National Women in Roofing Taps Into a Powerful Force

Photos: National Women in Roofing

In 2014, an organization devoted to helping advance the careers of women in the roofing industry was just an idea. Since then, the idea has become a movement. National Women in Roofing (NWIR) was officially launched at the International Roofing Expo (IRE) in 2016. The volunteer-based organization focuses on connecting and empowering women, and it has the support of more than 1,000 members — many of them men — and nearly two dozen sponsors. They all share the goal of working together to raise the professionalism of the roofing industry, bring more people into the field, and provide the education and training necessary to ensure its future success.

This February, Heidi Ellsworth handed over the position of NWIR chair to Shari Carlozzi. The two women shared their insights on the founding of NWIR with Roofing, detailing its current initiatives and plans for the future.

A Movement Is Born

Carlozzi and Ellsworth first discussed the idea of an organization to support women during a break at a meeting of the Midwest Roofing Contractors Association in 2014. As they shared their thoughts about working in a male-dominated industry,

Officers and directors of National Women in Roofing include (from left) Jennifer Stone, vice chair, executive committee; Jennifer Ford-Smith, secretary; Ellen Thorp, executive director; Shari Carlozzi, chair, executive committee; and Heidi Ellsworth, past chair, executive committee. Photos: National Women in Roofing

a light bulb went on. “We started talking, and we realized there are a lot more women in this industry than people give it credit for,” Carlozzi says. “There’s a lot of women! And we said, ‘We should start an organization where women can gather to network, to learn from each other, to mentor one another, and to help empower each other’ — because we are in an industry that we love.”

Ellsworth and Carlozzi shared the concept with Steve Little of Dallas-based KPost, who was then MRCA president. “He said, ‘That’s a great idea! We’ll help incubate you.’ And that’s how we got started,” Carlozzi remembers. “It went viral.”

As they traveled the country in their respective work roles — Ellsworth as a partner in RoofersCoffeeShop.com and Carlozzi as national sales manager for HAPCO Inc. — they soon realized that a lot of other women had the same needs. Many were even exploring the same idea. “At every trade show we went to, both of us would hear this from so many women,” Ellsworth says. “They would say, ‘We need to spend time together. We need to network.’ And networking is a big one because it’s sometimes a lot easier for guys to get together to network and women are left out. It was something that a lot of women truly believed in.”

Shari Carlozzi thanks the founding sponsors of the organization at NWIR Day. Photos: National Women in Roofing

After talking to others in the industry, it became clear the organization had to have a national presence. “We looked ahead to the IRE in New Orleans in 2015 and decided to have a little get-together and see if people are truly interested,” Ellsworth recalls. “We had 75 women show up. It just grew from there.”

The group formed a leadership committee and held meetings at industry trade shows throughout 2015. “It was at IRE in 2016 that we officially launched National Women in Roofing,” Ellsworth says. “We realized very quickly that there was a tidal wave — a tsunami — of women behind us who really needed this. We realized we had to take this to a national level, and we did.”

The Four Pillars

Overarching goals of the organization are exemplified by its four pillars: networking, mentoring, education and recruitment.

Heidi Ellsworth welcomes attendees to the inaugural NWIR Day, held February 4, 2018. Photos: National Women in Roofing

“Our four pillars we started with — networking, mentoring, education and recruitment — have been the focus of what we’ve wanted to do from the start,” Carlozzi says. “Some people are a little bit more involved in education, some people are a little bit more involved in networking — it all depends on what works for you. We’ve stayed true to our four pillars, and that has been extremely helpful in giving women opportunities to engage in what’s most important to them.”

Ellsworth agrees, pointing out that networking events and mentoring initiatives developed hand in hand. “Our first events were networking events,” she says. “One of our themes is ‘from the rooftop to the boardroom,’ and we had top leaders at companies including GAF, ABC, Owens Corning, Johns Manville — all of these ladies showed up early and then stayed on and helped to drive this. We partnered with 28 founding sponsors that first year.”

Mentoring relationships seemed to blossom. “I wish we could all take credit for it, but it just happened so naturally,” Ellsworth says.

Kelly Wade, CEO of North American Roofing, gives the keynote address at the National Women in Roofing’s Mentor Reception during the 2018 International Roofing Expo. Photos: National Women in Roofing

NWIR is launching a mentoring program this year, under the leadership of Mallory Payne and Melissa Walker, who head up the mentoring committee. “Mentoring has always been a big part of what we do,” Carlozzi says. “Men have more mentors than women do, and we want to change that.”

The education committee, led by Shelly Duhaime and Jennifer Keegan, is working on a full slate of educational sessions at industry events, as well as a series of webinars on topics such as networking, safety and business management. “Our education committee is on fire this year,” says Carlozzi. “People crave information. The only way we can excel in what we do is to keep learning.”

Carlozzi points to the NRCA’s ProCertification program as a model for educating the industry’s workforce and boosting professionalism. “We have to elevate the perception of the roofing industry,” she says. “We share the same values as the NRCA, and we want to speak with one voice to get the message across to people that this is a viable career option for you, whether you are a man or a woman in the trade, or whether you are looking for a career as a chemist, or an engineer, or a salesperson, or in data entry. It is a solid, reputable industry.”

It’s also an industry facing a worker shortage, so recruiting a new generation of workers is essential. The recruitment committee, led by Michelle Boykin and Chelsea Welsh, is active at employment fairs and career days, and NWIR is reaching out to other trade groups across the country to increase the visibility of the industry.

Part of the recruitment effort includes a commitment to helping women in crisis find employment and pursue a true career path.

Memberships and Sponsorships

The organization might be national, but it is also active at the local level. NWIR is developing councils across the country to cater to local educational needs and reach out to area community service opportunities. There are 29 local councils now, with a goal of reaching 50 by the end of 2018.

NWIR members participate in a breakout session at a mentoring workshop. Photos: National Women in Roofing

“It’s the best of both worlds for everybody because they get that national input through our epicenter — our newsletter and our website — and they can apply the information to what they are doing locally,” Carlozzi says. “We give local councils a lot of latitude to put together what works for them as long as they stay true to our four pillars and our national outreach program with women in crisis.”

Carlozzi and Ellsworth encourage all women and men to join the association. The membership fee is $60 per year. Half of the membership fee goes to develop and support local councils. “We made a very conscious decision to keep our membership dues very reasonable, and they are owned by the member,” Ellsworth notes. “If your career path takes you to another company, the membership goes along with you.”

Companies can help NWIR as sponsors. There are four levels of sponsorships. “We are also in the middle of our sponsorship drive, and that is a great way to get involved as a company,” Ellsworth says. “The value to the company — and its employees — is incredible.”

A Bright Future

Looking back at her tenure as the first chair of the organization, Ellsworth is proud of the group’s achievements and thankful for the friendships she’s made along the way. “It’s one of the greatest experiences I’ve had in my life,” she says. “The women I have met and the experiences we’ve had have been so empowering.”

Networking and mentoring have always been key areas of focus for NWIR members. Photos: National Women in Roofing

As Carlozzi takes the helm, she plans to lean on the talented team of women ready to take the organization into the future. “It’s a little overwhelming when you look at it at first because we came so far, so fast, and we have to keep that momentum going,” says Carlozzi. “In the process, we’ve had some exceptional, outstanding women who have stepped up and taken on the leadership roles that are needed to develop and maintain a national organization like this.”

When the industry taps into everyone’s talents, everyone wins. Carlozzi sees that spirit every day at NWIR. “Everyone comes up with new ideas of how to make things better,” she says. “Everyone is open to new ideas and assistance, and everyone is freely offering it. No one feels threatened — we’re all empowered. That’s the beauty of it.”

For more information about NWIR, visit www.nationalwomeninroofing.com.

Miami-Dade County and ARMA Team Up to Update High-Wind Codes

ARMA awarded the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department the 2017 ARMA Public Partnership Award.

ARMA awarded the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department the 2017 ARMA Public Partnership Award. Aaron R. Phillips, Corporate Director of Technical Services at TAMKO Building Products and chair of the ARMA Codes Steering Group, presented the award to Michael Goolsby and Miami-Dade team members who worked on the project. Pictured at the ceremony are (from left) Eduardo Fernandez, Gaspar Rodriguez, Michael Goolsby, Aaron Phillips, Alex Tigera and Jorge Acebo.

In the aftermath of 1992’s Hurricane Andrew, the entire building code for South Florida was rebuilt from the ground up. When it was launched in 1994, the South Florida Building Code was a groundbreaking document that set new roofing application standards and testing protocols for every component and system in the building envelope. More than two decades later, it was clear the building code for Miami-Dade County’s high-velocity hurricane zone (HVHZ) needed to be updated. Beginning in 2014, Miami-Dade County officials worked with the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) and others in the roofing industry to ensure the current code language was clear and up to date.

Two-and-a-half years later, their work is complete. The 2017 Florida Building Code is scheduled for implementation on Jan. 1, 2018, and it will include every one of the proposals and public comments jointly submitted by ARMA and Miami-Dade. As a result of this successful collaboration, ARMA presented the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department with the inaugural ARMA Public Partnership Award in 2017 for their work together in updating the building codes for the HVHZ.

Members of the joint task force on the project shared their thoughts on the experience with Roofing, including Mike Fischer, ARMA’s Vice President of Codes & Regulatory Compliance; Michael Goolsby, Miami-Dade Board and Code Administration Division Director; Jorge Acebo, Roofing Product Control Examiner; Alex Tigera, Roofing Product Control Examiner; and Gaspar Rodriguez, Code Compliance and Training Officer, Roofing.

They all believe this collaboration between industry and government could serve as a successful model for other industry trade associations and other code bodies to follow. “This kind of cooperation between a public regulator and a private trade association is rare enough,” says Fischer. “The overwhelmingly positive results are unprecedented.”

The Problems

Miami-Dade staff and ARMA representatives both saw shortcomings in the roofing requirements for HVHZ. There were outdated references that needed to be removed, including test standards that were out of date. This often resulted in questions that slowed down the product approval review process. Members of the roofing industry also wanted to explore coordinating the Miami-Dade HVHZ protocols with other national testing requirements to further streamline testing procedures.

Fischer summed up ARMA’s goals this way: “ARMA is a responsible advocate for the asphalt roofing industry. We take that role seriously. We are an advocate. Our job is to represent the collective interests of the producers, but we try to be responsible about it. And it’s that drive to be responsible which led us to this partnership with the Miami-Dade staff.”

At the first meeting between ARMA and Miami-Dade, Fischer tried to break the ice. “The first thing we said when we came into that meeting was, ‘Hi, we’re from industry and we’re here to help,’” Fischer recalls. “I will tell you that when we started that meeting in the morning, the Miami-Dade staff was probably skeptical of what we were there for. By the end of the day, we had laid out a project plan of how we were going to work together, and that set the tone for the rest of the project.”

Fischer knew it would take the two entities working together to get things done. “In the Florida process, we knew we had to work with Miami-Dade, as they are a key stakeholder. We brought in other roof covering manufacturers for some of the discussions, and we also talked to the FRSA, the Florida Roofing and Sheet Metal Association—the contractors—so they were at the table for quite a bit of this as well.”
ARMA set up a special task group to focus on the Miami-Dade protocols. The task force went through documents one by one with members of Miami-Dade group, identifying problems and sections that were out of date. They hashed out compromises when they didn’t agree.

Protecting the Public

Goolsby worked on the project on behalf of Miami-Dade along with members of his team including Acebo, Tigera and Rodriguez. “We cover a lot of territory,” notes Goolsby. “We maintain the building code and write the building code, but we also oversee all of the contractor licensing in Miami-Dade County. We have about 15,000 local licensed contractors. Of course, we handle product approvals, and we also service all of the boards here. We have a board of rules and appeals. We also oversee 35 building departments throughout Miami-Dade County. We try to make sure the code is uniformly enforced in all of those jurisdictions. So, we cover a lot of bases.”

The top priority is protecting the public. “In a general sense, we provide for the health, safety and welfare of the public,” Goolsby says, “But it’s these issues of life safety that are the most critical.”
Evacuating South Florida is difficult, so the residential portions of the code were written under the assumption that many people might have to ride out a storm in their homes. “We wanted their home to be just as strong as any commercial structure,” says Goolsby.

Acebo notes that ensuring the code is properly followed is as crucial as the code itself. He believes the inspectors’ role includes reassuring homeowners that systems are being installed correctly. “It’s important to us to fulfill our role to provide independent corroboration that the work is being done and installed properly,” he says. “The great thing about this particular effort is that it was truly collaborative. It was great to work with them and establish the language that was common with other jurisdictions or other certification agencies.”

Promising Results

Members of the joint task force agree that the changes make the code easier to understand. They also should streamline product approvals process.

“These updates definitely help the manufacturers get through the product approval process, specifically for Miami-Dade HVHZ requirements,” Fischer states. “It also helps the roofing contractor because we made sure the documents have the installation language updated, so it gives better direction to the installers of the products. And that trickles up to the general contractors in new construction, as it speeds up their processes and takes out some burdens.”

“At the end of the day, as a responsible advocate, one of ARMA’s main motivators was to make sure their industry’s products get installed the way they are intended to be installed,” Fischer continues. “That benefits the end user—the building owner and building occupant.”

Acebo agrees that the approvals process helps everyone—homeowners, contractors, manufacturers and inspectors. “If questions come out of the field from homeowners, manufacturers or contractors as to whether something is being applied or used properly, we can serve as that independent third party that doesn’t really have a stake in it other than to serve as an arbitrator who can clearly indicate whether something is right or not according to what has been provided and tested.”

The collaboration was so successful that the task force is already looking at other changes in the future. The Miami-Dade code is used as a model for other code bodies, and the joint task force could serve in that role as well, according to Fischer. “This is a model of collaboration between a governmental agency and private industry groups that will serve us well,” he says. “We are going to continue to do this with other groups, and frankly we’re going to continue doing it with Miami-Dade because this process isn’t ever done. Things will always be changing and we always have to keep up to date.”

Antis Roofing & Waterproofing Is Making a Difference By Embracing Community Service

Antis Roofing encourages employees, business partners and customers to join its quarterly team build projects for Habitat for Humanity.

Antis Roofing encourages employees, business partners and customers to join its quarterly team build projects for Habitat for Humanity.

If the name Antis Roofing & Waterproofing sounds familiar, it’s probably because you’ve seen it in the trade press quite a bit lately. The Irvine, Calif.-based company received several awards at the 130th National Roofing Contractors Association Convention, including first place in the CNA/NRCA Community Involvement Award, which honors NRCA contractor members for charitable works. Two Antis Roofing employees, Narciso Alarcon and Manuel Cortez, received Most Valuable Player (MVP) awards from the Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress, and Alarcon was also named the Best of the Best by the Alliance and Professional Roofing magazine.

In March, the company’s founder and CEO, Charles Antis, was elected to the board of directors for the NRCA. Later that month, he was honored by Alzheimer’s Orange County for his volunteer work on behalf of that organization and his company’s community service projects. In April, Antis was named to the board of the Orange County Ronald McDonald House.

For Charles Antis and everyone else at the company, it’s been a whirlwind year. “Someone was joking that it’s like Academy Award season,” Antis says. “I don’t want to get too caught up in it, but this may never happen again, so I want to enjoy every moment of it. I want to make sure my team enjoys every moment of it. It’s been really nice to be recognized for stuff that we think is important because it shows us that other people think it’s important, too. And there was a period where maybe it didn’t feel that way. It feels like it’s working and we’re making a difference, and that’s why it feels pretty awesome today.”

Filling a Niche

For Antis, the company’s community service projects are inextricably linked to its purpose and mission as a company. He says it just took him a while to realize that fact.

Founded in 1989, Antis Roofing has 90 employees and specializes exclusively in work for homeowners associations. Most of the roofing work involves clay tile, but it also does a lot of asphalt shingle roofs, metal roofs, and single-ply systems—primarily PVC. “Our only focus is HOA,” say Antis. “Our company services approximately 1,200 HOAs that average 200 units each. That’s 240,000 individual homeowners that could call us at any one time, so that’s a challenge.”

Charles Antis was recently appointed to the board of the Orange County Ronald McDonald House.

Charles Antis was recently appointed to the board of the Orange County Ronald McDonald House.

The demanding HOA market keeps the business running on all cylinders, notes Antis.“Because we were focused on this super-high customer care market, we developed some really great qualities as a business,” he notes. “For example, we photograph virtually everything we touch, everything we see, everything we do. We upload about 6,000 images per day because that’s what it takes to protect all of our stakeholders, from our material suppliers to our manufacturers to the individual homeowners association board members and homeowners. We memorialize everything that occurs with photographs and notes in our enterprise resource planning (ERP) system, much like a property manager would.”

In the drive to improve his company, Antis asked himself a lot of questions, including basic questions about what motivates him and the true purpose of his company. “Somewhere along the line we discovered that our purpose is to keep families safe and dry,” he says. “That’s what helped lead us to our philanthropy. It brought us back to the community.”

Finding a Passion

Antis believes the company’s community service efforts help employees find their passion and make a connection with the community. “Our philanthropy is tied to our central theme,” he notes. “We believe everybody deserves an opportunity to live in safe, dry home and have a happy family there.”

The first board Antis joined was for Habitat for Humanity in Orange County, which embraces the same goal. He also serves on NRCA committees and will begin serving on the NRCA board for the same reason. “I’m able to give back in a way that lifts me, my people, my stakeholders and my industry,” he says. “I’m also on the board of Ronald McDonald House, which is again giving people a safe, dry place to live while they visit their sick children in the hospital. All of these board memberships that I do are focused on keeping families safe and dry, which is the central mission of Antis Roofing.”

The company has worked with Habitat for Humanity since 2009, and it also helps other nonprofit organizations by repairing, maintaining and replacing their roofs at no charge through the Antis Foundation “This year we are keeping 15 different nonprofits dry,” he says. “In fact, we have two complete re-roofs we are setting up this summer for the Boy Scouts of America and America Family Housing.”

Everyone at the company has found community service projects personally rewarding, notes Antis. It’s also helped the business grow and thrive. “We’ve discovered that the more we give, the more we grow, the more money we make, and the more we can give,” he says. “We are in this awesome little cycle where we have purpose in our work. We understand that there is something magical happening right now, and we just have a hard time saying no when somebody has a leaky roof.”

Antis Roofing CEO Charles Antis (left) accepts an award at Alzheimer’s Orange County’s 19th annual fundraising event from Jim McAleer, president and CEO of Alzheimer’s Orange County.

Antis Roofing CEO Charles Antis (left) accepts an award at Alzheimer’s Orange County’s 19th annual fundraising event from Jim McAleer, president and CEO of Alzheimer’s Orange County.

Antis believes his purpose in life is to ignite passion in others to create social change. “We believe that we can bring that passion out in every worker in our company and all of our stakeholders. We have this crazy philosophy around here that we are changing the world, and because of that, we are changing the world. And that’s freaking awesome.”

Changing the World

Antis is extremely proud of the awards his company has won. He is also extremely grateful. “Winning those awards from the roofing industry just filled my heart with such gratitude,” he says. “It was just awesome to experience the way our whole company received the Community Involvement Award. We all feel like we are making the roofing industry a better place. We all feel at Antis Roofing that we are working to lift the brand and lift the paycheck of all 250,000 roofers in America. We have that purpose in what we do, and it was gratifying to win that award as a team.”

Alarcon and Cortez, the winners of the individual awards, both lead by example, according to Antis. “It also felt really good to see two of our really hardworking employees honored with MVP Awards, one of them the Best of the Best,” he notes. “We are really proud of our team members achieving recognition because we are family.”

Charles Antis believes the company’s philanthropic efforts have inspired everyone at his company and made it a more exciting place to come to work.

Charles Antis believes the company’s philanthropic efforts have inspired everyone at his company and made it a more exciting place to come to work.


Antis is thankful for the recognition his team has received, especially because it allows him to share his message with others in the industry. “We have this amazing story right now, and it is getting a lot of attention, but I don’t want to miss this opportunity to tell other business owners that this is not very complicated,” he says. “It’s just a slight shift in the way you look at business. It’s bringing a why—why you exist—into the picture. And suddenly, there’s a stronger culture. Everybody wants to come work here because there is purpose here.”

“We don’t consider ourselves lowly roofers anymore,” he concludes. “We consider ourselves roofing professionals that are truly making the world a better place. We have a very important service that we provide, and we provide it in the best way possible.”

Photos: Antis Roofing & Waterproofing

Kirberg Co. Receives BBB TORCH Award

Kirberg Co. receives the 2016 BBB TORCH Award from the Better Business Bureau.

Kirberg Co. receives the 2016 BBB TORCH Award from the Better Business Bureau.

Kirberg Co., St. Louis, has received the 2016 BBB TORCH Award from the Better Business Bureau (BBB) serving eastern Missouri and southern Illinois. The award recognizes the company’s commitment to customer service through exceptional standards for ethical business practices.

Laura Toledo, executive director of the Center for Women in Transition, St. Louis, nominated Kirberg Co. for the TORCH Award. In 2015, Kirberg Co. donated $36,000 in labor and materials to install a new roof at the Baker House, one of two transitional living facilities operated by the center.

“We are all extremely grateful for the generous donation of a complete roof replacement from Kirberg in 2015,” Toledo states. “They also coordinated with other contractors to make sure the job was done well and at no cost to the agency. Kirberg has continued to support the mission of the Center for Women in Transition in numerous ways since then. Kirberg is an excellent company that is dedicated to its community.”

Through practicing and promoting restorative justice, the Center for Women in Transition assists women in the criminal justice system to successfully transition back to their families and communities. The women are offered safe, stable housing through the center, as well as case management; life-skills instruction; guidance from volunteer mentors; and assistance with locating jobs and accessing other resources, such as substance-abuse treatment, medical and mental health care.

Eric Kirberg, president of Kirberg Co., accepted the TORCH Award and says: “We were delighted to be able to help our friends at the Center for Women in Transition. The center provides a wonderful service here in town, and a new roof was badly needed. Now the apartment building will remain open to help hundreds of women for years to come.”

Having provided nearly 100 years of service to the St. Louis community, Kirberg Co. installs nearly every type of roof system from slate and tile to flat-roof applications, vegetated and solar-power systems. With 90 field employees in St. Louis and approximately 50 in its branches, Kirberg Co. is committed to exceeding customer expectations.

“Getting roofs done right the first time, that’s always been our motto,” Kirberg notes. “When our roofers are as good as they are, it’s easy to have good customer service when the work is almost perfect.”

“BBB’s TORCH Awards celebrate exceptional companies with great customer service and ethics,” adds Scott Mosby, BBB board chair and chief executive of Mosby Building Arts, St. Louis. “Start with trust, honor the exceptional and learn from the best is our practice within St. Louis BBB. These companies and charities are examples to emulate for anyone who wants to be trusted in the marketplace.”

Learn more about Kirberg Co. at the website; visit the BBB’s website.

PHOTO: Kirberg Co.

RCASF More than Doubles Contribution to Make-a-Wish Foundation

With the generous contributions of local roofing contractors and associate members, the Roofing Contractors Association of South Florida more than doubled its 2016 contribution to the Make-a-Wish Foundation compared to its 2015 donation.

Through the 37th annual Fishing Tournament, RCASF members were able to raise enough money to make wishes come true for 15 children in south Florida who are struggling with illnesses.

Through the 37th annual Fishing Tournament, RCASF members were able to raise enough money to make wishes come true for 15 children in south Florida who are struggling with illnesses.


Through its 37th annual Fishing Tournament, RCASF members raised $75,000 to make wishes come true for 15 children in south Florida who are struggling with illnesses. Six Signature Sponsors gifted $5,000 each, or “one wish”. These gracious donors included Certified Contracting Group, CL Burks Construction, Earl W. Johnston Roofing, Empire Roofing, Spec Building Supply, and Weather-Tech Roofing & Waterproofing.

Norm Wedderburn, CEO and president of the Make-A-Wish Foundation Southern Florida, says, “We cannot thank the RCASF enough! RCASF has helped us to change many lives and for that we will be eternally grateful.”

Members of RCASF’s Fishing Tournament Committee donate $75,000 to Norm Wedderburn (far left), CEO and president, and Wanda Trouba (second from left), vice president, of the Make-a-Wish Foundation.

Members of RCASF’s Fishing Tournament Committee donate $75,000 to Norm Wedderburn (far left), CEO and president, and Wanda Trouba (second from left), vice president, of the Make-a-Wish Foundation.


The RCASF Fishing Committee has already begun planning for this year’s tournament, which will take place June 11. The committee hopes the 2017 tournament exceeds the 2016 contributions. Committee members encourage donations of fishing-related items for auction, as well as financial sponsorships. If you would like to contribute, contact Wendy Harvest, RCASF executive director, at (954)558-4982 or admin@rcasf.org.

Photos: Roofing Contractors Association of South Florida

Dan Worstell of Pyramid Roofing Creates Positive Change in His Community

Dan Worstell (right) is pictured with his dad Jerry (center) and his brother Dave (left).

Dan Worstell (right) is pictured with his dad Jerry (center) and his brother Dave (left).

Dan Worstell, president of Pyramid Roofing, which has offices in Newport News, Suffolk, Virginia Beach and Williamsburg, Va., believes the biggest changes can be made with small efforts. Worstell lives his belief every day.

For example, after signing up as a volunteer with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Williamsburg, he was quickly paired with 7-year-old Jordan. The plan as to spend a few hours a month with the boy over the course of a year, sharing activities and generally being a positive male role model for Jordan. Recently, the pair celebrated 10 years as “Big” and “Little,” and both their lives have changed for the better as a result of their relationship. Jordan is a smart, popular teen in his senior year of high school. He works after school and on weekends, has his own bank account and buys presents for the Worstell family at Christmas.

Meanwhile Worstell and his family—wife Tammy and sons Derek and Drew—include Jordan in family activities, from holiday celebrations to just hanging out around the house. Worstell also attends Jordan’s sporting events and hangs photos of Jordan along with his own sons on the walls of his office.

Through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Williamsburg, Wortsell has mentored Jordan for the past 10 years.

Through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Williamsburg, Wortsell has mentored Jordan for the past 10 years.

Worstell is not only one of the most prominent roofing contractors in the Hampton Roads area, he’s also a stand-up guy who cares about his employees and community.

For example, Worstell roofed the home of a disabled veteran for free and also supplied the labor to install roofing shingles (donated by Atlanta-based Atlas Roofing Corp.) at the Jamestown 4-H Center. On rain and snow days, Worstell keeps his crews working by posting on Facebook that the roofers are available to do odd jobs around the house. All Worstell asks in return is a $15 minimum donation to the Grove Christian Outreach Center.

On rainy mornings, Worstell often can be found in his company truck in the Chick-fil-A drive-thru in Hampton Roads. He hands his credit card to the cashier and moves to the end of the line, paying for breakfast for everyone originally behind him. Along with the free breakfast, the cashier passes out a chip clip with the Pyramid Roofing name and logo on it. This small investment has led to new business and positive feedback about Pyramid Roofing.

Photos: Atlas Roofing Corp.

Jasper Contractors Donates Roofing Labor to Military Family in Need

Kennesaw, Ga.-based Jasper Contractors Inc. representatives believe it’s important to give back to those who serve in our military. As such, the firm joined the Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project. Toledo, Ohio-based Owens Corning began partnering with Support Our Troops, Daytona Beach, Fla., in March. Via the project, military families in need can apply to have a roof installed at no cost to them by an Owens Corning Platinum Preferred Roofing Contractor, such as Jasper Contractors.

From left to right: Bobby Shifteh, Jasper Contractors’ business development manager, and Arielle Dysart, chief operating officer, pose with Paul and Colette Singrossi in front of their newly reroofed home in Winter Springs, Fla.

From left to right: Bobby Shifteh, Jasper Contractors’ business development manager, and Arielle Dysart, chief operating officer, pose with Paul and Colette Singrossi in front of their newly reroofed home in Winter Springs, Fla.

Owens Corning worked with Support Our Troops to locate Paul and Colette Singrossi, who have three children and live within Jasper Contractors’ Florida service area. Paul, an E6 staff sergeant, has served 16 years in the U.S. Army and recently returned home to Winter Springs, Fla., from a deployment in Africa. Paul and Colette both are police officers in their community.

The Singrossis’ existing roof was 11-years old and consisted of a lot of patchwork that was performed to pass inspection when the Singrossis purchased their home. While Paul was in and out of the country, roof repairs were neglected and leaks began appearing and worsening.

The new 2,500-square-foot Owens Corning Oakridge laminated asphalt shingle roof in the color Driftwood was installed in just one day by seven Jasper Contractors crew members.

Carl McNair, president of Jasper Contractors, is happy to help the Singrossi family: “This gave us the opportunity to provide just a small piece of relief to one of our most treasured veterans. Mr. and Mrs. Singrossi have done a wonderful service to our country, so it was a small gesture on our part to provide them with a new roof.”

Jasper Contractors also is committed to hiring veterans. Steven Edwards (left), vice president of Sales, served in the 82nd Airborne Division of the U.S. Army. Jeff Gonzales (right), regional manager, served eight years in the Marine Corps. “It’s an honor to work for an employer that’s veteran friendly and takes care of veterans in the community,” Gonzales says.

Jasper Contractors also is committed to hiring veterans. Steven Edwards (left), vice president of Sales, served in the 82nd Airborne Division of the U.S. Army. Jeff Gonzales (right), regional manager, served eight years in the Marine Corps. “It’s an honor to work for an employer that’s veteran friendly and takes care of veterans in the community,” Gonzales says.

The new roof alleviates the Singrossis’ worries. “There was water seeping through [the roof] so it’s really nice to have peace of mind that we don’t have to worry about trying to find the money for that,” Colette says.

Paul adds: “[Service members] have to come back and reintegrate into society, so there’s not a lot of time to look for things that help us out. It’s nice to have the support to know that what we do is actually cared about.”

PHOTOS: JASPER CONTRACTORS INC.

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Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project
Jasper Contractors Inc., Kennesaw, Ga.

2016 National Roofing Week Is a Success

As part of National Roofing Week, Rosemont, Ill.-based National Roofing Contractors Association members celebrated their industry pride in unique ways. The following images were shared via NRCA’s Facebook page:

Straight Line Roofing & Construction Wins 2016 CNA/NRCA Community Involvement Award

In recognition of its efforts to help disadvantaged members of its community meet basic nutritional needs, Straight Line Roofing & Construction, Shingle Springs, Calif., has been presented with the fourth annual CNA/NRCA Community Involvement Award, which is sponsored by the National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, Ill., and CNA, Chicago.

The award honors charitable works performed by NRCA contractor members.

In recognition of its efforts to help disadvantaged members of its community meet basic nutritional needs, Straight Line Roofing & Construction has been presented the fourth annual CNA/NRCA Community Involvement Award.

In recognition of its efforts to help disadvantaged members of its community meet basic nutritional needs, Straight Line Roofing & Construction has been presented the fourth annual CNA/NRCA Community Involvement Award.

Straight Line Roofing & Construction was selected because of its $16,330 donation to support the Food Bank of El Dorado County. Straight Line Roofing & Construction’s contribution came from hosting its Ninth Annual Thanks & Giving Customer Appreciation Event. During its 10-year involvement with the charity, Straight Line Roofing & Construction has replaced the facility’s roof system and raised more than $70,000 to help feed at-risk individuals.

“I just feel, as contractors, it’s our obligation to thank the customers that have blessed us so much,” said Jack Borba, owner of Straight Line Roofing & Construction, in a video acknowl- edging the award.

CNA awarded Straight Line Roofing & Construction with $5,000 for assisting the food bank, which partners with more than 40 local emergency food response agency sites.

Additionally, this year’s honorable mentions each received $1,000 from CNA; they are 7 Summits Roofing, Colorado Springs, Colo., for hosting the Brandon Schwartz Memorial Tournament; Aspenmark Roofing & Solar, Dallas, for its non-profit organization Roof Angels; and Jonesboro Roofing Co. Inc., Jonesboro, Ark., for its work with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

The awards were presented during NRCA’s Awards Ceremony and Cocktail Reception held during NRCA’s 129th Annual Convention this past February.

John Gooding Receives Prestigious NRCA J.A. Piper Award

John Gooding accepts the 2016 J.A. Piper Award from 2015 J.A. Piper Award Winner Don McCrory during NRCA’s 129th Annual Convention.

John Gooding accepts the 2016 J.A. Piper Award from 2015 J.A. Piper Award Winner Don McCrory during NRCA’s 129th Annual Convention.

The National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, Ill., has announced John Gooding, chairman of the board of GSM Roofing, Ephrata, Pa., as the 69th recipient of its annual J.A. Piper Award. The award was presented at the association’s 129th Annual Convention held Feb. 17-19 in Orlando, Fla. The J.A. Piper award is the industry’s most prestigious honor, recognizing roofing professionals who have devoted constant outstanding service to NRCA and the roofing industry.

Gooding, who served as NRCA’s chairman of the board in 2003-04, currently serves on the association’s National Roofing Council. Prior to serving as NRCA chairman of the board, Gooding served as NRCA chairman of the board- elect from 2002-03; vice president from 1997-99; and director from 1989-92, 1994-96 and 1999-2002. In addition, he has served on many committees, including as chairman of the Affiliate Relations, Budget and Finance, Health and Safety, PAC Advisory and Strategic Planning Committees. He also served on the Insurance Advisory Board and the Insurance Board of Governors. GSM Roofing also is a member of the Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress.

“He had roofing in his blood,” says fellow former NRCA Chairman of the Board and 2015 J.A. Piper Award Winner Don McCrory, president of Kiker Corp., Mobile, Ala. “He’s transformed the business his father started into one of the largest and most successful roofing companies today.”

Gooding is surrounded by previous J.A. Piper Award winners.

Gooding is surrounded by previous J.A. Piper Award winners.

First presented in 1948, the J.A. Piper Award is named for former NRCA Chairman of the Board Joseph A. Piper, whose extraordinary efforts kept the association alive during the Great Depression.

PHOTOS: National Roofing Contractors Association