About Chris King

Chris King is the editor in chief of Roofing magazine. He has covered the construction industry for more than 20 years, previously serving as editor of Roofing Contractor, managing editor of the Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration News, and associate editor of Plumbing & Mechanical. He can be reached by email at chris@roofingmagazine.com.

The Top 40 Products of 2020

The following product roundup features the Top 40 products of the year, as chosen by the readers of Roofing magazine. The products were selected based on the number of reader requests for sales leads through the Reader Action Card in the print issue and the number of clicks on the website, www.RoofingMagazine.com, including those generated through our monthly e-newsletter. The product generating the most leads from each print issue is also featured as our “Roofers’ Choice” product. If you have a new product you’d like us to consider for a future edition of our Materials & Gadgets section, please email Editor-in-Chief Chris King at chris@roofingmagazine.com.

Shingles With Mechanically Fused Common Bond

GAF’s Timberline HDZ shingles feature LayerLock technology, which mechanically fuses the common bond to offer the new StrikeZone nailing area — up to 600 percent larger than Timberline HD shingles. According to the company, the shingles are designed for strength and powerful wind uplift performance. Contractors can offer homeowners a GAF WindProven limited wind warranty with no maximum wind speed limit when installing GAF shingles with LayerLock technology and four qualifying GAF accessories. www.GAF.com

Shingle Underlayment With Slip-Resistant Film

Carlisle WIP Products’ WIP GRIP Premium Shingle Underlayment features a slip-resistant top film that improves roofers’ safety on wet and dry installations. The underlayment is comprised of a flexible, 55-mil-thick, rubberized asphalt, fiberglass-reinforced membrane. It can be used on critical roof areas such as eaves, ridges, valleys, dormers, and skylights; it may also be used as covering for the entire roof to prevent moisture or water entry. www.CarlisleWIPproducts.com

Standing Seam Roof Clamp

Dynamic Fastener’s Standing Seam Roof Clamp installs over the clip on a completely seamed, attached roof section a minimum 4 feet or further from the edge with no damage to roof panels or finished seams and no roof penetrations. The clamp accommodates seams up to 1 inch wide, and the unique “flip” design of the DFSSRC-03 allows for fit on both the Butler MR24 and Butler VSR-style seams just by removing the bolts, turning one side of the clamp around the ring and replacing the bolts. www.DynamicFastener.com

Acoustical Smoke Vent

The Bilco Company’s Type ACDSV Smoke Vent is specifically designed to provide fire and smoke protection for applications where exterior noise intrusion is undesirable, such as in auditoriums, concert halls, and theaters. The new ACDSV carries an OITC-46 sound rating to guard against low-frequency outdoor sounds such as traffic and airplane noises, and an STC 50 sound rating. In addition, the product has also received an ISO-140-18 sound rating when tested against rainfall sound. www.Bilco.com

One-Component Liquid-Applied Flashing

CertainTeed’s SmartFlashONE is a one-component, UV-stable, fluid-applied resin for steep and low-sloped roof flashing details and repairs. According to the company, SmartFlash ONE can be applied without a primer and resealed for future use, offering labor efficiency. The product is available in a 5-gallon pail or a 1-gallon pail. The 1-gallon pail is also available as part of a Flash Pack which includes resin, fleece and application accessories. www.CertainTeed.com

Rotating Deck Anchor

The FallTech Rotating Deck Anchor is designed for maximum versatility and safety with a 360-degree self-orienting D-ring for use in temporary fall arrest or restraint applications. The reusable anchor is designed for installation onto exposed #10 rebar and threaded rod and is secured with user-supplied rebar wing nut or hex nut. It features a plated stainless steel anchoring plate, steel plated D-ring and bushing, and its 360-degree self-orienting D-ring is designed to follow the user’s movement. www.FallTech.com

Heavy-Duty Snow Retention System

PMC Industries offers the Snow Titan, a heavy-duty snow retention system designed for areas with heavy snowfall. According to the company, the product installs quickly and easily, saving time and minimizing labor costs. The system utilizes non-penetrating AceClamp sliding-pin clamps and snap-in ice flags. Snow Titan’s new triangular-shaped rail structure is strong enough to tackle up to 48-inch spans, and can be configured in either one- or two-rail setups depending upon the roofing pitch and expected snowfall. www.AceClamp.com

Lead-Free Roof Flashing Membrane

MFM Building Products offers the GreenWeld PVB armored flashing system, a high-performance PolyVinyl Butyral (PVB) membrane enhanced with an aluminum scrim for superior flexibility, strength and weathering. The membrane is comprised of recycled PVB and can be used in residential and commercial roofing applications including flashing for pipe penetrations and through-wall flashings. It is easy to cut and use, heat-weldable, non-toxic, sustainable, flexible, lightweight, and comes with a 20-year warranty. www.MFMBP.com

Perimeter Safety System

The FallBan Cableguard System provides a temporary or permanent safety barrier around the perimeter of the roof. Horizontal steel cables are anchored to the roof and attached to vertical steel stanchions spaced at 20-foot intervals and then tightened to form a barrier to protect anyone on the roof from accidental falls. The system features stainless steel adjustable threaded parts, making it easy to install. FallBan is made in the United States and patented in both the United States and Canada. www.FallBan.com

Bath and Dryer Vent

Lifetime Tool introduces the Lifetime Bath-Dryer Vent for shingle roofs. The proprietary design enables the housing structure to mount to the plate without rivets, fasteners and sealants. The vent assembly is crimped into the seamless deep-drawn plate with an EPDM gasket, and the shingle vent plate is 24-gauge galvanized Kynar with 4 inches of flashing on the sides, 6 inches at the top and 3.5 inches at the bottom. In independent laboratory testing, the Lifetime Bath-Dryer Vent exceeded 110 mph in the ASTM T166-18 – Wind Driven Rain Test. www.LifetimeTool.com

7-Inch Gutter Guards

Leaf Solution’s 7-inch Xtreme Gutter Guards complement the company’s product mix of 5-inch and 6-inch gutter guards for residential or commercial installation. Xtreme features .42 stainless-steel mesh to block debris including leaves, pine needles, oak tassels, shingle grit and pollen, yet allows water to flow freely into the gutter. A durable substrate backing reinforces the mesh, horizontally and vertically, from stretching or sagging and simplifies installation. The product is available for fascia or under-shingle mount in mill silver or black. LeafSolutionUSA.com

Monumental Glass Skylight System

EXTECH/Exterior Technologies Inc.’s SKYGARD 2500 Series aluminum-framed, monumental glass skylight system is available in pyramid, single slope and ridge configurations. The skylight complements commercial, institutional and industrial building designs. The SKYGARD 2500 skylight system accepts glass up to 1-5/16 inches thick, including monolithic or insulated glass units. The skylight system has passed industry-standard testing for air infiltration per ASTM E-283 to 12 psf and water infiltration per ASTM D-331 to 15 psf. www.ExtechInc.com

Slate-Look Metal Roofing Panel

EDCO Products introduces Generations Slate, a roofing panel that combines the company’s popular ArrowLine Slate Roofing panel with its advanced HD coating technology to produce an authentic slate appearance. Manufactured with the strength of steel and a multilayered PVDF cool chemistry finish, Generations Slate can reduce energy bills and does not support mold and algae growth. The product is backed by a lifetime warranty. www.EDCOproducts.com

Ladder Safety Device

The Ladder Lock Pro allows roofing contractors to lock ladders in place to perform work on the roof. The product attaches directly to the roof itself when a new roof is being installed. The Ladder Lock Pro is made of lightweight aluminum and installs in minutes by attaching the upper ladder step to the rooftop using three screws. The products can be purchased in angled or flat configurations to accommodate different types of roofs. The device attaches to any upright ladder using a locking pin. Once the locking pin is in place, it can be attached to the roof using three screws. www.LadderLockPro.com

Redesigned PVC Drain Kit

Marathon Roofing Products offers the Economy Enpoco Pak, the assembled kit of the ULRD Roof Drain with all the components for easy installation. Available in 2-inch, 3-inch and 4-inch sizes, the Economy Enpoco Pak offers versatility and easy installation on new and existing roofs. The product features a newly designed injection-molded PVC body with stronger gussets and an overflow option; a molded polyethylene dome strainer; and ABS clamping collar (metal standard) with gravel stop. www.MarathonDrains.com

Color Palette for Coil Coatings

Sherwin-Williams unveils an architect-inspired color palette, the Fluropon Architect Series, which was created by architects who attended the company’s “Color Mixology” event during the AIA Conference on Architecture 2019. The private event brought together hundreds of architects who helped to create newly developed colors. Sherwin-Williams selected 10 unique colors and matched them in various Fluropon 70 percent PVDF systems for exterior metal architecture. This special edition color series incorporates a wide range of colors, textures and effects. www.Coil.Sherwin.com

New Hire Fall Protection and Safety Kits

New Hire Fall Protection and Safety Kits from Malta Dynamics are designed to simplify the process of outfitting new employees. The kits include a full body harness; short- and long-sleeve high-visibility shirts; high-visibility surveyor vest; clear and tinted safety glasses; safety gloves; white cap-style hard hat; durable bag with handles and detachable, adjustable shoulder strap. According to the company, the equipment is tested to meet safety requirements for OSHA and ANSI. www.MaltaDynamics.com

Hard Hat Liners

NoSweat is a disposable, moisture-wicking performance hard hat liner. The product is designed to stick to the inside of any hat or hard hat, wicking away sweat to help prevent headwear from becoming musty smelling while also helping workers focus on the task at hand. According to the company, NoSweat is made with hypoallergenic materials that are thin, soft and lightweight. The liners also help reduce fogging in eyewear and are made in the USA. www.NoSweatCo.com

Lead-Free Roof Flashing

Boral Roofing’s Wakaflex, the company’s versatile lead-free flashing solution, is listed through IAPMO UES as a permanent flashing (ER-579). The product earned the distinction by undergoing and passing an extremely rigorous 2,000-hour UV exposure test. According to the manufacturer, Wakaflex contains an internal aluminum mesh, making it extremely flexible and easy to shape. It chemically seals to itself, and its Polyisobutylene material composition makes the flashing extremely resistant to all weather conditions. www.BoralRoof.com

Heated Apparel for Winter Conditions

Gobi Heat’s Duck Cotton Workwear jacket and vest are heated using a compact battery that is both comfortable and discreet, offering up to 9 hours of battery life. There are three heat settings: low, medium, and high. The jacket is made from 13.4 oz. Duck Cotton Material and features built-in shoulder gussets for maximum flexibility, nylon interior, elastic cuffs, and a removable hood. The company also offers heated beanies, which offer up to 7.5 hours of battery life. www.GobiHeat.com

Synthetic Underlayment

System Components Corporation introduces QuickSilver synthetic roofing underlayment for tile, metal, and other durable roof systems currently available in the market. According to the manufacturer, QuickSilver’s patented design offers gasketing technology that helps prevent water penetration around fasteners. The product also features low shrink construction, which mitigates shrink and lift at slope transitions. The elastomer bottom surface is designed to grip high-slope decks, improve fastener seal and help provide a safer walking surface. www.SystemComponents.net

[Images: reclaimed-metal-rust-standing-seam.jpg, recliames-78-corrugated-barnyard-rust.jpg]

Metal Panel Recreates Look of Reclaimed Metal

Reclaimed Metal Rust is a new pre-painted metal roofing and siding panel from Western States Metal Roofing that recreates the look of reclaimed metal. The panel features white and silver coloring with orange and reddish rust streaks throughout its design to mimic the look of old, faded galvanized that is rusting. The panel is available in Kynar 500 paint system and comes in 10 different profile finishes. It is available in coil, flats, metal roofing, siding, and wall panels. www.PaintedRustedRoofing.com

Improved Universal Base Attachment

Green Link Engineering’s retooled KnuckleHead universal base offers an improved attachment feature for more secure installations. The universal base, which accepts a range of head designs, now features four holes, which allows for the doubling of mechanical fasteners. In laboratory tests, the four-fastener base installation increased support strength by 40 percent tested on a 12-inch strut Knucklehead configuration. The base can also be further secured and sealed using specially formulated Green Link Adhesive/Sealant. www.GreenLinkEngineering.com

Roof Windows

VELUX offers roof windows for in-reach applications in both top- and side-hinged options for attic and bonus room renovations. With easy maneuverability, roof windows also provide a point of egress, which can help structures comply with building codes requiring two points of escape in case of fire. With convenient side or bottom handles for easy operation and a variety of blind options, homeowners can increase the amount of natural light and fresh air ventilation in their spaces, all while enjoying panoramic views. www.VELUX USA.com

Adhesive Carts With Options for Bead Spacing

OMG Roofing Products announces that OMG BeadPro Carts, which apply canister based OlyBond500 Insulation Adhesive, now offer roofing contractors a choice of 6- or 12-inch on center bead application. The carts offer a stable platform for holding adhesive canisters and allows contractors to apply four adhesive beads spaced perfectly at 6- or 12-inches on center. Contactors simply load the cart with the canisters, secure the hoses, and apply straight line beads of OlyBond500 Insulation Adhesives. www.OMGBeadPro.com

Gauge Tool Set for Metal Clamps and Brackets

The LMCurbs gauge tool set was designed to help customers save time and money by quickly determining the type of clamp or bracket that is needed for a metal roofing application. There are two styles, one for the S-5! Utility Clamps and one for the five different profiles of the S-5! RibBrackets. These gauges will greatly reduce the need for shipping out samples to test fit. Customized laser etching is available, allowing companies to hand them out to their customers with their contact information. www.LMCurbs.com

Temporary Anchor Point for Metal Roofs

Metal Plus, LLC’s Universal Safety Anchor (USA) is a temporary anchor point with a unique hinge-system designed to accommodate most panels without any loose components. According to the manufacturer, the Universal Safety Anchor is easy to install: just open, close, and torque. It requires no adjusting of set screws. The patented Universal Safety Anchor was designed to eliminate problems including damage to metal panels from set screws, rusting of panels when anchor points are removed, and voiding the manufacturer’s warranty. www.MetalPlusLLC.com

Utility Tray Accessory for Material Hoist

Safety Hoist Company’s Utility Tray XL is easily installed on the EH-500 and HD-400 hoist models. The pre-assembled tray is a steel fabrication and measures 44 inches wide by 25 inches deep and 12 inches high. The Utility Tray includes two Deck Extenders, which expand the carriage width to 45 inches, allowing greater support for rolled goods. Using the Utility Tray XL, contractors cab safely lift items such as tiles, buckets, tools, HVAC units and other construction materials. www.SafetyHoistCompany.com

Pitch Pan Kits

Mule-Hide Products Co.offersShapeShift Kits, which put everything needed to create pitch pans in one convenient package. A new addition to Mule-Hide Products’ ShapeShift line, the “grab-and-go” kits are available in two sizes to accommodate jobs of various sizes. Large kits create four 7- by 7-inch pitch pans. Small kits create four 4- by 4-inch pitch pans. Kit sections are made of high-strength polymer in white and snap together for easy assembly. ShapeShift kits can be used to create pitch pans for acrylic-coated, smooth modified bitumen, and smooth built-up roofing systems. www.MuleHide.com

Box Rib Wall Panels

Petersen expands its family of PAC-CLAD Precision Series wall panels with the introduction of the Box Rib line. The four new Box Rib wall panels feature 87-degree rib angles and a variety of rib spacing patterns. The Box Rib architectural wall panels are 1-3/8 inches deep with a nominal 12-inch width. Each of the four Box Rib profiles is offered in a no-clip fastener-flange option, or a clip-fastened panel to accommodate thermal expansion and contraction. The Box Rib panels are backed by the following tests: ASTM E-330, ASTM E-1592, ASTM E-283 and 331, AAMA 501. www.PAC-CLAD.com

Telescoping Debris Disposal System

Rocket Equipment’s Trash Rocket is a self-supported telescoping debris disposal system designed for commercial and residential roofing contractors. The trailer-mounted Trash Rocket has a totally enclosed chute, which also doubles as an emergency exit for personnel. The composition of the Trash Rocket provides durability and strength with its corrosion-resistant aluminum and high-density poly chute. The folding chutes adjust to locations, rooflines, and landscapes. Adjustable outriggers provide leveling and safety on uneven terrain. www.RocketEquipment.com

Pneumatic Nailers

SENCO added two new pneumatic nail guns with increased magazine capacity: the JoistPro 150MXP and JoistPro 250MXP. Used for fastening metal structural connectors like joist hangers, seismic/hurricane straps and rafter ties, the products feature several design innovations, including increased magazine size. The JoistPro 150MXP weighs just 5.3 pounds and holds two strips of SENCO paper-tape collated nails, cutting downtime for reloading in half. The more powerful JoistPro 250MXP features an all-new nosepiece that provides accurate nail placement into pre-punched metal framing hardware. www.SENCO.com

Swivel Metal Roof Anchor

Dynamic Fastener offers a swivel metal roof anchor for use with lifelines, rope/cable grabs or retractors. It offers continuous protection and freedom of movement with the 360 degree swivel and 180-plus degree flip movement of the D-ring, keeping the connection point in line with your work. According to the company, the unique design keeps the anchor point above the high point of the panels. The swivel metal roof anchor can be used for temporary or permanent application. It is designed to fit in the valleys of lighter R panels and capture the purlin below. www.DynamicFastener.com

Roof Ventilation Systems

Atlas Roofing Corporation’s TruRidge and HighPoint Roof Ventilation intake and exhaust systems complement the current line of Atlas residential roofing products and are the company’s first ventilation products. The TruRidge and HighPoint systems are manufactured with a proprietary polymer that is formulated to withstand the rigors of severe weather conditions. When properly installed, TruRidge and HighPoint exceed U.S. Department of Energy recommendations and all nationally recognized ventilation building codes. www.AtlasRoofing.com

Hybrid Snow Guard System

Alpine SnowGuards unveils the Fusion-Guard, a hybrid snow guard system that offers the option of adding pipe-style snow guards to the new pad-style snow guard. According to the manufacturer, Fusion-Guard pairs the company’s newly designed pad-style snow guard with an optional pipe-style approach to managing snow. The system’s two optional 3/8-inch rods are accepted by the Fusion-Guard Rod Bracket, which fastens onto the back of the snow guard face, allowing the installer to add rods if desired during, or any time after, the initial installation. www.AlpineSnowGuards.com

High-Performance House Wrap

Benjamin Obdyke’s Flatwrap HP is a high-performance house wrap designed for use in non-absorptive cladding applications or in conjunction with a rainscreen for other applications. According to the manufacturer, the product offers superior durability via a trilaminate polypropylene substrate. The trilaminate design protects the water hold out layer from damage during install. Flatwrap HP can be installed as an air barrier and is also breathable with an ideal perm rating between 10 and 20 perms per building science research. www.BenjaminObdyke.com

Fall Arrest Anchors

Kee Safety offers a comprehensive line of Kee Rigid Anchors fall arrest systems to provide personal fall protection. Available in stock for shipment within 24 hours, they are designed to withstand a pull-out force of 5,000 pounds applied in any direction and meet applicable OSHA, ANSI, and Cal/OSHA standards. The anchors are galvanized for corrosion resistance and durability, easy to install, and have insulated posts to stop conductivity and provide for temperature consistency on the building. The product line includes five standard options to meet a wide range of building and roof types. www.KeeSafety.com

PVC Spray Contact Adhesive

ICP Building Solutions Group’s Polyset PVC Spray Contact Adhesive is a portable, self-containing, single component solution designed with speed and simplicity in mind. Engineered to adhere most PVC membranes to most vertical walls and substrates for commercial low slope roofing applications, Polyset PVC Spray Contact Adhesive delivers high adhesive output with a fast setup time, helping commercial roofing professionals reduce labor time and complete jobs faster. According to the company, the adhesive can be applied in temperatures as low as 25 degrees Fahrenheit and higher. www.ICPgroup.com

New Line of Evaporative Coolers

The Cold Front line of evaporative coolers from Big Ass Fans brings a full range of customer options for use in spaces of all sizes and applications, delivering a dramatic temperature reduction up to 33 degrees Fahrenheit. Capable of covering anywhere from 600 to 6,500 square feet, the Cold Front lineup allows owners to cool at a fraction of the cost of air conditioning. All models feature locking swivel casters, automatic low-water shutoff, and an easily accessible drain plug, while the largest model adds a backlit LCD display, premium remote, occupancy sensor for hands-free operation, and an auto-dry function. www.BigAssFans.com

Upgraded Flashing Membrane

TAMKO Building Products LLC offers the newly-upgraded TW-105 Flashing Membrane, which features white polymer surface film technology that gives the product increased UV resistance. According to the manufacturer, this new generation of TW-105 increases the UV resistance from the original 60 days to an extended length of 180 days. TW-105 Flashing is available in 12-inch-by-40-foot rolls and each carton contains two 40-foot rolls for a total of 80 feet of length per carton. The product comes with a 5-year Limited Warranty. www.TAMKOwaterproofing.com

Pulling Together

As we were wrapping up this issue, the country was going through a tumultuous election in the midst of a pandemic. Our November-December issue typically focuses on government and municipal projects, and as we compiled these stories spotlighting successful public projects it was hard not to reflect on the nation’s highly polarized political environment.

According to roof consultant John A. D’Annunzio, public projects are typically a solid and dependable sector of the roofing market, and he outlines tips for successfully bidding and executing public projects in this issue.

Want to make sure you get paid at the end of the job? Working for a government entity can mean that it’s impossible to file a lien or sue in civil court, so check out the article by David Keel and Richard Anderson of Cotney Construction Law, who detail ways contractors can protect themselves and make sure they are compensated when the work is done.

This issue profiles government and municipal projects of many different types, including low-slope and steep-slope work, both retrofit and new construction. Several of them involved complex roof replacements in facilities that were open throughout the duration of the project. In Baton Rouge, Louisiana, the roof on the 300,000-square-foot United States Post Office General Mail Facility was replaced with a modified bitumen system while mail processing at the facility continued 24-7. In Owatonna, Minnesota, restoring the city’s historic administration building included installing 29,000 square feet of synthetic slate — and a detailed safety plan to protect workers and members of the public.

In Sevierville, Tennessee, a community center’s roof was replaced with metal-over-metal retrofit, which cut costs and minimized safety concerns. During a new construction project nearby, a butterfly standing seam metal roof and metal wall panels were installed on Sevier County Utility District’s new multipurpose facility.

D’Annunzio, who has been a roof consultant for more than 30 years, begins every pre-construction meeting by saying, “Nobody wins unless everybody wins.” His point is that the fate of the general contractor, roofing contractor, architect, engineer and consultant are all intertwined. All of them will benefit if they work together and the project is successful. They will all suffer if the project fails and ends up in litigation.

“Nobody wins unless everybody wins.” Not a bad motto for running a roofing project. Not a bad motto for running a government, either.

Butterfly Roof and Metal Wall Panels Highlight New Multipurpose Facility

Sevier County Utility District’s new multipurpose facility sports a butterfly roof over the main event space and two lower roof sections that cover offices, conference rooms and the kitchen. Each end of the building is open, with overhanging roofs, allowing for mountain views. Photo: Denise Retallack

The centerpiece of Sevier County Utility District’s new multipurpose facility in in Sevierville, Tennessee is a large event space that can be used by the district or rented to the public. The building also houses large conference rooms, a training room, a fitness area, administrative offices and a catering kitchen.

The design features large clerestory windows that flood the interior with natural light and a front canopy supported by steel columns. The facility’s exterior is dominated by its striking, V-shaped standing seam metal roof and metal wall panels, which are accented by brick and fiber cement siding.

“The roof was a major design element on this project from the beginning,” says A.J. Heidel, project manager for BarberMcMurry Architects in Knoxville, Tennessee. “We used the blue butterfly roof to accent the main assembly space and we used the lower roof as a wrapping element for the support spaces.”

To execute the design, it took a talented group of construction professionals including two Knoxville-based companies: Denark Construction, the general contractor on the project, and Baird and Wilson Sheetmetal Inc., the roof and wall system installer.

Crews from Baird and Wilson Sheetmetal installed approximately 13,500 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc panels in Berkshire Blue on the roof. Photo: Denise Retallack

BarberMcMurry, Denark Construction, and Baird and Wilson had teamed up on other projects for the Sevier County Utility District (SCUD) in the past, so they were a perfect fit for this new construction project. The roof system chosen for the building is comprised of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc panels in Berkshire Blue.

“We chose a standing seam metal roof because its material properties allow for a range of colors and ribbing patterns, and because of its ability to act as a wall cladding as well as roof,” notes Heidel. “We were able to give different characteristics to separate volumes by changing from blue smooth flat lock panels to Musket Gray ribbed panels while maintaining a similar method of installation.”

The design team originally explored using insulated metal panels for the roof and walls. “We were asked by Denark Construction to price this project,” says Jim Galbraith, vice president of Baird and Wilson. “I priced the insulated roof and wall panels and Denark came back asking if there were potential savings through value engineering. We submitted pricing for single-skin roof and wall panels and it was accepted.”

To make sure everyone was on the same page, pre-construction meetings involving the architect, general contractor and roof system installer included a mock-up of the panel system. “We had a mock wall with all of the roofing and wall conditions, and we met with them on site to go over all of the details,” explains Heidel.

The Installation

Baird and Wilson installed approximately 13,500 square feet of Tite-Loc roof panels on the roof, as well as 3,500 square feet of 16-inch Snap-Clad standing seam wall panels. “We also fabricated and installed gutter, downspouts, horizontal flush wall panels, low and high soffit, and fascia,” notes Galbraith.

After the metal deck topped with a nail base, insulation, and ice and water shield, the roof panels were installed and mechanically seamed. “The slope was less than 3:12, so the Tite-Loc panel was a perfect fit,” Galbraith says.

The exterior of the is features a mix of materials, including seamed metal wall panels, flush wall panels, fiber cement siding and brick accents. Photo: Matt Horton, hortonphotoinc.com

Work began on the butterfly roof. The valley features an internal gutter, which drains through downspouts that penetrate through the soffit and go down the front of the building, where they drain through underground pipes. “At the entrance we installed some horizontal blue flush panels that matched the roof,” notes Galbraith. “We also installed the fascia and soffit in Berkshire Blue, which matched the roofs on other buildings on the campus, which were also that color.”

The roof-to-wall transition was designed to make it appear the roof was wrapping around the building. “The roof panels were 16 inches on center, and the wall panels were 16 inches on center,” Galbraith explains. “The seams on the wall panels and the roof panels had to line up perfectly all the way down, so that was a bit tricky. You had to pay attention and do the math as you were going down to make it all work.”

Challenging Site

The limited area surrounding the building proved to be a major challenge on the project. “The building itself takes up much of the buildable area, leaving little room for things like parking and site drainage,” says Heidel. “We were able to avoid a water detention pond by using rain gardens on the site.”

The rain gardens are located against the main road, with parking spaces designed to shed water to that area, which includes native plants that thrive in a wet habitat. The pipes from the building’s downspouts flow there as well.

Tennessee’s spring weather was also a concern. “Construction took place in early spring, and the wind was whipping,” says Galbraith. “It was also rainy, and there was a corner where water would sit, so we had to be careful moving our lifts so they didn’t get stuck in the mud. The most difficult problem was manhandling the long roof panels. Many were more than 50 feet long.”

Photo: Matt Horton, hortonphotoinc.com

Despite the challenges, the project went smoothly. “BarberMcMurry prioritizes long-term client relationships, and this project is a great example of that,” Heidel says. “We have a history of successful projects with SCUD, and we continued that pattern through this project, which was delivered on time and on budget.”

“We work with our clients on designs that fit their brand, reflect their use, and are fully functional as well as beautiful,” Heidel continues. “That outlook is reflected in this project, too, through the overall design of the spaces and our creative use of materials. Finally, BMA is committed to sustainability and stewardship through design. In this project with SCUD, you can see sustainable design elements in the rain gardens, which filter and control the release of storm water as it leaves the site, and in the building’s clerestory windows and shaded curtain wall, which take advantage of daylighting.”

The project also showcases the quality workmanship of Baird and Wilson. Galbraith cited a quote from Charles R. Swindoll that serves as a company motto: “The difference between something good and something great is attention to detail.”

TEAM

Architect: BarberMcMurry Architects, Knoxville, Tennessee, www.bma1915.com

General Contractor: Denark Construction, Knoxville, Tennessee, www.denark.com

Roofing Contractor: Baird and Wilson Sheetmetal Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee, www.bairdandwilson.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD 24-gaugeTite-Loc panels in Berkshire Blue, Petersen, www.PAC-CLAD.com

Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 24-gaugeSnap-Clad panels in Musket Gray

New Synthetic Slate Roof Tops Historic Owatonna City Hall

The city offices in Owatonna, Minnesota, are housed in a historic building that underwent a complete roof replacement as part of an ambitious restoration plan. Photo: Lakeshore Drone Services

The massive brick complex in Owatonna, Minnesota, that currently serves as its city hall has an interesting past. According to Aaron Fitzloff, facility manager for the City of Owatonna, the structure was originally built in 1886 as the Minnesota Public School for Dependent and Neglected Children. The facility closed in 1945 and later became the Owatonna State School. “The state closed it in 1970, and the city of Owatonna took it over in 1974,” notes Fitzloff. “In 1975, the building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.”

The complex now houses administrative offices for the city and the Minnesota State Public School Orphanage Museum. Asphalt shingles had been installed on the roof at some point in the 1990s, but leaks developed over the years, and the city budgeted for a complete roof replacement as part of an ambitious restoration plan. “The intent was to get the building back to its original state,” says Fitzloff.

Specifying a New Roof

The city consulted with Adsit Architecture and Planning, a full service architectural and interior design firm located in Minneapolis. When the firm completed a condition assessment for another historic building in Owatonna— the Firemen’s Hall —that project led to a request from Fitzloff to look at the city’s administration building.

Crews from Schwickert’s Tecta America installed more than 29,000 square feet of DaVinci synthetic slate. Photo: Lakeshore Drone Services

“Aaron realized that all of the roof systems were in need of replacement at this point,” says Gunstad. “He wanted to make sure, first and foremost, that we mitigated any moisture problems that were occurring up in the attic space. The project was about insulation as well as roofing.”

Finding the right roof system was crucial. Evidence suggested that the original roof was comprised of slate, but that couldn’t be confirmed due to a fire that had destroyed the main building in 1904. “Even before we did our research, we knew from our first look at the building that an asphalt roof on a building of this mass and scale did not look right,” Gunstad says.

Adsit Architecture specified a synthetic slate roof system manufactured by DaVinci Roofscapes. “Right off the bat we felt that given the scale of the building that slate would have been prohibitively expensive for them, and they agreed,” Gunstad recalls. “We knew with the cost, ease of installation, the warranty, the weight — all of that — the synthetic slate would be a really good fit, and DaVinci had an enormous amount of color choices for the blends we needed.”

DaVinci’s Color Visualizer Tool was used to help determine the colors. A European blend of gray shades and purple was installed. As the project got under way, the hunch that the original roof was slate was confirmed. “When we got into reconstruction and were up digging around in the attic, we did find some old slate pieces,” Gunstad recalls. “Oddly enough, they were a perfect match for the colors we had chosen.”

Installing the Roof Systems

The installer on the project was Schwickert’s Tecta America, headquartered in Mankato, Minnesota. “We ended up being the only bidder on it, which of course you don’t know at the time,” notes Scott Haefner, Schwickert’s steep slope project manager.

The scope of work on the project included 60-mil Carlisle EPDM, new gutters and custom-fabricated metal trim. Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

According to Haefner, the difficulty of the project is what made it appealing for the company, which thrives on projects others turn away from. “Those are the ones we look for — the ones that have some complexity to it,” says Haefner. “That’s where we can shine. We have our own metal shop, we can do all our own metal fabrication, and we can do the types of things that can really set us apart. It gives us an advantage because we don’t have to farm some of that work out, and we have complete control over the whole process.”

The scope of work included installing more than 29,000 square feet of the DaVinci synthetic slate. The roof also included low-slope areas, and for these a 60-mil EPDM from Carlisle was installed. Sheet metal work included new gutters and custom-fabricated metal trim.

The safety plan was crucial, as the building would be open during the construction process. “You start with the safety plan,” says Haefner. “With staff and members of the public walking in and out, it is critically important in your pre-construction meetings to address those issues with overhead protection in certain areas, and blocking off certain areas when you’re working above them for the day.”

The safety plan incorporated scaffolding and personal fall arrest systems, as well as overhead protection for pedestrians. Photo: Schwickert’s Tecta America

Coordination with the city staff was critical. “Aaron Fitzloff helped us tremendously in that area,” says Haefner. “We had a standing meeting every Tuesday morning at 9, and that was always a big part of the conversation — safety and the sequence of what we were going to do that day. Aaron and I would also see each other every day also, typically. He was a great attribute to the whole project, for sure.”

Safety equipment included scaffolding and PFAS. “The vast majority of the building was scaffolded,” Haener says. “Fall arrest was anchored to the roof in areas we didn’t have scaffolding, and even where we did, the roof pitch was steep enough that everyone was always tied off with anchors and fall arrest systems.”

Work began in the late fall and progressed in sections. “That’s part of the beauty and charm of the building — its different additions and roof sections,” notes Haefner. “That also allowed us to focus on one area at a time. That’s typically what you do — you start and do a section that’s kind of an easy one to just get your feet underneath you and get a feel for how it’s going to go. There were some big, long planes of roof that we were able to get a start on and get a feel for the whole sequence.”

Schwickert’s steep-slope division handled the composite slate roof installation, while its flat roof division tackled the EPDM roofs.

Tying in flat and steep-slope roof systems was critical. Steep slope-crews completed most of their work first, using a Grace Ice & Water Shield product that is compatible with EPDM. “Let’s say you know the EPDM is going to go let’s say two feet up the slope of the roof, from flat to transition up the steep slope,” Haefner explains. “We’d leave off the bottom two or four courses of shingles, and leave the ice and water shield exposed, but not adhered.”

Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

Low-slope crew members would just flip up the ice and water shield and install the EPDM. Steep-slope crews would then install the metal flashing, adhere the ice and water shield, and add the final courses of shingles.

A snow retention system from Rocky Mountain Snow Guards was installed in several sections of the roof.

Re-roofing the large turret was made easier by DaVinci’s turret package, which supplies pre-cut tiles. “You give them some basic information, including the circumference and the pitch,” Haefner says.

It worked well on the project, with one minor hitch that was quickly remedied. “This one was a little different because it has a sort of witch’s hat appearance to it, where the pitch changes at the bottom,” Haefner says. “It’s not a typical cone shape. When I sent in the request for the package, I didn’t take that into account, and we needed to order some more shingles to finish the turret.”

The large finial on the turret was taken down, painted and replaced.

A heat mesh system was installed in certain areas that had been subject to ice dams in the past. The Warmquest Zmesh system consists of woven copper mesh, which was installed below the tile, sandwiched between layers of ice and water shield. “That was a tricky part of the installation,” says Haefner. “We had to run big transformers, electrical panels, and run conduit to these areas from the old attic.”

The Minnesota weather brought things to a halt in the mid-winter, and work concluded this spring.

Mission Accomplished

Haefner points to this project as proof of his company’s ability to complete projects with multiple scopes of work. “With steep slope, flat roof, sheet metal work, new gutters, insulation, and the electrical portion involved with installing the heat mesh system — it shows perfectly how we can install multiple complex systems that have to go together in a certain way,” he says. “That type of complexity is where we shine.”

The city and its residents have been pleased with the result, according to Fitzloff. “Feedback has been nothing but positive,” he says. “We cleaned all of the limestone around the whole building as well, and it looks fabulous.”

Gunstad notes that the project fulfilled its design goals: making the building sound and restoring it to its former glory. “Performance and maintenance of the project were our primary concerns, but design-wise, looking at this building, which is rather grand, we knew it lacked something — and that something was a substantial roof,” says Gunstad. “We wanted to give that visual prominence back to that building, which is a hallmark of the city.”

TEAM

Architect: Adsit Architecture and Planning, Minneapolis, Minnesota, www.adsitap.com

Roofing Contractor: Schwickert’s Tecta America, Mankato, Minnesota, www.schwickerts.com

MATERIALS

Synthetic Slate: Single-Width Slate, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com

Low-Slope Roof: Carlisle 60-mil EPDM

Leak Barrier: Grace Ice & Water Shield

Underlayment: Titanium UDL

Snow Retention: Rocky Mountain Snow Guards

A Green Future

The cover story of this issue is titled “Roofing for the Green Future.” The article documents the design and construction of The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design on the campus of Georgia Tech. The design team decided to meet the rigorous performance requirements of the Living Building Challenge — the world’s most ambitious green building program.

A TPO roof system with optimal polyiso insulation, energy-efficient mechanical systems, and a rooftop solar array are designed to help the 46,800-square-foot Kendeda Building produce more energy than it uses. The roof is also designed to capture rainwater for collection into an underground cistern. It is also home to a 1,000-square-foot accessible roof deck and a 4,300-square-foot rooftop garden, complete with a honeybee apiary.

The Kendeda Building is an amazing example of sustainability, resilience, and energy efficiency in action, but the headline “Roofing for the Green Future” would have worked on every project profiled in this issue. The designers, installers, and manufacturers of the roof systems detailed here all focused on bringing energy efficiency, durability, and resilience to life.

Examples include the metal and modified systems installed on the new Latrobe Elementary School; the synthetic slate, built-up, and green roof systems on the University of Minnesota’s renovated Pioneer Hall; the new EPDM system installed on the 66,300-square-foot hyperbolic paraboloid roof of the athletic complex at Clarkson University; and the energy-efficient wall systems on the new gymnasium at Pacific Christian.

On a massive Texas project, 195,000 square feet of a high school’s campus was re-roofed with a highly reflective modified system to alleviate concerns about the urban heat island effect. At an elementary school re-roofing project in Michigan, an energy-efficient PVC roof system was installed and 8,700 pounds of the old PVC membrane was recycled, keeping it out of the landfill and resulting in a lower cost for the school district.

It’s rewarding to cover projects that embody a true win-win-win scenario. Installing a truly resilient roof system can provide optimal protection for building occupants, ease the burden on the environment, and offer a lower life-cycle cost to the owner. You don’t hit that trifecta in business very often.

In a year in which “back to school” has a radically new meaning for many, it’s uplifting to see these educational facilities being constructed for the long haul. For many, the first day of school this year found students at home, in front of their computers. Let’s hope everyone will soon be exploring a brighter future together, in buildings designed to bring out the best in us.

Ford Plant Transformed into Museum and Hotel Is Crowned by Rooftop Deck

Built on the site of a Ford assembly plant, the 21c Museum Hotel in Oklahoma City is crowned by a rooftop deck that provides access to the plant’s original water tower. Photo: Mike Schwartz

The 21c Museum Hotel in Oklahoma City encompasses a contemporary art museum, a 135-room boutique hotel, event spaces, and Mary Eddies Kitchen x Lounge. It also features a rooftop deck with stunning views of the city.

The hotel was built at the site of an idle Ford Motor Company assembly plant originally designed by Albert Kahn. The building was refurbished to serve as the hotel and museum in the first phase of an ambitious development project. The Ford plant’s original water tower was retained during the renovation, and it is accessible via a catwalk from the rooftop deck, which also frames a green roof area.

The deck’s 1,500-square foot wood paver system was manufactured by Bison Innovative Products and installed by Elevated Paver Systems (EPS), headquartered in Oklahoma City.

According to Adam Fink, president of EPS, the company was founded in 2011 to serve the pedestal-set rooftop paver market in Oklahoma. The company specializes in difficult hardscape projects including rooftop pavers, pavers at grade, and architectural stone, including cut-to-size marble and granite. EPS was tapped for the deck installation by Lingo Construction, the general contractor on the project.

“It is a really unique venue and it was a unique construction project,” Fink says.

The building is crowned by its rooftop deck, which is comprised of 2-foot-by-2-foot, eight-plank Ipe Wood Tiles set on Bison Versadjust Pedestals. The pedestals were installed atop steel I-beams that were erected above the newly refurbished roof, which features a 60-mil PVC roof system manufactured by Johns Manville. The beams were installed along with the catwalk and an integrated railing system.

“This was a unique project for us because we are usually installing our systems right on top of the roof membrane,” Fink says. “Here we had a newly installed steel substrate that our pedestals rested on.”

Proper placement of the beams was crucial. “The flat part of the beam was pretty narrow, all things considered, so the biggest challenge in the whole scenario was to make sure that the steel was exactly right,” notes Fink.

The steel beams had to be at the correct elevation and proper spacing throughout their length, with a tolerance of plus or minus a quarter inch. According to Fink, the key to success was communication between the design and installation teams. “We worked carefully on the shop drawings and dictated the on center spacing,” Fink recalls. “Little things that usually don’t matter very much were critical here because the tolerances were so tight. The steel subcontractor did an excellent job.”

The pedestals were adhered to the beams using Dow Corning 795 silicone sealant, and the wood tiles were then locked into place. Crews used an automatic laser to make sure the tiles were level, using shims in areas where the steel beams were slightly off.

The green roof was also supported by a steel substructure. Since the roof framed the rectangular garden area, coordination was crucial here as well. The goal was to ensure that the tiles fit optimally. “We coordinated the shop drawings to make sure we didn’t have any small pieces,” notes Fink.

Safety concerns were minimal, as the area was surrounded by a large parapet wall and railings, and material could be brought to the roof by the freight elevator. The biggest concern for EPS crews was the trip hazard posed by the steel beams. “It was kind of like working above a kids’ jungle gym,” says Fink. “But it’s nothing we couldn’t cover in our toolbox talks.”

The deck installation went smoothly, and Fink credits detailed planning for the successful outcome. “Coordination was the key,” he says, noting that precise shop drawings and pre-engineering meetings were the most crucial elements of the project. “Once the steel was in place, we just took out field measurements and went at it from there,” he says. “It was all a downhill slide after that.”

Fink points to in-house drafting capabilities as a key strength of EPS. “We pride ourselves on our pre-construction submittals,” he says. “This job went really well. There weren’t any glitches because we prepared a very good plan and executed it.”

TEAM

Architect: Deborah Berke Partners, New York, www.dberke.com and Hornbeek Blatt Associates, Edmond, Oklahoma, www.hornbeekblatt.com

General Contractor: Lingo Construction Services Inc., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, www.buildwithlingo.com

Roofing Contractor: Coates Roofing Company Inc., Seminole, Oklahoma, www.coatesroofing.com

Roof Deck Installer: Elevated Paver Systems (EPS), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, www.okeps.com

MATERIALS

Pavers: Ipe Wood Tiles, Bison Innovative Products, www.bisonip.com

Pedestal System: Versadjust Pedestals, Bison Innovative Products

Roofing Membrane: 60-mil PVC,Johns Manville, www.JM.com

Recycling Membrane Saves School District Money and Protects the Environment

More than 8,700 pounds of the existing PVC membrane was recycled as part of the Bishop Elementary School re-roofing project as part of Duro-Last Roofing’s Recycle Your Roof program. Superior Services RSH Inc.

When the roof on Bishop Elementary School outlived its warranty, the Lincoln Consolidated School District put the roof replacement project up for bid. The school district already had a specific product in mind, and that made things pretty straightforward for Superior Services RSH Inc., headquartered in Lansing, Michigan.

Founded in 1975, Superior Services focuses on commercial and industrial low-slope roofing. The company also has an architectural metals division and a dedicated service and maintenance department. According to Derek Heins, its vice president, the company works closely with Duro-Last Roofing, and that relationship was key to being awarded the bid to re-roof Bishop Elementary School in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

“The existing roof that was on this building was a Duro-Last roof. It had been on there for more than 20 years, and the school had been very happy with its performance,” Heins says. “Most of the other buildings in the Lincoln Consolidated School District have Duro-Last roofs, so they are really comfortable and really familiar with the product. The school likes the single-ply PVC and the reflectivity of the white membrane, and have been really happy with the performance.”

The recycled material was secured to pallets in a staging area and then taken to the Duro-Last factory on a trailer. The recycled material is used to make products including flooring, walkway pads, and concrete expansion joints.

During the bidding stage, Heins suggested a way the project could save money while putting less stress on the environment. “We suggested utilizing the Recycle Your Roof program with Duro-Last Roofing,” he says. Through the program, mechanically attached Duro-Last PVC membrane can be returned to the manufacturer at the end of its useful life.

Heins explained the benefits of the recycling program to the district, which included a lower installation cost. “You’re reducing landfill costs by not bringing in dumpsters and paying for disposal of the old membrane,” he notes. “We essentially take it directly to Duro-Last’s factory, where they grind up the material and use if for making products including flooring and rooftop walkway pads.”

The school district agreed, and more than 8,700 pounds of the existing PVC roofing membrane was recycled as part of the re-roofing project.

Removal and Replacement

The 77,000-square foot roof featured different elevations. The center area where the two wings met was divided into several sections, most separated by parapet walls. The roof also features a large skylight, which was replaced as part of the project. The site-specific safety plan incorporated for each section included a perimeter warning line system and personal fall arrest systems (PFAS). A guardrail system was set up around the skylight.

The first step was the tear-off. The roof removal process is critical for the recycling program. “When we started the project, we sliced the roof membrane at the fastening rows,” explains Heins. “By doing this, it allowed us to roll up the loose membrane between the fastening rows. The rows were approximately 5 feet wide. After rolling them up, we tack welded the rolled-up material using a hot-air welder.”

Superior Services RSH Inc. installed a new Duro-Tuff PVC roof system. Details included a custom-made Velux skylight and a Bilco roof hatch.

The rolls were removed from the roof with the assistance of a telehandler, stacked on pallets, and secured with straps. Crews then removed the fastening tabs and fasteners from the existing roof system, using screw guns to back out the fasteners from the metal deck.

The next step was inspecting the underlying polyiso insulation for any moisture, damage or deterioration. It was replaced as necessary, but the vast majority of it was reused, which offered additional cost savings.

New tapered drain sets were installed for all of the internal drains on the building. “We used the Duro-Guard insulation tapered drain sets,” Heins notes. “We cut out the existing insulation and put in new wider drain sets to help promote water flow on the roof.”

The tapered drain sets are prefabricated and pre-sloped. They are available in two sizes: 4 feet by 4 feet, and 8 feet by 8 feet. “We try to use larger size drain sets whenever possible,” Heins says. “They unfold to form an 8-foot box around the drain. The marked center circles allow you to simply lay it over the drain sump and cut out the sump opening.”

Crews then installed the 50-mil Duro-Tuff PVC roof system, which was mechanically attached. Enhancements at the perimeter were made using a RhinoBond induction welder.

“We install a hybrid perimeter using RhinoBond induction welding,” Heins explains. “We run two wind rows around the perimeter of the building. Then we roll out the 10-foot wide membrane rolls. With the membrane rolled out, we fasten it down per the manufacturer’s specifications. After we finish putting the membrane down, we go back and use the RhinoBond machine to weld the membrane down to all the perimeter plates for our wind laps.”

Final Details

Crews then installed prefabricated accessories, including custom-manufactured wall flashings, curb flashings, and stack flashings. Drains were fitted with new drain inserts and strainers. Crews also installed a new Bilco S-20 roof hatch.

Perimeter metal and copings were supplied by Exceptional Metals. “We used their two-piece compression metal,” Heins notes. “We also installed custom scupper collector boxes and downspouts on the project as well. By using Exceptional Metals, a division of Duro-Last, we were able to include everything in their Edge to Edge Warranty.”

Heins points to the large skylight as one of the most difficult details on the project. The existing skylight was replaced with a new custom-made Velux double dome skylight, which was installed after the roofing work was completed. When the new skylight arrived at the site, crew members lifted it to the roof and removed the existing skylight. The temporary flashings were replaced with new flashings as the new skylight was installed.

The biggest challenge on the job was the tight schedule. The project was completed in two weeks during July of 2019. “We had a limited window of time to complete this project,” says Heins. “Like most school construction projects, we were required to complete the roof during the summer break, making it essential to finish as much work as possible each day.”

Recycling

At the end of the project, the old membrane was put on a trailer and returned for recycling.

Heins is proud to promote the Recycle Your Roof program as a win-win proposition. “It’s best for everybody to be conscious of the environment,” he says. “We focus on being environmentally friendly, and we also focus on the cost savings. Recycling the membrane and reusing the insulation that is in in good condition offers a big cost reduction for our customers — and it keeps the material out of the landfill.”

According to Heins, this project highlights some of the strengths of Superior Services. “One of the things this project demonstrates is our commitment to utilizing the latest roofing technologies,” he says. “One example is Duro-Last’s prefabricated accessories. Duro-Last has always been a frontrunner in providing prefabricated and custom accessories, and Exceptional Metals offers further custom fabrication. It is important to us, as a company, to strive to be on the leading edge of technology, both on the roof and in the office. It’s part of our culture, as well as emphasizing sustainability and energy-efficient roofing.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Superior Services RSH, Inc., Lansing, Michigan, https://superiorservicesrsh.com

MATERIALS

Roofing Membrane: 50-mil Duro-Tuff PVC, Duro-Last, www.duro-last.com

Edge Metal: Exceptional Metals, www.exceptionalmetals.com

Roof Hatch: S-20 Type S Roof Hatch, BILCO, www.bilco.com

Skylight: Custom-Size Double Dome Acrylic Skylight, Velux, www.veluxusa.com

Omaha Re-Roofing Project in Historic District Wins Top Honors From ARMA

When the Molly Jenkins Carriage House was damaged by hail, a new roof system featuring CertainTeed Carriage House shingles was installed to protect the home and recapture its classic look. Photos: Everlast Exteriors

The Molly Jenkins Carriage House is located in the historic Country Club District of Omaha, Nebraska. The home, originally built in the 1920s, needed a new roof after it sustained hail damage and multiple leaks were discovered. The homeowners wanted an aesthetically pleasing, durable roof system that would be true to the style of the neighborhood and capture the look of the house as it was originally designed.

Omaha-based Everlast Exteriors was called in to consult on the project after the storm. “Their insurance agent recommended us to the homeowner,” says Brent Hall, co-owner of Everlast Exteriors. “The Country Club historic district is an early 20th century Omaha neighborhood that was marketed to attract homebuyers who expected an exceptionally high level of quality. The community was added to the National Register Of Historic Places in 2004. On this home, the existing asphalt shingle roof had to be replaced, as did the inlaid gutters, which were also damaged.”

Hall recommended asphalt shingles due to their beauty and performance. After consulting with the homeowner, the company installed CertainTeed Carriage House shingles.

The first step was to replace the gutter system. “We had to remove the first 3 feet of the roofing and put down a high-temp ice and water shield,” explains Hall. “We installed it within the inlaid gutters, and then ran it 3 feet up the roof. Then we fabricated and installed the inlaid gutter, before we went back and roofed it. We had to do it that way because the gutter system extends under the shingles and underlayment.”

The gutters were custom fabricated out of 24-gauge pre-finished galvanized steel and installed in the existing wood frame. “We also re-flashed the chimneys using the 24 gauge pre finished steel color to match shingles.” Hall says.

The new shingles were installed over a synthetic underlayment and ice and water shield. New accessories included lead boots for the plumbing vents, a new gutter apron, drip edge and exhaust vents.

Standout features included a custom-fabricated turret cap and a new weather vane. “We fabricated a copper turret cap that might be the biggest one we’ve ever made,” says Hall. “She also purchased a copper weather vane, and we installed that for her, too.”

The copper turret cap was the final touch on the project. According to Hall, the homeowner really wasn’t sure what she wanted, so the project was put in the hands of Todd Sterba, a top metal fabricator at Everlast Exteriors. “Executing something like this takes the right tools and the right fabricator,” notes Hall. “He worked on it in our shop and even took it home to his own workshop to put some finishing touches on it. We never even saw the final product until he brought it out to the job. The homeowner really loved it.”

The style of shingle was chosen because it fit in with the character of the area. “It’s an old house in a historic neighborhood, and that asphalt shingle really has a timeless look,” says Hall. “It’s made to emulate a slate roof, and it looks like something they might have installed in the era when the home was built.”

Everlast Exteriors submitted the project to the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association for the ARMA Excellence In Asphalt Roofing Awards program, which recognizes industry professionals for their high-performing steep-slope and low-slope asphalt roofing projects across North America. The Molly Jenkins Carriage House received the Gold Award in 2020. The company received a check for $2,000 at the 2020 International Roofing Expo.

“We were really happy to learn that we won,” Hall recalls. “We try and just knock out the coolest, best roofs around. We use the best products out there and provide the best workmanship. That’s our goal. Our top priority is to put out the best product not get the biggest profit — so it’s nice to get recognition.”

According to Hall, the award-wining project showcases the company’s strengths. “We match high-end material with high-end labor,” he says. “We try to bring together the best shingles and accessories, with the best labor practices to install the best product we can while meeting every customer’s budget. We provide a transferable lifetime labor warranty so we make sure every roof we do is aesthetically pleasing and maintenance free.”

Submissions are being accepted for ARMA’s 2021 Excellence in Asphalt Roofing Awards. For more information or to apply, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Everlast Exteriors, Omaha, Nebraska, www.everlastexteriorconstruction.com

MATERIALS

Shingles: Carriage House Gatehouse Slate, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

Pieces of History

A home built in 1879. A hotel built in 1902. An industrial site that produced destroyers during World War II. What do these sites have in common? Roofs that stood the test of time, and then were recently restored with modern systems that preserve the historic integrity of the structures.

If you’re a bit of a pessimist, sometimes you might find yourself wondering how any roof gets successfully replaced. Re-roofing involves a coordinated effort that typically includes manufacturers, distributors, contractors and installation crews. Factor in architects, consultants, building owners, tenants, and members of other trades, and the odds of pleasing everyone increase exponentially. When you’re talking about a historic restoration project, the degree of difficulty gets even tougher, as historical societies and other organizations can have rigid standards designed to guarantee the building maintains its historic authenticity.

Historic projects can show the roofing industry at its best, and in this issue, you’ll find three case studies documenting roofs being restored on structures that have been around well over a century.

When the original soldered flat-panel roof on the historic Dilley-Tinnin home in Georgetown, Texas was damaged by lightning, crews from Texas Traditions Roofing were faced with a difficult, labor-intensive puzzle as they installed a double-lock standing seam roof system on multiple intersecting roof planes with low-slope transitions.

On the Chippewa Hotel on Mackinac Island, the Bloxsom Roofing faced a challenging re-roofing project and also found themselves facing turn-of-the-century problems on an island that doesn’t allow motorized vehicles. The roofing materials were delivered by ferry and transported to the jobsite by a team of horses.

At historic Pier 70 in San Francisco, an ambitious restoration project converted an empty industrial facility into a modern office complex. But ensuring occupant comfort proved a difficult task in a building without air conditioning. Central Coating Company devised a plan to install a spray foam roofing system on the uninsulated metal roof to minimize heat gain and ensure the historic look of the building.

These stories share common themes, including the importance of quality craftsmanship, then and now. In the case of Pier 70, Central Coating Company President Luke Nolan points out that aside from a few persistent leaks, the original corrugated metal roof was in pretty good shape.

“For us as a foam roofing contractor, we typically do roofing projects that have the benefit of adding insulation to the building,” Nolan said. “This one was different in that we were doing a foam roofing project that was really an insulation job.”

Complex Metal Roof Replacement Becomes Award-Winning Project

The main roof on the historic Dilley-Tinnin home was made up of multiple roof planes and featured an internal gutter. Photos: Texas Traditions Roofing

Located just outside of Austin in Georgetown, Texas, the historic Dilley-Tinnin home dates back to 1879. When it was struck by lightning, the main roof was damaged beyond repair. The original soldered, flat panel roof would have to be removed and replaced as part of a restoration project that posed numerous challenges.

The roof was made up of some 20 roof planes and included an internal gutter system, numerous penetrations, and multiple low-slope transitions. The new metal roof would have to be watertight and durable — and meet strict guidelines for historical accuracy.

Crews from nearby Texas Traditions Roofing were up to the challenge. They removed the damaged sections of the existing roof and installed a striking red standing seam metal roof manufactured by Sheffield Metals.

Michael Pickel, vice president of Texas Traditions Roofing, was called in to assess the damage. The original roof had a standing seam look to it in some sections, but it was comprised of metal panels that were soldered together. “It was metal 100 percent, from the fascia, to the gutter, to the flat portion, all soldered together into one piece,” he notes.

Crews from Texas Traditions Roofing removed the damaged sections of the existing roof and installed a red standing seam roof manufactured by Sheffield Metals.

The entire main roof area would have to be replaced, while the gray metal roof system on one wing was left in place. The main roof was comprised of multiple roof areas with slopes ranging from completely flat to pitches of 3:12 and 4:12. “It really wasn’t that steep, and that’s what caused us to recommend the double-lock panels,” Pickel says. “Given all of the soffits and all of the transitions, the slope required us to use a double lock.”

The Texas Traditions team worked for eight months with the local historical committee to ensure that the new roof would meet its guidelines. The committee approved the 2.0 Mechanical Standing Seam roof manufactured by Sheffield Metals, and the roof restoration work began.

The metal panels of the original roof were removed, along with most of the internal gutter. “The home was leaking pretty bad,” Pickel recalls. “There was some significant damage to the integral gutter, and we had to rebuild at least 80 percent of it. It was flat, and we added slope to it. It was a beast. We tore the whole thing off and came in with all manufacturer approved products: high-temp synthetic underlayment, high-temp ice and water, and the metal panels and butyl sealant.”

The existing roof was damaged by lightning. The soldered, flat panel roof had to be removed and replaced.

Most of the deck was in good shape, but the fascia needed extensive repairs. Extreme care had to be taken to protect the custom carpentry just below the eaves. “It was a crazy custom fascia,” Pickel notes. “We’ve never seen anything like it before.”

After the internal gutter was rebuilt, it was lined with a 60-mil TPO membrane from GAF. “We did a metal fascia, and it was also lined with TPO. It ran about 18 inches up behind the field panels to give it some added security. It was also lined with ice and water shield.”

The metal panels were roll-formed on the site. “Due to all the different lengths, we took measurements, rolled them on site, and applied them one at a time,” Pickel explains. “All of the trim and accessories were manufactured in our metal shop and brought to the site.”

Panels were lifted into place with a rope-and-pulley system and installed over Viking Armor synthetic underlayment and GAF StormGuard leak barrier. The re-roofed area was approximately 2,500 square feet, but the project was a labor-intensive puzzle. “It was a small project, but it was really cut up,” Pickel says.

Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time at the eave and while installing the metal panels. “The nice part was it wasn’t too steep, and the lip of the integral gutter added another layer of safety as well,” Pickel explains. “From a safety standpoint, it was pretty basic; the steepest section was 4:12, and a lot of the work was done on the flat area.”

In the flat area, crickets were used provide adequate slope beneath the metal panels. The transitions made for some tricky details. “When you hit the low slope on metal — and that’s really 2:12 or less — you start to be more concerned about making sure you’re doing everything you can to get that water off that roof,” Pickel says. “If the water moves slowly, you have to do all you can to make sure that roof is fully sealed and ensure it just won’t leak.”

Crews tackled the challenges one at a time. “Just like any project, once you start to move on it, it gets a little bit easier,” Pickel says. “We learned a lot as we progressed. Each section made the next section a little bit easier.”

Texas Traditions submitted the project to Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) for its Best Residential Metal Roofing Project competition, and MRA selected Texas Traditions Roofing and Sheffield Metals as the first-quarter winners in the category.

“When we got the news, we were just ecstatic,” Pickel says. “I think roofers are very proud of the work they do, and to get that recognition is fun and exciting. It also gets the team fired up.”

Pickel credits his company’s success to a simple formula: quality craftsmanship by talented and experienced crews. “One of our owners has been in construction for 40-plus years,” he says, referring to his father, Mike Pickel. “He handled multi-million-dollar commercial projects for a very large general contractor. His experience and ability to manage our jobs, educate our crews, and educate our superintendents helps out gain knowledge beyond the roof. There’s more to it than just the roof, and being mindful of the entire building is a huge advantage.”

For more information about how to enter MRA’s “Best Metal Roofing” competition for the trades, visit www.metalroofing.com.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Texas Traditions Roofing, Georgetown, Texas, www.texastraditionsroofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: 2-inch mechanical lock panels in Cardinal Red, Sheffield Metals, www.sheffieldmetals.com

Underlayment: Viking Armor synthetic underlayment, VB Synthetics, www.vbsynthetics.com

Leak Barrier: GAF StormGuard, GAF, www.gaf.com