a Class A Fire Rating. The above-sheathing ventilation also enables above-deck insulation and airflow that prevents ice dams (even though that condition is less likely to occur in Southern California).

The Vus have been pleased with their new cool roof system, not only because it increases their comfort and looks nice, but because the lower costs have been quite noticeable.

“On average, we are saving almost $60 per month on our energy bills,” Vu notes. “These savings make a real difference for us and we couldn’t be happier.”

About the author: Pete Croft is brand manager for Steel Roofing with Boral Roofing LLC.  For more information, visit Boral Roofing online at www.BoralRoof.com; contact Pete at Pete.Croft@boral.com.

At North Bethesda’s Pike & Rose, the Farm Is on Top of the Building

The Farm at Pike & Rose covers 17,000 square feet of rooftop space in North Bethesda, Maryland. Photos: Federal Realty Investment Trust

If today’s locavores are enthusiastic about locally grown food because it’s fresher than typical supermarket food and doesn’t need to be preserved and brought in by truck, they’ll be thrilled with the Farm at Pike & Rose. Federal Realty Investment Trust (FRIT) has taken local farming to a new level — to the rooftop access from thesixth floor of one of Pike & Rose’s buildings in North Bethesda, Maryland. Instead of seeing concrete and HVAC equipment on the nearby roof, you see row after row of carefully cultivated crops between furrows of rich soil. Here, on 17,000 square feet of sunny roof, lies the largest rooftop farm in the Mid-Atlantic region.

With its flexible, waterproof membrane, the roof was originally conceived as a green roof to be covered with seeded mats. It was designed to withstand and perform in submersed water conditions like no-slope decks, water features, pools, and vegetated roofs. In 2018, the original plantings were converted to an active urban farm, producing greens and vegetables that are served at restaurant tables 40 feet below and through Community Support Agriculture (CSA) boxes to some residents in the adjacent residences. FRIT brought in an outside expert to manage the new venture, Up Top Acres. The local farming company is committed to converting underutilized spaces into productive farmland and had already been operating farms on a number of DC area rooftops since 2014.

Up Top Acres, a local farming company, manages the rooftop farm. The company is committed to converting underutilized spaces into productive farmland.

Since the building’s roof was already engineered to support the weight of eight inches of soil and any precipitation that might fall on it as a green roof, it was not too difficult to replace the existing ground cover with productive crops. Experience taught Up Top Acres that access and storage were key concerns. Working with FRIT they identified an unused portion of the adjacent parking garage — accessible both by truck from the outside and by elevator from the farm — which was fenced off to house farm supplies and a refrigeration unit. On the roof, a secondary storage area holds tools for the day-to-day management of the farm. The original roof access hatch located within the projection room of the iPic movie theater was not a realistic pathway for daily garden visits, so a ladder from the adjacent sixth-floor landing of the Pallas apartment building and a hoist for heavy lifting were constructed to facilitate transporting supplies and the ongoing harvest.

This summer, farmers harvested a rainbow of goodness from the rooftop: lettuce, cucumbers, watermelons, berries, swiss chard, okra, peppers (Shishito, Lunchbox and Carmen varieties), microgreens, herbs (basil, parsley, thyme, rosemary, sage, mint), lavender blossoms and edible flowers. All of the produce goes to customers within a few blocks of where it is grown. Remaining food and any farm shares that are not picked up are donated to the Manna Food Bank which serves the surrounding community.

Numerous Benefits

Operating a farm on the roof has distinct advantages from a wildlife perspective—it eliminates much of the danger from rodents as well as digging and foraging animals that are the bane of many ground-level farms — and it increases biodiversity within the city. The exposed area does attract birds, so fabric row covers are used to protect the most vulnerable and attractive crops. To ensure effective pollination, the farm features two beehives on site.

This summer, farmers harvested a wide variety of crops. All of the produce goes to local customers or is donated to the Manna Food Bank which serves the surrounding community.

An unexpected benefit has been the positive response from tenants in adjacent buildings who enjoy watching the steady growth of the crops and the deliberate care of the farmers at work. Operation disruptions have been prevented by the careful design for getting farmers and equipment up and harvested produce down to the garage staging area. Other positives include the reduced cost of not having to maintain the section of the roof being farmed, and a mutually beneficial arrangement for enlisting the farmers for maintenance on the rest of the building’s green roof — providing some side income for the farmers and reducing the hassle and traffic of working with another contractor.

To minimize risks, the developer checked with the roof manufacturer to make sure the new usage would not void any product warranties and included liability protection in its agreement with Up Top Acres. Since weather is unpredictable, a smart sprinkler system was installed to monitor rainfall and adjust irrigation in response to need. A separate meter was installed for the sprinklers to ensure that the building’s water costs are equitably divided. With input and support from the University of Maryland Extension service, the Pike & Rose rooftop garden has become a pilot program for sustainable urban agriculture and the lessons and best practices discovered by the farmers are being collected and transmitted to other groups who are interested in similar projects.

For the farmers who started Up Top Acres — three of whom are Washington, D.C. natives — the Pike & Rose rooftop garden is the crowning jewel in the network of farms they’ve established to bring local food and sustainability to the urban landscape where they grew up. For the rest of us, the transformation of this ocean of impermeable concrete into a living, thriving ecosystem in the middle of a bustling mixed-use development is a window into the possibilities for coupling the convenience of city life with the ecological stewardship and wholesome freshness of local, sustainable farming.

About the Author: Mickey Papillon, CRRP, CSM, is Vice President – Regional General Manager, Federal Realty Investment Trust. Federal Realty’s environmental practices are reflected in the way they develop and manage their properties: from their efforts to minimize and reduce environmental impact through energy management, waste reduction and resource-efficient buildings in transit-oriented locations, to investing in renewable energy sources, and creating places that promote health and well-being.

Green Roof Benefits in Rain or Shine

In the open country, large swaths of green — lawn, forests, and farms — convert the sun’s light to energy for plant growth and cool the area around them. In the city, where asphalt, concrete, and rooftops absorb the heat during the day and release it at night, an “urban heat island” effect that raises the temperature of the entire area can be created. These impermeable surfaces send storm water into gutters and streets, carrying pollutants and biological contaminants into waterways.

Cities often focus on the vital work of reforestation and setting aside conservation areas and parks to mitigate some of these problems. But there are many ideas for incorporating permeable surfaces and growing spaces into the built environment that can magnify the benefits of these programs. Research by scientists at the University of Cardiff in the UK found that implementing green roofs and walls can significantly lower temperatures—the hotter the city, the greater the cooling effect. During the hottest months in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, for example, a network of green roofs would shave 9.1 Celsius or about 16 degrees Fahrenheit from the temperature. The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that a green roof also absorbs between 50-90 percent of the water and contaminants that would otherwise flow into storm drains.

Many states are embracing green construction codes that outline targets for reducing water and energy consumption, diverting debris from landfills, and mitigating heat island effects. For example, in Maryland, any development that affects more than 5,000 square feet of land triggers the state’s storm water performance standards that require developers to retain and treat 90 percent of the average annual rainfall. These policies, coupled with incentive programs that offer substantial rewards and tax credits for approved storm water management systems, have catapulted a number of area cities into the top 10 for number of green roof square feet, with Washington, DC coming in first. Green roofs also contribute to cleaner air quality and provide a building with natural insulation, decreasing heating and cooling costs.

Metal Retrofit Project Protects Air Force Base

On this 7,800-square-foot building at Hurlburt Field, a new metal roof was installed over the existing roof using Roof Hugger sub-purlins. Photos: Roof Hugger

Over the past 15 years, Royster Contracting, LLC of Fort Walton Beach, Florida, has completed several metal-over-metal retrofit projects. Skip Royster, the company’s owner, started his general contracting firm in 1977, and it has a strong reputation for quality construction, with a focus on metal buildings, metal roofing and walls, and retrofit roof systems.

Royster’s newest retrofit roofing project was for the U.S. Air Force on a 7,800-square-foot building located at Hurlburt Field in Okaloosa County, Florida. This Air Force base is very familiar with retrofit roofing projects, with some stretching back more than 25 years. The existing building needed a new metal roof, but in lieu of removing the existing roof and replacing it, the Base Facility Construction department elected a metal-over-metal retrofit. In this case, a new metal roof was installed over new structural sub-framing from Roof Hugger that attaches directly to the existing roof’s support system, without removing the existing metal roof.

Officials at the base knew that it was possible to engineer the new retrofit system to meet current wind uplift design criteria for the area. In this case, the system was designed to meet a Category V hurricane with wind speeds of 157 mph. With the recent catastrophic Hurricane Michael damage at nearby Tyndall Air Force Base and elsewhere on the Florida Panhandle, this project just 82 miles away suffered no damage, even with Michael’s documented peak wind speed of 155 mph.

Roof Hugger provided 2,700 linear feet of the standard Model C sub-purlins, manufactured to fit over 12-inch on center PBR rib panel roofs. Central States Manufacturing of Lowell, Arkansas, furnished their 24-inch-wide Central Seam Plus trapezoidal standing seam roof in 24-gauge Brite white. The general contractor for the project was CCI Mechanical, LLC of Shalimar, Florida.

In addition to hardening the building with the increase in wind uplift resistance, the Base chose to include 3 inches of fiberglass insulation between the existing roof and bottom of the new metal roof. Hardening of building roofs is very common on metal-over-metal retrofit roofs in the coastal states. Many older buildings that were engineered for a 90 to 100 mph windspeeds must be upgraded to minimum code requirements that are currently at 120 mph inland and 130 mph for coastal areas; some parts of Florida and Texas have requirements of 155 mph or greater. U.S. Government facilities typically specify criteria that exceed locally adopted codes.

TEAM

General Contractor: CCI Mechanical, LLC, Shalimar, Florida, www.cci-alliance.com

Roofing Contractor: Royster Contracting, LLC, Fort Walton Beach, Florida, www.roysterconst.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: Central Seam Plus Trapezoidal Standing Seam Roof, Central States Manufacturing, www.centralstatesmfg.com

Sub-Purlins: Roof Hugger, www.roofhugger.com

Composite Slate Roof Tops New Train Station

The 2,800-square-foot Wyandanch Station is topped with 5,000 square feet of DaVinci composite slate roofing. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

These days, when trains stop at the Wyandanch Station in Wyandanch, New York, they’re traveling through a completely renovated, eye-stopping facility. Atop that train station can be found a new composite slate roof.

The state-of-the-art location is the most recent new train station constructed by the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR). The 2,800-square-foot structure is topped with 5,000 square feet of DaVinci Single-Width Slate roofing in a Castle Gray color.

As part of the Double Track Project, the LIRR built two new 12-car-long platforms that include a snow melt system, a pedestrian overpass with elevators, new stairs, new canopies and new platform shelters. The interior of the station features Terrazzo tile floors, a wood-paneled ceiling and chandeliers. Some 4,200 people use the train station each day.

The new Wyandanch Station is part of a revitalization effort called Wyandanch Rising. A highlight was the construction of the new train station and adding a second Long Island Rail Road track running through the Wyandanch area. The LIRR partnered with the Town of Babylon and Suffolk County in the site location and design of the new Wyandanch Station.

As construction progressed on the train station, Ashlar Contracting was brought in to work on the project and install the roof. “The roof is a key architectural element on the design of this station,” says Christopher Monahan, owner of Ashlar Contracting in Bohemia, New York. “The DaVinci composite slate was very easy to install and makes a large visual impact on this structure. The product looks like real slate and complements the entire look of this train station.”

Opened in September of 2018, the Wyandanch Train Station is receiving positive reviews from daily users and the general public. “We get compliments all the time on the train station,” says Peter Casserly, project manager with Bay Village Consultants Inc. out of Amityville, New York, developer of the site. “The entire facility has been well received by the immediate community and all those who utilize it. The roof plays a vital visual role in the train station. I’m pleased to say we’ve had no issues with it and look forward to it providing both shelter and beauty for the structure for decades into the future.”

TEAM

Roof System Installer: Ashlar Contracting, Bohemia, New York, www.ashlarcontracting.com

MATERIALS

Roof System: DaVinci Single-Width Slate roofing, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Putting a Lid on Gainesville’s New Airport Fire Station

The fire station’s standing seam metal roof was constructed with 22-gauge MegaLoc panels from Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing. Photos: Scherer Construction

When Gainesville Regional Airport leaders decided to retire the airport’s aging fire station, they knew the replacement facility had to be safe, secure and attractive from above.

After all, most of the passengers who flew to Gainesville in north-central Florida would only see the fire station’s roof from the sky, as their planes took off and touched down. What Gainesville Fire Rescue Station 6 needed was a roof that was tough as nails but also matched the city’s image as a healthcare and education hub.

The choice was clear: A standing-seam metal roofing system that was engineered to withstand hurricane-force winds and designed to look beautiful.

Clayton Crosier, owner of Crosier & Son Roofing in Gainesville, said during the four-week job the crew transformed what could have been a dull municipal building into a shining star at the two-runway airport.

“The roof turned out great,” Crosier says. “It’s one tough roof. It’s not blowing off, I can tell you that.”

Not only does the new fire station roof meet stringent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) guidelines, it protects against anything Mother Nature can throw at it.

Making Way for a New Fire Station

The move to the new fire station, officially called an aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) facility, began in late 2016. With two major airlines — American and Delta — flying out of Gainesville Regional and steady growth in passenger loads, a new ARFF facility had to be ready for new challenges.

When the original 5,600-square-foot ARFF station was constructed in 1979, 180,550 passengers boarded aircraft at Gainesville Regional. By 2018 (the most recent data available), the number of passengers had increased to 236,019. 

The new 9,589-square-foot facility allows for wider firetrucks and also adds training space.

At the same time, the building needed significant renovations, including a new roof and repairs to the crew quarters, electrical systems and plumbing. Storage space was also tight, in large part because firefighting equipment had been getting bigger over the years. The new structure allows for wider fire trucks and also adds training space.

After studying the possibility of a renovation, the airport authority decided to build anew in a different location on airport property. The chosen site is near the control tower and has a direct view and access to the runways, which is critical to emergency operations. The construction, funded by a $3.8 million FAA grant, was completed in fall 2017.

In planning for the new 9,589-square-foot facility, Crosier knew the roof was required to meet local, state and federal specifications. Per FAA rules, the new building needed to be constructed with fire-resistant materials and have systems in place to control noise. In addition, the building had to be low maintenance and designed with energy conservation in mind, among other factors. Finally, local and state building codes specified that the structure be built to withstand hurricane-force winds.

Fire Station 6 Cleared for Take Off

To meet the standards, Crosier knew the roof had to be heavy duty. He chose Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing’s mechanically seamed roof system MegaLoc in the color Nevada Silver, which complemented the building’s white concrete-block construction. The roof’s specifications called for 2-inch standing seams and 22-gauge steel, which was coated with a premium metallic paint.

To start the 114-square project, the Crosier & Son crew installed plywood sheeting over the existing steel joist system. On top, 5-inch rigid insulation with an R-value of 35 and Grace Ice & Water Shield HT high-temperature waterproof underlayment were installed. From there, the crew took meticulous care to custom fit the materials on site to prevent panel laps.

The roof was mechanically seamed at 180 degrees. Running the metal roof seamer was a two-person job, with one person at the ridge and the other at the eaves overhang to ensure accuracy. Several weeks after the roof was completed, Crosier & Son returned to install the metal soffit, fascia, gutters and downspouts.

A Job Well Done

Since the construction was completed, the roof has successfully weathered severe weather, including Hurricane Michael in 2018. Looking back on the project, Crosier said he never doubted that the standing seam roof was a perfect fit for the ARFF building.

“With the size and scope of this project,” he said, “I am incredibly happy with the result of the hard work we all put in.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Crosier & Son Roofing, Gainesville, Florida, www.crosierroofing.com

Construction Contractor: Scherer Construction, Gainesville, Florida, www.schererconstruction.com

MATERIALS

Standing Seam Metal Roof: MegaLoc, Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing, www.gulfcoastsupply.com

Underlayment: Grace Ice & Water Shield HT, GCP Applied Technologies, www.gcpat.com

New System Avoids Tear-Off, Eliminates Leaks, Meets Strict Florida Codes

The Solid Waste Authority facility’s existing roof was re-covered with a symmetrical standing seam roof system from McElroy Metal. Photos: McElroy Metal

Advanced Roofing Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, runs its operation by the belief that what the customer wants, the customer gets.

The Solid Waste Authority (SWA) in West Palm Beach, Florida, had a building with an aging and leaking R-panel metal roofing system. “It was leaking everywhere,” says Mike Scardina, the Sheet Metal Department Manager at Advanced Roofing. “The original roof looked to be over 20 years old.”

Advanced Roofing is a commercial roofing company with nine locations, specializing in re-roofing, repairs and maintenance services for occupied buildings in Florida and the Caribbean. When it comes to commercial re-roofing to meet strict building standards and wind codes, Advanced Roofing has seen it all.

The roof panels were manufactured from .040-inch aluminum in Ash Gray. The panels are 16 inches wide, with pencil ribs.

This particular SWA building was used as a dumping site for foliage collected from the community. Eventually, the leaves are moved to a compost site or a recycling facility. Roof leaks were threatening electrical components and creating many problems in a small workshop within the building. The SWA wanted a permanent solution to fix the leaks and wanted a long-lasting solution for an area where hurricane-force winds are a constant threat.

The 238T symmetrical roof system was chosen because of its extremely high uplift capacity over the open framing and ease of repair if it would ever become damaged by a future storm. This system also eliminates the need for additional edge and corner framing typically required when re-roofing an open frame metal building like this, with existing 5-foot-on-center purlin spacing. Instead of a complete tear-off of the original R-panel roof, Advanced Roofing left the roof in place and installed Roof Hugger sub-purlins every 5 feet on-center —approximately 7,600 linear feet. Leaving the existing roof in place maintained the structural diaphragm that the R-panel provides to the building. The roof re-cover was completed with the 238T symmetrical standing seam roofing system from McElroy Metal in .040 aluminum. The assembly is approved for Florida’s High Velocity Hurricane Zone.

“SWA wanted their roof system engineered to the highest standard possible and in line with their goals of durability in the most extreme conditions, and that’s what we gave them,” Scardina says. “This system will last a long time and hold up under tough conditions.”

After the roll former was lifted into place by a crane, the panels were run at the eave.

McElroy’s 238T symmetrical standing seam systems do not have male and female seams; instead they are comprised of panels with matching left and right seams. The panels are joined with a mechanically seamed cap. The panels are non-directional and can be installed left to right, right to left or even from the center out. In addition to the installation benefits, symmetrical panels offer easy individual panel removal and replacement. Individual panels can also be re-installed, requiring only the purchase and installation of a new cap.

Before working on the roof, Advanced Roofing had to replace several rusting 20-foot purlins with new purlins. The roof panels for this project were .040-inch aluminum, painted Ash Gray, They were 16 inches wide with pencil ribs to reduce the appearance of oil canning. Seventy percent of the panels were 87 feet long and the remaining 30 percent were 100 feet long. All of the panels were run at the eave as Advanced Roofing used its in-house crane division to lift their 238T roll former into place.

To obtain HVHZ and Florida building code approval, the 238T roofing panels were installed with 100 percent 24-gauge continuous clips, meaning the clips run the entire length of each panel. The C-shaped clips are pre-installed back-to-back and run down each side of the panel and attached to the top of the Roof Huggers using two or three fasteners per side. Because of the extreme corner pressures and the 5-foot purlin spacing, a small 22-gauge plate was added on top of the clip base over the Roof Hugger in the edge and corner zones. After three holes were drilled through the plate, clip and Roof Hugger, an AB #14 screw was used to fasten the plate and clip to the Roof Hugger in the edge and corner zones.

Roof Hugger sub-purlins were installed every 5 feet on-center.

“It’s a special fastener that has a point and gets real fat where it meets the hex head,” says Tom Mahon, Sheet Metal Field Superintendent for Advanced Roofing. “It meets the uplift requirements for the area.”

Scardina and Mahon say to meet High-Velocity Hurricane Zone approval, the installation is more labor intensive, mainly because of the time needed to pre-drill plates, but the level of added durability makes it worth the work. The symmetrical panel legs are capped and the caps are secured by a seamer.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Advanced Roofing Inc., Fort Lauderdale, Florida, www.advancedroofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: 238T Symmetrical Standing Seam Roofing System, McElroy Metal, www.mcelroymetal.com

Sub-Purlins: Roof Hugger, www.roofhugger.com

Roof Restoration, Cooperative Purchasing Alliance Offer Savings for Taxpayers

Building I, shown here, had its existing a TPO roof restored using PM’s 3201 high-solids silicone coating. Photos: Anthony Roofing Ltd, a Tecta America Company

After leaks appeared in their middle and elementary school buildings, the St. Joseph Central Consolidated School District in St. Joseph, Illinois, decided it was time to re-evaluate their roofs. Since it is a public agency, the school district began looking into the request for proposal (RFP) process, which can be costly and time-consuming. Thankfully, before they spent too much time or money, they were approached by Anthony Roofing and the Progressive Materials (PM) team.

Anthony Roofing, a Tecta America Company, inspected the roofs and determined they were in prime condition for a roof restoration, as opposed to two full roof replacements. Between this cost-saving measure and the use of the National Cooperative Purchasing Alliance (NCPA) contract, the Anthony Roofing/PM team was able to save the school district a substantial sum of money. The NCPA is a publicly bid contract that allows awarded vendors/contractors to streamline the RFP process for publicly funded work because it has already performed the competitive bid process.

Building II had an EPDM roof system, which was cleaned with PM’s P-120 EPDM Cleaner prior to application of the coating to ensure proper adhesion and optimal waterproofing.

Anthony Roofing is one of Tecta America’s 70-plus locations and is certified to utilize NCPA contracts. Contractors are strongly examined and scrutinized by the lead public agency to become an award-winning contract holder. Contractors must prove a demonstrated track record of quality workmanship, customer satisfaction, and competitive pricing to be an NCPA vendor. Because of this relationship, St. Joseph Central Consolidated School District knew they were getting a top-quality contractor while saving substantial taxpayer money in the process.

Anthony Roofing was able to completely waterproof both buildings’ roofs in just four weeks using just one six-person crew. If the school district had elected to replace the roofs, the teams would have been double in size, taken double the time, and the school would have been vulnerable to even more water damage during the replacement process.

Restoring the Roofs

Building I had a single-ply substrate, which was ideal for the silicone coating process. Anthony Roofing completely restored the roof in three steps. First, crew members power-washed the existing TPO roof. They then patched seams, worn areas, and flashings. Finally, they applied PM’s 3201 high-solids silicone restoration system.

Building II’s roof had an EPDM substrate, so Anthony Roofing took additional measures to ensure proper adhesion and optimal waterproofing. They cleaned the EPDM with PM’s P-120 EPDM Cleaner to prepare for power-washing process. They then power-washed the EPDM roof and patched seams, worn areas, and flashings before applying the coating.

In just four weeks, Anthony Roofing coated roughly 117,000 square feet of roof area for the school district. Both buildings qualified for a 20-year warranty. After calculating the cost savings, it was determined that a roof replacement for these buildings would have cost roughly $18 per square foot. The expert application of the silicone coating reduced the project cost to $3.55 per square foot, saving the school district an estimated $1.6 million. Combine that with the money and time saved by utilizing the NCPA cooperative purchasing contract to streamline the process, and you get two waterproof roofs, one happy school district, and thousands of satisfied taxpayers.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Anthony Roofing Ltd, a Tecta America Company, Aurora, Illinois, www.tectaamerica.com

MATERIALS

Roof Coating System: PM 3201 high-solids silicone coating, Progressive Materials, www.pmsilicone.com

Marina’s New Roof Is Its Signature Design Element

When the former Morrow’s Marina first hit the Ridley Township, Pennsylvania, real estate market, it seemed like this last piece of the town’s open space might soon become a townhome development. But the township’s board of commissioners had a different idea for the tumble-down, 14-acre property, sited on Darby Creek, less than a mile from the entrance to the Delaware River. In addition to a new public recreation amenity, some on the board also saw a possible income opportunity too good for the township to pass up.

“I think, with good management, there could be a lot of revenue in the future,” says Bob Willert, who was then the board’s president, of the financial benefits the marina could offer.

Over the years, the town has made improvements to the marina, boosting its popularity with boaters. And, with the recent opening of a new $6 million restaurant, along with marina offices, right on the waterfront, that income potential is becoming a reality. Owned by the township and leased to a local restaurateur, the new Stinger’s Waterfront has quickly become a popular destination. It’s also easy to find, even without a GPS, thanks to a standout metal roof finished in an impossible-to-miss Copper Penny hue.

Choosing the Roof System

While the color is certainly eye-catching, it was the classic PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad profile that first caught the attention of Clarice Jones, project architect with Catania Engineering Associates, the restaurant’s Milmont Park, Pennsylvania-based design firm. She knew the standing seams on the 10,500 square feet of Snap-Clad roof panels — complemented by a matching 1,500 square feet of vented PAC-750 Soffit Panels — would emphasize the crisp lines of the building’s contemporary façade.

Crews from E.P. Donnelly installed 10,500 square feet of PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad roof panels in Copper Penny and 1,500 square feet of matching vented soffit panels. Photos: © hortonphotoinc.com

“The seaming is punched out — I saw a particular style,” she says. “I liked the way the seam looked in profile; it was a nice tight look.”

E.P. Donnelly Inc., of Warrington, Pennsylvania, installed the roof, and it was a complicated project. The sloped design is interrupted on both sides with three triangular window dormers, requiring complex detailing. And a multi-gabled cupola required similar attention, though at a smaller scale. Donnelly’s project manager, Gerry Campi, suggested Petersen’s PAC-CLAD product to the general contractor — J.S. McManus Inc. of Chester Heights, Pennsylvania — as a better fit for this demanding project.

“I told the GC that Petersen was a much better product, and the GC made the switch,” Campi says. “We use the Snap-Clad profile regularly. It snaps together the best. It’s a really nice product.”

For Jones, metal was the only roofing option that would work; any other option would have looked too residential. But, interestingly, the bright metallic finish wasn’t her first choice. Initially, her plans had called for a more neutral gray, but the town’s business manager opted for the definitely-not-neutral Copper Penny shade. “They wanted something bolder,” Jones says. “It’s like a flame; I’m glad they chose it. It sparkles like a diamond.”

Building a Landmark

The roof design features a multi-gabled cupola as well as triangular window dormers.

After winning the project, J.S. McManus Inc. needed to complete the building construction on a tight schedule. Michael McManus, vice president of J.S. McManus, coordinated the work of subcontractors and worked closely with the architect, owner, restaurant owner, and the other prime contractors. “I had my superintendent, Tim O’Connell, who was on site to handle the day-to-day operations,” McManus notes. “We kept our focus on getting the steel superstructure completed as soon as possible so that we could get the roof installed. As with all projects, once the roof is installed, then you can really expedite the project since you don’t have to worry about being impacted by the weather. It took a lot of hard work from my team, and we all stayed focused and worked diligently to complete the project on time.”

As soon as they could, crews from E.P. Donnelly tackled the challenging installation. Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time to ensure safety. The architectural features called for extra care during detailing to ensure smooth lines, and crews worked carefully to make sure that all areas were fully sealed and waterproofed.

Snow Retention System

Despite Ridley Marina being located in snow country, no snow retention had been specified for the project. “We actually brought this up to the owner and architect that no snow guards were specified for the metal roof, which would create a serious safety concern,”says Campi.E.P. Donnelly recommended installing the S-5! ColorGard system, citing it as the only system the company installs.

A ColorGard engineered snow guard system was added at the recommendation of the roofing contractor on the project.

Sourcing the snow guard system was an easy decision because Campi had worked with a specific distributor since 2013. Brock and Associates Metal Resources, based in Pittsburgh, fulfilled the necessary bill of materials. Brock is a manufacturer and distributor of exterior metal cladding systems for commercial and industrial applications.

The project called for thirty 8-foot sections of unpunched ColorGard rail. To attach the rail, 290 S-5-S Clamps were employed. Then, 290 Sno-Clips II and 290 VersaClips were installed to complete the engineered snow guard system atop the marina’s new copper penny roof. Of course, ensuring aesthetics remained an important design goal, and matching the roof color was crucial. The product allows color-matched strips of the roof metal to be inserted into the ColorGard sections, providing the necessary holding strength while still maintaining a streamlined appearance.

Since its completion, the Ridley Township Marina project has become a stunning showpiece for the area, and all involved with the project point to the roof as its most stunning architectural feature. Campi notes that the roof has become a billboard, of sorts, for the marina, visible from a nearby interstate highway. “When you’re coming down I-95 through Philly, that Copper Penny roof really stands out,” he says.

TEAM

Architect: Catania Engineering Associates, Milmont Park, Pennsylvania, www.cataniaengineering.com

General Contractor: J.S. McManus Inc., Chester Heights, Pennsylvania, www.jsmcmanus.com

Roofing Contractor: E.P. Donnelly Inc., Warrington, Pennsylvania

Distributor: Brock and Associates Metal Resources, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, www.brock-assoc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad Panels, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Soffit Panels: PAC-CLAD PAC-750 Soffit Panels, Petersen

Snow Retention System: ColorGard, S-5!, www.s-5.com

Speaking of Education…It May Be Back to Class for Contractors

It’s no surprise that almost all states require general contractors and some subcontractors to register with regulatory boards and pass a qualifying exam in advance of bidding, contracting, and certainly physically undertaking construction work. That’s not new. However, there is an emerging trend towards requiring general contractors, and even some subcontractors, to participate in continuing education. Depending on the jurisdiction, some contractors and subcontractors are now statutorily obligated to complete a certain amount of continuing education — similar to what has been historically required only of doctors, lawyers, and accountants — to maintain licensure.

For instance, this summer, North Carolina became the most recent state to impose continuing education requirements for general contractors. Effective January 1, 2020, general contractors will be required to complete 8 hours of continuing education per year. Because roofing contractors in North Carolina performing work in excess of $30,000 are required to be licensed as general contractors, they will now be subject to the new continuing education requirements.

This recent legislation and its impact on the roofing industry raises questions about what is required for roofing contractors nationwide. Does roofing require special licensure and registration or continuing education? The answer is entirely dependent on the jurisdiction where the work is to be performed.

The following states currently require licensure for roofing: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, and Virginia.

Other states don’t require licensure per se but do require roofing contractors to register. For instance, Oklahoma requires roofing contractors to register with the Construction Industries Board. Failure to register is a misdemeanor, and registration and endorsement as a commercial roofing contractor requires 4 hours of continuing education every 36 months. Similarly, Idaho does not require a state license, but requires roofing contractors to register with the Idaho Contractors Board.

As seen in Figure 1, even among the states which require continuing education, the requirements vary greatly both in the amount and type of education required. For instance, Florida law requires contractors holding a roofing license to take 1 hour of wind mitigation methodologies as part of the 14 annually required continuing education hours. In Massachusetts, construction supervisors within the roofing industry are required to take 2 hours of continuing education in code review and four one-hour courses in topics of workplace safety, business practices, energy, and lead safe practices.

Figure 1. Licensing and continuing education requirements by state.

Finally, in those states which don’t require licensure or continuing education, some industry groups have developed self-regulation. These industry groups are aimed at consumer protection and seek to secure public confidence in the roofing industry. In Georgia, which does not require a state roofing license, the Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association of Georgia (RSMCA) provides a voluntary licensing program. Similarly, Kentucky has no license requirements for roofing contractors. However, the Kentucky Roofing Contractor Association (KRCA) is a nonprofit and professional organization which certifies roofing contractors. To obtain and maintain KRCA certification, roofing contractors must complete 10 hours of continuing education per year.

But just because a state legislature or professional association has not enacted regulations necessitating continuing education does not mean contractors are free from such requirements. While not mandated by the state itself, many cities have imposed their own directives. States such as Kansas, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Missouri, New York, Oklahoma, Wyoming, and Pennsylvania each contain at least one municipality that compels contractors to take board-accredited continuing education courses. For example, Idaho Falls, Idaho, requires 8 hours of continuing education.

Regardless of where you are engaged in the practice of roofing contracting, it is imperative that all contractors exercise due diligence and review and comply with all state and local regulations before undertaking any project.

Contractors and trades are seeing a rise in regulation through the government by way of mandated continuing education courses. Do you think contractors should be required to take continuing education classes? Is this a necessary void that needs to be filled by the government intervention or is this just another example of unnecessary government regulation? Tell us what you think.

About the author: Lindsey E. Powell is an attorney with Anderson Jones, PLLC practicing in North Carolina and Georgia. Questions about this article can be directed to her at lpowell@andersonandjones.com. Special research credit is given to Kyle Putnam, Juris Doctor candidate and summer law clerk with Anderson Jones, PLLC.

Author’s note: This article is intended only for informational purposes and should not be construed as legal advice.